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People and organizations
Victoria University Archives

Ching, Julia

Julia Ching was a Victoria University professor and an internationally recognized expert on neo-Confucian philosophy and religion. Born in Shanghai in 1934, she grew up there and in Hong Kong before fleeing China during World War II. She was a student at the College of New Rochelle in New York, and then became an Ursuline nun for twenty years. She resumed her studies at the Catholic University of America (M.A.), and then at the Australian National University (Ph.D. 1972). After teaching at Columbia University (1973–1975) and Yale University (1975–1978) she joined the faculty at Victoria University in 1978, becoming a Professor of Religious Studies/Study of Religion, 1981–1995, and then a University Professor of Philosophy, 1995 until her death in 2001. Dr. Ching was very active in the academic world, publishing widely and a contributing member of many organizations. She was also in demand as a consultant and interviewee concerning news relating to China. She was survived by her husband, academic colleague Willard Oxtoby, who died in 2003.

Sawyer, John A.

John A. Sawyer was born in Toronto in 1924. He graduated from Victoria University with a Bachelor of Commerce degree in 1947 and then went on to receive an M.A. (Economics, 1948) from University of Toronto, and a Ph.D. from University of Chicago (1966). After teaching at the University of Alberta (1949–50) and the Royal Military College (1951–53), he worked for the Dominion Bureau of Statistics. In 1960 he began teaching at the University of Toronto and was appointed a full professor in 1965. He remained at U of T until retiring as Professor Emeritus in 1990. Dr. Sawyer married Virginia Peterson in 1952, and has three sons.

Grant, John Ratcliffe

John Ratcliffe Grant was born in Henan Province, China, the son of Presbyterian missionaries. He was granted a PhD from Harvard University in 1947, and in 1950 came to Victoria University as an Assistant Professor of Classics. Dr. Grant taught at Victoria until 1979, becoming a Professor of Classics in 1975.

Knight, M.L. (Mary Louise)

M.L. (Mary Louise) Knight (née Kilgour) was born in Winnipeg, Manitoba in 1924 to the Rev. Hugh Bryans Kilgour and Mae Louise Kilgour (née Cory). In 1945, she attended Victoria College, where she met her future husband David James Knight and studied with Northrop Frye. She later became Professor of English at Victoria College as well as an author, poet and publisher. Her works include The Lace Volcano and Overlooking the Red Jail.

After raising four sons, M.L. Knight began working on collages and exhibited her work at more than a dozen shows. Her largest work, the "Vic Collage", is in the main hall of Old Victoria College in Toronto.

M.L. Knight died in 2013 in Toronto.

Wallace, Paul Anthony Wilson

Paul Anthony Wilson Wallace (1891-1967) was born in Cobourg, Ontario. He attended grade school in Toronto, and high school at Harbord Collegiate Institute in Toronto. He received a B.A. from Victoria University at the University of Toronto in 1915, an M.A. in 1923, and a Ph.D. in 1925. He was active in World War I as part of the Canadian Expeditionary Force from 1916-1918. He was a teacher in a one room county school at Baraca, Alberta in 1915, and lectured in English at the University of Alberta from 1919-1922, and at the University of Toronto from 1922-1925. In 1925, he began as Chairman of the Department of English at Lebanon Valley College in Pennsylvania. From 1948-1967 he was a staff historian with the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission.

Wallace was a prolific writer and published many articles and books, mainly in the field of Pennsylvania and American Indian history, including biographies of Conrad Weiser, Henry Melchior Muhlenberg and his three sons, and Milton Hershey; a history of Pennsylvania: Pennsylvania, Seed of a Nation; a history of Lebanon Valley College; and three works on the Indians of Pennsylvania and New York: The White Roots of Peace, The Indians of Pennsylvania, and Indian Paths of Pennsylvania. One of his books, "White Roots of Peace" an historical work on the founding of the Five Nations of the Iroquois Confederacy, was selected for inclusion in the White House library.

He was married to Dorothy Eleanor Clarke in 1919; their two children are Anthony Francis Clarke Wallace and David Harold Wallace.

