Showing 4909 results

People and organizations

Brady, Elizabeth

  • Person
  • 1945-2017

Elizabeth Brady (known professionally as Liz Brady) was born 3 June 1945 in Toronto and was the daughter of James Anderson Brady and Dorothy O’Connell. She attended Burlington High School and later the University of Western Ontario for both her B.A (Hons) (1967) and her M.A (1969). Brady received her Ph.D at the University College of London, England on
Virginia Woolf in 1972.

Brady was an active writer, both academic and fiction, and editor. She wrote book reviews between 1974 and 1978 and was an editorial member of the Fireweed collective from 1978-1980 and the managing editor of Canadian Woman Studies from 1984-1989, 1991-1992. She was the author of Tintype (Fiddlehead Poetry Books, 1977), Marian Engel and Her Works (ECW Press, 1987) and the Jane Yeats mystery series: Sudden Blow (1998), Bad Date (2001), and See Jane Run! (2004, Second Story Press). Sudden Blow received the Arthur Ellis Award for Best First Novel in 1999. Elizabeth Brady died in 2017.

Chelvanayakam, Samuel James Velupillai

  • https://viaf.org/viaf/113941416/#Chelvanayakam,_Samuel_James_Velupillai,_1898-1977
  • Person
  • 1898-1977

Samuel James Velupillai Chelvanayakam was born in Ipoh, Malaysia on 31 March 1898 to Viswanathan Velupillai, a businessman, and Harriet Annamma Kanapathipillai. He moved to Tellippallai, Sri Lanka, with his mother, two brothers, and sister (only his brother E. V. Ponnuthurai survived past childhood) in order to receive his early education at Union College, Tellipalai for eight years. From then he studied for five years at St. Johns College, Jaffna, and then to St. Thomas’s College, Mount Lavinia. Chelvanayakam graduated from the University of London as an external student in 1918 with a degree in Science. In 1927 he married Emily Grace Barr-Kumarakulasinghe. They had four sons and one daughter.

He was a teacher at St. Thomas’s College until moving to Wesley College in 1919 to teach Mathematics. He later became the Head of the Science Department. He attended lectures at the Law College and sat for the law examinations at the Law College while he was still teaching at Wesley College. Chelvanyakam started his legal career in the Court of Requests in Colombo. He set up a private practice first in Hultsdorp and later in St. Sebastian Hill. From the Court of Requests, Chelvanayakam moved to the District Court and later to the Appellate Courts. He was made Queen’s Counsel on 31st May 1947.

Chelvanayakam then left his practice and joined politics as a primary organizer of the All Ceylon Tamil Congress (ACTC) in 1944. He was elected as a member of Parliament for the first time in September 1947. On 18 December 1949, Chelvanayakam launched the Ilankai Thamil Arasu Kadchi (ITAK, also known as the Federal Party) along with E. M. V. Naganathan and V. Navaratnam elected as joint General Secretaries. He was also a director of the Tamil newspaper Suthanthiran (Freedom).

Chelvanayakam was known by Tamils as Thanthai Chelva (Father Chelva) because of his interest in safeguarding the identity and interests of Tamil people.

Together with the Prime Minister of Sri Lanka he signed the Bandaranaike-Chelvanayakam Pact on 26 July 1957 which would request parity for the Tamil language; cessation of colonization on traditional Tamil-speaking homelands; give regional autonomy for the Tamil provinces; and restore the citizenship and rights of the upcountry Tamils (S. J. V. Chelvanayakam and the Crisis of Sri Lankan Tamil Nationalism / A. J. Wilson). On 24 March 1965 he signed the Senanayake-Chelvanayakam Pact which addressed the Tamil Language Special Provisions Act No. 28 of 1958 but this was not passed.

Chelvanayakam’s health declined due to Parkinson’s disease and in 1961 he had surgery in Edinburgh. After suffering from a fall resulting in head injuries in March 1977, Chelvanayakam passed away on 26 April 1977.

Arts and Science Students' Union

  • Corporate body
  • 1972-

The Arts and Science Students’ Union (ASSU) is an organization representing full-time undergraduate students in the Faculty of Arts and Science (FAS) at the University of Toronto, St. George Campus. The core functions of ASSU as an umbrella organization for over 60 course unions are performed by full-time staff and seven executive members. Executives are elected by members of the Council, the governing, legislative body of ASSU that is made up of representatives from each course union. The course unions in turn directly represent students in the various departments and programs within the Faculty of Arts and Science.

