Showing 1176 results

People and organizations
Corporate body

Indian-Eskimo Association of Canada

  • Corporate body
  • 1957-2015

The Indian-Eskimo Association (I.E.A.) was first established as a commission for the Canadian Association for Adult Education (CAAE) in 1957 to study issues in Indigenous communities and issues faced by Indigenous individuals living off reserves. In 1960, the commission withdrew from the CAAE and formed the Indian-Eskimo Association with the purpose of providing national services to Indigenous communities and individuals including housing, community, and economic development, as well as fundraising and to provide a forum for research on Indigenous issues by both Indigenous and non-Indigenous people, scholars, activists, organizations, and governmental entities. The I.E.A had a mixed membership and Indigenous individuals formed at least 25% of the membership of the I.E.A, and sat on the Board of Directors. One of the services of the I.E.A was a library, which actively collected books, as well as amassing reports, periodicals, speeches, and pamphlets by or relating to Indigenous communities and issues. The library provided research resources and reproduced speeches, press releases, offprints and reports, and developed and shared bibliographies and booklists. The I.E.A’s headquarters was originally in Toronto, but in 1973, they moved to Ottawa and changed their name to the Canadian Association in Support of Native Peoples. The association dissolved in 2015.

University of Toronto History Society

  • Corporate body
  • 2016-2022

Formed in 2016, the University of Toronto History Society (UTHS) is a club open to all undergraduate students at the University, who share an interest in the University’s history and in presenting a history that focuses on issues of importance to students. The club hosts a website, Facebook page, and Instagram account that curates and shares the history of the University of Toronto.

In March 2022, the Society was renamed the University of Toronto Students' History Collective (UTSHC).

University of Toronto Students' History Collective

  • Corporate body
  • 2022-

Formed in 2016 as the University of Toronto History Society (UTHS), the University of Toronto Students' History Collective (UTSHC) is a club open to all undergraduate students at the University, who share an interest in the University’s history and in presenting a history that focuses on issues of importance to students. The club hosts a website, Facebook page, and Instagram account that curates and shares the history of the University of Toronto.

In March 2022, the University of Toronto History Society was renamed the University of Toronto Students' History Collective.

Victoria College (Cobourg, Ont.). Philalethic Society

  • Corporate body
  • [ca. 1839]-1842

The Society was active from at least ca. 1839 to 1841 as a student society of Upper Canada Academy, and in 1842 of Victoria College. In vol 1 no 1 of Society's publication, "The Philomath." it gives the following summary of the Philalethic Society: "The Philalethic Society as the name clearly signifies, was established for the discovery and promotion of Truth. Its existence is not only antecedent to the Charter of Victoria College but its foundation may almost be said to have been laid with that of the noble edifice; and whilst U.C. Academy was struggling through the vale of obscurity to the attainment of a nobler name, and more conspicuous situation in the literary world; the operations of this first regularly organized literary club were felt and appreciated and known in the public account of the Institution."

The early minutes of the society shows that their primary function was to hold regular debates on various topics.

Creative Anarchy

  • Corporate body
  • 1997-2008

Creative Anarchy is a Toronto-based film production company. Creative Anarchy co-produced the crime documentary series Exhibit A: Secrets of Forensic Science with Kensington Communications, and co-produced a similar series, 72 Hours: True Crime with Kensington Communications and Meech-Grant Productions.

Kensington Communications Inc.

  • Corporate body
  • 1980-

Kensington Communications is a production company founded in 1980 in Toronto’s Kensington Market that has produced documentary and factual films, television shows, and multimedia projects for more than 40 years. Kensington has produced documentaries and series for the CBC and NFB, and its productions have been broadcast internationally on Discovery Channel, TLC, BBC, ZDF Arte, and other networks.
Early productions in the 1980s focused on social issues such as blended families (Stepdancing, 1986), youth suicide (Childhood’s End, 1981), and addiction (Out of the Past, 1989).
Many of Kensington’s productions have featured Earth’s natural environment and human activities that threaten it: Fragile Harvest (1986, the Nature of Things), Sacred Rhythm (1990), Sacred Balance with David Suzuki (2002), and Port Hope: A Question of Power (2005, The Nature of Things).
Kensington also has a history of producing iconic music documentaries. One Warm Line: The Legacy of Stan Rogers (1990), Mariposa: Under a Stormy Sky (1990), My Beat: The Life & Times of Bruce Cockburn (2001), and the City Sonic App (2009) all highlight Canadian music and musicians.
Kensington Communications worked with Bruce Cockburn over decades from the 1980s to the 2010s to produce short documentaries and advertisements for USC (formerly known as the Unitarian Service Committee of Canada) about their work in Nepal.
Kensington produced two successful crime series that focused on the role of forensics in solving real crimes – Exhibit A: Secrets of Forensic Science, and 72 Hours: True Crime.
Recent TV productions include The Shadow Of Gold (2019), Risk Factor (2017), The Equalizer (2016), and three seasons of the popular international TV series Museum Secrets, which goes behind the scenes at great museums of the world.
Kensington Communications has also been a leader in using multimedia websites to enhance documentary and television content. River of Sand, Sacred Balance, Diamond Road, Raw Opium, and Museum Secrets all included website content. Museum Secrets included a tie-in app called Scopify to help visitors navigate the Royal Ontario Museum, and the documentary Risk Factor was accompanied by the Risk Navigator app.

