Showing 46 results

People and organizations
Trinity College Archives

Ross Parmenter

  • F2360
  • Person
  • 1912-1999

Ross Parmenter was born in 1912 May 30, Toronto Ontario. He graduated from Trinity College in 1933 briefly working for the Toronto Evening Telegram before moving to New York in 1934 to work for the New York Times. There he worked as an investigative reporter, and later a reviewer and editor for their music department until his retirement in 1964. Mr. Parmenter’s career was briefly interrupted by the outbreak of World War II, where he served as a medic for 3 years under contentious objector status. Aside from his career with the New York Times Mr. Parmenter was also an accomplished author who published 12 books, several of which focused on Mexico, where he owned a residence and had spent a large portion of his life. On October 18, 1999 Ross Parmenter died in Manhattan New York.

Young, Archibald Hope

  • F2053
  • Person
  • 1863-1935

Archibald Hope Young, educator and historian, was known as “Archie” to generations of Trinity College students. Born 6 February 1863 in Sarnia, Canada West, to Archibald and Annie (née Wilson) Young, he attended Sarnia Public, Private, and High Schools before going to Upper Canada College 1878-1882, where he was Head Boy in his final year. He matriculated at the University of Toronto in 1882 as a Prince of Wales Scholar and graduated with a BA in Modern Languages in 1887. He was also the president of the University of Toronto Modern Language Club 1886-1887. He received a BA ad eundem in 1892 from the University of Trinity College, and his MA in 1893. He also studied for a period of time at the University of Strasbourg. In 1916 he was awarded the degree of Doctor of Civil Law, honoris causa, by the University of King’s College.

Before coming to Trinity College, Young was the assistant master in Drummondville High School 1884-1885 and an assistant junior master in Upper Canada College 1887-1889. He was also a Modern Languages master 1887-1892 and an assistant housemaster 1889-1891. Young first became associated with Trinity College in 1892, when he was hired as a lecturer on Modern Languages and Philology. He held this position until 1900, when he was promoted to Professor of Modern Languages and Philology. In 1905, he became Professor of German, a post he held until his retirement in 1931, when he became Emeritus Professor of German. In 1911-1912 Young was Acting Professor of French, and in 1920-1921 he was a lecturer on Church History. He also served for one year as a University of Toronto lecturer on Italian 1909-1910. Upon his retirement he was appointed Research Fellow in Canadian History.

Young also held a number of administrative positions at Trinity College. He was the Librarian 1896-1902, the Clerk of Convocation 1901-1902 and 1903-1922, the Trinity College Registrar 1903-1914 and the Trinity University Registrar 1907-1914 (the two positions were combined in 1914), and the Dean of Residence 1914-1922. In 1904, upon the college’s federation with the University of Toronto, for which he was an advocate, Young was elected by the Trinity faculty to act as a representative on the university’s Senate. He was re-elected to this position until 1923. He also served as editor for the Trinity University Yearbook 1896-1914. Upon the creation of the Universities Bureau of the British Empire in 1913, Young began to act as its corresponding secretary, having attended the Congress the previous year. Young was the principal organizer of Trinity College’s jubilee celebrations in 1902. Naturally, he was also an ex officio and an elected member of both Corporation and Convocation.

In 1903 Young attended the International Congress of History Studies in Rome. In 1910 he was elected as president of the Modern Languages section of the Ontario Educational Association. In 1913 Young became a Non-Resident Life Fellow of the Royal Colonial Institute, and in 1919 he became a member of the St. Andrew’s Society. Young was the historiographer of the Diocese of Toronto starting in 1914 and also served for a time as president of the Ontario Historical Society. In 1920-1921 Young served as a member of the executive of the University of Toronto Alumni Association.

