Showing 589 results

People and organizations
University of Toronto Music Library

Weait, Christopher

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/488149294285080521410
  • Person
  • 1939-

Christopher (Robert Irving) Weait is a bassonist, teacher, and composer. He was co-principal bassoonist of the Toronto Symphony (1968-1985), and was a member of the Toronto Winds (formerly known as the Toronto Woodwind Quintet), the Toronto Baroque Trio, Canzona Trio, and the Toronto Chamber Winds (1979-1985). He taught at the University of Toronto from 1973 to 1984.

Weinzweig, John

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/74658981
  • Person
  • 1913-2006

John Weinzweig, composer, teacher, and administrator, was born in Toronto on March 11, 1913 and died in Toronto August 24, 2006. He studied at the University of Toronto, where he studied with Healey Willan, Leo Smith, and Sir Ernest MacMillan. In 1934, he founded the Universtiy of Toronto Symphony Orchestra, which he conducted until 1937. In 1952, he was appointed to the Faculty of Music, where he taught until his retirement in 1978. Throughout the 1980s, he gave guest seminars, workshops, and residencies.

Schafer, R. Murray

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/78771967
  • Person
  • 1933-2021

R. Murray Schafer attended the Royal Conservatory of Music and the University of Toronto from 1952 to 1955, where he studied with Alberto Guerrero (piano), Greta Kraus (harpsichord), John Weinzweig (composition), and Arnold Walter (musicology). He was a visiting composer at the University of Toronto in 2001.

Goddard, Peter

  • Local
  • Person
  • 1943-2022

Peter Darwin Goddard studied at the University of Toronto Faculty of Music, receiving his Bachelor of Music (1967) and Master of Music (1971). His teachers included Margaret Butler (piano), Mieczyslaw Kolinski (musicology), and Gustav Ciamaga (electronic music). He was a pop music critic for various newspapers and magazines, and was the author of several music books.

Monohan, Thomas

  • Local
  • Person
  • 1937-1994

Thomas (Tom) Monohan, double bass, joined the teaching staff at the University of Toronto Faculty of Music in 1967.

Fisher, Constance L.

  • https://viaf.org/viaf/92579748
  • Person
  • 1928-2023

Constance Fisher, stage director, soprano, was born in Hamilton, Ontario October 3, 1928. She studied with Alberto Guerero (piano), and Weldon Kilburn and Irene Jessner (voice) at the Royal Conservatory of Music in Toronto, and with Herman Geiger-Torel and the Opera School. In 1972, she became the stage director and instructor of the University of Toronto Opera Division, and then divisional co-ordinator and resident stage director in 1978. She was married to conductor and coach William James Craig. Fisher passed away on May 10, 2023.

Lysenko, Boris

  • Local
  • Person
  • d. 2017

Boris Lysenko, piano, joined the University of Toronto Faculty of Music in 1981 and was made an adjunct professor in 1986.

McIntyre, Paul

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/264269046
  • Person
  • 1931-2020

Paul (Poirier) McIntyre was born in Peterborough, Ontario on October 1, 1931. He was a composer, pianist, conductor, and administrator.

He attended the University of Toronto Faculty of Music, where he received a Bachelor of Music (1951), Artist Diploma (1952), and Doctor of Music (1958). His teachers included Eileen McManamy, Eric Rollinson, Oskar Morawetz, Arnold Walter, Bela Böszörmenyi-Nagy, Alexander Uninsky, Tony Aubin, Olivier Messiaen, Igor Markevitch, Sixten Ehrling, Wolfgang Sawallisch, and Pierre Monteux.

McIntyre taught at the University of Minnesota (1964-1967) and the University of Windsor (1970-1996), where he was also Director of the Music Department (1970-1980).

McIntyre passed away on November 4, 2020.

Wilkins, Rick

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/79736169
  • Person
  • 1937-

Rick (Herbert Richard) Wilkins is a Canadian arranger, composer, conductor and tenor saxophonist. Born in Hamilton, Ontario on February 1, 1937, he played in and arranged for various dance bands in Hamilton and Burlington before moving to Toronto in 1957. In Toronto, he performed with Benny Louis' dance band among others, and was an arranger for Jack Kane's CBC orchestra. He briefly studied arranging with Phil Nimmons at the Advanced School of Contemporary Music in Toronto.

Throughout his career, he prepared and conducted music for a number of CBC and CTV specials, including scoring Oscar Peterson's Canadiana Suite for a 1979 CBC TV presentation. During a stint in Los Angeles, he was a music director at CBS TV for a series and several specials featuring the Jackson Five. In addition to his work as an arranger, Wilkins also composed a number of original scores for CBC TV dramas, documentaries, and the opening ceremonies at the Calgary Olympics, to name a few.

As a performer, Wilkins worked with various Toronto studio orchestras and was a member of the Boss Brass, Nimmons 'N' Nine Plus Six, and other ensembles.

Wilkins was named a Member of the Order of Canada in 2002.

CCMC

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/147681489
  • Corporate body
  • 1974-

The Canadian Creative Music Collective, or CCMC as they were known by 1978, is a "free music orchestra" founded in Toronto in 1974. The group was inspired by free jazz and defined themselves as "a composing ensemble... united by a desire to play music that is fluid, spontaneous, and self-regulating."