The Provincial Marine

  • MS Coll. 00022B
  • Corporate body
  • 1788-1792

Traders and merchants based in Quebec and the Thirteen Colonies had been successfully advancing the fur trade in the Great Lakes region since the mid-1760s, largely through the assistance of privately-owned commercial vessels to ship trade merchandise to western posts and retrieve bales of peltries to be sold for handsome profits. The trade had only recently transitioned from the old French structure to a modified system under British management, and was gaining momentum and efficiency. But all that changed with the onset of the American Revolution in 1775. The British government at Quebec responded to the war threat with plans to prevent American incursions into the Great Lakes region and ensure that weapons, ammunition, and provisions were not smuggled to the American side through the fur trade network. To that end, Governor Guy Carleton (1724-1808) outlawed the use of private vessels on the Great Lakes in the spring of 1777.

According to Governor Carleton’s 1777 announcement, vessels taken into the King’s service would be armed and manned by the Crown, be the exclusive carrier of troops and stores for the war effort, and maintain absolute control over the Great Lakes. The service was also the official conveyor of United Empire Loyalists relocating to British territory in the Province of Quebec. The fleet of King’s Ships of the Provincial Marine would be on constant military patrol between British garrisons at Carleton Island and Fort Niagara on Lake Ontario (employing Snow Seneca, Ship Limnade, and Sloop Caldwell), Fort Little Niagara, Fort Schlosser, Fort Erie, and Detroit on Lake Erie (employing Schooner Faith, Snow Rebecca, Schooner Hope, Brig Gage, Schooner Dunmore, Sloop Felicity, and Sloop Wyandot), and Detroit and Mackinac Island on Lake Huron (employing Sloop Felicity, Sloop Wyandot, Sloop Welcome, and Sloop Angelica).

The fur trade was at the heart of the young Canadian economy. Prior to Carleton’s 1777 orders, traders and merchants had their merchandise and peltries shipped over the Great Lakes on private vessels, many of which were owned and operated by the traders and merchants themselves. The new regulations dealt a serious blow to the fur trade when all private vessels on the lakes were effectively taken out of service and purchased or leased by the Crown for the exclusive use of the Provincial Marine. Traders, merchants, and agents were assured of services for the transport of their goods on board the King’s Ships, provided there was sufficient room available and military manoeuvres were not impacted.

The Provincial Marine thus became the sole means of transporting commercial goods on the Great Lakes. When merchandise and peltries were consigned for transport aboard the King’s Ships, promissory freight notes were issued to confirm the nature of the cargo and formalise a commitment to pay freight charges at some later date to Provincial Marine officials at Detroit, Carleton Island, or Quebec. Private transport of goods between Montreal and Carleton Island along the Saint Lawrence River was still permitted, but only in canoes and flat-bottomed cargo boats or bateaux.

Under the British system for managing the fur trade, the transport of trade merchandise to western depots was heavily regulated, and required a license from the governor (of which there was only a limited number issued each year). Ownership, origin, and destination of cargo was heavily scrutinized along the way by garrison commandants and ship masters, who had the authority to seize unauthorized shipments and prohibited goods. Strict supervision ensured that American traders were entirely excluded from the trade.

By the summer of 1778, Frederick Haldimand (1718-1791) had been installed as the new Governor of Quebec, and wasted no time in refining the organisation of the Provincial Marine. According to his General Orders and Regulations for the Better Government of His Majesty’s Armed Vessels Employed on the Different Lakes, issued on 1 July 1778, the fleet of vessels on the Great Lakes was divided into geographic commands: Lake Ontario constituted its own jurisdiction, and Lake Erie and the three upper Great Lakes (being lakes Huron, Superior and Michigan) constituted another, each with its own senior naval officer. In addition to organisational details for manning and operating the King’s Ships, Haldimand’s directive required that the British Articles of War be read on board each vessel at least once every month, to maintain order and discipline. Unfortunately, the chain of command between land- and lake-based officials was poorly defined, and led to quarrels that impacted the ability of the Provincial Marine to assist with the army’s land operations and properly fulfill commercial shipping obligations to those in the fur trade.

At the height of the war in 1779, during a period of particular difficulty for the fur trade, nine trading partnerships strategically combined their assets and resources to form the first consortium that would become the North West Company. The 16-share syndicate, composed of leading traders and merchants operating out of Montreal and Mackinac Island, eventually developed into the principal fur trade concern in Canada in opposition to the Hudson’s Bay Company. Another similar 16-share agreement was made in 1783, which was expanded to a 20-share agreement in 1787. A few of the traders included in the North West Company agreements are represented on promissory freight notes as the shippers and receivers of merchandise and peltries carried by the Provincial Marine, most notably George McBeath and Normand McLeod who were among the first British traders in the Great Lakes region after the British conquest
Forced to conform with the regulations for shipping their merchandise and peltries only on the King’s Ships, traders, merchants, and agents were at the mercy of the fleet’s management, staff, schedules, and performance, the weather and sailing conditions, and the physical state of the vessels. The lack of suitable storage facilities for goods held at garrisons added to the impact on trade, and other serious problems were numerous and widespread. Trade merchandise and peltries were delayed at transfer points for extended periods of time, damaged through improper storage, sodden by transport aboard leaky vessels, lost and misplaced through incompetence, and ransacked by unscrupulous military staff. Delays were particularly injurious to the trade, owing to the inherently tight trade cycle of shipping goods (which were usually obtained on credit from merchant-outfitters) to the interior and receiving furs the following year for sale at Montreal. Goods sometimes lay for months at Carleton Island, Fort Niagara, and Fort Erie, and were sometimes delayed so long that they could not be sent until the following season. Disruptions in the cycle equated to monetary losses through higher interest payments, damage to credit ratings, and strained relations with outfitters and investors. Petitions and Memorials complaining of unfair treatment and exorbitant freight charges were drawn up by traders, merchants, and agents, and sent to the governor and council at Quebec, but were largely ignored.