Field, George Wallis

George Wallis Field was a scholar and professor of German Literature at Victoria University. He was born in Cobourg, Ontario, and graduated in 1935 from Victoria University with high honours and as a Gold Medal winner.

When the Second World War broke out he joined the Royal Artillery of the British Army in India (1940) serving on the North West Frontier and the Khyber Pass area. As Lieutenant Colonel, he commanded the University of Toronto contingent of the Canadian Officers Training Corps from 1966–1968 and became Honorary Colonel of the 2nd Company of the Canadian Intelligence corps.

After the war, he returned to University of Toronto completing his MA (1945) and PhD (1948). Completing his PhD thesis, Professor Field began his career with Victoria University and edited many scholarly texts in addition to writing numerous articles and translations of German literature and contributing to the Northcott Literary History of Germany series, The Nineteenth Century. Professor Field was most renowned for his scholarly work on Hermann Hesse: Hermann Hesse, Kommentar zu sämtlichen Werken (1977) and by his work on Hesse for the Twayne World Authors series.

Redcliffe, Gary Lorne

Gary Redcliffe was a long-time member of the faculty of Emmanuel College. Born and raised in South Wooler, a farming community in eastern Ontario, he moved to Quebec at nineteen to work as a miner. After earning a B.A. from Sir George Williams University he earned three degrees from McGill University (B.D., M.A., Ph.D.). As an ordained minister, he went on to serve pastoral charges in Montreal, Toronto, and Saskatoon. In 1986, he began teaching at Emmanuel College as an Assistant Professor. As Associate Professor at the College, he served as Director of Basic Degree Studies, and initiated the Master of Pastoral Studies and Master of Theological Studies programs. He was also involved in planning for the Lay Certificate in Theology and the Diploma in Health Studies. Redcliffe was appointed Associate Professor Emeritus in 2007. He died in 2010.

Cayley, Murray Alexander

Murray A. Cayley was a Victoria College Graduate, Class of 1922. He was a member of the Victoria College Dramatic Society, Victoria College Male Quartet, and served on the executive of the Victoria College Choral and Glee Club and the Victoria College Orchestra, becoming President in his final year.

Robson, John Mercel

John Mercel Robson was born on May 26, 1927, in Toronto, to William Renton Mercel Robson and Christina Henderson Sinclair. He studied at Swansea Public School and Runnymede Collegiate Institute and received his B.A. (1951), M.A. (1953), and Ph.D. (1956) from University of Toronto. His PhD thesis, “The Social and Political Thought of J.S. Mill” was supervised by A.S.P. Woodhouse.

In 1953, he married Prof. Ann Provost Wilkinson Robson, and they had three children: William Bertie Provost (born August 9, 1959), John Sinclair Petifer (born December 9, 1960), and Ann Christine Wilkinson (born December 24, 1962).

Robson served as a teaching fellow in the Department of English, University College, from 1952–1954; researcher under G. Tillotson at Birbeck College, University of London, 1954–1956; and instructor with the Department of English, University of British Columbia, 1956–1957. He then joined the Department of English at Victoria College, serving as Assistant Professor from 1958–1963, Associate Professor from 1963–1967, and became Professor in 1967. He also served as Principal of Victoria College from 1971–1976.

Robson's most recognized academic accomplishment was his general editorship of the 33 volume Collected Works of John Stuart Mill.

He sat on many committees within Victoria University and the University of Toronto, serving as chair of the SGS Dean’s Advisory Committee on Admission to the Graduate Faculty and sitting on the Department of English Graduate Planning Committee. In addition, he served as Chairman of the Manuscript Review Committee at the University of Toronto Press from 1975 until his death. He also served as the general editor of the collected papers of Northrop Frye, until his death in 1995.

His other scholarly offices include: Advisory Editor, Wellesley Index to Victorian Periodicals; Board of Directors, Research Society for Victorian Periodicals; Advisory Board, Victorian Periodicals Review; Advisory Board, Scholarly Publishing; Chairman, Editorial Committee, Disraeli Project, Queen’s University; Bentham Committee, University of London; Advisory Board, Bertram Russell Edition, McMaster University; Advisory Board, Centre for Editing Early Canadian Texts, Carleton University; Advisory Board, A.M. Klein Edition, Trent University; and Trustee, Dickens Society. He became a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada in 1974, served as its Vic-President from 1980-1982, and its honorary editor in 1984.

