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People and organizations
Corporate body

Albert College (Belleville, Ont.)

Albert College was established as Belleville Seminary in 1857. Its name was changed to Albert College in 1866, and when it later affiliated with Victoria University in 1884, it gave up its right to grant degrees.

Aldeburgh Connection

The Aldeburgh Connection was founded in 1982 by pianists Stephen Ralls and Bruce Ubukata. Former faculty members, pianists, and coaches at the Britten-Pears School in Aldeburgh, England, Ralls and Ubukata moved to Toronto in 1978 for positions at the Faculty of Music, University of Toronto.

Starting in 1982, Ralls and Ubukata developed a Sunday afternoon vocal and piano concert series in Walter Hall that featured leading Canadian singers. The Aldeburgh Connection was officially formed as an organization and registered charity in 1986 under the name “The Aldeburgh Connection Concert Society.” Their founding patron was Sir Peter Pears, and Ralls and Ubukata were co-artistic directors.

Each concert in the Sunday afternoon series was based on a theme (musical, literary, or a historical character or period) and integrated music and narration, based on letters, diaries, newspapers, and poetry. In addition to this concert series, which ran from 1982 until 2013, the Aldeburgh Connection also produced a recital series (1993-2013), featuring complete song cycles without a narrative framework; and, the Young Artists Recitals series (1998-2011), renamed the Discovery Series in 2006. The Discovery Series consisted of two recitals per season and featured vocal and opera students from the University of Toronto. Following the success of three annual concerts in Bayfield, Ontario (2004-2006), the Aldeburgh Connection also established the Bayfield Festival of Song (2007-2012), which included masterclasses and concerts. Starting in 2009, they added a tour of Huron and Perth elementary schools to the festival. Ralls and Ubukata also performed with the Aldeburgh Connection at various venues in North America and in the United Kingdom, including two appearances at the Aldeburgh Festival in Suffolk, England (1988 and 1992).

The Aldeburgh Connection regularly commissioned new works by Canadian composers, including John Beckwith, Roger Bergs, John Greer, Derek Holman, Gary Kulesha, James Rolfe, Erik Ross, Harry Somers, and Timothy Sullivan. They also released seven CDs, including the 2008 Judo-nominated Schubert among Friends, with Gillian Keith (soprano), Colin Ainsworth and Michael Schade (tenors), and Gerald Finley (baritone). In 2013, Ralls and Ubukata were both named members of the Order of Canada.

Alert Music

  • 2005.006
  • Corporate body
  • 1984-2006

Alert Music was founded in 1984 by Toronto’s W. Tom Berry and Montreal’s Marc Durand. From 1975-1983, Berry had been managing director at Anthem Records whose roster included Rush, Max Webster and Bob and Doug Mackenzie. Durand was the manager and producer of the Montreal rock band Men Without Hats. Alert’s mission was to create a unique label that could bridge the “two solitudes” of Canada, hopefully turning regional hits into national ones; the Toronto office would sign English language artists that the Montreal office would attempt to promote in French Canada, and vice versa. The Montreal office immediately signed The Box, while the Toronto office signed Kim Mitchell (who had recently begun a solo career).

In the late 1980s, Berry decided that his interest in rock music was waning and he and Durand agreed to go their separate ways. Berry kept the name Alert and all the English language artists currently signed to the label, while Durand kept The Box and the company’s Montreal office. Sometime after, Berry discovered jazz singer Holly Cole performing with pianist Aaron David and bass player David Piltch. He signed the trio and immediately set out to create a distinctive image and style for Cole. Her album Girl Talk caught the attention of jazz label Blue Note Records, and they released Cole’s next five albums in the American market. The majority of Alert’s efforts since the mid1990s have revolved around recording and marketing Cole. The label also continues to record and market other Canadian jazz, blues and roots-oriented music including Roxanne Potvin, Michael Kaeshammer and Cole’s accompanists, Piltch and Davis.