In the end, a large proportion of freight notes were not voluntarily settled: traders and merchants were summoned to court and sued for full or partial payment, whereas others were pardoned on the basis that negligence by the Provincial Marine caused financial losses that exceeded freight charges.

Alinari, Fratelli

  • https://viaf.org/viaf/122269178/
  • Corporate body
  • 1852-

Queer Peel Oral History Project

  • Corporate body
  • 2020

The Queer Peel Oral History Project was a student-driven initiative that emerged from a third-year history course taught by Prof. Elspeth Brown at the University of Toronto Mississauga in early 2020.

Toronto Wagner Society

  • Local
  • Corporate body
  • 1975-

Founded in 1975 by Dorothy Graziani with the support of Dr. Boyd Neel, the Toronto Wagner Society is a non-profit organization of people with a common love of the music dramas of Richard Wagner. The Society's objective is to encourage interest in, study of, and further presentation of the music-drams of Wagner. The Society meets monthly and organizes various events (lectures, interviews, video screenings, roundtable discussions, debates, and reviews). Their newsletter, Wagner News, is issued to members 3-4 times per year and features articles, reviews, and information about Wagner performances worldwide. The Society also maintains a scholarship to support young singers.

Past chairs of the Society are: Dorothy Graziani (1975-1981); Eric Domville (1981-1985); Hans de Groot (1985-1990); Frances Henry (1990-1996, 2007-); L & M Hutcheon (1996-1999); Wayne Gooding (1999-2001); Helmut Reichenbächer (1999-2003); Richard Rosenman (2001-2005); Jim Fisher (2003-2007); Yvonne Chiu (2005-2009); and Lorne Albaum (2009-2013).

Victoria University (Toronto, Ont.). Bob Revue

  • Corporate body
  • 1874-

The Committee was formed to stage the Bob Revue, an annual presentation in honour of Robert Beare. Bob Beare was a janitor at Victoria and a friend to students. Beginning in 1874 he would invite the freshmen class to meet the rest of the college and out of this evolved the Bob Revue. The Revue was put on by the sophomore class and aimed its barbs at freshmen. It was considered as part of orientation to campus life.

The Bob Revue was traditionally an all male production and in 1949 the Scarlet and Gold revue was created as a co-ed musical revue. Scarlet and Gold co-existed with the Bob for two years (1949 and 1950) before it merged with the Bob in 1951 and the Bob officially became co-ed.

The Bob Revue operates under the Arts and Culture Commission, part of the Victoria University Students' Administrative Council (VUSAC).

Alert Music

  • 2005.006
  • Corporate body
  • 1984-2006

Alert Music was founded in 1984 by Toronto’s W. Tom Berry and Montreal’s Marc Durand. From 1975-1983, Berry had been managing director at Anthem Records whose roster included Rush, Max Webster and Bob and Doug Mackenzie. Durand was the manager and producer of the Montreal rock band Men Without Hats. Alert’s mission was to create a unique label that could bridge the “two solitudes” of Canada, hopefully turning regional hits into national ones; the Toronto office would sign English language artists that the Montreal office would attempt to promote in French Canada, and vice versa. The Montreal office immediately signed The Box, while the Toronto office signed Kim Mitchell (who had recently begun a solo career).

In the late 1980s, Berry decided that his interest in rock music was waning and he and Durand agreed to go their separate ways. Berry kept the name Alert and all the English language artists currently signed to the label, while Durand kept The Box and the company’s Montreal office. Sometime after, Berry discovered jazz singer Holly Cole performing with pianist Aaron David and bass player David Piltch. He signed the trio and immediately set out to create a distinctive image and style for Cole. Her album Girl Talk caught the attention of jazz label Blue Note Records, and they released Cole’s next five albums in the American market. The majority of Alert’s efforts since the mid1990s have revolved around recording and marketing Cole. The label also continues to record and market other Canadian jazz, blues and roots-oriented music including Roxanne Potvin, Michael Kaeshammer and Cole’s accompanists, Piltch and Davis.

Barna-Alper Productions

  • Corporate body
  • 1979-2004

Born to Hungarian Holocaust survivors in 1949, Laszlo Barna arrived in Montreal shortly after the Soviet Union’s Red Army suppressed the 1956 Hungarian democratic revolt. He attended McGill University in the late 1960s and, after a brief period as an academic, he became an independent filmmaker. In the late 1970s, he moved with his partner (Laura Alper) and their daughter to Toronto, where they established BarnaAlper Productions.

Initially, the company produced industrial films (primarily for unions, including the Canadian Auto Workers). Later, they produced small documentaries at the National Film Board, but their big break came in 1989 when CBC introduced the all-news channel Newsworld. Barna pitched a weekly current affairs, called Workweek, which became their first broadcast series. Over the next decade, BarnaAlper continued to produce factual series (including Frontiers of Construction, one of the first shows commissioned by Discovery Canada, and Turning Points of History, one of the first programs commissioned by History Television in 1997). Through this period, Alper began to take a less active role in the day-to-day affairs of the company, and she now serves as a consultant. In 1996, BarnaAlper entered the field of dramatic programming with the story of Teamster leader Diana Kilmury. The movie-of-the-week met with critical success in Canada and the United States, and the company began developing a slate of new dramatic projects. In 2008, BarnaAlper was acquired by Entertainment One (E1).

The company has won numerous awards, among them Geminis for Best Dramatic Series, Best Documentary Series, Best Sports Program or Series, Best Science, Technology, Nature and Environment Documentary Program, and Best History Documentary Program. They have also been recognized at prestigious TV festivals in the United States, including the Columbus International Film and Video Festival, Double Take, and the Chicago International TV Festival.