Addison, Margaret Eleanor Theodora

Margaret Eleanor Theodora Addison was born in 1868 in Horning's Mills, Ontario. She graduated from Victoria College in 1889 with a B.A. After graduation, she taught in high schools and at the Ontario Ladies' College in Whitby. In 1900 she travelled to Europe to study educational methods and was inspired by women's higher education there, particularly with the sense of college life that women students had; made possible through ensuring that they had space on campuses, something that Victoria College had lacked when Addison had attended. Back in Toronto, one of her goals to make a residence for women at Victoria had become a reality. Annesley Hall, the first women's residence was opening in 1903 and Addison had been asked by Mrs. Burwash, the President of the Victoria Women's Residence and Educational Association (later the V.W.A), to serve as Dean of Annesley Hall. In 1920, she was appointed as and Dean of Women at Victoria University, to reflect that not all women lived on campus. She served in this role until 1931 when she retired. Addison was also involved with the International Y.W.C.A., the Student Christian Movement, and the University Club. Margaret Addison died in 1940.

Michael, John Hugh

John Hugh Michael was ordained in the Wesleyan Methodist Church in England and joined the staff of Victoria University as a Professor of New Testament in 1913. He continued to teach at Emmanuel College until retiring in 1943. He published several books including Why don't we preach the Apocalypse? (pub. 1940), A phenomenon in the text of Romans (pub. 1938) and The Epistle of Paul to the Philippians (pub. 1940).

Sissons, Charles Bruce

Charles Bruce Sissons was born near Barrie and graduated from Victoria University in 1901. After studying at Oxford University, he returned to Victoria in 1909 to teach history, initially as a lecturer, later becoming an Associate Professor and then Professor Emeritus. He is perhaps best known for his biography of Egerton Ryerson. He also published a history of Victoria University.

Johnston, Alexandra F.

Alexandra (Sandy) F. Johnston was born in 1939. She attended Brantford Public School, Brantford Collegiate Institute and Vocational School, and studied at Victoria College from 1957 to 1961, receiving her BA in English Language and Literature. She studied medieval drama in her post-graduate work, receiving her MA and PhD from the University of Toronto in 1962 and 1964, respectively. After teaching at Queen’s University, she returned to Victoria University to serve as Assistant Professor of English in 1967 and became Professor of English in 1978. In 1981, she was appointed the first female Principal of Victoria College, and served in that position until 1991. She served again as acting Principal in 2004. After retiring from teaching in 2004, as a Professor Emerita, she worked full-time on the Records of Early English Drama (REED) project, an international scholarly project that had begun in 1975. Her achievements have been acknowledged through an honorary Doctorate of Laws from Queen’s University and an honorary Doctorate of Divinity from The Presbyterian College, Montreal. She has also received the University of Toronto Faculty Award and is a member of the Royal Society of Canada.

Dyke, Doris Jean

Doris Jean Dyke, born Doris Jean Scott, near Toronto, was a prominent member of the Emmanuel College faculty, and a noted academic figure in the areas of feminist theology and education. Her first career was as a teacher in Ontario. In 1959, she graduated with a B.A. from Queen’s University, and later received a B.Ed. (1961) and M.Ed. (1963) from University of Toronto, as well as a M.A. (1962) and Ed.D. (1967) from Columbia University and Union Theological Seminary, New York.

Her academic career began at University of Saskatchewan in 1964 and was followed by appointments at various institutions in Western Canada, University of Louisville in Kentucky, and Dalhousie University in Halifax, where she was Professor and Dean of Education, 1973–1977. Ms. Dyke’s tenure at Emmanuel College began in 1977, where she was a Professor until her retirement in 1995, also serving as Director of Master of Religious Education (M.R.E.), 1977–1990.

