Showing 3585 results

People and organizations

Egoyan, Atom

  • Person
  • 1960 -

Atom Egoyan, born on July 19, 1960 in Cairo, Egypt to Armenian parents, is an internationally renowned film director whose films have appeared at several festivals including Cannes and the Toronto International Film Festival along with being nominated for and winning several awards. In 1997 his film The Sweet Hereafter was nominated for two Academy Awards, Best Director and Best Adapted Screening, and it won three awards at that years Cannes Film Festival: the FIPRESCI Prize, the Grand Prize of the Jury, and the Prize of the Ecumenical Jury.

In 1963 Egoyan’s family moved from Egypt to Victoria, British Columbia. In 1978 he enrolled at Trinity College at The University of Toronto where his studies concentrated on international relations. It was at this point in Egoyan’s life when he became interested in his own culture as an Armenian, an interest which would permeate throughout his personal life as well as influencing the subject matter of films like Ararat (2002), a film which concentrated on the Armenian genocide in 1915. Along with becoming a member of the University of Toronto’s Armenian Society he became an active contributor to the school’s newspaper, The Newspaper. It was also at this time in his life when, with funds from the Hart House Program, Egoyan would create his first short film Howard in Particular (1979). Since the creation of his first short film while attending the University of Toronto, and by the end of 2014, Egoyan had directed 14 feature films, 5 of which (Exotica (1994), The Sweet Hereafter, Felicia's Journey (1999), Where the Truth Lies (2005), Adoration (2008), and The Captive (2014)) have been nominated for the Palme d’Or at Cannes. Egoyan continues to make films to this day with his 15th feature film, Remember, set to debut in 2015.

In recognition for his artistic achievements as a Canadian citizen Egoyan, in 1999, was made an Officer of the Order of Canada, the country’s highest civilian honour.

Nahabedian, Harold J.

  • Person

Reverend J. Nahabadian was a member of the Campus Chaplains' Association

O'Connor, John

  • Person
  • 1870-1952

John O'Connor was a Roman Catholic parish priest based in the town of Bradford, Yorkshire. Born on 5 December 1870 in Clonmel, County Tipperary, Ireland, O'Connor was educated by the Franciscans and Christian Brothers until the age of twelve, at which point he left for Douai in Flanders to study at the English Benedictine College. He later studied theology and philosophy at the English College in Rome. He was ordained at St. John Lateran on 30 March 1895. O'Connor served as curate at St. Joseph's in Bradford, England and later at St. Marie's, Halifax, West Vale and St. Anne's, Keighley. From 1909 to 1919 O'Conner was parish priest of Heckmondwike where he helped build the Church of the Holy Spirit. It was in Keighley that O'Connor met the writer G.K. Chesterton in 1904. He would later receive Chesterton into the Roman Catholic faith in 1922. O'Connor served as parish priest at St. Cuthbert's from 1919 until his death. In 1937 he was made Privy Chamberlain to His Holiness. In addition to Chesterton, O'Connor was also associated with the Catholic authors Hilaire Belloc, Maurice Baring and the typographer and engraver Eric Gill. O'Connor published poems, book reviews and prose in English Catholic periodicals and news papers, and also translated the work of French poet Paul Claudel, (including "The Satin Slipper" and "Ways and Crossways") and the philosopher Jacques Maritain's "Art et Scolastique".John O'Connor died in the Sisters' of Mercy Nursing Home at Horsforth on 6 Febraury 1952.