Annesley Student Government Association

  • Corporate body
  • 1906-1934

The Annesley Student Government Association was formed in 1906 in response to a general demand among students for self-government. Prior to this, decisions about women students in residence was the purview of the Women's Residence and Educational Association (the Victoria Women's Association) and the Committee of Management, the Dean of Women and the Senate. The ASGA had an executive with a chairman known as the Head of the House and along with Dean Addison, they created a code of conduct. In 1911, the Chancellor of the University wrote to Dean Addison with concerns about discipline at Annesley Hall and noted his intention to bring the issue to the Senate. As a result, a Committee of the Senate was formed to review the code of conduct and student self-government, which the ASGA was promoting. In 1912, The Annesley Hall Commission was tasked by the Senate to report on this issues. The final report found confidence in the idea of student government and Dean Addison and suggested more power be given to her and the the students. Opposition by President Burwash and several members of the Committee of Management however, put this on hold. In 1914, the new President, Richard Pinch Bowles, signed the charter of the Annesley Student Government Association, which permitted the establishment of the Women's Students Council and the Annesley Student Government Association continued its existence as a residence council. In 1934, it became part of the Victoria College Union.

Art Museum at the University of Toronto

  • Corporate body
  • 2016-

Comprised of the Justina M. Barnicke Gallery and the University of Toronto Art Centre, which are located just a few steps apart, the Art Museum at the University of Toronto is one of the largest gallery spaces for visual art exhibitions and programming in Toronto. Building on the two galleries’ distinguished histories, the Art Museum organizes and presents a year-round program of in-house and off-site exhibitions, as well as intensive curricular engagement and educational events. - from http://www.utac.utoronto.ca/index.php

Artifacts Collection

  • Corporate body
  • 1832 - 2011

The Victoria University Artifacts Collection consists of donated artifacts, artifacts of unknown provenance, and artifacts accumulated by the Archives via the University.

Arts and Science Students' Union

  • Corporate body
  • 1972-

The Arts and Science Students’ Union (ASSU) is an organization representing full-time undergraduate students in the Faculty of Arts and Science (FAS) at the University of Toronto, St. George Campus. The core functions of ASSU as an umbrella organization for over 60 course unions are performed by full-time staff and seven executive members. Executives are elected by members of the Council, the governing, legislative body of ASSU that is made up of representatives from each course union. The course unions in turn directly represent students in the various departments and programs within the Faculty of Arts and Science.

ASSU traces its history back to the 1960s with the formation of student-led course unions. Their major aims were to improve the educational experience of undergraduates, and to advocate for increased student involvement in decisions made about faculty promotion and tenure, as well as curriculum and program content. The earliest course unions were funded through the Students’ Administrative Council’s (SAC) Education Commission. In 1972, the Arts and Science Students’ Union was formed to act as the intermediary between SAC and the course unions, and has been independently funded through a direct undergraduate fee levy since 1975.

Aside from providing funding for course unions and the production of the annual Anti-Calendar, ASSU has provided a variety of services to students, including advising on academic grievances, administering scholarships and bursaries, and offering a past test library. It has also engaged with other student groups, community members and university administration and faculty to organize events and to advocate for changes in policies and programs.

Associated Producers Ltd.

  • Corporate body
  • 1967 -

Associated Producers Ltd. was founded by Simcha Jacobovici and Elliott Halpern in 1983. As a writer, producer and on-air presence, Jacobovici has long been the company’s guiding force, and he also serves as the most visible media representative. Jacobovici was born in Israel in 1953. His parents, Joseph and Ida, were Romanian Holocaust survivors and Jacobovici and his sister were raised in a religious home. The family moved to Montreal when Jacobovici was nine, and he graduated from McGill University with an honours degree in philosophy in 1974. In 1978, Jacobovici enrolled in an MA program at the University of Toronto and while there became involved in activism (in 1979 he served as president of the International Congress of the World Union of Jewish Students, and in 1980 he was awarded the Knesset Medal for his Zionist work on North American campuses). He graduated in 1980 with a MA in international relations. Jacobovici had been interested in the problems of the Falasha (a community of Ethiopian Jews who were being persecuted in that country) since 1978, and in 1982 he secured funding from CBC’s Man Alive series to travel to Ethiopia and Sudan to document their plight. He was accompanied by former National Film Board of Canada director Peter Raymont and a production crew, and the film that they produced, Falasha: Exile of the Black Jews, was released in 1983. Following its release, the Israeli Knesset launched Operation Moses, the airlift of the Falasha to Israel. When Jacobovici began his next film, he realized that he needed a writer to produce the script. He ran into Elliot Halpern, whom he had known during his time at the University of Toronto (and where Halpern had served as the editor of The Varsity). Though he was by that time working as a lawyer, Halpern was convinced to write the script. The project was never completed, but the new production company, Associated Producers Ltd., would go on to great success.

