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People and organizations

Borins, Sandford F.

Sandford Borins is Professor of Public Management in the Department of Management, University of Toronto Scarborough, where he was the founding chair, serving in that capacity from 1991 to 2003. He also holds graduate appointments in the Rotman School of Management, School of Public Policy and Governance, and Political Science Department. He has been a visiting professor at the Harvard Kennedy School and the Goldman School of Public Policy, University of California at Berkeley, and Scholar-in-Residence in the Ontario Cabinet Office. He is currently a research fellow at the Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation, Harvard Kennedy School.

He is the author of numerous articles as well as eleven books. The eleven books include Negotiating Business Narratives: Fables from the Information Technology, Automobile Manufacturing, and Financial Trading Industries, with Beth Herst (Palgrave Pivot, 2018), The Persistence of Innovation in Government (Brookings, 2014), Governing Fables: Learning from Public Sector Narratives (Information Age Publishing, 2011), Innovations in Government: Research, Recognition, and Replication (Brookings, 2008), Digital State at the Leading Edge (University of Toronto Press, 2007), “If you build it . . . ” Business, Government, and Ontario’s Electronic Toll Highway, co-authored with Chandran Mylvaganam (University of Toronto Centre for Public Management, 2004), Political Management in Canada, co-authored with Hon. Allan Blakeney, former premier of Saskatchewan (University of Toronto Press, 1998), Innovating with Integrity: How Local Heroes are Transforming American Government (Georgetown University Press, 1998), and The Language of the Skies: The Bilingual Air Traffic Control Conflict in Canada (McGill-Queens University Press, 1983). The Language of the Skies was recognized as one of the twenty best books in English supported by the Social Science Federation of Canada between 1940 and 1990.

Professor Borins has had a wide range of professional experience. He is a frequent conference speaker on public sector innovation and on narrative. He was a member of the board of directors of the Ontario Transportation Capital Corporation, responsible for developing Ontario’s Highway 407. He was the President of the Canadian Association of Programs in Public Administration from 2003 to 2007.

He did his undergraduate studies at Harvard, where he graduated magna cum laude, was elected to Phi Beta Kappa, and received a Woodrow Wilson Fellowship. He then took a Master in Public Policy at the Kennedy School of Government, and received his Ph.D. in Economics at Harvard.

Masucci, Lorraine

  • Person
  • 1924-2018

Sister Lorraine Masucci, RSM (Sister M. Cephas) was born on April 20, 1924. She received her BS in Education from St. Bonaventure College and an MS in Religious Education from Seattle University in Washington. Teaching ministries were at Our Lady of Mt. Camel, St. Mary's, Corning, & St. Louis. She later served as pastoral assistant at St. Paul of the Cross Parish, Honeoye Falls, before moving to Atlanta, Georgia where she was an adult religious education coordinator in the Diocese of Atlanta. She died on November 23, 2018.

Till, Paul

  • Person
  • 1953-

Paul Till was born in London, England in 1953. He immigrated to Canada at age four. He has always had an interest in photography, taking high school art and building his own darkroom to experiment with various ways of manipulating photographs. Here he practiced solarisation, and hand colouring of black & white prints.

In 1974, Till took photographs at the Bob Dylan concert at Maple Leaf Gardens. After extensive manipulation of the images, he sent them to Dylan, who in turn enjoyed them so much he used one for the cover of "Blood on the Tracks" (1975). Doing the same thing at Dylan’s 1975 concert, the photos made their way onto the cover of the book “Bob Dylan: Songs 1966-1977”.

After this success Till's work began to grow. He has continued to shoot album covers, posters, and stage backdrops, especially for musical acts signed with El Mocambo Records. Till has also worked as a freelance photographer for NOW Magazine, beginning in 1982. Because of this position he’s been able to document the Toronto music scene, while also trying new subjects like architecture and art. His work has been exhibited around the world, and some of his work resides in the National Gallery of Canada.