By the time of their third album (1978), they had developed several hundred interpretations of the acronym CCMC, including Craven Cowards Muttering Curses, Cries Crashes Murmurs Clanks, Careless Choir Muffling Chord, Completely Canadian Monster Circus, Certified Careless Mush Concept, Clip Clop Manure Crop, and Catchy Canuck Melody Convinces. These names are featured on the cover of their third album Volume Three.

CCMC established the Music Gallery in 1976 where they performed twice-weekly until 1983, and then weekly. They were formally associated with the Gallery until 2000. CCMC has also performed on multiple tours in Canada and Europe and at various national and international festivals, and has recorded 11 albums.

CCMC was made up of: Peter Anson, guitar and synthesizer (1974-1979); Graham Coughtry, trombone (1974-1977); Larry Dubin, percussion (1974-1978); Greg Gallagher, saxophones (1974-1977); Nobuo Kubota, saxophones (1974-1994); Allan "Al" Mattes, bass, bass guitar, electronics (1974-1996); Casey Sokol, piano (1974-1988); Bill Smith, saxophones (1974-1977); and Michael Snow, piano, trumpet, guitar, analogue synthesizer (1976-2023); John Kamevaar, drums, electronics (1981-1996); Paul Dutton, vocals (1989-); Jack Vorvis, drums (1994-1996); and John Oswald, alto saxophone (1996-).

Harmantas, Frank

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/2037114
  • Person
  • 1946-2023

Frank Harmantas taught low brass at the University of Toronto Faculty of Music, where he also started and directed the University of Toronto Trombone Choir.

Harmantas received a Bachelor's degree in Music Education from the University of Illinois before joining the United States Army Band as Principal Trombone and Soloist. While in Washington, D.C., he also obtained a Master's Degree in Performance from the Catholic University of America. He also studied at Indiana University and the Eastman School of Music. In 1971, he joined the Toronto Symphony. He has also appeared as principal trombone with the CBC Orchestra, National Ballet Orchestra, and the Hamilton Philharmonic.

Harmantas passed away in Toronto on August 6, 2023.

McPeek, Ben

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/8684779
  • Person
  • 1934-1981

Benjamin Dewey "Ben" McPeek, composer, conductor, arranger, and pianist, was born in Trail, British Columbia on August 28, 1934. He moved to Toronto in 1953, where he studied at the Royal Conservatory of Music of Toronto and the University of Toronto with John Beckwith, Talivaldis Kenins, Oskar Morawetz, Godfrey Ridout, and John Weinzweig. He received his certification as an Associate of the Royal Conservatory of Music (ARCT) in 1954 and his Bachelor in Music in 1956.

McPeek began his musical career playing piano in various Toronto dance bands and singing on CBC with the Five Playboys. In the 1960s, he started composing and directing musical theatre, including Up Tempo 60, That Hamilton Woman, Suddenly this Summer, Actually this Autumn, and the 1968 Spring Thaw. In 1963, he wrote his first opera The Bargain. His musical Joey, co-written with Helen Porter, was produced at the Charlottetown Festival in 1973.

In 1964, McPeek established himself as a jingle writer for television and radio and formed his own company Ben McPeek Ltd. He went on to write 2000 jingles in the 1960s and 1970s. McPeek also composed scores for films, including The Rowdyman (1972), Only God Knows (1974), and the documentary Catch the Sun (1973). In 1979, he formed the Canadian Film Composers Guild with Harry Freedman.

McPeek was also active with popular music, and founded the label Nimbus 9 Productions in 1966 with Jack Richardson. In 1982, he initiated what would become the Imperial Oil McPeek Pops Library, a collection of Canada pop music arranged for symphony orchestra.

His other compositions include a piano concerto, piano sonatas, other solo piano music, music for bras and woodwind quintet, and various orchestral works.

McPeek passed away in Toronto on January 14, 1981.

Faculty of Music Anti-Racism Alliance

  • Local
  • Corporate body
  • 2020-

The Faculty of Music Anti-Racism Alliance (FoMARA) is a student organization which aims to create an equitable and safe environment within the University of Toronto Faculty of Music, empowering the voices of BIPOC members. FoMARA advocates on issues surrounding racism, systemic oppression, and colonialism. Goals of the organization include facilitating student activism, fostering dialogue between students, faculty, and administration, and challenging Eurocentric pedagogy, curriculum content, and performance values within the Faculty of Music.

Blachford, Frank

  • https://viaf.org/viaf/105288766
  • Person
  • 1879-1957

Frank Blachford was a violinist, teacher, conductor, and composer. He was born on December 28, 1879 in Toronto, Ontario and passed away on June 24, 1957 in Calgary, Alberta. He studied at the Toronto Conservatory of Music (TCM) with Bertha Drechsler Adamson and graduated with his ATCM in 1897, before continuing his studies at the Leipzig Conservatory with Hans Sitt and Carl Reinecke, graduating in 1901 with the Helbig prize. He then studied in Geneva, Switzerland with Henri Marteau and in Berlin, Germany. He returned to Canada in 1901 and taught at the TCM until his death. He was also concertmaster of the Conservatory Orchestra (1906-1908) and the Welsman Toronto Symphony Orchestra (1908-1918), and was a first violinist with the Toronto Symphony Orchestra (1932-1946). He also performed as a solo violinist. As a chamber musician, he founded the Toronto String Quartet in 1907; performed with the Schumann Trio (1902-1905), the Conservatory Trio (1926-1928); and, conducted the Conservatory String Orchestra (1914-1925) and the Victoria College Orchestra (1920-1930). In 1932, he formed the Blachford String Symphony, a group of 16 musicians from the Toronto Symphony Orchestra. Blachford's compositions include pedagogical works for violin, and transcriptions of baroque and romantic music for string quartet and orchestra. He also wrote a number of songs.