ASSU traces its history back to the 1960s with the formation of student-led course unions. Their major aims were to improve the educational experience of undergraduates, and to advocate for increased student involvement in decisions made about faculty promotion and tenure, as well as curriculum and program content. The earliest course unions were funded through the Students’ Administrative Council’s (SAC) Education Commission. In 1972, the Arts and Science Students’ Union was formed to act as the intermediary between SAC and the course unions, and has been independently funded through a direct undergraduate fee levy since 1975.

Aside from providing funding for course unions and the production of the annual Anti-Calendar, ASSU has provided a variety of services to students, including advising on academic grievances, administering scholarships and bursaries, and offering a past test library. It has also engaged with other student groups, community members and university administration and faculty to organize events and to advocate for changes in policies and programs.

Beverley, Jo

  • Person
  • 1947-2016

Jo Beverley is the author of thirty-two published historical romances. She has been the recipient of numerous awards including the Golden Leaf, the Award of Excellence, the National Readers Choice, and a two Career Achievement awards from Romantic Times. She is also a five-time winner of the RITA, the top award of the Romance Writers Of America, and is a member of its Hall of Fame and Honor Roll. Beverley passed away in England in 2016.

Rosenblatt, Joe

  • Person
  • 1933-2019

Rosenblatt, Canadian poet, was born in Toronto in 1933. He has published several books of poetry & fiction. His selected poems, Top Soil, won the Governor General's award for poetry.

Mulhallen, Karen

  • Person
  • 1942-

Karen Ann Mulhallen is a writer, publisher, Professor of English at Ryerson Polytechnic University and the editor-in-chief of Descant. Born May 1, 1942 in Woodstock, Ontario to H.J. Thomas and Edna Anne (neé Naylor), Mulhallen was educated at Waterloo Lutheran University (B.A. 1963) and the University of Toronto (M.A. 1967, Ph.D. 1975).

Mulhallen was Lecturer at Ryerson from 1966, and became a Professor in 1971. Her area of scholarly expertise is 18th century English art. She is the author of several books of poetry, a work of travel fiction, and articles on the literary and visual arts in Canadian journals and magazines, including Blewointment, Quarry, and The White Wall Review. She was the Poetry Review Editor and the Arts Feature Editor for Canadian Forum (1974-1979), and has edited several collections of poetry, travel writing, and criticism for Somerville House Publishers. As editor-in-chief, Mulhallen has made Descant one of Canada's

Mulhallen was a finalist in the CBC Literary Awards (1989) and the CBC-Saturday Night Literary Awards (1994), and won the Maclean Hunter Arts Journalism Fellowship (1994), and the Hawthornden Castle Fellowship (1996). She was the Sarwan Sahota Distinguished Professor at Ryerson (1998), and has received various other grants and fellowships. She has also been a grants and awards adjudicator, and has made numerous public readings and broadcasts for television and radio.

Gibson, Graeme

  • Person
  • 1934-2019

Graeme Gibson was born in London, Ont. in 1934. He studied at the University of Western Ontario and later taught at Ryerson. He has travelled widely, living abroad in England, France, and elsewhere. In 1959 he married Shirley Gibson, who later became President of Anansi Press (1972-1974). In 1969 his first novel, Five Legs, was published by Anansi Press, followed by his second, Communion, in 1971. In the 1970's he became active in various cultural organizations. He was a founding member of the Writer's Union of Canada, serving as its chairman in 1974/75. In 1975 he helped to establish the Book and Periodical Development Council, which he chaired the following year. He has also been chairman of the Writer's Development Trust. In 1973 he edited a collection of interviews entitled: Eleven Canadian Novelists, published by Anansi Press. In 1978 he was awarded a Scottish Canadian Exchange Fellowship. In 1982 he published his third novel, Perpetual Motion and in 1993, Gentleman Death. In 1996, he decided to stop writing novels and has since published two non-fiction books: The Bedside Book of Birds (2005) and the Bedside Book of Beasts (2009). He lives in Toronto with Margaret Atwood.