Always one to take an active role with students, Young served as chairman of the Trinity University Review Board of Management from 1914 until his death. He was named honorary president of the Trinity Glee Club in 1905, and in 1906 he founded the Deutscher Klatsch Club to assist students in attaining proficiency in conversational German, an organization which lasted until the outbreak of the First World War. During the war, he wrote to Trinity students and alumni who were involved in the war effort and organized care packages to be sent to them at Christmas. At the time of Young’s death, Provost Cosgrave wrote the following in the midsummer edition of the Trinity University Review: “[Graduates of Trinity College] will think most gratefully of [Young’s] influences upon them in the most critical and formative years of their lives and of his continued interest in them after they had left college. His greatest pleasure was to gather a group of graduates for tea in his room or in the Board Room and recall the days when they were students at Trinity. He wrote annually or oftener to hundreds of his former students expressing his interest in their concerns and telling them what was passing at Trinity College.”

Young valued his time at Upper Canada College, too, which he demonstrated by his permanent connection to it in the years after he left. For years he acted as a member of Corporation and the Board of Governors. He was also the corresponding secretary and treasurer for the Upper Canada College Old Boys Association. In 1917 he edited The Roll of Pupils of Upper Canada College Toronto: January 1830 to June 1916, and in 1923 he edited The War Book of Upper Canada College Toronto (1914-1919). He was also a member of the Governing Body of Trinity College School.

Young published widely on the history of Upper Canada and the Church of England in Canada, usually in the form newspaper and journal articles or reviews. His larger works included The Revd. John Stuart, D.D., U.E.L. of Kingston, U.C. and his Family: A Genealogical Study and he edited The Parish Register of Kingston, Upper Canada 1785-1811. In 1922, along with Professor W.A. Kirkwood, Young edited the War Memorial Volume of Trinity College, Toronto, which listed every member of the college who served in the First World War. Young never married and had no children, and lived for most of his life at Trinity College. Much of the latter half of Young’s life was spent writing biographies of John Strachan and John Stuart, but these were left incomplete when he died in Toronto 6 April 1935.

Hortense Cathrine Fardell Wasteneys

  • F2259
  • Person
  • 1923-1996

Hortense Catherine Fardell Wasteneys (1923-1996), daughter of Hardolph Wasteneys, was a social worker, counselor, scholar, educator, and volunteer. Born on 27 September 1923, she lived her entire life in her childhood home in Toronto’s Annex neighbourhood where she was an active parishioner at St Thomas’ Anglican Church. Wasteneys was educated at St Mildred’s School and St Clement’s School. She completed her BA at Trinity College (1943-47) and maintained a lifelong commitment to the institution and its students. Wasteneys completed her MSW (1950) and DSW (1975) at the Faculty of Social Work of the University of Toronto. She also held a MEd from the University of Toronto, a MDiv (1993) from the Faculty of Divinity at Trinity College, and at the time of her death she was working towards her doctorate of divinity.

Wasteneys worked as a counselor, therapist and teacher, specializing in her later years in marital counseling. She had a home-based psychotherapy practice. Wasteneys was actively involved in life at Trinity College and served at various points as the Chair of Convocation (1977-79) and President of St Hilda’s Board of Trustees (1988). She was a long-serving member of the Board of Trustees at both Trinity College and St Hilda’s. She served as President of the St Hilda’s Alumnae Association and was a member of Corporation.

She died at Toronto on 25 September 1996.

Hardolph Wasteneys

  • F2259
  • Person
  • 1881-1965

Hardolph Wasteneys (1881-1965), biochemist and university professor, was born in Richmond, England, in April 1881. He received his PhD in biochemistry (1916) from Columbia University in New York City. Before he was hired as a Professor of Biochemistry at the University of Toronto in 1918, he held various positions including Assistant Government Chemist in Queensland, Australia (1900-03), Chemist and Biologist, Board of Waterworks, Brisbane, Australia (1903-09), Assistant, Rockefeller Institute (1910-13), Associate, Rockfeller Institute (1913-1916), and Assistant Professor, Pharmacology, University of California (1916-18). Wasteneys was Head of the Department of Biochemistry at the University of Toronto between 1928 and 1951.