Conservatory Chamber Music Club

  • Local
  • Corporate body
  • 1937 - ca. 1943

The Conservatory Chamber Music Club of the Toronto Conservatory of Music (TCM) was sponsored by members of the Conservatory Quartet (Elie Spivak, Harold Sumberg, violins; Cecil Figelski, viola; and Leo Smith, cello). They held their first meeting on November 29, 1937 at TCM with William Haehnel, president and Phyllis Parker, secretary. Other members of the initial executive were Molly Sclater, librarian; Emily Baker, rehearsals; and Persis Hebden, convener. The Club aimed to present chamber music rarely heard elsewhere, including a minimum performance a one original Canadian compositions at each meeting. They also formed a Chamber Orchestra of approximately 22-25 members, conducted by a music student (Frank March, 1937-1938; Wilfred Powell, 1938-1939; and Broch McElheran, 1939-1940).

Membership was open to students of TCM and other institutions, and ranged from 65 to 170 people. The Club met monthly throughout the school year (September or October to May), usually at TCM. Meetings included performances and guest lectures and refreshments for informal discussions. In November 1941, after the Musicians' Union decreed that no member could perform at a Club meeting without a fee, the Club turned to "impromptu chamber music," whereby instead of a pre-scheduled program, members would bring their instruments and perform chamber music together ad hoc.

Guest speakers at Club meetings included Leo Smith, Viggo Kihl, Donald Heins, Ettore Mazzoleni, Norman Wilkes, Sir Ernest MacMillan, Frederick Horwood, Hugo Burghauser, and Elie Spivak. Original Canadian compositions included those by Patricia Blomfield, William Haehnel, Robert Manson, C.M. Birkett, Martin Chenhall, Thomas J. Crawford, Walter McNutt, Healey Willan, Godfrey Ridout, Ernest Farmer, John Weinzweig, Godfrey Ridout, Mrs. Piersall, Horace Lapp, George Coutts, Barbara Pentland, Robert Fleming, and Marcus Adeney.

In 1939, Chris Wood took over as president and Elinor K. Doan replaced Phyllis Parker as secretary. Godfrey Ridout was president during the 1942-1943 academic year.

Irwin, Kathleen

  • Local
  • Person
  • 1902-1990

Kathleen Pole Irwin was born on November 23, 1902 in York, Ontario to Charles Irwin and Anna M. Warren. She attended the University of Toronto in the early 1920s and received a Bachelor of Music degree. After graduating, she performed in a two-piano duo with Winnifred Mazzoleni. The duo toured throughout Canada and the United States in the 1930s. She also performed with violinist Florence Richardson and in another two-piano duo Winifred MacMillan. Irwin stopped performing after her marriage in 1939 to Dalton Constright Wells (1900-1982), with a few exceptions. She joined the Women's Musical Club of Toronto (WMC) in 1946 and served in various executive positions, including as President (1955-1957). She retired from WMC in 1964. She passed away on February 16, 1990.

Epstein, Edward

  • Local
  • Person
  • active 1983-

Edward Epstein, an ex-New Yorker, has been active on the Toronto music scene since 1983. He was the owner, curator, and music programmer of Gallery 345, an art gallery and performance space at 345 Sorauren Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, which opened in 2005 and closed in 2019 when the building was sold.

Falck, Robert

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/27114497
  • Person
  • 1937-2023

Robert Falck was born September 14, 1937 in Silver Spring, Maryland. He studied musicology at Brandeis University and in Göttingen as a Fulbright fellow. Falck moved to Toronto in 1967 to accept a teaching position at the University of Toronto Faculty of Music. He served twice as Acting Dean (1981, 1995-6) and once as Associate Dean (1979-83), during his more than thirty years (1968-2003) at the Faculty of Music. He supervised over a dozen PhD dissertations, and many of his students are teaching at universities all over the country. Early in his career he published articles, books and dictionary/encyclopedia articles in the field of medieval music, focusing on polyphonic and monophonic music of the 12th and 13th centuries. In more recent years his research and publication interest shifted to the twentieth century, and he produced a number of published and some unpublished papers especially on Arnold Schoenberg, but also on Alban Berg, Anton Webern and Stefan Wolpe. His teaching largely reflected those diverse interests, but in 1970 he was also the first to teach a course on jazz at this university and probably in all of Canada.

Falck passed away in Toronto, Ontario on December 2, 2023 at the age of 86.

Beckwith, John

  • https://viaf.org/viaf/113215951
  • Person
  • 1927-2022

John Beckwith (born March 9, 1927 in Victoria, British Columbia) is a composer, pianist, author, and teacher. He moved to Toronto in 1945 to study piano with Alberto Guerrero at the Royal Conservatory. He also studied composition in Paris with Nadia Boulanger (1950-1951) and has a Mus.B. (1947) and Mus.M. (1961) from the University of Toronto, where he studied with John Weinzweig, among others. He began lecturing part-time at the University of Toronto in 1952, taught full-time from 1955 to 1990, and was dean of the Faculty of Music from 1970 to 1977. He was also the director for the Institute for Canadian Music at the Faculty of Music and held the Jean A. Chalmers professorship in Canadian music.