Over the next several years, the company produced a number of well-regarded (and at times controversial) films. These included Deadly Currents, a two-hour feature documentary about the Palestinian Intifada that won a Genie Award for best feature-length documentary. In the 1990s, Associated Producers made several films on topical medical issues, including Plague Monkeys and Plague Fighters about the Ebola virus, and Frozen Hearts which explored the use of hypothermia during heart surgery. Jacobovici’s interest in Israeli and Judaic issues shaped later projects, such as Hollywoodism: Jews, Movies & the American Dream, Quest for the Lost Tribes, The Struma and Impact of Terror. In 1999, Associated Producers entered into a five-year agreement with England’s Yorkshire Films to co-produce new documentary series.

Halpern left the company in 2002 to form Yorkshire Associated Producers (YAP) while Jacobivici kept the original company. Associate Producers Ltd. also includes Producer/Director Ric Esther Bienstock and Producer Felix Golubev.

Association of United Church Theological Communities

  • Corporate body
  • 1975-

The Association was constituted in 1975; its membership was open to any member in the communities of theological education of the United Church of Canada; its purpose was to act as a forum of discussion and a channel of communication, and as an agency to represent theological students in necessary situations.

Atlantic Council of Canada

  • Corporate body
  • 1966-

The Atlantic Council of Canada (ACC) developed out of the Canadian Atlantic Coordinating Committee (CACC) which was formed in 1954 under the leadership of Professor Edgar McInnis of the Department of History, University of Toronto (later the first full-time president of the Canadian Institute of International Affairs - CIIA). In doing so he acted at the suggestion of the Secretary of State for External Affairs, Lester B. Pearson, his friend and former colleague, who had recognized that as the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) was to continue indefinitely it was necessary to provide public understanding of and support for it. The CACC brought together representatives of the CIIA and the United Nations Association (UNA). In 1966 it was succeeded by the Atlantic Council of Canada, which two years later was incorporated and continued this role.

Atlantic Council of Canada

  • F2313
  • Corporate body
  • 1966-

The Atlantic Council of Canada (ACC) developed out of the Canadian Atlantic Coordinating Committee (CACC) which was formed in 1954 under the leadership of Professor Edgar McInnis of the Department of History, University of Toronto (later the first full-time president of the Canadian Institute of International Affairs - CIIA). In doing so he acted at the suggestion of the Secretary of State for External Affairs, Lester B. Pearson, his friend and former colleague, who had recognized that as the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) was to continue indefinitely it was necessary to provide public understanding of and support for it. The CACC brought together representatives of the CIIA and the United Nations Association (UNA). In 1966 it was succeeded by the Atlantic Council of Canada, which two years later was incorporated and continued this role.

Banting Research Foundation

  • Corporate body
  • 1925-

The Banting Research Foundation was created in 1925 to commemorate the discovery of insulin and to support further medical research by Banting and other scientists in Canada, in the hopes of finding additional medical discoveries of equal importance. A fundraising campaign in 1925, led by Sir William Mulock, Chancellor of the University of Toronto, raised $500,000 from individual and corporate donors to establish an endowment.[1] A large bequest in 1948 from the estate of Kate E Taylor of Toronto added to the endowment.[2] From its inception, the intent was to create a fund for researchers with "good ideas but no money",[3] as was the situation for Banting when he approached JJR Macleod in 1921 with a request for facilities and resources to pursue his ideas about insulin.