Delaney & Friends Productions

  • Corporate body
  • 1993-1998

Delaney & Friends was incorporated by Christopher Delaney in Vancouver in 1984. Delaney was joined by his brother, animation designer and comic book artist John Delaney, in 1992. Throughout the 1980s and early 1990s, the company produced several television commercials for such clients as 711, Purex and the Vancouver Province, and they garnered a number of awards for these (including two TVB Awards, three Bessie Awards, and an IBA Award).

In 1993, Delaney & Friends produced an animated Christmas special, Christopher the Christmas Tree (the special was based on a record album of the same name, produced by George T. Bowers in 1969). The program premiered on the FOX Kids network in the United States and YTV in Canada. Over the years, several stations around the world have picked up the broadcasting rights to the special, and as of 2007 Christopher the Christmas Tree had been shown in over 35 countries while the commercially released DVD had sold over 50,000 copies.
Beginning in 1995, Delaney produced the first of two full seasons of the animated series Nilus the Sandman. Created by Michael Fawkes, each season consisted of 13 episodes; these were all either written or edited by Michael Mercer and employed the voices of Donny Osmond and Holly Cole. The first season was co-produced with Cambium Entertainment of Toronto at a studio in Manila. The studio (Typhoon Toons) employed a staff of 400 animators, though it failed due to interference from customs agents and the difficulty of managing such a large operation from afar. When production of the second season began in 1998, Delaney subcontracted production work to Morning Sun Animation studio in Shanghai. The Nilus series was recognized with numerous nominations and awards, including two Geminis, three Worldfest awards, two U.S. International Film and Video Festival awards and a Golden Sheaf Award from the Yorkton Short Film Festival.

In 1996, Delaney & Friends produced The Littlest Angel, based on the children’s book originally published in 1940. In addition to the material produced through Delaney & Friends, Chris Delaney has created such well-known animation programs as The Care Bears, Detective Dog, Tales of the Mouse Hockey League, Leonard Lemming’s Lament, The Legend of the Candy Cane and Phish and Chip.

In 2003, Vancouver videogame developer Radical Entertainment agreed to purchase the assets of Delaney & Company, which was no longer operational. Two years later, Radical was acquired by Vivendi Universal Games, a global games publisher.

Kessler-Colero

  • Corporate body
  • 1975-2002

Syd Kessler and Jody Colero operated a number of commercial studios from the 1970s to 2000. Hamilton born Syd Kessler began working in media in 1966 when he was hired by Chuck Blore Creative Services, a Los Angeles-based radio production company. Over the next five years, Kessler learned his way around a recording studio while also freelance writing for the prime time comedy show, Laugh-In. Returning to Toronto in 1971, Kessler obtained work writing for television shows such as Wayne and Schuster and began working on commercials with noted jingle writer and film composer Ben McPeek. Kessler joined the Cockfield Brown Advertising Agency in 1973; it was here that he met Cubby Marcus, who would become his mentor.

By 1975, Kessler had started his own company, WAMO (Words and Music Organization), which then became Kessler, Morrison, Meteskey and Giacomelli Inc. Three years later, he founded Kessler Productions (later Kessler Music Corp.), which over the next several years became the largest jingle company in Canada. In 1981, Kessler acquired Berryman Studios and Sounds Interchange and formed the Air Company and Creative Interchange. These two companies dominated the advertising business in Canada for nearly a decade, with Kessler co-writing, producing and/or directing commercials for major companies including Coca-Cola, Esso, Air Canada, McDonald’s and others. In 1988, John Labatt Ltd. merged with Kessler Music Corp, thereby forming a new entity called Supercorp. Five of Kessler’s competitors came under the Supercorp umbrella; one of these, Einstein Brothers, included Jody Colero.

Following a change in direction in 1994, Kessler sold his shares in Supercorp and started a new company called The Kessler Group. In 1997, Kessler became co-director of KPMG e-commerce practice. He retired in 2000, and published a book (called The Perfect System) in 2005, and currently lives in Toronto.

Jody Colero began his professional career in 1977, working as an engineer at Thunder Sound. He subsequently worked in A & R, signing notable Canadian pop and rock artists such as Teenage Head, Harlequin and David Bendeath while helping to develop a number of successful Canadian songwriters like Mary Margaret O’Hara and Tim Thorney. Colero also worked with such notable Canadian acts as Dr. Music and Craig Russell. In 1985, Colero formed Einstein Brothers Music Inc. with two partners that he subsequently bought out. The company was acquired by Kessler’s Supercorp in 1992. Shortly afterwards, Colero created the Einstein Brothers Record label, which enjoyed some success with Cassandra Vassik and Charlie Major. Einstein Brothers Inc. was acquired by Supercorp in 1992 and, after its dissolution, Colero became the sole owner of the company that he once co-owned. After a brief sabbatical at the end of 2001, Colero returned to the advertising business with a new company called Silent Joe. He continues to create musical products for all media.

In addition to their advertising work, both Kessler and Colero served as executive producers or worked ‘hands on’ on commercial recordings by Bob and Doug MacKenzie, Rick Moranis and Mary Margaret O’Hara, among others. Kessler and Colero’s work has been well-regarded within the advertising, music and broadcasting communities, and they have earned countless awards: AMPAC (Advertising Music Producers Association of Canada), Andys (Advertising Club of New York), Bessies, Canadian Radio Commercial Awards, Canadian TV Commercials Festival, CLIOs (International Broadcasting Awards), International Film & TV Festival awards, Toronto Art Directors Club Awards, and others.

Shaftesbury Films Inc.

