Showing 1646 results

People and organizations
University of St. Michael's College, John M. Kelly Library, Special Collections

McCoy, Sarah

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/103976067
  • Person

Poole, Norman

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/77921014
  • Person

Péret, Benjamin

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/90640237
  • Person
  • 1899-1959

Benjamin Péret (b. July 4, 1899 - d. September 18, 1959) was a French poet, Dadaist, and one of the founders of the French Surrealism movement.

Éluard, Paul

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/73848255
  • Person
  • 1895-1952

Paul Éluard, was born Eugène Émile Paul Grindel on December 14, 1895, in Saint-Denis, France. He was a French poet and one of the founders of the Surrealist movement. Éluard died on November 18, 1952 in Charenton-le-Pont, France.

Zeller, Ludwig

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/49741420
  • Person
  • 1927-2019

Ludwig Zeller was a Chilean poet and visual artist associated with the surrealism movement. He was born in 1927 in Río Loa in the northern Chilean region of Calama. From 1952-1968, he was the curator and director of the Ministry of Education Art Gallery in Chile. In 1971, he moved to Toronto with his family where he continued his career as a surreal collagist and poet. While in Canada, Zeller and his wife, artist Susana Wald, established Oasis Publications, Canada’s only surrealist publishing house. In 1993, Zeller and Wald re-located to Oaxaca where they resided until Zeller's death in 2019.

Buller, Herman

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/316885432
  • Person
  • 1927-

Author of One Man Alone, Days of Rage and Quebec in Revolt: the Guibord Affair.

Dreadnaught Press

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/144145541814796601946
  • Corporate body
  • 1972-1987

Dreadnaught Press was a Toronto printing collective and publisher. Dreadnaught Press was established in the mid 1970s with the intention of publishing poetry and excerpted literature using traditional fine press printing techniques. It was founded by Robert Macdonald, Elizabeth Abraham, Deborah Barnett, Ross MacDonald, and David Jang, and was the first incorporated worker co-operative in Canada. The press took its name from Dreadnaught, a short-lived underground paper started by Robert Macdonald in the early 1970s.

The collective set up a working pressroom at 24 Sussex Ave., near the University of Toronto campus, where they composed, designed, typeset, and hand-printed materials using traditional letterpress equipment. Dreadnaught Press published the works of many Canadian poets and writers, including Margaret Atwood, A.F. Moritz, Marshall McLuhan, Susan Musgrave, and Jack Hannan, and worked with numerous designers, artists, editors, typesetters, and illustrators. Dreadnaught Press was part of a vibrant local printing community that developed in the Annex neighbourhood of Toronto in the 1970s, including neighbouring publishers Coach House Press and House of Anansi. In addition to their own projects, the collective completed commissioned design, typographic and printing work for a range of commercial clients.

Dreadnaught Press briefly expanded with a second shop (NovaDreadnaught) and handmade paper operation in Nova Scotia in the early 1980s, before disbanding altogether as founding members moved on to other endeavours. In the late 1980s, Deborah Barnett relaunched Dreadnaught as Dreadnaught Design, a design and communication firm that shifted away from hand-printing operations and focused on commercial work.

Barnett, Deborah

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/106023624
  • Person
  • 1953-

Deborah Barnett (born December 15, 1953) is a Canadian creative director, fine press printer, and graphic designer based in Toronto.

She attended high school at Central Technical School in Toronto and was accepted into the school’s art program, where she took an interest in sculpture and drawing. Shortly after graduating, she became a founding member of Dreadnaught Press, working first as an apprentice, and later as an art director. The fine press printing collective was well-known in the Canadian literary and publishing community, and served as a space for Deborah to hone her print, design, and typography skills.

After Dreadnaught Press disbanded in the mid 1980s, she started her own commercial design studio under the name Dreadnaught Design. During this time, she also lectured at the Banff Publishing Workshop in Alberta, teaching design, art direction, and colour theory. In the early 2000s, she worked as a creative director in the corporate sector. In 2001, she closed Dreadnaught Design to open Someone.ca. She returned to fine press printing in 2010. In 2015, she launched Someone Editions, a specialty letterpress imprint in the spirit of Dreadnaught Press, alongside editor and poet Beatriz Hausner.