Barbarian Press

  • Corporate body
  • 1977-

Barbarian Press was established in 1977 in Kent, England, where the Elsteds worked with Graham Williams at the Florin Press. Having acquired three flatbed hand presses – an 1850 super royal Hopkinson & Cope Albion, an 1833 foolscap folio Barrett bench Albion, and an 1854 foolscap folio Sherwin & Cope Imperial – together with many cases of type, they returned to their native Canada in 1978 and set up shop in Mission, British Columbia, about 50 miles east of Vancouver in the Fraser Valley, where they remain. To the English hand presses they have added Vandercook Universal I and Universal III proofing presses, two Chandler & Price vertical platen presses, much more type, and a small hand bindery.

The press’s publications range from new English translations of poetry and prose from various languages and new poetry in English to bibliography, illustrated classics, typography, and books on wood engraving. This last has become a particular speciality since the publication in 1995 of Endgrain: Contemporary Wood Engraving in North America, which was greeted with considerable acclaim, and is now widely sought after. This has spawned an ongoing series of books called Endgrain Editions, each showing selected work of a single engraver, printed from the original blocks, with an introduction and a catalogue of major works. The first of these, on Canadian engraver Gerard Brender à Brandis, appeared in 2000; the fourth volume, on Simon Brett, was published in 2014, and further volumes are planned.

Barna-Alper Productions

  • Corporate body
  • 1979-2004

Born to Hungarian Holocaust survivors in 1949, Laszlo Barna arrived in Montreal shortly after the Soviet Union’s Red Army suppressed the 1956 Hungarian democratic revolt. He attended McGill University in the late 1960s and, after a brief period as an academic, he became an independent filmmaker. In the late 1970s, he moved with his partner (Laura Alper) and their daughter to Toronto, where they established BarnaAlper Productions.

Initially, the company produced industrial films (primarily for unions, including the Canadian Auto Workers). Later, they produced small documentaries at the National Film Board, but their big break came in 1989 when CBC introduced the all-news channel Newsworld. Barna pitched a weekly current affairs, called Workweek, which became their first broadcast series. Over the next decade, BarnaAlper continued to produce factual series (including Frontiers of Construction, one of the first shows commissioned by Discovery Canada, and Turning Points of History, one of the first programs commissioned by History Television in 1997). Through this period, Alper began to take a less active role in the day-to-day affairs of the company, and she now serves as a consultant. In 1996, BarnaAlper entered the field of dramatic programming with the story of Teamster leader Diana Kilmury. The movie-of-the-week met with critical success in Canada and the United States, and the company began developing a slate of new dramatic projects. In 2008, BarnaAlper was acquired by Entertainment One (E1).

The company has won numerous awards, among them Geminis for Best Dramatic Series, Best Documentary Series, Best Sports Program or Series, Best Science, Technology, Nature and Environment Documentary Program, and Best History Documentary Program. They have also been recognized at prestigious TV festivals in the United States, including the Columbus International Film and Video Festival, Double Take, and the Chicago International TV Festival.

Bata Shoe Company

  • Corporate body
  • 1894-

The Bata Shoe Company was founded in Zlin, Czechsolovakia in 1894 by Tomáš Baťa (1876-1932).

Big Coat Media

  • Corporate body
  • 2000-

Created in 2000 by Catherine Fogarty and Maria Armstrong, Big Coat Media is an award winning television and digital media production company based in Toronto, Ontario. With a focus on un-scripted entertainment, they have produced many beloved programs. With a solid reputation, Big Coat Media has built relationships with many of North America’s major broadcasters.
Their most popular program is Love It or List It, which has had two direct spin offs: Love It or List It Vancouver, and Love It or List It Vacation Homes. The success of Love It or List It can be seen through its longevity, reaching 9 seasons (2008-2015). The program has garnered acclaim, being nominated for two Gemini Awards.