Watson, Sheila

  • Person
  • 1909-1998

Sheila Martin Watson (nee Doherty) was an author, teacher and professor of English, living between 1909 and 1998. Born in New Westminster, British Columbia on October 25 1909, Sheila was the second child of Dr. Charles Edward Doherty and Mary Ida Elwena Martin. Sheila attended St. Ann's Academy in Victoria, B.C. for her elementary and secondary schooling and attended the University of British Columbia, earning a B.A. Honours in English in 1931 and her Academic Teaching Certificate in 1932. In 1933 she received her M.A. in English, her thesis concerning Addison and Steele, editors of the eighteenth-century periodical "The Spectator." Watson would go on to teach in Dog Creek (1934-1935) in Cariboo Country and Langley Prairie High School (1936-1940) in the Fraser Valley and in Duncan on Vancouver Island from 1940-1941, where she met and married the poet and dramatist Wilfred Watson.Marrying December 29, 1941, Sheila remained in Mission City, in the Fraser Valley, where she taught from September 1941 to the spring of 1945. Wilfred remained in Vancouver, completing his undergraduate degree in 1943. Following World War II, the couple settled in Toronto, where Wilfred pursued his M.A. in English at the University of Toronto, while Sheila taught at Moulton Ladies College (1946-1949). The Watsons remained in Toronto from 1945-1948/49. From 1949-1951, Sheila taught at the University of British Columbia, and for the academic year of 1951/52 she taught at a public high school in Powell River, BC. Watson lived with her husband in Calgary from 1952-54, after which they briefly separated but then spent a year in Paris on a Royal Society of Canada fellowship between 1955-1956.Sheila returned to Toronto from September 1956 to August 1961 to pursue her Doctorate of Philosophy at the University of Toronto, supervised by Marshall McLuhan. Her thesis was titled "Wyndham Lewis and Expressionism." Sheila went on to teach at the University of Alberta as a Professor of English, teaching from 1961 to her retirement in August, 1975. From the early 1970s, Watson was a member of several juries of The Canada Council for arts grants and the Governor General's Awards for poetry and fiction. She and her husband moved to Nanaimo, B.C. in 1980, where she continued to advise former students and aspiring writers, and occasionally giving public readings of her work. She died Sunday, February 1, 1998. Watson is best known for her novel "The Double Hook", published in 1959, her series of short stories based around the character of Oedipus and her novel "Deep Hollow Creek", which was written in the 1930s but was not published until 1992, when it was nominated for a Governor General's Award for best new fiction. Watson was also co-founder of the literary journal "White Pelican."

Pett, Douglas Ellory

  • Person
  • 1924-2005

The Rev. Dr. Douglas Ellory Pett died on February 18, 2005. He was Sacrist at Gloucester Cathedral from 1954 to 1958. He was School Chaplain at Gloucester King's School and taught English. His doctoral thesis was based on an examination of the sermons of Cardinal John Henry Newman. As Vicar of Gulval, Penzance, from 1961 to 1966 he first became interested in gardening. The main thrust of his ministry was as resident Chaplain at St. Mary's Hospital, Paddington, London, from 1966 to 1983. In retirement he developed further his interest in horticulture and garden history. This led to the publication of a series of books on the gardens of Cornwall. A frequent visitor to the Isles of Scilly, his research on horticulture and flower growing there were awarded the biennial prize for research in 2004 by the Royal Institute of Cornwall. He published two works on the subject, "Horticulture on the Isles of Scilly" and "The Narcissus Trade, 1870-1950".

Catholic New Times

  • Corporate body
  • 1975 - 2006

Catholic New Times was incorporated by letters patent in the Province of Ontario on December 13, 1976, with the object of promoting the advancement of religion in Canada particularly through the publication and distribution of a Roman Catholic newspaper. (More detailed descriptions of the vision, mission, and objectives of the corporation can be found among the records; see especially File 2007 02 1). A non-profit corporation, it was registered as a charitable organization in 1977. Catholic New Times neither had nor desired an official mandate from, or financial or contractual relationship with, any diocese, bishop, or conference of bishops or any other Catholic institution. Rather, through the publication of the Catholic New Times, it sought to be an alternative and independent Catholic voice in Canada, speaking about local, national, and international news and issues of concern to Catholics. The newspaper was published bi-weekly (20 issues per year) in Toronto from December 2, 1976 to November 26, 2006, at which time paper closed due to declining financial support. Catholic New Times Inc. initially operated using a “collective model ” that consisted of three main groupings: office staff who ran the paper, a working group (“the Collective”) that met bi-weekly to plan issues and set editorial and general policy, and the editorial group (which included staff) that met weekly to generate stories and determine the details of each issue. By September 1982, committees composed of collective members, staff, and volunteers had emerged to handle particular needs: promotion, finance, personnel, and editorial. In 1989 to 1990, the corporation underwent a structural reorganization to form a Membership Group of 25-30 people who then elected a Publishing Group of about 10 people from among themselves. The Membership Group met twice a year, with the business conducted at the fall meeting; the Publishing Group, which also acted as the Board of Directors, met with the editor 10 times per year. Members also sat on one of four committees (Editorial, Finance, Human resources, and Marketing) that met according to its specific needs. When the Catholic New Times ceased publication in November 2006, the Publishing Group decided to retain the incorporated status and the basic governance structures of New Catholic Times in order to remain open to possibilities for future publications. It also decided to maintain the website (www.catholicnewtimes.org) for as long as it is able, as of July 2014 the website is no longer available.