Samuel, Julian

  • Person
  • 1952-

Julian Samuel was born in Lahore, Pakistan in 1952. His family immigrated to Canada from England. Samuel studied English Literature at Trent University, then completed a Master of Fine Arts in photography at Concordia University.
Samuel is an artist of many mediums. A small selection of his visual work resides at the National Gallery of Canada. He is perhaps best known as a documentary filmmaker, with a focus on the race and politics in culture and nationalism. Some of his most popular films include Atheism (2006), Save and Burn (2004) and The Library in Crisis (2002). Samuel is also the author of various published works, including a book of poetry, novels, non-fiction, and academic articles.
He has taught courses on film at both John Abbott College and Concordia during the 30 year period he lived in Montreal. Today, Samuel lives in Toronto.

Branscombe, Gena

Gena Branscombe was born in Picton, Ontario on November 4, 1881. She was a composer and conductor, and left Canada in 1897 to study and work in the United States. Her piano pieces, songs, and choral and orchestral works were published and performed in both countries. In 1934, she founded The Branscombe Choral (1934-1954) in New York, for whom she composed and arranged works. The choir also premiered various musical works by other female composers. Branscombe died in New York on July 26, 1977.

Curran, Andy

  • Person

Andy Curran has been in the Canadian music scene since his beginning with the band Coney Hatch in 1982. Curran was a founding member, playing with Dave Ketchum, Steve Shelski, and Carl Dixon. Together they released three albums: Coney Hatch (1982), Outta Hand (1983), and Friction (1985). After the band broke up in 1985, Curran formed Soho 69 as the lead singer and bassist. Though the band included Michael Borkosky, Simon Brierley, Glenn Milchem, and later Eddie Zeeman, their debut album was titled Andy Curran (1990). They released a second album, Scatterbrain (1993), and in 1998, they released Caramel, under the band’s new name Caramel. He’s played under the names: Drug Plan, Trailer Park, and Leisureworld. Coney Hatch reunited in 2010, and released a new album, Four, in 2013. Curran never left the music world, as he’s composing music for TSN, CTV, and Inside Sports.

Lambert, George James

  • OTUFM Local
  • Person
  • 1900-1971

George (James) Lambert, baritone and teacher, was born in Long Preston, Yorkshire, England, on December 17, 1900, and died in Toronto on the September 13, 1971. In 1932, Lambert joined the teaching staff of the Toronto Conservatory of Music (TCM); he taught there until his death.

Stoneman, John

  • Person
  • 1939-

John Stoneman was a Canadian underwater filmmaker and conservationist. His career spans four decades, and has garnered many awards.

Stoneman was born in 1939 in Devonshire, England. His first step into film was with Pinewood Studios in 1957, then in 1963 he joined BBC as a director/cinematographer for the underwater documentary film “The Indian Ocean”. His career continued as a second unit action director on documentaries.

In 1971 Stoneman went to Canada to take a job as an assistant director. While there, he met CBC’s John Hirsch, and Stoneman’s future wife Sarah. It was she who helped convince Stoneman to stay in Canada. Together they created the production company Mako Films Ltd.

Mako Films created material for National Geographic, BBC, PBS, while also doing independent work. Stoneman’s career continued to grow, directing the first IMAX underwater film “Nomads of the Deep” (1979). One of his biggest successes was the CTV series “The Last Frontier”, with over 100 episodes. He later worked with CBC for the production of “The Ocean World of John Stoneman: The Canadian Odyssey”. Due to his long career, Stoneman’s library of underwater footage is extensive. He and his wife were also the founders of the Foundation for Ocean Research which recognized work in marine environment and ran from 1975-2004.

Morton, Desmond

Desmond Dillon Paul Morton was born in Calgary in 1937 to a family with a tradition of military service. On his father’s side, his great-grandfather, Sir William Dillon Otter, led the column of the Canadian forces that marched on Battleford during the North-West Rebellion of 1885 and later captured Chief Poundmaker. In 1899 he commanded the first contingent of soldiers sent to the South African War. Desmond’s father, Ronald Edward Alfred, began his military career in Winnipeg and served in the Canadian Army during World War II, where he commanded the Fort Garry Horse, a tank regiment, from 1940 to 1944. In 1950, as the recently appointed commander of the Army Prairie Command, he oversaw the joint military-civilian fight to save Winnipeg during its massive flood. In 1952 he was appointed head of Canada’s Far East Military Mission in Japan, and in 1954 was sent to Laos as the first military adviser to Canada’s truce team in Indo-China. (After his death in 1976, Dr. Morton established a prize in his honour to Erindale College.) On his mother’s side, Dr. Morton was descended from the loyalist aid-de-camp of Benedict Arnold during the latter’s brief period of service for Britain during the American Revolution.