As Professor Emeritus she went on to teach courses in gerontology and ministry at Emmanuel College, and at Vancouver School of Theology, UBC. Throughout her career, she contributed articles and reviews for academic publications, authored the book “Crucified Woman,” lectured widely, and served many organizations and committees, including acting as President of Canadian Theological Society, 1994–1995.

Line, John

John Line was born in England. He was ordained in Newfoundland and studied at Victoria University and Wesleyan College, Montreal, before a teaching career that included thirty-four years at Victoria University.

Albert College (Belleville, Ont.)

Albert College was established as Belleville Seminary in 1857. Its name was changed to Albert College in 1866, and when it later affiliated with Victoria University in 1884, it gave up its right to grant degrees.

Nelles, Samuel Sobieski

Samuel Sobieski Nelles was an educator and long-time academic administrator, who served various positions at Victoria College/University, Cobourg, 1850-1887. He was born in Mount Pleasant, Ontario in 1823, and received his earlier education in New York state, before spending two years at Victoria College under the tutelage of Egerton Ryerson. Following a year of home study he took his degree at the Wesleyan University in Middletown, Connecticut, 1846. After an interval of teaching and Methodist Church work he was named Principal of Victoria College in 1850, and then President in 1854, a position he held until his death in 1887. During the years 1852-1887 he was also a Professor; his titles included Professor of Mental Philosophy, with Logic, Ethics, Evidences of Religion, and Homeletics, 1856-1872.

Wallace, Francis Huston

Francis Huston Wallace was educated in a series of private schools, including Upper Canada College in Toronto, where he was head boy in 1868-69. He enrolled in University College, Toronto, the following year. Although he was not impressed with the quality of teaching, he graduated with a first and a gold medal in classics in 1873 and secured an MA a year later. Wallace and his family had assumed that following graduation he would enter Knox College and become a Presbyterian minister. During his second undergraduate year, however, he became greatly distressed about his spiritual condition and his vocation. He agreed with his father as to the absolute necessity of a conversion experience as the foundation of a truly Christian life, but he was deeply depressed by his failure to achieve it.

Fortunately, at this juncture he was befriended by several perceptive and sympathetic Methodists. Inspired by their counsel and by participation in Methodist services, he eventually felt "his heart strangely warmed," as had John Wesley, and he became "gloriously happy in the joy of salvation." Despite his father's anger and grief, Wallace rejected the Westminster Standards, adopted by the Church of Scotland in 1647, and the prospect of becoming a Presbyterian minister. His Methodist friends quickly decided that he would be a valuable recruit for the Methodist ministry, and with their encouragement, he was accepted as a local preacher in 1873. Nathanael Burwash, the founding dean of theology at Victoria College in Cobourg, hinted at an eventual appointment in the college. Wallace enrolled in Drew Theological Seminary in Madison, N.J., in 1873. After graduating in 1876, he proceeded to the University of Leipzig, then a leading institution in biblical studies attended by many foreign theological students, where he spent a year. He would return to Germany in 1911-12 to study at the University of Berlin and, in particular, to enroll in the course offered by the eminent and radical church historian Adolf von Harnack, whom he later privately described as a "Unitarian of the highest type."

Wallace was ordained in the Methodist ministry in 1878 and subsequently appointed to pastorates in Peterborough, Toronto, and Cobourg, positions in which he acquired several prominent lay supporters and the friendship of Samuel Sobieski Nelles and other members of the teaching staff at Victoria College. In 1887 he was appointed professor of New Testament literature and exegesis in Victoria's faculty of theology; he began teaching the following January. Wallace was a member of the faculty until 1920 and its dean from 1900. A respected and committed teacher and administrator, he helped to shape the development of the faculty and the theological outlook of many in the Methodist ministry in Canada, during a period of profound intellectual upheaval - a generation influenced by Darwin's writings, the development of higher criticism in biblical studies, and growing awareness that Christian theology is a transitory construction, as are other forms of human thought. By 1920 Victoria's faculty of theology and the Methodist community in general had come to accept the implications of contemporary biblical scholarship and were probably more distressed by the moral implications of World War I than by arguments about Genesis and prophecy.