Séguin, Madeleine

  • Person
  • 1968-1993

Madeleine Séguin was the Secretary of the Faith and Sharing Federation from the movement’s inception in 1968 to 1993. She was also Secretary and Treasurer of the North American Committee from 1972-1993.

Rubes, Jan

  • Person
  • 1920 - 2009

Jan Rubeš was a singer, actor and director whose career spanned more than half a century. Born in Volynĕ, Czechoslovakia in 1920, Rubeš was the second son of a local bank manager. Although he had planned to follow his brother into medicine, his studies were interrupted by the closure of the Faculty of Medicine at Charles University by the German occupying forces during World War II. Rubeš transferred to the Prague Conservatory, where he studied under Hilbert Vavre and launched a career as a promising basso. In 1948, while representing Czechoslovakia at the International Music Festival in Geneva, Switzerland, Rubes sought and was granted political asylum in Canada. In 1950, he married fellow singer and actress Susan Douglas, who would remain his partner for the next six decades (and with whom he would have three children).

Rubeš was a soloist with the CBC Opera (1949-1958), and an original member of the Opera Festival Company of Toronto (later the Canadian Opera Company). He appeared more than 1,000 times in over 50 Canadian Opera Company productions, and participated in some 20 national tours. He also performed as guest soloist with opera companies in Frankfurt, Mexico, Central America, New York City, Detroit, Seattle, and New Orleans.

Between 1953 and 1963, Rubeš appeared as singer and host on CBC’s popular Songs of My People, a program that featured folk music from around the world. He also wrote, produced, acted and directed the TVO television program Guess What (1975), and sang on the CBC radio program Rhapsody with Ivan Romanoff.

Rubeš developed a film career later in life, appearing in more than 100 roles (some of his more memorable films include Witness (1985), One Magic Christmas (1985), The Outside Chance of Maximilian Glick and Deceived (1991). He also appeared on Canadian and US television programs such as The Forest Rangers, The X-Files, King of Kensington, and Due South.

Rubeš won a Gemini Award for his role in Two Men (1989), the Queen’s Jubilee Medal (1978), the Canadian Centennial Medal (1967), and the Earl Grey Award for lifetime achievement in television (1990). He was artist-in-residence at Wilfrid Laurier University in 1981, and taught at the University of Windsor in 1985. In 1998, he was awarded a Honourary Doctor of Letters degree at the University of Windsor. In addition to his success in the performing arts, Rubeš was also a lifelong athlete who excelled in tennis.

Jan Rubeš died in 2009 at the age of 89.

Hirsh, Michael

  • 2003.004, 2008.014
  • Person
  • 1948 -

Michael Hirsh was born in Belgium in 1948. He arrived in Toronto at the age of three, and a decade later the family relocated once more to New York City. While a student at the Bronx School of Science, Hirsh became interested in filmmaking and spent much of his time back in Toronto at York University, working with various partners on a number of live action and animated films. One of those partners was Patrick Loubert.

After graduating, Loubert and Hirsh worked briefly for Cineplast, creating animated sequences for Sesame Street. In 1971, they founded their own company, Laff Arts, which became Nelvana one year later with the arrival of English animator Clive Smith. Nelvana’s earliest years were spent producing short ‘filler’ films (2-4 minute films that could be used to complete an hour of programming when a feature or series film was short) for CBC in addition to whatever contract work they could find. In 1977, the fledgling company produced A Cosmic Christmas; this caught the attention of George Lucas, who hired them to produce a ten-minute animated segment for a Star Wars television special. He subsequently hired Nelvana to co-produce (with his own Lucasfilm Ltd.) two ABC-TV series, Ewoks and Droids. Gradually, the partners at Nelvana evolved into their roles: Loubert became a key administrative figure and co-CEO; Smith became the director of Nelvana’s most important films, and Hirsh asserted himself as Nelvana’s co-CEO and major spokesman for the organization. Nelvana’s period of artistic success ground to a sudden halt when the heavy metal-influenced feature Rock & Rule became a financial debacle; though the film has gone on to achieve cult status, Nelvana could have folded as a result of the film’s failure.