Morton grew up leading the typical life of an ‘army brat’, moving frequently – his schooling began in Canada but he graduated from high school in Japan. Given this background, it is not surprising that he developed an interest in military history. He is currently Canada’s pre-eminent military historian, following a tradition laid down a generation earlier by C. P. Stacey.

His official association with the military began in 1954 when he began a five-year stint as an officer cadet. In 1959 he was commissioned as a lieutenant in the Canadian Army and was promoted to captain in 1962. In 1961 he was stationed at Depot Company, Royal Canadian Army Service Corps, at Camp Borden, Ontario, where he trained recruits for Basic. The next year, he was put in charge of the Officer Candidate Program (with Jack Granatstein as his junior) in the Officer Training Company at the Service Corps School. Between 1963 and 1974, he was employed as an historical officer in the Historical Section of the National Defence Headquarters in Ottawa.

At the same time, Morton was acquiring a formal education. This began with a diploma at the College Militaire de St-Jean in St. Hyacinthe, Quebec (1957) and was followed with a BA (1959) from the Royal Military College in Kingston, Ontario. Morton then went to Oxford University as a Rhodes Scholar, where he received his second BA in 1961, followed by an MA in 1966. He then took his doctorate at the University of London, graduating in 1968. His doctoral thesis, ‘Authority and policy in the Canadian Militia, 1868-1904’ was supervised by the eminent historian, Kenneth Bourne, of the London School of Economics and Political Science.

While in Ottawa, Morton served as visiting assistant professor at the University of Ottawa (1968-1969) and Western Ontario (1970-1971). In 1969 he was appointed assistant professor in history at Erindale College, University of Toronto, and settled in Mississauga. He was promoted to the position of associate professor in 1975. During his sabbatical term in 1975 he was visiting associate professor at the University of Michigan, and on his return was promoted to full professor. At the same time he took on increased administrative duties at Erindale College as associate dean. The next year he as also appointed vice-principal, academic and held both positions until 1979. From 1986 to 1994 he served as principal of Erindale College. Beginning in 1979, Dr. Morton also annually delivered a series of lectures at the Canadian Forces Staff College in Toronto; a few years later he began doing the same for the Canadian Forces Staff School. In 1994 he left the University of Toronto to become director of the McGill Institute for the Study of Canada in Montreal.

In addition to his academic and administrative activities, he has served on a number of professional associations and on committees and groups, often as president or chair, and a consultant to government. His active participation in the Canadian Historical Association, the Canadian Commission on Military History, and the journal History and Social Science Teacher began in the mid-1970s. Dr. Morton has been a frequent consultant to the Department of National Defence, most recently in the restructuring of the military following the Somalia inquiry, and to other federal agencies. At the provincial level he has advised on the teaching of history and on the role of private schools and universities in Ontario (he has adamantly opposed the creation of private universities). His involvement with community organizations has been with those in the areas in which he has resided, principally the Region of Peel.

Politics has always been one of Dr. Morton’s passions and for many years it constituted a major part of his activities. In the mid-1960s he was an employee at the Ontario wing of the party and from then to the mid-1980s he was an active supporter of the New Democratic Party at the federal and provincial levels. He also played an active role in municipal politics in Mississauga, Ontario. (A detailed description of his activities may be found in the introduction to series 8.) In his various roles he helped to formulate party policies and wrote party briefs and reports. He also designed and wrote pamphlets and in 1978 was the standard bearer in his constituency for the anticipated federal election; when it did not materialize, other commitments forced him to step aside. At the municipal level, he was active in Hazel McCallion’s election campaigns during her long tenure as mayor of Mississauga.