His over 160 compositions include four operas, orchestral, chamber, solo and choral works, and he has published critical and scholarly articles in Canadian music studies. He was also a staff (1953-1955) and freelance (1955-1965) script-writer and programmer for Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) music series, and a critic and columnist for the Toronto Star (1959-1962, 1963-1965).

Beckwith holds five honorary doctorates from Canadian Universities, and received the Canadian Music Council’s annual medal (1972) and the Composer of the Year citation (1984), the Toronto Arts award for music (1995), and the Diplome d’honneur of the Canadian Conference of the Arts (1996). He was named a member of the Order of Canada in 1987.

Beckwith passed away in Toronto, Ontario on December 5, 2022.

Columbia-Princeton Electronic Music Centre

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/148930761
  • Corporate body
  • 1958-

The Columbia-Princeton Electronic Music Center (CPEMC) was the first electronic music studio in the United States. The studio was founded by Otto Luening and Vladimir Ussachevsky at Columbia University. They received a Rockefeller Foundation grant (awarded in 1958) to create the studio, which became operational in 1959. Among the many composers who worked on compositions in this studio are Edgard Varese, Milton Babbitt, Jon Appleton, Bulent Arel, Luciano Berio, Wendy Carlos, Mario Davidovsky, Alfred del Monaco, Charles Dodge, Jacob Druckman, Halim El-Dabh, Paul Lansky, Alcides Lanza, Ilhan Mimaroglu, Pauline Oliveros, Ramon Sender, Alice Shields, Pril Smiley, Harvey Sollberger, Diane Thome, Michiko Toyama, and Barry Vercoe. The studio was renamed in Columbia University Electronic Music Center in the late 1980s, and the Columbia University Computer Music Center in 1996. Ussachevsky served as the studio's director from 1958 until 1980, followed by Mario Davidovsky (1980-1994); Fred Lerdahl and Brad Garton (1994-1996); and Brad Garton (1996-present).

Shand, Patricia Martin

  • https://viaf.org/viaf/57880509
  • Person
  • 1942-

Patricia Martin Shand was born in Winnipeg, Manitoba November 29, 1942. She started teaching music education at the University of Toronto Faculty of Music in 1968 and served as acting director of the university's Institute for Canadian Music in 1987. From 1973 to 1991, she was director of the John Adaskin Project.

Carlos, Wendy

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/170421246
  • Person
  • 1939-

Cross, Lowell Martin

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/73902995
  • Person
  • 1938-

Lowell Cross attended the University of Toronto from 1964-1968 as a graduate student in electronic music and musicology. His Bibliography of Electronic Music (University of Toronto Press) and his Toronto thesis, “Electronic Music, 1948-1953” were published during this period. He worked with the late Harry Somers on the 4 channel tape segments for the opera Louis Riel. Lowell later developed laser projection systems culminating in his invention of the “laser light show”. His installation at Expo ’70 , Osaka, Japan was the first major public laser-art projection system, which was seen by over 2,000,000 visitors. He later was Professor of Music and Director of Recording Studios at the University of Iowa.

Mercer, Ruby

  • https://viaf.org/viaf/94113332
  • Person
  • 1906-1999

Ruby Mercer was an American-born Canadian soprano, writer, and broadcaster. She made her debut at the Metropolitan Opera in 1936 and toured North America as an opera, operetta, and musical comedy performer for several years, before becoming the producer and host of WNYC's radio program Mr. and Mrs. Opera (1949-1958) and MBS's The Ruby Mercer Show (1954-1958).

Following her marriage to Geza Por in 1958, they moved to Toronto, where she founded Opera Canada in 1960 and remained its editor until 1990. In 1968, she co-founded the Canadian Children's Opera Chorus with Lloyd Bradshaw. As a radio broadcaster, she hosted Opera Time and its successor Opera in Stereo on CBC radio (1962-1979, 1979-1984).

Mercer also wrote various books, including a biography of Edward Johnson The Tenor of his Time (Toronto, 1976) and The Quilicos: Louis, Gino and Lina (Oakville, 1990).

Mercer was named a member of the Order of Canada in 1995 and received an honorary doctorate from the University of Toronto in the same year. She passed away on January 26, 1999 in Toronto, Ontario.

University of Toronto. Electronic Music Studio

  • https://viaf.org/viaf/125774024
  • Corporate body
  • 1959-

By the late 1950s, Electronic Music had become an accepted academic discipline. It opened new areas of musical experience and extended the modern musicians' traditional range of taste. It created an awareness of the perimeters of musical performance and composition to an extent that was impossible until the techniques and equipment of Electronic Music were developed. In order to make available the results and benefits of the research and instruction in this area, Dr. Arnold Walter, in his capacity as Director, established in May of 1959 the Electronic Music Studio (UTEMS) as an integral and permanent division within the Music Faculty of the University of Toronto. Dr. Hugh Le Caine, of the National Research Council of Canada in Ottawa, was the technical advisor who maintained a dominant role in the technical development of new equipment and studio techniques. The original staff consisted of Dr. Arnold Walter, Professor Harvey Olnick, and Professor Myron Schaeffer.

UTEMS was the second university studio in North America. It followed the creation of the Columbia-Princeton Electronic Music Center in 1958. The New York studio was funded by a grant from the Rockefeller Foundation. The initial proposal suggested a consortium that was to include the University of Toronto studio, but Rockefeller apparently intervened and rejected the plan.

The Electronic Music Studio of the University of Toronto was initially housed in an old house on Division Street, near Spadina and College—now the site of the CAMH building—pending completion of the new Edward Johnson Memorial Faculty of Music Building.