At Victoria, from 1892 located in Toronto, this process of adjustment was marked by two controversial incidents and facilitated by Wallace's own approach to biblical studies and his constructive appointments to the faculty. He played no formal part in the first issue, the resignation of his friend and colleague George Coulson Workman in 1891. He concluded, however, that Workman was a Unitarian and therefore unsuited to instruct Methodist theological students. Again, in 1909 his friend George Jackson, newly appointed professor of English Bible, was threatened with dismissal for stating publicly that the account of creation in Genesis is not a historical one. The dispute was resolved through a statement prepared by John Fletcher McLaughlin, Workman's successor, and signed by the entire faculty of theology. It declared that, "so long as our theological professors maintain their personal vital relation to Christ and Holy Scripture, and adhere to the doctrinal standards of our own church . . . they must be left free to do their own work," a position later accepted by the General Conference of the Methodist Church.

A quiet, firm, but tolerant scholar, Wallace believed that the New Testament is "all alive with the experiences, difficulties, struggles, antagonisms, heresies, arguments, appeals, eloquence of the men and times to whom Jesus Christ spake." Historical study enabled Christians better to understand "the living realities of the Bible and of Christian experience." Wisely and perhaps deliberately, he left public controversy to others. His preaching was scholarly and balanced, and he welcomed changes in the role of the church. Wallace did not neglect his duties as a minister. He was a strong advocate of the establishment of the deaconess order in the Methodist Church and an effective supporter of union with the Presbyterian and Congregational churches, achieved in 1925. His home was a hospitable place where he welcomed each generation of students. Above all, he strove to make Victoria's "work in theology equal in scholarship to that of the very best institutions on this continent." He left his colleagues and his students with a "memory of good words and good deeds" that would help constructively to shape the college's role in theological education.

Wallace was married in 1878 to Joy Wilson, the daughter of Bishop Edward Wilson of New Jersey. She died in 1918. His eldest son, Edward Wilson Wallace, was a missionary to China and became Chancellor of Victoria University. His daughter Muriel taught in Peterborough, Ontario and at Bloor St. Collegiate Institute, and his son, Paul, was a professor of English at Lebanon Valley College, Pennsylvania. Two other children, Dorothy and Polly, died at an early age.

Robins, John D.

John D. Robins was a professor, creative writer and editor of note who had a lengthy and distinguished teaching career at Victoria University. Born in Windsor, Ontario in 1884, to Thomas Brackhill Robins and Elizabeth Snelson Plant, he attended Albert College in Belleville before graduating with a B.A. (1913) and M.A. (1922) from Victoria University, and a Ph.d. from University of Chicago (1927). He began his teaching career at Victoria as a Lecturer in German in 1910, went on to become a Professor of English and Head of the Department, 1941–1952, while also serving as the Librarian, 1945–1952. In addition to his academic endeavors, he edited the highly regarded "A Pocketful of Canada" (1946), and wrote the popular non-fiction book "The Incomplete Anglers" (1944), as well as the novel "Cottage Cheese" (1951), and was also recognized for his knowledge of folklore. John D. Robins died suddenly in 1952.

Joblin, Kingsley

Kingsley Joblin was a Victoria University graduate and long–time member of the faculty of Victoria University. Born in 1912 in Toronto, he attended high school in Stirling, Ontario before attaining a B.A. from Victoria College in 1932. After receiving a Bachelor Of Divinity (1936) from Emmanuel College, he was ordained into the ministry of the United Church of Canada, and went on to serve two churches in Toronto. In 1946, he began his teaching career at Victoria University, as Assistant Professor of the English Bible. He went on to become Professor of Religious Knowledge/Studies, 1959–1977, and also served as Chairman of that Department, 1952–1970. Rev. Joblin was a Professor Emeritus from 1978 until his death in 2003; he was predeceased by his wife Pat (nee Lipsett).

Victoria University (Toronto, Ont.). Library

The library at Victoria University (and its earlier institutions) existed from at least the 1840s. In 1910, the Birge Carnegie Library was built to house the collection, and in 1961 the Victoria College Library was built for the Victoria College collection; the library was renamed to the E.J. Pratt Library in 1967.