University of Toronto Press Incorporated

  • Corporate body
  • 1901-current

Founded in 1901, University of Toronto Press (UTP) is Canada's leading scholarly publisher and one of the largest university presses in North America. UTP has published over 6,500 books, with well over 3,500 of these still in print. The Scholarly Publishing division produces approximately 175 titles per year, and the Higher Education division publishes around 25 titles per year. The Press has published dozens of notable authors, including Northrop Frye, Robertson Davies, Harold Innis, Marshall McLuhan, Yousuf Karsh, Michael Bliss, Carl Berger, Umberto Eco, and Julia Kristeva, and has produced some of the most important books ever published in Canada, such as the Historical Atlas of Canada, the Dictionary of Canadian Biography, the Encyclopedia of Canada’s Peoples, and the History of the Book in Canada. With the publication of these landmark titles, as well as a continuing dedication to groundbreaking new scholarship, UTP has firmly established its reputation for excellence. - from http://www.utpress.utoronto.ca/aboutus.php?sectionID=2&subsectionID=1&pageID=1

Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto. Northwestern Field Centre

  • Corporate body
  • 1970-current

Established in 1970, the Northwestern Filed Centre is the OISE/UT teaching, outreach, and research campus in Thunder Bay.
Field Centres make OISE / UT unique among North American universities. Located in Kitchener, Peterborough, and Thunder Bay, the Field Centres provide OISE/UT with a physical presence across Ontario. The Field Centre provide off-campus sites for courses in both graduate and Continuing Education Programs and serve as the OISE?UT contact point for students in the regions. Further, through Program-Based Field Development projects, the Field Centres link the curriculum and professional development needs of school boards with OISE/UT graduate studies, continuing education, research, and development activities.
The Mandate of the Northwestern Field Centre is to conduct field development projects with local practitioners in order to ensure that initiatives such as site based management, school councils, and new curriculum policy and programs are implemented in a manner consistent with the context and culture of the North. Further, through partnerships with the Northern School Resource Alliance and the local school districts, the Northwestern Field Centre also focuses on the development of leadership at the school and district levels. Finally, the Centre's faculty teach courses on class curriculum.

University of Toronto. Real Estate Operations

  • Corporate body
  • ca. 2000s

Real Estate Operations fell under the the Office of the Vice-President, Business Affairs, and included the Chief Real Estate Officer, the Director of Capital Projects, and the Manager of Design and Engineering. The mandate of the University of Toronto's Real Estate Operations office was taken over by the Office of University Planning, Design and Construction.

University of Toronto. Department of Medical Art Service

  • Corporate body
  • 1925-1945

In 1925, Maria Torrence Wishart (1893–1983), who had studied with Max Brödel at Johns Hopkins University, founded the Department of Medical Art Service in the Anatomy Building (now the McMurrich Building) at the University of Toronto. The Dean of the Faculty of Medicine approved her appointment as the first professionally trained medical illustrator.

In 1945, Wishart founded a 3-year diploma course in medical illustration, at which time the name of the department changed to Art as Applied to Medicine (AAM).

MacMillan, Ernest, Sir

  • https://viaf.org/viaf/275654
  • Person
  • 1893-1973

Sir Ernest MacMillan, conductor, organist, pianist, composer, educator, writer, administrator, was born in Mimico (Metropolitan Toronto) on August 18, 1893, and died in Toronto on May 6,1973. He was one of the most influential Canadian musicians of the middle 20th century.

Feldbrill, Victor

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/14957048
  • Person
  • 1924-2020

Victor Feldbrill, Canadian conductor and violinist, was born on April 4, 1924 and died June 17, 2020 in Toronto, Ontario. He was a champion for new compositions by Canadian composers, conducting numerous premieres throughout his long and distinguished career.

Feldbrill studied with various violinists, conductors, music theorists, and composers, including: Sigmund Steinberg (violin, 1936-1943); John Weinzweig (1939, theory); and, Ettore Mazzoleni at the Toronto Conservatory of Music (TCM) (conducting, 1942-1943). During World War One, he served with the Royal Canadian Navy (1943-1945) and played violin in Meet the Navy. While stationed in London, England, he studied continued his studies with Herbert Howells (harmony and composition) at the Royal Conservatory of Music and Ernest Read at the Royal Academy of Music (conducting). After returning to Canada, he continued his studies with Kathleen Parlow (violin, 1946-1949), at Tanglewood (conducting, summer 1947), with Pierre Monteux (conducting, summers 1949 and 1950), with Willem van Otterloo (conducting, summer 1956), and with Meinhard von Zallinger (conducting, summer 1956).

As a violinist, he appeared as concertmaster with the Royal Conservatory of Music Symphony Orchestra and Opera Company (1945-1949); first violin with the Toronto Symphony Orchestra (TSO) (1949-1956); first violin with the CBC Symphony Orchestra (1952-1956). He also appeared as a guest conductor with the CBC Symphony Orchestra during this time.