Myron Schaeffer was hired in 1958 to teach musicology and to develop the Electronic Music Studio. Correspondence from 1957-58 indicates that musicologist Harvey Olnick (an American, coming to the faculty via Columbia-Princeton) made enquiries about equipment purchases for the studio.

Following Schaeffer's death in 1965, Professor Gustav Ciamaga became the director of the studio. While Ciamaga was Dean of the Faculty of Music in the mid 80s, the position was passed to Professor Dennis Patrick. Since 2019, UTEMS has been under the direction of Professor Eliot Britton.

Hutcheon, Linda

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/101807260
  • Person
  • 1947-

Linda Hutcheon is a University Professor Emeritus in the University of Toronto Department of English and the Centre for Comparative Literature, where she began teaching in 1988 after receiving her PhD. from the University of Toronto in 1975. Alongside Caryl Clark, she was co-chair of The Opera Exchange and presented over 40 educational symposia on the multi-disciplinary nature of opera.

Clark, Caryl Leslie

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/101624305
  • Person
  • 1953-

Caryl Clark is a retired Professor of Music History and Culture at the University of Toronto and Fellow at Trinity College. She studied music history at the University of Western Ontario (Honours BMus), McGill University (MA) and Cornell University (PhD.). Her research and teaching interests include Enlightenment aesthetics, Haydn studies, gender and ethnicity in opera, the politics of musical reception, piano cultures, Glenn Gould, and music entrepreneurship. Alongside Linda Hutcheon, she was co-chair of The Opera Exchange and presented over 40 educational symposia on the multi-disciplinary nature of opera.

Toronto Wagner Society

  • Local
  • Corporate body
  • 1975-

Founded in 1975 by Dorothy Graziani with the support of Dr. Boyd Neel, the Toronto Wagner Society is a non-profit organization of people with a common love of the music dramas of Richard Wagner. The Society's objective is to encourage interest in, study of, and further presentation of the music-drams of Wagner. The Society meets monthly and organizes various events (lectures, interviews, video screenings, roundtable discussions, debates, and reviews). Their newsletter, Wagner News, is issued to members 3-4 times per year and features articles, reviews, and information about Wagner performances worldwide. The Society also maintains a scholarship to support young singers.

Past chairs of the Society are: Dorothy Graziani (1975-1981); Eric Domville (1981-1985); Hans de Groot (1985-1990); Frances Henry (1990-1996, 2007-); Linda and Michael Hutcheon (1996-1999); Wayne Gooding (1999-2001); Helmut Reichenbächer (1999-2003); Richard Rosenman (2001-2005); Jim Fisher (2003-2007); Yvonne Chiu (2005-2009); and Lorne Albaum (2009-2013).

Centro, Vic

  • Local
  • Person
  • 1924-2007

Jazz accordionist Vic Centro was born in Vancouver, British Columbia and began his career there performing in clubs, on the radio, and on television programs. He was the leader of the Western Serenaders, Vancouver night club and radio entertainers (with Gordon Brand, electric guitar; Mike Ferby, bass guitar, novelty vocalist; George Tait, violin, keyboard; Johnny Lane and Beverley Thorburn, vocalists). While on the West coast, he also toured the Philippines and Okinawa, travelled with the USO, and performed with the Ray Norris Quintet. Later, he performed in Korea with the comedy duo Wayne and Schuster (1953).

In the late 1940s, he moved to Toronto, where he performed with Nimmons 'N' Nine, the Bill Page Orchestra, and his own Vic Centro Sextette. He was also part of the house band for the Billy O'Connor Show, CBC Television Network (1954-1956) with Jackie Richardson, bass and Kenny Gill, guitar.

In 1968, Centro moved to Los Angeles, before moving to Carson City in 1975 and Iowa in 2003.

University of Toronto. Opera Division

  • Local
  • Corporate body
  • 1946-

In the Fall of 1946, Arnold M. Walter, started the Opera School under the auspices of the Senior School of the Royal Conservatory of Music. The University of Toronto Faculty of Music assumed administrative and budgetary responsibilities for the Opera School in 1968 and it was officially renamed the "Opera Department of the Faculty of Music" in 1969, overseen by Chairman Ezra Schabas (1969-1978). In 1978, it became the "Opera Division" under Dean Gustav Ciamaga.

In a brief to the Royal Commission on National Development in the Arts, Letters and Sciences in 1949, Walter described his initial aims for the Opera School: "...as a school it undertakes to train young singers and to make them familiar with all phases of operatic production; as an operatic company, it presents those artists so trained in productions which depend exclusively on Canadian talent."

The School's first full-length production was Smetana's The Bartered Bride (April 1947) at the Eaton Auditorium, following an opera excerpts concert on December 16, 1946 at Hart House Theatre. The School relocated to the Edward Johnson Building when it opened in 1963, and the Opera School performed Albert Herring's Benjamin Britten as part of the opening ceremonies (March 4, 1964) in the MacMillan Theatre, the new home of Opera School productions.

The new facilities offered further opportunities for training and performance, and in 1964, Wallace A. Russell began a course in theatre technology, offering instruction in technical direction, stage and production management, lighting, scenic and costume design. This program was cut in 1974, with a decision from the Ministry of Colleges and Universities that technical theatre training belonged at Ryerson Polytechnical Institute. In 1969, the university introduced a two-year post-graduate professional diploma in operatic performance, and the University of Toronto Symphony Orchestra started accompanying opera productions.