The position of Librarian existed at Victoria University dating back to at least 1878. Incumbents in the position included:
John Fletcher McLaughlin, 1896-1907, 1912-1913;
Augustus Edward Lang, 1907-1912, 1913-1924;
Francis Louis Barber, 1924-1945;
John Daniel Robins, 1945-1952;
Margaret V. Ray, 1952-1965;
Lorna D. Fraser, 1965-1977;
Robert C. Brandeis, 1977-2013
Lisa Sherlock

Victoria University (Toronto Ont.). Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies

In 1964, the Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies (CRRS) was established by the Board of Regents to be: a research institute dedicated to the Renaissance and Reformation while having the Andrew James Bell Erasmus collection at its core, and; to develop a broader collection of reference works, texts, and bibliographical material for the period of ca. 1500-1700. The CRRS was co-publisher of the journal Renaissance and Reformation, it later began publishing the journals Early Theatre and Confraternitas, as well as five lines of books.

Victoria University (Toronto, Ont.). Students' Administrative Council

The Council was constituted in 1970 by members of the Emmanuel College Student Society and the Victoria College Union Council. Its mandate was to derive policy and administer all matters of concern to the Victoria University student body.

Currently, VUSAC has twenty-five elected and appointed members who provide services such as the administration of student clubs, host events, and represent the Victoria College student body.

Victoria University (Cobourg, Ont.). Department of Medicine

The Department of Medicine was established in 1854 when John Rolph's medical school in Toronto became attached to Victoria College. In 1866, L'École de médecine et de chirurgie de Montréal also became affiliated with Victoria College. No classes were actually given in Cobourg, however the medical diplomas were issued by Victoria College/University because neither medical school was empowered to grant degrees on their own. The Department's Medical Board of Examiners was established in 1875 to examine students with certificates from medical schools who wished to obtain M.D. degrees. Dr. Uzziel Ogden taught on the Toronto Faculty for many years. The name of the Department was changed when Victoria University was constituted in 1884, and the Department ceased to exist when Victoria University became affiliated with the University of Toronto.

Haanel, Eugene

Eugene Haanel was born near Berlin and studied at Breslau. He taught at several American colleges before coming to Victoria College, Cobourg in 1872 where he served as Professor of Chemistry and Physics, 1872–1889. He also served as Dean of Science and founded the Faraday Hall, the first science hall in Canada.
He was married to Julia Darling of Michigan and the couple had 5 children.

Canadian Society for Renaissance Studies

In 1976, the Canadian Society for Renaissance Studies/Société canadienne d'études de la Renaissance was founded by an informal group of Francophone Canadian scholars called Les Seiziémistes, the Centre d'études de la renaissance in Sherbrooke, and the Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies in Toronto. The CSRS is a bilingual, interdisciplinary society dedicated to the study of the Renaissance; it was formally recognized as a learned society in 1976.

Upper Canada Academy

Upper Canada Academy was constituted at Conference of Methodist Episcopal Church in Canada in 1830, and established by Royal Charter in 1836. Its name was changed to Victoria College by Act of Legislature, 1841.

Burwash, Nathanael

Nathanael Burwash was born in St. Andrews, Quebec, in 1839 and entered Victoria College, Cobourg as a prepatory student in 1852, graduating in 1859 after an interruption to allow his younger brother the funds to enrol. He was ordained in 1864 and continued his education at Yale (Science) and Garrett Biblical Institute of Evanston, Illinois (Theology) and received his M.A. from Victoria in 1866. Burwash began his teaching career at Victoria, lecturing in the natural sciences and in 1871 began teaching theology as well as science courses – two years later he was appointed Dean of the new Faculty of Theology and in 1877 helped set up the Theological Union of Victoria, an organization designed as a postgraduate extension of theological study. In 1887, Burwash was named Chancellor and President – he held these positions until 1913, and continued to teach doctrinal history until his death in 1918.