Hirsh persuaded the owners of The Care Bears franchise to have his studio produce their feature film and television series, and The Care Bears effectively saved the company. Nelvana went on to produce some of the most popular children’s series of the 1980s and 1990s, including My Pet Monster, The Adventures of Tintin, Rupert the Bear, Pippi Longstocking, Babar, Franklin, as well as the live action T & T (starring Mr. T.).

Nelvana now has hundreds of employees all over the world, and the company’s backcatalogue includes over 1400 productions. It also now produces both 2D and 3D animation, and its productions are seen in 180 countries. Nelvana was sold to Corus Entertainment in September 2000, and Hirsh resigned his position as CEO in October 2002. Since that time, Hirsh has served as CEO of Cookie Jar Entertainment; he also serves as CEO of the company’s education division, which includes Carson-Dellosa Publishing and HighReach Learning.

Michael Hirsh is the coauthor of The Great Canadian Comics. He lives in Toronto.

Siren, Paul

  • 1999.008
  • Person
  • 1917-2009

Paul Siren was born in Alppila, Ontario on July 19, 1917. Although forced to abandon his formal studies before the commencement of high school, Siren enjoyed a long and prominent career as a trade union leader and organizer. In 1942 Siren was appointed the International Representative of the United Auto Workers (UAW), a position that he held until 1960. From 1960 – 1964, Siren worked as an independent consultant for stakeholders in labour disputes.

After leaving the automobile manufacturing sector, Siren held several key positions in the creative community trade labour union movement. Posts held by Siren during this period include: General Secretary of ACTRA (1965 – 1985), member of the Executive Committee of the International Federation of Actors (1967 – 1985), Chairman of the English speaking group of the International Federation of Actors, (1973 – 1985), executive committee member for the International Federation of Artists, Canadian representative at UNESCO during the drafting of that group’s Recommendations on the Status of the Artist (1980), co-chairman of the Canadian Task Force on the Status of the Artist, and President of the Board of Governors of the Canadian Conference of the Arts (1988-90). Siren also served as a member of the Canadian Association of University Teachers (CAUT) External review Committee from 1985-87.

Siren was the recipient of numerous awards throughout his career including the Association of Cultural Executives (ACE) award in 1990, The Canadian Conference of the Arts’ Diplôme D’Honneur in 1992, and appointment as a Member of the Order of Canada in 1987. Siren died in Toronto on May 31, 2009.

Crelinsten, Jeffrey

  • Person
  • [19?? - ]

Jeffrey Crelinsten is a science writer and historian with over 25 years experience popularizing science for non-specialist audiences. Crelinsten studied physics at McGill University (B.Sc.), astronomy at the University of Toronto (M.Sc.), and history of science at the Université de Montréal (Ph.D.). He was a professor in Science and Human Affairs for six years at Concordia University before embarking on a science writing career. He wrote radio and television science documentaries for over ten years on topics such as stellar evolution, space exploration, artificial intelligence, and microgravity science, including two radio documentaries on relativity for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC).

In 1978-9, Crelinsten wrote a two-hour radio biography of Albert Einstein (for CBC and U.S. National Public Radio), which was broadcast for the centenary of Einstein's birth. He also collaborated on an animated film about special relativity for the National Film Board of Canada.

Crelinsten is co-founder and President of The Impact Group, a Toronto firm specializing in science and technology communications, education and policy. He is co-publisher of RE$EARCH MONEY, Canada's leading source of intelligence on R&D spending, and President of Research Infosource, publisher of Canada's Top 100 Corporate R&D Spenders and Canada's Top 50 Research Universities. He is a past-president of the Canadian Science Writers Association, a former Director of the Youth Science Foundation, and a founding member of the Science and Technology Awareness Network.

His book "Einstein's Jury: The Race to Test Relativity" is published by Princeton University Press. His radio biography "Albert Einstein: The Human Side of Genius" was broadcast by CBC Radio in two parts on Ideas on June 2 and 3, 2005 and is available on CD.

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