His conducting career began in 1942, when he conducted the University of Toronto Symphony Orchestra (TSYO) (1942-1943). He made his conducting debut with the TSO on March 30, 1943. From 1945 to 1949, he was assistant conductor of the Royal Conservatory of Music Symphony Orchestra and Opera Company (where he was also concertmaster). In the 1950s, he founded and conducted the Canadian Chamber Players (1952), appeared as a conductor and violinist for various CBC radio and TV programs, was assistant conductor of TSO (1956-1957), and conducted the Hart House Orchestra at Brussels World's Fair (1958).

Feldbrill then became conductor of the Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra (1958-1968). In 1968, he returned to Toronto to join the staff at the University of Toronto (1968-1982), where he conducted the University of Toronto Symphony Orchestra, and became a special lecturer (1969) and conductor-in-residence (1972). During this time, he was also the TSO's director of youth programming (1968-1978) and resident conductor of the TSO (1973-1977). In 1974, he founded the Toronto Symphony Youth Orchestra, which he conducted until 1978.

Feldbrill also conducted and guest-conducted various other Canadian symphony orchestras and events throughout his career, including: the International Conference of Composers at Stratford (1960); the Vancouver International Festival (1961); the National Youth Orchestra (1960-1962, 1964, 1969, 1975); youth orchestras at the Banff Summer Festival for the Arts (starting in 1975); the London Symphony Orchestra (music director, 1979-1981); the Hamilton Philharmonic (1990-1996); CBC orchestras in Edmonton, Vancouver, Winnipeg, and Montreal; various CBC TV productions; the Atlantic Symphony Orchestra; Calgary Philharmonic; Edmonton Symphony Orchestra; Montreal Symphony Orchestra; Quebec Symphony Orchestra; Regina Symphony Orchestra; Saskatoon Symphony Orchestra; Vancouver Symphony Orchestra; National Arts Centre Orchestra (NACO); the University of Toronto Opera Department; and the Canadian Opera Company (COC). Notably, he conducted the premiere performances by the COC of Louis Riel by Harry Somers (1967) and Heloise and Abelard by Charles Wilson (1973).

Outside of Canada, he guest conducted various orchestras in the USSR (1963, 1966-1967); United Kingdom (annual appearances as a guest conductor for the BBC starting in 1957); and the Czech Republic (1993-2003). He was the first Canadian guest conductor at the Tokyo National University of Art and Music in 1979, where became a professor (1981-1987) and principal conductor of the Geidai Philharmonia. He was also the first Canadian to guest conduct the Philippine Philharmonic Orchestra (1984) and to guest conduct and lecture in China (Peking and Shenyang, 1987).

His contributions to music have been recognized by various awards, including the first Canada Music Citation from the Canadian League of Composers (1967), City of Tokyo medal (1978), first recipient of the Roy Thomson Hall award (1985), Officer of the Order of Canada (1985), Order of Ontario (1999), University of Toronto's Distinguished Visitor Award (1999), and ambassador of the Canadian Music Centre (2009).

Weinzweig, John

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/74658981
  • Person
  • 1913-2006

Weait, Christopher

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/488149294285080521410
  • Person
  • 1939-

Wilson, Charles

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/105879309
  • Person
  • 1931-

Karam, Frederick

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/44565740
  • Person
  • 1926-1978

McIntyre, Paul

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/264269046
  • Person
  • 1931-

Tremblay, Gilles

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/79167897
  • Person
  • 1932-2017

Hurst, George

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/116805700
  • Person
  • 1926-2012

Kaufmann, Walter

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/230545509
  • Person
  • 1921-1980

Matton, Roger

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/54412083
  • Person
  • 1929-2004

Symonds, Norman

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/114551489
  • Person
  • 1920-1998

Mann, Leslie

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/184582774
  • Person
  • 1923-1977

Morley, Glen

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/50679669
  • Person
  • 1912-

Morawetz, Oskar

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/5124664
  • Person
  • 1917-2007

Ridout, Godfrey

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/17488989
  • Person
  • 1918-1984

Betts, Lorne M.

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/103972237
  • Person
  • 1918-1985

Dolin, Samuel

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/27330406
  • Person
  • 1917-2002

Chong, John

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/305872785
  • Person
  • [1954?]-

Cowell, Johnny

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/61156173
  • Person
  • 1926-2018

Davies, Victor

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/69139364
  • Person
  • 1939-

Eggleston, Anne

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/104035530
  • Person
  • 1934-1994

Prévost, André

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/73939127
  • Person
  • 1934-2001
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