  • 2007.008
  • Corporate body
  • 1987-

Shaftesbury Films was founded by Canadian Film Centre alumnus Christina Jennings 1987. The initial goal was to produce feature films with strong Canadian content and identity; their first feature, Camilla, was produced in 1992 and followed by Swann and Painted Angels. In 1996, Jennings recruited Jonathan Barker, a former IMAX Corp. executive. Due to the scarcity of funding for feature filmmaking in Canada, Shaftesbury quickly moved into television, producing their first ‘movie of the week’ (External Affairs, based on Timothy Findlay’s The Stillborn Lover) in 1998. After establishing their commitment to adapting prestigious Canadian literary works by such authors as Margaret Atwood, Carol Shields, and Mordecai Richler, Shaftesbury expanded to produce a broad range of television programming for children and adults. In 1998, Shaftesbury established a large format division (SK Films) in partnership with IMAX founder Robert Kerr. The company distributed Bugs!, Journey to Mecca, and Gold Fever, among other films. Also in 1998, Jennings and Barker further diversified their company by launching a feature-film distribution arm in partnership with Oasis Pictures. In 2008, Barker left Shaftesbury Films; he and Kerr now have sole control of SK Films.

Shaftesbury has accumulated a host of awards over its twenty-three year history, including Geminis, International Emmys, Canadian Screenwriting Awards and Directors Guild of Canada Awards. Jennings was awarded the Crystal Award for Oustanding Achievement by the Women in Film and Television organization in 2006.

S&S Productions

  • 2005.002
  • Corporate body
  • 1980-

S & S Productions was founded by husband-and-wife comedy team Steve and Morag Smith in 1980. The company was founded just as Canada’s broadcasting industry was experiencing unprecedented growth; the new cable market was just developing, and smaller companies like S & S were able to feed the demand for new content with cost-efficient and viewer-friendly programming.

The duo first achieved success with the series Smith & Smith, and subsequent series included The Comedy Mill and Me & Max. However, S & S has achieved its greatest success with The Red Green Show. Originally aired by CHCH-TV in Hamilton in March of 1990, the comedy enjoyed a fifteen year run on television. The series also aired in the United States, Australia, India and Israel. With Red Green’s success, S & S kept diversifying and expanding: more comedy like An American in Canada and History Bites as well as lifestyle programs like Balance Television for Living Well, The Gardener’s Journal and Anything I Can Do. In 2002, the company produced their first feature film, Duct Tape Forever.

Over the course of its 30 year history, S & S Productions has won three Gemini Awards and been nominated for several more. The company has also received nominations for two Rose D’Or awards, and was a finalist in the New York Festival’s International Competition for Television Film and Video Communication.

Lionsgate Entertainment

  • Corporate body
  • 1997 -

Lionsgate was founded by Frank Giustra in 1997. Giustra, the son of a nickel miner, was born in Sudbury, ON and eventually became CEO of Yorkton Securities Inc., an investment bank that specialized in funding mining ventures. A lifelong film fan, Giustra became involved with the financing for a half-dozen films before deciding to found a Canadian film company that could compete with Hollywood on its own terms. Giustra contributed $16 million of his own money to found Lion’s Gate, and secured $40 million from investors (including Yorkton, his former employer). He obtained an additional $64 million when Lion’s Gate merged with Toronto Stock Exchange listee Beringer Gold Corp. to become a publicly traded company. Beringer’s mining assets were sold off, and Lion’s Gate was soon in a position to acquire a number of existing Canadian film companies.
One of these was Cinepix Film Properties (CFP), which was founded in Montreal by John Dunning and Andre Link in 1962. Created at the height of Quebec’s Quiet Revolution, CFP quickly became the centre of risqué filmmaking with such hits as Denis Heroux’s Valerie. When this and other Cinepix titles were distributed in English Canada in the early 1970s, there was a good deal of criticism levied at the Canadian Film Development Corporation (now Telefilm Canada) for spending Canadian tax dollars on what some referred to as ‘sexploitation movies’. CFP released both English and French films, and also had an American distribution arm based in New York. The company produced 10 – 12 modestly budgeted films annually, while also distributing such arthouse titles as Hype and Buffalo 66. CFP also owned 56 percent of CineGroup, a Montreal-based animated film production company. Cinepix was renamed Lion’s Gate Films after the acquisition (though its leadership remained intact), and an offshoot, Lion’s Gate International, was later formed in Los Angeles to serve as a worldwide distribution branch.

Giustra also acquired Vancouver-based North Shore Studios in 1997. North Shore (subsequently renamed Lion’s Gate Studios) was Canada’s largest film production facility, and home to a number of American television programs (including The XFiles). Over the next several years, Lion’s Gate continued to acquire various film and television companies, including International Movie Group, Inc., Artisan, Redbus and Trimark. In addition to the feature films that they produced and/or distributed, several of these companies also brought extensive inventories of home entertainment titles. As such, Lionsgate has grown to become one of the most commercially successful independent production companies in North America.
In 2000, CEO Frank Giustra stepped down and was replaced by former Sony Pictures executive John Feltheimer. In 2005, the company changed its name from “Lion’s Gate” to “Lionsgate” across all of its divisions. Under the rebranding, division titles Lions Gate Films, Lions Gate Television, Lions Gate Documentary, Lions Gate International. Lions Gate Home Entertainment, Lions Gate Family Entertainment, Lions Gate Family Home Entertainment and Lions Gate Music disappeared.

Lionsgate currently employs ca. 800 people, and has offices in Vancouver, BC and Santa Monica, CA.

Radke Film Group

  • 2007.010
  • Corporate body
  • 1992-

The Radke Film Group was formed in Toronto in 1992 by Richard Radke (in partnership with the company Partners’ Film Company). Radke, who was raised in New York City, had come to Canada in the early 1980s and began his advertising career in 1988. The company was intended to be a director-driven enterprise with sales agents generating contracts to produce commercials for various clients. Radke enlisted several directors to his firm, which his company then represented to various clients. In addition to representing Canadian directors, the Radke Film Group also served as a sales representative for a number of the major American production companies for business in Canada.