Pearson, Lester Bowles

Lester Bowles Pearson was born in Newtonbrook (now part of Toronto), the son of Edwin Arthur Pearson and Anne Sarah Bowles. He graduated from Hamilton Collegiate Institute in 1913, then, at age sixteen, went on to Victoria University that year. At Victoria he lived in residence, and participated in sports such as basketball and rugby. During World War I Pearson served as a Medical Orderly overseas. He completed his B.A. at Victoria in 1919, then returned as a Lecturer in History in 1923; during this period he married Maryon (née Moody). Lester Pearson went on to a distinguished career, first as a diplomat, and then as a politician. He was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1957 for his achievements during the Suez Crisis, and went on to become leader of the federal Liberal Party in 1958, then Prime Minister in 1963. He maintained his affiliation with Victoria University, serving as Chancellor from 1952 to 1959. In 2000, the Lester B. Pearson Peace Garden was established on campus.

Love, Christopher Charles

Christopher Charles Love was born in England in 1911, and received a MA from the University of Cambridge in 1933. He emigrated to Canada the same year to teach Classics and be a housemaster at Bishop’s College School in Lennoxville, Quebec. During World War II, Dr. Love served in the Royal Canadian Navy, and following the war he studied at the University of Toronto, receiving his PhD in English in 1950. His teaching career at Victoria University began in 1949 and continued until 1977, when he became Professor Emeritus of English. Throughout his years of active teaching and beyond, Dr. Love was a prominent and popular member of the Victoria University community.

Dr. Love served as Senior Tutor, 1950–1961. Responsibilities of the Senior Tutor of Burwash Hall and the men’s residences included admissions to and continuance in the residences, supervision of the residences, including discipline, approval of social activities, and acting as a liaison to the Residence Council.

Bennett, Gladys

Gladys Bennett was born in 1901; she was a student at Victoria University, 1921–1925, receiving an honours degree in English and History, and went on to teach high school in Ontario before retiring in 1962.

French, Goldwin S. (Goldwin Sylvester)

Dr. Goldwin French was an accomplished academic and President of Victoria University, 1973–1987.

He was born in Dresden, Ontario, in 1923, and after high school there he went on earn a B.A. from Victoria College in University of Toronto in 1944. Following war service in the R.C.A.F. he returned to University of Toronto to earn an M.A. (1947). His teaching career subsequently began at McMaster University as a lecturer. While there he received his Ph.D in Canadian History (1958), and became chairman of the History Department in the same year. Dr. French was appointed President of Victoria University in 1973. From 1982 to 1991 he was also a sessional lecturer at Emmanuel College, continuing beyond his retirement as President in 1987. During his distinguished scholarly career he chaired the Ontario Historical Series among other pursuits. Married to Iris Ivey in 1946, Dr. French died in 2013.

Fraser, Lorna D.

Lorna Dawn Fraser was the Chief Librarian of Victoria University Library. She was born in Toronto, Ontario, and died in Orillia, Ontario. Fraser received an Honours B.A. in music from University of Toronto (Trinity College) in 1946. She was awarded an M.A. in music history from Yale in 1948 and completed a Bachelor of Library Science degree from U of T in 1951. Between 1956 and spring of 1961, Fraser was employed as the head of the music cataloging department at the U of T Library and was later appointed as the Assistant Director of York University Libraries. In June of 1965, she succeeded Margaret V. Ray as the Chief Librarian of Victoria University Library. During the 1950s and ‘60s, Fraser served on the executive boards of several professional organizations, including the American, Canadian, and Ontario Library Associations, as well as the Institute for Professional Librarians for Ontario. Following her marriage to Dr. Luke Irwin, Fraser retired in October 1976.

Ng, Greer Anne Wenh-In

Greer Anne Wenh-In Ng was an Associate Professor at Emmanuel College who was very involved with Asian and feminist Christian activities and studies. She earned a B.A. (1958) and M.A. (1960) from the University of Hong Kong before emigrating to North America, where she received a Ph.D. (1969) from Columbia University, and then a M.Div. (1980) from Emmanuel. After graduating from Emmanuel she worked at a United Church in Toronto, before being hired as the Christian Development Officer for Hamilton Conference in 1981. From 1986 to 1995 she was Assistant Professor, Educational Ministries, and also Director of Lay Education, 1986–1989, at Vancouver School of Theology. In 1995, she began her career at Emmanuel as Associate Professor, Christian Education, and Faculty Liaison, Centre for Asian Theology. She retired from Emmanuel in 2004.