In 2018, Deborah became the Master Printer at Kelly Library at St. Michael’s College. In this role, she taught printing and typesetting workshops, and led production of a series of limited edition chapbooks for the Kelly Library Print Studio. In 2021, she earned a Master of Fine Arts (MFA) in Interdisciplinary Art, Media, and Design (IAMD) from OCAD University.

Kontos, Alkis

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/115270895
  • Person
  • 1937-

Snider, Bob

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/31740011
  • Person
  • 1946-

Sandman, John

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/67706726
  • Person

O'Neill, Teresa V.

  • Person
  • 1920-2006

Teresa (Teasie or Tie) V. O’Neill was born in Warrenpoint, County Down, in 1920, the eighth child and third daughter of Patrick O’Neill and his second wife Brigid. Teresa studied at the University College of Dublin, where she graduated with her BA in History and English in 1941, her Honours Diploma in Education in 1942, and her MA, for which she was awarded First Class Honours in Modern Irish History, in 1943. After graduating, she moved back to Warrenpoint, where she taught at Sacred Heart Grammar School in Newry. In 1959 she married Arthur O’Neill and moved to Limerick (Republic of Ireland), where she taught at Ard Scoil Mhuire (St. Mary’s Grammar School) for about twenty years. Teresa also led tutorials at the University of Limerick and worked with professors at the University College of Dublin until the last few years of her life. Teresa V. O’Neill died in 2006 near Limerick.

O'Connor, John

  • Person
  • 1870-1952

John O'Connor was a Roman Catholic parish priest based in the town of Bradford, Yorkshire. Born on 5 December 1870 in Clonmel, County Tipperary, Ireland, O'Connor was educated by the Franciscans and Christian Brothers until the age of twelve, at which point he left for Douai in Flanders to study at the English Benedictine College. He later studied theology and philosophy at the English College in Rome. He was ordained at St. John Lateran on 30 March 1895. O'Connor served as curate at St. Joseph's in Bradford, England and later at St. Marie's, Halifax, West Vale and St. Anne's, Keighley. From 1909 to 1919 O'Conner was parish priest of Heckmondwike where he helped build the Church of the Holy Spirit. It was in Keighley that O'Connor met the writer G.K. Chesterton in 1904. He would later receive Chesterton into the Roman Catholic faith in 1922. O'Connor served as parish priest at St. Cuthbert's from 1919 until his death. In 1937 he was made Privy Chamberlain to His Holiness. In addition to Chesterton, O'Connor was also associated with the Catholic authors Hilaire Belloc, Maurice Baring and the typographer and engraver Eric Gill. O'Connor published poems, book reviews and prose in English Catholic periodicals and news papers, and also translated the work of French poet Paul Claudel, (including "The Satin Slipper" and "Ways and Crossways") and the philosopher Jacques Maritain's "Art et Scolastique".John O'Connor died in the Sisters' of Mercy Nursing Home at Horsforth on 6 Febraury 1952.