The opera program produced two fully-staged operas per year until 1985, when budgetary restrictions forced a reduction to one per year, supplemented by staged operatic excerpts with piano accompaniment. Its productions include a number of premiere performances, including Raymond Pannell's Aria da capo (1963); the English-language premiere of Humphrey Searle's Hamlet (1969); stage premiere of Healey Willan's Deirdre (1965); and Canadian premieres of Paisiello's Il Mondo della Luna (1962), Orff's Die Kluge (1961), Cherubini's The Portuguese Inn (1966), Holst's The Wandering Scholar (1966), Rossini's The Turk in Italy (1968), Robert Ward's The Crucible (1976), Richard Rodney Bennett's The Mines of Sulphur (1976), Janacek's Katya Kabanova (1977), Paisiello's The Barber of Seville (1977), Vaughan Williams' Sir John in Love (1984), and Tchaikovsky's Iolanta (1989).

The directors, musical directors, and stage directors of the opera program have included: Arnold Walter (director, 1946-1952), Ettore Mazzoleni (director, 1962-1966), Peter Ebert (director, 1967-1968), Anthony Besch (director, 1968-1969), Georg Philipp (director, 1969-1972), Richard Pearlman (director, 1972-1973), Nicholas Goldschmidt (musical director, 1946-1958), Ernesto Barbini (musical director, 1961-1975), James W. Craig (musical director, 1976-1990), Felix Brentano (stage director, 1946-1948), Herman Geiger-Torel (stage director, 1948-1976), Andrew MacMillan (stage director, 1952-1967), Werner Graf (stage director, 1963-1966), Peter Ebert (stage director, 1967-1968), Anthony Besch (stage director, 1968-1969), Leon Major (stage director), Giuseppe Macina (stage director, 1969-1974), Constance Fisher (stage director 1972-1978, coordinator 1978-1983, associate coordinator 1987-), Michael Albano (stage director 1977-1982, coordinator 1983-1987, associate coordinator 1987-), and Sandra Horst (co-director, director).

Shopiro, Leonard

  • Local
  • Person
  • 1930-2000

Leonard "Len" Shoprio was a Toronto musician who played with various army bands (Irish Regiment of Canada, the Queen's Own Rifles, and the RCAF 411 Squadron) as well as his own Lenny Shopiro Rehearsal Band. He also worked as a music teacher for the Metropolitan Separate School Board. Over his lifetime, he developed an extensive music library of arrangements and charts, which he bequeathed to the University of Toronto Music Library.

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/144201535
  • Corporate body
  • 1936-

The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) is Canada's national broadcasting system, created in 1936. It replaced the Canadian Radio Broadcasting Commission (CRBC), established in 1932.

Bodle, Douglas

  • https://viaf.org/viaf/28546875
  • Person
  • 1923-2022

(George Talbot) Douglas Bodle, pianist, harpsichordist, organist, was born in Winnipeg, Manitoba August 7, 1923. He taught piano, harpsichord, and organ at the University of Toronto Faculty of Music from 1969 to 1989, and on a part-time basis in 1990-1991.

Manson, Robert Graham

  • Local
  • Person
  • 1883-1950

Robert Graham Manson was a violinist, violist, pianist, and composer. Born in London, England on July 11, 1883 to James Alexander Manson (journalist and author) and Margaret Emily Deering, Robert G. Manson studied music at the Royal College of Music in London (1900-1903) with Arthur Somervell, Sir Frederick Bridge, and Sir Charles Villiers Stanford. After graduation he stayed in the United Kingdom where he performed with the Scottish Orchestra and London Symphony Orchestra.

By 1911, he was living at a boarding house at 320 Spadina Avenue, Toronto, Ontario with fellow musician Percy Thomas, a second violinist in the Toronto Symphony Orchestra (TSO) conducted by Frank Welsman starting in 1908. Manson also played in Welsman's TSO, and is listed as a violist on two programs for TSO concerts with Kathleen Parlow (March 16, 1911 and October 18, 1911).

After World War One, during which he served in the British Expeditionary Force, he married Mary L. Stewart in Bedford, England (m. 1921, d. 1940 in Toronto) and performed regularly in North America, including two seasons with the Cleveland Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Nikolai Sokoloff, and fifteen years with the "New" Toronto Symphony Orchestra, formed by Luigi von Kunits (violin, 1925-1932; viola, 1932-1940). He also performed with the Spivak String Quartet, led by Elie Spivak, and taught at the Hambourg Conservatory of Music in Toronto.

Manson also wrote a number of original compositions and made several arrangements. His compositions exist in manuscript form only. Helmut Kallmann's Catalogue of Canadian Composers (Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, 1952) lists eight manuscripts: Symphony in C minor, An Atlantean episode, Niagara, Canadian fantasy, Ukrainian fantasy, Quintet in F major, Quartet in D major, Alouette. and The collection of Manson's manuscripts at the University of Toronto Music Library also includes Symphony in G minor, which was premiered in County Orange Hall by the Toronto Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Donald Heins; Symphony in D major; and two of Manson's arrangements.

During World War Two, he served as a translator in Ottawa; on one of his travel documents from a trip in 1922 from England to Canada, he listed having reading comprehension of English, French, German, and Spanish. Following the war, he continued to perform regularly in and outside of Canada. According to his obituary, he performed at the Hart House Theatre two weeks before he died at his home on 49 Huntley Street, Toronto on February 14, 1950.