Following Radke’s sudden death at the age of 40 in 1994, then General Manager Edie Weiss took over the company. In 1998, Partners’ sold its 30% share to Weiss and she became the company’s full owner (she continues to serve as President). In 2003, the company opened an office in Vancouver.

The Radke Film Group also encompasses a number of affiliates:
· Steam Films was launched in 2001 to enable Radke to represent a larger number of directors; in 2003, they too opened a Vancouver office. Steam also provides crew and production for American shoots.
· Soft Citizen, a dedicated music video production company, was founded in 2003 with the intention of producing videos for both Canadian and international artists. To date, the company has produced videos for such artists as Badly Drawn Boy, Broken Social Scene, Cut Copy, and Death Cab for Cutie.
· The Vapor Music Group is a full service music house based in Toronto. The company specializes in original music, sound design, film/television branding, long format licensing, radio and voice direction. Vapor is managed for former Jungle Music head Roger Harris; clients include Nissan, Purolator, AGF, Gatorade, Nike and Toyota.

Radke directors have won every major international advertising award, including Cannes Lions, Clios, AICP’s (Association of Independent Commercial Producers), Bessies and more. Amongst the best known directors are Mike Bigelow, Antoine Fugua, Zak Snyder, Martin Shewchuk and Eric Lynne; a number of these people have also worked on feature films.

Primedia Productions

  • 2006.010
  • Corporate body
  • 1981-1994

In 1981, producer/director W. Patterson Ferns and writer Richard Nielsen formed Primedia Productions Ltd. Their previous company, Nielsen-Ferns Ltd., had been created in 1972 when the two left their posts at CBC in order to focus on independent productions. In early 1985 Nielsen left Primedia to pursue his writing career and Pat Ferns took over the company.

In the years prior to Primedia’s founding, Ferns initiated several co-production arrangements with international partners; although an unusual practice in the 1970s, such co-productions have become a mainstay of the contemporary Canadian television industry. Ferns was instrumental in the creation of an independent production department within the CBC and for acceptance of independent production by private broadcasters. His arguments in front of the CRTC and other representations have been credited with sowing the seeds from which the Broadcast Fund of Telefilm Canada was born. As a result of these efforts, he has been referred to as “the father of independent production” in Canada.

Following his departure from Primedia, Neilsen founded Norflicks Productions Ltd. He has been granted a Michener Award, a Chetwynd Award and four Gemini Awards for his work. By the time Primedia folded in 1992, it had produced approximately 100 programs that had been seen around the world. Primedia’s programming falls into four general categories: performing arts programs, original TV drama, celebrity-hosted travelogues, and science programming.

In 1994, Primedia was sold to Douglas Dales, president of Production Services Ltd., one of Canada’s largest motion picture equipment rental companies.

NOW Communications

  • 2002.002
  • Corporate body
  • 1981-

NOW Magazine was founded in 1981 by Michael Hollett and Alice Klein. In many ways, NOW was modeled as a Toronto equivalent to New York’s Village Voice; a weekly newsprint publication combining progressive news coverage with extensive and literate coverage of the cultural events occurring in the city. However, one essential difference between NOW and its predecessors was that NOW was completely supported by ad revenue and thus available for free. While this was a new concept in 1981, the majority of North American cities now have at least one such publication.
Over the course of its history, NOW’s arts writers have provided in-depth coverage of the film, theatre, music, dance, poetry and visual arts scenes in Toronto. The emphasis in this coverage has been on independent and alternative artists whose work gets little or no exposure in the mainstream press. NOW’s news coverage has also been influential, providing a voice for a variety of communities that were traditionally marginalized elsewhere (including LGBT people, sex workers, labour organizers, environmental activists and so on).

In the course of its coverage of politics and the arts, NOW has published original photography by nationally and internationally renowned names such as Larry Towell, David Hlynsky, Paul Till and Chris Nichols. The magazine has also printed original art by people such as Margaret Hathaway, Buzz Burza, Thach Bui and Kris Patterson.

Insight Productions

  • Corporate body
  • 1970 -

The Insight Production Company Ltd. is an independent production company based in Toronto. It was established in 1970 by Penray "Pen" Densham and John Kingsley Watson. In 1973, the company gained recognition for the documentary film Life Times Nine, which received two Academy Award nominations. In December 1978 John McLeod Brunton, Jr., assistant editor and director with Insight, bought the rights to the company from Densham and Watson, becoming President.

Born in Toronto (ca. 1954), Brunton was the youngest of three children and attended the Ridley School in St. Catharines, ON. Upon graduating, Brunton attended York University, Guelph University and Ryerson University. After being impressed by a short film produced by Insight in the mid1970s (Dazzled), Brunton called the company and expressed interest in their work. He began working for them in 1976. Working with Executive Vice President Barbara Bowlby (who joined the company in the mid 1980s), Brunton established a company that has fostered Canada’s domestic star system. Insight has created programs in several genres (documentary, drama, sports, variety, comedy, music, reality), and has adapted to shifting tastes, technology and formats. Canadian Idol, an Insight-produced iteration of the successful international format, aired between 2004 and 2008 to record-breaking audiences. Insight is also credited with revamping Canada’s national music awards, the JUNO Awards. By moving the show from a theatre to an arena setting, Insight was ultimately able to take the show on the road to cities across the country. The company has produced a number of award-winning programs for youth, including The Truth About Alex and the dramatic series Ready or Not. Insight is also recognized for producing Canada’s first successful late-night talk show, Open Mike with Mike Bullard, for six years.