Birdsall & Son Bookbinders and Stationers

  • Corporate body
  • 1792-1961

The firm began in 1792 when William Birdsall purchased the small bookbinding business of John Lacy in Northampton, England. In the 1840's, Anthony Birdsall, great-nephew of the founder, bought the business and with his son, Richard, made it into one of the better known firms in the trade. The firm did the standard bindings which the general public requested as well as specializing in relieures-de-luxe and restoration work. Business continued to thrive until after the Second World War. When the factory closed its doors in 1961, it was the olderst firm in Northampton, with an international reputation for fine binding and restoration work. In 1968 the University of Toronto Library was able to purchase from Anthony Birdsall, 1877-1972, the last head of the firm, a collection of over 3,000 finishing tools. These are in constant use in the Rare Book Library Bindery, and have been described in 'The Birdsall Collection of Bookbinder's Finishing Tools', a pamphlet published by the University Library in 1972. Mr. Birdsall also gave the Library the Birdsall Book of Rubbings.

Blue Rodeo

  • Corporate body
  • 1975 -

Blue Rodeo’s roots can be traced to the late 1970s, when singer/songwriters Jim Cuddy and Greg Keeler (along with bassist Malcolm Schell and drummer Jimmy Sublett) formed a power pop band in Toronto called the Hi-Fi’s. The group issued one single on the Showtime label, but broke up in 1981. Cuddy and Keeler spent the next three years in New York City in a group called Fly to France; this band recorded four demos, including the future Blue Rodeo hits “Try” and “Outskirts”. Upon returning to Toronto in 1984, Cuddy and Keeler recruited keyboard player Bobby Wiseman, bassist Basil Donovan and drummer Cleave Anderson for a new group they called Blue Rodeo. The band debuted under this name in 1985, and played regular shows in Toronto before expanding their concert base across the country.

The band was signed to Risque Disque in 1986, and their debut album Outskirts included the song “Try”, which became a major Canadian pop and country hit. Between 1986 and 2002, Blue Rodeo issued one live album (1994’s Five Days in July), as well as nine studio albums. In 1990, Blue Rodeo appeared in the film Postcards from the Edge.

There have been several changes in the band’s lineup over the years. In 1989, Mark French replaced drummer Anderson, and three years later Glenn Milchem became the drummer. In 1992, Wiseman left and was replaced by Kim Deschamps; he, in turn, was replaced by James Gray, who was then replaced by Bob Packwood, and then Mike Boguski. In 2013 Colin Cripps joined the band as a full member. In addition to their work in Blue Rodeo, both Cuddy and Keeler have released solo albums. On August 5, 2013, James Gray suffered a fatal heart attack.

Blue Rodeo has won numerous industry awards, including JUNOs and SOCANs. In 2012 they were inducted into the Canadian Music Hall of Fame. In 2014, they were honored with Canada's highest honour in the performing arts – the Governor General's Performing Arts Award (GGPAA) for Lifetime Artistic Achievement.

Brett Club

  • F2154
  • Corporate body
  • 1946-[199?]

In the autumn of 1946, Trinity College’s Arts and Letters Club became the umbrella organization that coordinated the coeducational recreational activities of several of the College's academic departments. Academic staff and students participated in meetings held by various groups loosely affiliated with a specific faculty. These included meetings of those in the community who were interested in Fine Art, Music, Literature or Philosophy as well as other arts endeavours.
The meetings of the Philosophy discussion group were spearheaded by Dr George Edison and were from the beginning very popular. Because of this unexpected popularity, Edison encouraged students to form a Philosophical Society. Thus began the Brett Club in September 1946, named after George Sidney Brett, Head of the Department of Philosophy at the University of Toronto and a professor active in the Trinity community from 1919 until his death. He died suddenly at his home on 27 October 1944, remembered fondly by many students still attending the College.
Once formed, however, attendance in the Brett Club seemed to decline almost immediately, possibly because of the requirement that the Club was "restricted to those students genuinely interested in Philosophy" (Review, August 1947). The Brett Club failed to form a Constitution in the 1940s. It became known by the college community at large as "a certain species of cult to which new participants are admitted only upon invitation" (Review, Summer 1949).
The Arts and Letters Club included philosophical discussions that were more accessible. During the 1967-1968 academic session, the Brett Club revived through the efforts of its new President, Derek Allen (BA 1968, Head of Arts 1967-1968 and a Rhodes Scholar). It survived in a variety of forms over the intervening years, holding open and closed meetings about sophisticated philosophical questions and concepts.

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