Esprit Orchestra

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/145352993
  • Corporate body
  • 1983-

Founded in 1983 by Music Director and Conductor, Alex Pauk, with financial assistance from Canada Council and Suncor Inc., Esprit Orchestra is Canada's only full-sized, professional orchestra devoted to performing and promoting new orchestral music. It was known as Esprit Contemporain from 1983 to 1986.

They gave their first concert on August 19, 1983 in Kingston, Ontario with the National Youth Orchestra, featuring works by Serge Garant and Alexina Louie, and premiering two commissioned works: Alchemies by John Burke and Vanishing Points by John Rea.

The orchestra, based in Toronto, commissions and premieres new Canadian works and ensures continued public access to this material via repeat performances, audio and film recordings, radio broadcasts, and national and international tours. Their concert programs also regularly feature Canadian premieres of music by leading international composers. As of 2023, the orchestra consists of 65 members. Esprit's annual subscription series consists of three to five concerts per season, held at Toronto's St. Lawrence Centre and at Koerner Hall, University of Toronto.

In addition to their commitment to new music, Esprit is dedicated to working with the next generation of new music professionals, with mentorship and outreach programs, lectures, open rehearsals, and the annual New Wave Composers Festival that celebrates young Canadian artists.

Esprit has received several awards, including three Lieutenant Governor’s Arts Awards (1996, 1998, 2000), the Jean A. Chalmers National Music Award (1995), the Vida Peene Award and the SOCAN Award for Imaginative Orchestral Programming (1990).

Williamson, Gary

  • Local
  • Person
  • 1944-2019

Gary Williamson, a Toronto Jazz pianist, gave his first solo piano recital at age 12 at the Royal Conservatory of Music. He began playing professionally in 1964, and started studying harmony and arranging with Gordon Delamont.

From 1968 to 1972, he toured Hawaii and Asia, before settling in Toronto with his wife Rose in 1976, where he continued his career recording, touring, performing, and recording. He performed with many musicians in the Toronto jazz scene and backed visiting "greats". He played and toured with Nimmons N Nine Plus Six (1974-1980); toured with the Dave McMurdo Jazz Orchestra to the Soviet Union (1991); and recorded with various artists, including Phil Nimmons, Ed Bickert, Katherine Moses, Charlie Gray, Sam Noto, and Hagood Hardy.

Williamson also taught jazz at the Banff Centre in Alberta and the University of New Brunswick (starting in the mid-1970s), and then as part of the new jazz program at the University of Toronto (1990). His students include Renee Rosnes, Chris Donnelly, David Braid, and Adrean Farrugia.

Healey, Derek

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/26628963
  • Person
  • 1936-

Composer, organist, and teacher Derek Healey was born in Wargrave, England in 1936 and studied with Herbert Howells at the Royal College of Music, London (1952-1956). He received his Bachelor of Music degree from the University of Durham in 1961, and continued his studies at graduate summer school at the Accademia Musicale Chigiana in Siena (1961-1963, 1966) with Vito Frazzi, Francesco Lavagnino, and Goffredo Petrassi. He also studied with composer Boris Porena in Rome (1962-1963) before moving to Canada in 1969, where he taught at the University of Victoria (1969-1971), University of Toronto (1971-1972), Waterloo Lutheran University (1971-1972), and the University of Guelph (1972-1978). He received his doctorate (D Mus, 1974).

Healey then joined the Department of Music at the University of Oregon in 1978, where he taught until 1988, when he accepted a position at the Royal Air Force (RAF) School of Music in Uxbridge, England. He retired from teaching in 1996 and moved to Brooklyn, New York, where he continues to live with his wife Olive Scholey.

Healey's early compositions are marked by a neo-classic style, before showing atonal and aleatoric influences in the 1960s. His move to Canada in 1969 spurred an interest in ethnic music. Reflecting on his compositional style, Healey writes that:

"The first pieces with which I am satisfied were written in the Neo-Classic style, a style which appealed to me coming from an organist's background; the composers I particularly liked were Hindemith and Milhaud. After some four or five years I became concerned with the strict limitations of classicism and this resulted in a period in Italy where I studied the techniques of the Second Viennese and Post-Webern schools with Boris Porena and Goffredo Petrassi. The techniques of these composers have stayed with me ever since as a continuum on which to place other current interests, the most important of these being ethnic music (N.W. Canadian and other Pacific based musics) and also techniques learnt from electronic music.

"Since I have lived for considerable periods of time in England, Canada and the U.S.A., I am more conscious than most of the effect the environment has upon musical creativity – the effect of which is to divide one's compositions into a number of clearly definable artistic periods. Despite the resulting compartmentalization of one's creative output, I feel that my music has been true to the different artistic worlds in which I have lived – the resulting divergences being an exciting phenomenon of Global Shrinkage and the Immigrant Twentieth Century Composer" (Canadian Music Centre biography).

Adaskin, John

  • https://viaf.org/viaf/104827481
  • Person
  • 1908-1964

John Adaskin, conductor, radio producer, administrator, and cellist, was born in Toronto on June 4, 1908 and died in Toronto on March 4, 1964. He was the first program director of the Canadian Radio Broadcasting Commission in 1934 and an ardent supporter of Canadian composers and young musicians. In 1961, he was appointed executive secretary of the Canadian Music Centre where he established the "Graded Educational Music Plan" to promote Canadian music in schools. After his death, this project was renamed the "John Adaskin Project".