Trinidad Theatre Workshop

  • Corporate body
  • 1959-

The Trinidad Theatre Workshop was founded by Derek Walcott in 1959. It introduced the first theatre season in Trinidad and Tobago with three plays: Jean Genet's The Blacks, Eric Roach's Belle Fanto, and Wole Soyinka's The Road. Since that time the Workshop has produced Trinidad's foremost actors, and indeed has been a source of theatre skills for the entire Caribbean.

Contact Press

  • Corporate body
  • 1952-1967

The legendary Contact Press was founded by Raymond Souster, Louis Dudek and Irving Layton in 1952, and the first book to bear the Contact imprint was Cerberus: Poems, written by the three co-founders. For the next 15 years, Contact Press emerged as the most important poet-operated and self-financed small press in Canada. Between 1960 and 1967, it published important book-length collections by new and younger writers whose work had until then appeared in little magazines or may have been published in chapbook form. Its list of writers included Milton Acorn, Al Purdy, Gwendolyn MacEwen, John Newlove, Frank Davey, George Bowering and Margaret Atwood.

National Inter-Faith Immigration Committee

  • Corporate body
  • 1967-

The National Inter-Faith Immigration Committee was established in 1967 to provide a widely representative inter-faith body whose members work in the field of immigrant and refugee resettlement. Its function was to provide a national and regional supportive assistance service to the work of the Federal Department of Manpower and Immigration.

Blue Rodeo

  • Corporate body
  • 1975 -

Blue Rodeo’s roots can be traced to the late 1970s, when singer/songwriters Jim Cuddy and Greg Keeler (along with bassist Malcolm Schell and drummer Jimmy Sublett) formed a power pop band in Toronto called the Hi-Fi’s. The group issued one single on the Showtime label, but broke up in 1981. Cuddy and Keeler spent the next three years in New York City in a group called Fly to France; this band recorded four demos, including the future Blue Rodeo hits “Try” and “Outskirts”. Upon returning to Toronto in 1984, Cuddy and Keeler recruited keyboard player Bobby Wiseman, bassist Basil Donovan and drummer Cleave Anderson for a new group they called Blue Rodeo. The band debuted under this name in 1985, and played regular shows in Toronto before expanding their concert base across the country.

The band was signed to Risque Disque in 1986, and their debut album Outskirts included the song “Try”, which became a major Canadian pop and country hit. Between 1986 and 2002, Blue Rodeo issued one live album (1994’s Five Days in July), as well as nine studio albums. In 1990, Blue Rodeo appeared in the film Postcards from the Edge.

There have been several changes in the band’s lineup over the years. In 1989, Mark French replaced drummer Anderson, and three years later Glenn Milchem became the drummer. In 1992, Wiseman left and was replaced by Kim Deschamps; he, in turn, was replaced by James Gray, who was then replaced by Bob Packwood, and then Mike Boguski. In 2013 Colin Cripps joined the band as a full member. In addition to their work in Blue Rodeo, both Cuddy and Keeler have released solo albums. On August 5, 2013, James Gray suffered a fatal heart attack.

Blue Rodeo has won numerous industry awards, including JUNOs and SOCANs. In 2012 they were inducted into the Canadian Music Hall of Fame. In 2014, they were honored with Canada's highest honour in the performing arts – the Governor General's Performing Arts Award (GGPAA) for Lifetime Artistic Achievement.

Exile Editions

  • Corporate body
  • 1976?-

Exile Editions is an independent Canadian publisher based in Toronto. It was founded in 1976 by Barry Callaghan.

Victoria University (Toronto, Ont.). Board of Regents Property Committee

  • Corporate body
  • 1927-1954, 1992-

In 1927, a committee consisting of Mr. F.H. Deacon, Mr. J.R.L. Starr and Mr. G.H. Locke and later Chancellor Bowles, was appointed as a Property Committee to ‘keep an outlook and advise the Board on properties which can be obtained which it might seem wise that the Board should purchase’. To this Committee was also referred the method of administering the property of the College and also had power to make necessary building repairs. In 1954, the Property Committee merged with the Finance Committee to form the Finance and Property Committee. In 1985, The Finance and Property Committee became the Financial Management and Planning Committee. The Property Committee was one of 3 sub-committee to this Committee (along with the Budget and Investment Committees). In 1992, By-Law No. 1 was amended and the Financial Management and Planning Committee was dissolved and it's sub-committees became Standing Committees. The new Property Committee had responsibility for all matters pertaining to the use, maintenance and improvement of the University's buildings, grounds and other real assets. It was also tasked with developing long-term plans for capital improvements in the University's buildings, facilities and lands.

Tsuji, Mia - The Tsuji Communications Inc Fonds

  • Corporate body
  • 1980-2000

The Tsuji Communications Inc. (TCI) was founded by Susan Tsuji and Roy Tsuji in 1980 as a local production company and distributor/agent for Nippon Hōsō Kyōkai or the NHK programs from Japan. Their productions were aired initially on Multilingual Television (MTV), then CITY-TV (Toronto), and finally CHCH (Hamilton).
Before Susan and Roy Tsuji began their career in television, they volunteered in their communities to promote the importance of Japanese culture to Japanese Canadians and Canadians in general. In the 1970s, Susan earned a TV production certificate from Ryerson Polytechnical Institute and with Roy, they started their career in television. Susan was chosen as the new producer for MTV multicultural television Japanese Panorama, a significant step in Susan’s career in television. However, Susan and Roy left MTV to start their show, Hello Japan. With their involvement in Canadian television, they pioneered a way to promote Japanese culture to Japanese Canadians and to a wider audience. Thus, their productions were shot in English, and the NHK segments were in Japanese but given English subtitles.