Davies, Alan T.

Alan T. Davies was a Lecturer and then Associate Professor in the Department of Religious Studies, Victoria College, 1969–1989; Professor, Department for the Study of Religion, Centre for the Study of Religion, University of Toronto, 1989–1998. Dr. Davies work included research in the area of Jewish-Christian relations.

Moore, Arthur Bruce Barbour

  • LCCN 90655819
  • Person
  • 1906–2004

A.B.B. Moore was President of Victoria University, 1950-1970, and also a prominent United Church minister. Born in Keswick Ridge, New Brunswick in 1906, the son of a Congregationalist minister, he grew up in The Eastern Townships in Quebec, before attending McGill University (B.A. 1927). After earning a B.D. (1930) from United Theological College in Montreal, Moore completed his graduate studies at Oxford. In 1933 he married Margaret Price; they celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary in 2003, before her death later that year. Moore served as a minister in Quebec, Ontario, Saskatchewan, and Pennsylvania before becoming Principal of, Professor of Theology at, St. Andrew's College at the University of Saskatchewan, 1946-1950. A.B.B. Moore's twenty year tenure as President at Victoria University was marked by his vision as a builder of campus resources and for his involvement in the formation of the Toronto School of Theology. The same year Moore retired from the University, he was elected Moderator of the United Church of Canada; prior to that he had been co-chair of the commission to form a union between the United and Anglican Churches. In 1977 Moore began a three year term as Chancellor of the University of Toronto. While in "retirement" he continued to be active in educational and religious affairs until his death in 2004.

Emmanuel College (Toronto, Ont.). Council

  • Corporate body
  • 1928–1994

The Council was established in 1928 by The University Act, 1928. Its duties and powers included: determining the theological curriculum; preparing courses of study for degrees in Divinity and submitting them to Senate for approval; arranging for the teaching and examining of students; granting diplomas; and certifying students, who have completed their course of study for ordination, to presbytery. The Principal served as Chair of the Council and the Registrar as Secretary or Clerk.

Victoria College (Toronto. Ont.). Registrar's Office

  • Corporate body
  • 1837-

The Registrar was appointed by the Board of Regents, but had a closer working relationship with the Senate; as Secretary, he kept the records of the latter body. The Registrar's responsibilities included conducting elections of graduate representatives to the Senate and the Board of Regents, arranging enrollment into and withdrawal from Victoria College, course transfers, applications for scholarships, petition requests, examination requests, and timetable problems; as well as advising on academic matters and organizing functions such as the Charter Day Convocation, Baccalaureate Convocation Service, and the Emmanuel College Graduation. Although the Registrar was technically responsible for Emmanuel, the theological school appointed one of its own staff members to administer the registration of its students.

Victoria University (Toronto, Ont.). Theological Union Montreal Conference Branch

  • Corporate body
  • ca.1878-[1925?]

The Theological Union was constituted ca. 1878 with the object being the sacred and literary fellowship of all Methodist ministers and preachers, the advancement of theological learning among its members, and the formation of a theological literature in connection with Victoria University; it included a branch of members in Montreal Conference, and was discontinued when the United Church was formed.

Victoria University (Toronto, Ont.). Bob Revue

  • Corporate body
  • 1874-

The Committee was formed to stage the Bob Revue, an annual presentation in honour of Robert Beare. Bob Beare was a janitor at Victoria and a friend to students. Beginning in 1874 he would invite the freshmen class to meet the rest of the college and out of this evolved the Bob Revue. The Revue was put on by the sophomore class and aimed its barbs at freshmen. It was considered as part of orientation to campus life.

The Bob Revue was traditionally an all male production and in 1949 the Scarlet and Gold revue was created as a co-ed musical revue. Scarlet and Gold co-existed with the Bob for two years (1949 and 1950) before it merged with the Bob in 1951 and the Bob officially became co-ed.

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