Dr. Morton’s standing as a military historian and his interest in political and social issues are reflected in his voluminous writings. He has authored or co-authored over 35 books, some of which, such as his Illustrated History of Canadian Labour, The Short History of Canada, and A Military History of Canada have gone through several editions. Though many of his books have had military themes (and have met with critical and popular acclaim), those on social and political issues have also proved popular. In recent years, Dr. Morton has also turned his attention to constitutional issues and has written books aimed at young people. In addition to books, he has written numerous articles in academic journals, and many for non-academic ones. He has also found time to pen regular columns in newspapers such as the Toronto Star, Ottawa Citizen, the Mississauga Times (and News) and in the United Church Observer.

Dr. Morton early saw the value of moving images as a teaching and information tool. Between 1973 and the end of the 1980s, he produced a series of video accounts of issues in Canadian history relating to war, immigration, and labour. In recent years, some of these have been recast in CD-ROM format. He has, in addition, been an advisor to and participant in programmes produced by TV Ontario, and an occasional commentator on radio. He has also been a frequent speaker at academic, military and other functions.

1954-1959 Officer Cadet
1959-1962 Lieutenant, Canadian Army
1961-1963 Instructor Royal Canadian Army Service Corps School
1963-1964 Historical Officer National Defence Headquarters, Historical Section, General Staff
1964-1968 Assistant Provincial Secretary, New Democratic Party of Ontario
1968-1969 Visiting Assistant Professor, University of Ottawa
1969-1971 Assistant Professor, University of Toronto
1970-1971 Visiting Assistant Professor, University of Western Ontario
1971-1975 Associate Professor, University of Toronto
1975 Visiting Professor, University of Michigan
1975- Professor of History, University of Toronto
1975-79 Associate Dean, Erindale College
1976-1979 Vice-Principal, Academic, Erindale College
1986-1994 Principal, Erindale College
1994-2001 Director, McGill Institute for the Study of Canada
1997 - Professor of History, McGill University
1999 - Professor Emeritus University of Toronto

World of Comedy Film Festival

  • Corporate body
  • 2003-2010

The World of Comedy Film Festival was founded by Carla Nolan (1957-2017) in 2003. The Toronto based festival was unique in that there were only two other comedy film festivals in the world when it began. Nolan wanted to create the festival so as to offer “some much needed laughter in the middle of winter”. The World of Comedy Film Festival became the showcase for both Canadian and international filmmakers, especially shorts which often took center stage at the festival.

Johnstone, John Francis

John Francis Johnstone was born on November 25, 1838 in Kirkburton, near Huddersfield, in West Yorkshire. His father William was a tea merchant; his mother was Anne Whitehead.

In official birth registration documents for his children, J.F. is described as a teacher, but it is not known whether he taught just music. According to family lore, his future wife, Mary Curtis was at boarding school where she was sent by her parents who lived in Jamaica (Timothy Curtis was a Methodist minister/missionary who spent his career in Jamaica, moving from parish to parish). However, Mary Curtis was 18 at the time of her marriage, and in spite of family tradition was probably not a schoolgirl when she wed Frank. The family appears to have moved around a bit but always within the small circle of Bradford and its environs. Mother to five children, Mary Curtis died in 1877, three years after the last child was born, and soon afterwards J.F. married Catherine McGregor who was born in Scotland, and according to the census of 1881 was ten years older than her husband. In 1880 the family emigrated to Toronto where J.F. is described in the 1881 census as a music teacher. According to family lore Catherine returned to Britain.

J.F.’s obituary in the February 25, 1913 issue of The Toronto Daily Star gives further details of his life. “Mr. Johnstone was a well-known figure in musical circles in Toronto during the past 35 years. He had for many years his studio at the corner of Spadina Avenue and College Street. He was organist of Broadway Tabernacle and Christ Church, Lippincott and College, for a number of years. He was organist of Surrey Lodge, S.O.E. [Sons of England], of which he was a member for thirty years and was secretary of the Hospital Committee for the Sons of England for a number of years. In this work, which took him into the hospitals, his kindness and cheery face made him beloved by all who came in contact with him.”

J.F. Johnstone is given an entry in The Encyclopedia of Music in Canada, and although some of the facts about his early life are incorrect, the text does mention that “he was associated with the CNE” and “taught privately.”

What is not mentioned in reminiscences or in documents is the many compositions and songs that J.F. wrote (just the music – not the words). These were published for voice, or piano or both, and usually in collaboration with the poet/publisher John Imrie.

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