Ontario Woodsworth Memorial Foundation

  • Corporate body
  • 1944-

The Ontario Woodsworth Memorial Foundation was founded in Toronto in 1944 to honour the founder of the CCF party, James Shaver Woodsworth. Its aims were to sponsor research on social and economic problems in Canada in the twentieth century, to publish the results of such research in inexpensive pamphlets for a wide audience, to sponsor lectures, study groups and conferences, to operate a book club for its members, and to collect and preserve the historic documents of the early days of the labour movement, CCF and farm organizations.

Canadian Authors Association

  • Corporate body
  • 1921-

Founded in 1921 by Stephen Leacock, Pelham Edgar, B.K. Sandwell, John Murray Gibbon (who became its first president), and other prominent writers of the time, to lobby for the protection of authors’ rights, the Canadian Authors Association has continued to pursue this objective to this day. Instrumental in the 1924 copyright legislation, the Association began pressing for a new Copyright Act in the 1980s.

Canadian Society for Civil Engineering. Toronto Section.

  • Corporate body
  • 1887-

Founded in 1887 by prominent Civil Engineers in Canada, the Canadian Society for Civil Engineering (CSCE) is a learned society intended to enhance the public image of the civil engineering profession and to develop and maintain high standards of civil engineering practice in Canada.

Royal Canadian Institute

  • Corporate body
  • 1849-

Founded in Toronto in 1849 as the Canadian Institute by a group of engineers, surveyors, and civil engineers as a professional society that would include all architects, surveyors, and engineers in Ontario. It 1850 it was agreed to include all "whose pursuits or studies were of a kindred character". Incorporated in 1851, became the Royal Canadian Institute by Royal charter in 1914.

Catholic Church. Papal Birth Control Commission

  • Corporate body
  • 1963-1966

The Papal Commission on Population and Birth Control met in Rome from 1963 to 1966. The Commission was initially convened by Pope John XXIII and continued by Pope Paul VI after Pope John’s death in 1963. Originally, six members were appointed to the Commission and the group was later expanded into a two-part 79 member commission comprised of 64 lay persons (i.e. people who are not bishops, priests, or deacons in the Church) and 15 clerics. The mission of the Commission was to determine how the Church could change its position on birth control, due to rapid population growth, without undermining papal authority.

After three years of deliberation, the Commission concluded that it was not possible to make this change without undermining papal authority, but that the Church should change their position on contraception and birth control. The lay members voted 60 to 4 for change, and the clerics, 9 to 6 for change. Chairman of the Commission, Rev. Henri de Riedmatten, produced a final report, often referred to as the “Majority Report”, that reflected this call for change.

Despite the overwhelming vote of the members of the Commission, Pope Paul refused to alter the Vatican's stance on birth control citing that to do so would fundamentally undermine papal infallibility and, in 1968, wrote the ''Humanae Vitae'' encyclical which emphasized the continuation of the Vatican's opposition to contraception.

Victoria University (Toronto, Ont.). Residence Council

  • Corporate body

The Residence Council was made up of members, including the Dean of Men and members from the residence houses, who were responsible for all matters of general concern to the whole men’s residence, including acquisition of art, residence athletic programmes, social events, supervision of seminars and other intellectual activities, and relations with the administration.

Victoria University (Toronto, Ont.). Board of Regents Executive Committee

  • Corporate body
  • 1890-

The Executive Committee held it's first meeting on October 23, 1890 and was appointed by the Board of Regents to complete the federation with the University of Toronto. The Committee was reorganized in 1914, when the powers of the Buildings and Grounds, Faculty, and Finance Committees were absorbed. The Bursar acted as Secretary.

The Executive Committee has the power and authority to coordinate management of the University's resources, including planning for its future development. The Executive Committee has authority to act for the Board in relation to all matters arising between regular meetings of the Board. The Chairman of the Board of Regents is also the Chairman of the Executive Committee.

Victoria University (Toronto, Ont.). Women's Council

  • Corporate body
  • 1932-1952

In 1932, after the Board of Regents hired a warden to take over the administration of residences from the Committee of Management (they had already lost financial control of the residences in 1920), the focus changed and the Committee merged into the Women’s Council. The first meeting was held on June 28th, 1932. The Women's Council acted as an advisory committee to the Dean of Women, administered bequests for needy students and the Tennis Fund, and aided in projects such as the Wymilwood Sunday Evening Concerts, the Wymilwood Reading Room, etc. In 1947, recommendations were made that the Women's Council be asked re-organize itself and serve the University by supporting women's organizations on campus - thus losing all control over residences (The Women's Residence Committee, a standing committee of the Board was established in 1948 with 2 members of the Women's Council ). The Women's Council was disbanded in 1952

Victoria University (Toronto, Ont.). Board of Regents Library Building Committee

  • Corporate body
  • 1908-1911

In 1908, a gift from Cyrus A. Birge and Andrew Carnegie made it possible to secure a library for Victoria University. A Library Building Committee was established that same year and given authority to employ and architect and consider a ground plan and specific library building plans. The Committee arranged for the construction and the necessary financial provisions. The Members of the Library Building Committee were Chancellor Burwash, Vice-Chancellor McLaren, C.C. James, J.R.L. Starr and A.E. Ames, Dr. Wallace, Professor A.E. Lang (Librarian), and Dr. Withrow.
Prior to this, the Property Committee had been acting as a library committee of the Board.

Victoria University (Toronto, Ont.). Board of Regents House Committee

  • Corporate body
  • 1907-1921

The House Committee was a standing committee of Board of Regents from 1907 until 1921. The committee was concerned with overseeing and payment for small repairs, purchasing of supplies and furniture, utilities, cleaning and janitorial services for the University's buildings.

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