John Adaskin Project

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/132443180
  • Corporate body
  • 1961-

The John Adaskin Project started in 1961 as the "Graded Educational Music Plan" by John Adaskin, executive secretary to the Canadian Music Centre (CMC). The initiative was underway by 1962 with a committee of music educators grading and evaluating Canadian repertoire in terms of its suitability for student performers. The project was renamed in its founder's memory in 1965, and became the "John Adaskin Project (Canadian Music for Schools)" in 1973 under the direction of Patricia (Pat) Shand, overseen by the Canadian Music Educators' Association (CMEA) and the CMC. The project organizes workshops, demonstrations, and lectures; publishes research guides; and commissions new works by Canadian composers.

Ontario Registered Music Teachers' Association

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/124253396
  • Corporate body
  • 1936-

Founded in Toronto in 1936, the Ontario Music Teachers' Association (OMTA), later named the Ontario Registered Music Teachers' Association (ORMTA), aims to "encourage and provide the highest calibre of music education possible and to promote exceptional standards of music in each community." The first meeting at the Royal York Hotel in Toronto (October 6-8, 1936), brought together several local teachers' associations, including those from Toronto, Hamilton, Guelph, St. Catherines, Simcoe, London, and Stratford.

Thomas, Theodore

  • VIAF ID: 12302400
  • Person
  • 1935-1905

Thomas, Theodore (1835-1905), formed his own orchestra in 1862 and gave concerts in many American cities, always including some unfamiliar work. He conducted the New York Philharmonic 1877– 91, and was the first conductor of the Chicago Symphony 1891 – 1905.

Tanin, Ates

  • Local
  • Person
  • 1936-2019

Ates Tanin taught chemistry at the University of Toronto from 1984 to 2001, and was an avid collector and researcher of the pianist Sviatoslav Richter.

Parker, Jamie

  • https://viaf.org/viaf/63761810
  • Person
  • 1963-

Jamie (James Edward) Parker, piano, was born in Burnaby, British Columbia May 31, 1963. He is a founding member of the Gryphon Trio (1993). He joined the teaching faculty at the University of Toronto in 2003 as the Rupert Edwards Chair in piano.

Sicsic, Henri-Paul

  • Local
  • Person
  • active 1986-

Henri-Paul Sicsic was appointed Associate Professor of Piano at the University of Toronto Faculty of Music in 2007. He taught at the Faculty until 2014.

Plettner, Arthur

  • https://viaf.org/viaf/78378481
  • Person
  • 1904-1999

Arthur Plettner was born November 15, 1904 in Bronx, New York. He moved to Germany with his parents at age 5 and studied flute and piano at the State Conservatory in Wurzburg. They returned to New York in 1924, at which time Plettner was the Associate Conductor and Chorus Master for the German Comic Opera Company in New York. In 1931, he joined the faculty at the Emma Willard Conservatory, teaching piano and harmony, before attending Juilliard Graduate School, where he studied conducting with Albert Stoessel. In 1937, he was named the Juilliard Professor of Music at the University of Chattanooga, and from 1937 to 1949 he conducted the Chattanooga Symphony Orchestra. During this time, he also received a Bachelor of Music degree (1943) and Doctor of Music (1951) from the University of Toronto Faculty of Music, primarily studying off-campus.

Starting in 1990, Arthur Plettner and his wife Isa McIlwraith donated their collection of music scores and books to the University of Toronto Music Library. Following his death on February 13, 1999 a bequest to the Faculty of Music established an endowment to support merit-based scholarships for undergraduate and graduate music students at the Faculty.

Pedersen, Paul

  • https://viaf.org/viaf/6939130
  • Person
  • 1935-

Paul (Richard Pedersen), administrator and composer, was born in Camrose, Alberta August 28, 1935. He was dean of the Faculty of Music, University of Toronto (1990-1995).

Maniates, Maria Rika

  • https://viaf.org/viaf/15193589
  • Person
  • 1937-2011

(Maria) Rika Maniates, musicologist, was born March 30, 1937 and died October 20, 2011 in Toronto, Ontario. She studied at the University of Toronto where her teachers included Harvey Olnick (BA, 1960) and joined the teaching staff at the Faculty of Music and the Faculty of Arts and Science in 1965. She was director of the Early Music Group from 1965 to 1967 and chair of the department of history and literature of music (1973-1978). She also served as academic secretary of the graduate department of music (1968-1969, 1972-1973); associate dean of humanities (1990-1991); assistant dean of humanities (1991-1992); vice-dean of graduate studies (1991-1993, 1995); and acting chair of the graduate department of music (1992). She retired in 1995 and was named professor emerita.

Kolinski, Mieczyslaw

  • https://viaf.org/viaf/24593629
  • Person
  • 1901-1981

Mieczyslaw Kolinski, ethnomusicologist and composer, was born in Warsaw September 5, 1901 and died in Toronto, Ontario May 7, 1981. He taught ethnomusicology at the University of Toronto from 1966 to 1976.

Goldschmidt, Nicholas

  • https://viaf.org/viaf/52757732
  • Person
  • 1908-2004

Nicholas Goldschmidt was born Tavikovice, Morive December 6, 1908 and died Toronto, Ontario February 8, 2004. He moved to Toronto at the invitation of Arnold Walter where he was the first music director of the Royal Conservatory Opera School (now the University of Toronto Opera Division) (1946-1957).

McGee, Timothy J. (Timothy James)

  • https://viaf.org/viaf/79083139
  • Person
  • 1936-

Timothy McGee taught at the University of Toronto Faculty of Music from 1973 to 2003.

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