Watson, Sheila

  • Person
  • 1909-1998

Sheila Martin Watson (nee Doherty) was an author, teacher and professor of English, living between 1909 and 1998. Born in New Westminster, British Columbia on October 25 1909, Sheila was the second child of Dr. Charles Edward Doherty and Mary Ida Elwena Martin. Sheila attended St. Ann's Academy in Victoria, B.C. for her elementary and secondary schooling and attended the University of British Columbia, earning a B.A. Honours in English in 1931 and her Academic Teaching Certificate in 1932. In 1933 she received her M.A. in English, her thesis concerning Addison and Steele, editors of the eighteenth-century periodical "The Spectator." Watson would go on to teach in Dog Creek (1934-1935) in Cariboo Country and Langley Prairie High School (1936-1940) in the Fraser Valley and in Duncan on Vancouver Island from 1940-1941, where she met and married the poet and dramatist Wilfred Watson.Marrying December 29, 1941, Sheila remained in Mission City, in the Fraser Valley, where she taught from September 1941 to the spring of 1945. Wilfred remained in Vancouver, completing his undergraduate degree in 1943. Following World War II, the couple settled in Toronto, where Wilfred pursued his M.A. in English at the University of Toronto, while Sheila taught at Moulton Ladies College (1946-1949). The Watsons remained in Toronto from 1945-1948/49. From 1949-1951, Sheila taught at the University of British Columbia, and for the academic year of 1951/52 she taught at a public high school in Powell River, BC. Watson lived with her husband in Calgary from 1952-54, after which they briefly separated but then spent a year in Paris on a Royal Society of Canada fellowship between 1955-1956.Sheila returned to Toronto from September 1956 to August 1961 to pursue her Doctorate of Philosophy at the University of Toronto, supervised by Marshall McLuhan. Her thesis was titled "Wyndham Lewis and Expressionism." Sheila went on to teach at the University of Alberta as a Professor of English, teaching from 1961 to her retirement in August, 1975. From the early 1970s, Watson was a member of several juries of The Canada Council for arts grants and the Governor General's Awards for poetry and fiction. She and her husband moved to Nanaimo, B.C. in 1980, where she continued to advise former students and aspiring writers, and occasionally giving public readings of her work. She died Sunday, February 1, 1998. Watson is best known for her novel "The Double Hook", published in 1959, her series of short stories based around the character of Oedipus and her novel "Deep Hollow Creek", which was written in the 1930s but was not published until 1992, when it was nominated for a Governor General's Award for best new fiction. Watson was also co-founder of the literary journal "White Pelican."

Catholic New Times

  • Corporate body
  • 1975 - 2006

Catholic New Times was incorporated by letters patent in the Province of Ontario on December 13, 1976, with the object of promoting the advancement of religion in Canada particularly through the publication and distribution of a Roman Catholic newspaper. (More detailed descriptions of the vision, mission, and objectives of the corporation can be found among the records; see especially File 2007 02 1). A non-profit corporation, it was registered as a charitable organization in 1977. Catholic New Times neither had nor desired an official mandate from, or financial or contractual relationship with, any diocese, bishop, or conference of bishops or any other Catholic institution. Rather, through the publication of the Catholic New Times, it sought to be an alternative and independent Catholic voice in Canada, speaking about local, national, and international news and issues of concern to Catholics. The newspaper was published bi-weekly (20 issues per year) in Toronto from December 2, 1976 to November 26, 2006, at which time paper closed due to declining financial support. Catholic New Times Inc. initially operated using a “collective model ” that consisted of three main groupings: office staff who ran the paper, a working group (“the Collective”) that met bi-weekly to plan issues and set editorial and general policy, and the editorial group (which included staff) that met weekly to generate stories and determine the details of each issue. By September 1982, committees composed of collective members, staff, and volunteers had emerged to handle particular needs: promotion, finance, personnel, and editorial. In 1989 to 1990, the corporation underwent a structural reorganization to form a Membership Group of 25-30 people who then elected a Publishing Group of about 10 people from among themselves. The Membership Group met twice a year, with the business conducted at the fall meeting; the Publishing Group, which also acted as the Board of Directors, met with the editor 10 times per year. Members also sat on one of four committees (Editorial, Finance, Human resources, and Marketing) that met according to its specific needs. When the Catholic New Times ceased publication in November 2006, the Publishing Group decided to retain the incorporated status and the basic governance structures of New Catholic Times in order to remain open to possibilities for future publications. It also decided to maintain the website (www.catholicnewtimes.org) for as long as it is able, as of July 2014 the website is no longer available.

Shaull, Richard

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/3266568
  • Person
  • 1919-2002

Wagner, John C.

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/6246760
  • Person
  • 1931-2015

Buys, Anneke

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/280968032
  • Person
  • 1945-

Uomoto, Jay M.

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/315989074
  • Person
  • 1956-

Oden, Bryant

  • http://viaf.org/viaf/170487779
  • Person
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