From 1918 until his death, Wasteneys lived in Toronto’s Annex neighbourhood and kept a country house, Headon, in West Hill, Ontario. He was extremely active in Toronto community organizations. Positions he held include: Chairman, Central Committee on Education and Recreation for Unemployed (1929-34); Chairman, Community Gardens Association (1932-43); and Chairman, Board of Directors, University Settlement (1938-53).

Hardolph Wasteneys was married to Clare Miller. They had four children: Hardolph, Geoffrey, Hortense, and Gervase. He died at Toronto on 1 February 1965.

Beatrice Mary Scott

  • F2028
  • Person
  • 1899-1978

Beatrice Mary Scott Turner, educator and volunteer, was born about 1899 in Millbrook, Ontario. She was the daughter of Henry Allen Turner Jr (died 1951), a graduate of Trinity Medical College, and Alice Jane Scott. Turner received her early education in Millbrook and entered Trinity College in 1915. After graduating with a BA in 1919 she lived in Hamilton and taught at Kingsthorpe, a private girls‟ school. She then returned to Millbrook to care for her mother and while there took an active interest in the community, especially her church and the local branch of the Red Cross. She eventually settled in Toronto and was active in the St Hilda‟s College Alumnae Association and was Year Group Convenor for the years prior to 1922. She kept the Alumnae well informed of College activities either personally or by correspondence as well as keeping Convocation up to date with news of alumnae. In 1975 she was elected to the Corporation of Trinity College. She was involved in the Altar Guild and the Women‟s Auxiliary at the Church of St Alban the Martyr and worked closely with St Andrew‟s Japanese Congregation. She was made a life member of the Women‟s Auxiliary of the Diocese of Toronto and was an active member of the Diocesan Chancel Guild. At the time of her death she was a member of Christ Church, Deer Park. She died at Toronto on 12 August 1978.

Trinity College, Faculty of Music

  • F1016
  • Corporate body
  • 1851-1904

The University of Trinity College was founded in Toronto in 1851, receiving its royal charter in 1852. It had degree-granting rights in arts, divinity, medicine, and law. Although no Faculty of Music had been formed, on 28 April 1853 Trinity appointed George William Strathy to be professor of music. On 1 June 1853, he was granted a Bachelor of Music (B.Mus.) and in 1858 a Doctor of Music (D.Mus.). Strathy was listed in the College’s calendar throughout the 1860s and early 1870s. However, he seems to have given only occasional lectures until the 1878-79 academic sessions when he formed a class in music theory.

In the April 1881 edition of the student magazine Rouge et Noir, students complained about the neglected state of music education at the College. Later that year there was an application from a candidate for examination in music. That same year Trinity formally created a Faculty of Music; however, its mandate was only to administer examinations.

Candidates for the B.Mus. degree had to provide evidence of five years of musical study, to compose “a song or anthem in four parts, and perform the same publicly,” and to pass an examination in Theory. The doctorate required evidence of eight years of study along with the composition and performance of a part song or anthem in six or eight parts with orchestral accompaniment.

Requirements were changed in 1883 so that B.Mus. candidates had to pass three annual examinations, in harmony, counterpoint, history of music, form in composition, and instrumentation, and to compose an exercise in at least four parts with accompaniment. No arts subjects were required. Three years after obtaining a B.Mus. a student could achieve a D.Mus. Women were allowed to take the B.Mus. examination and received a certificate of passing, but were not granted degrees until 1885. Emma Stanton Mellish, later a theory teacher at the Toronto Conservatory of Music, and Helen Emma Gregory (MacGill), later a judge, were the first female graduates of Trinity. Each received a B.Mus. in 1886.

In 1885 England's Musical Standard, with information gleaned from a United States journal, published Trinity's curriculum and examination papers. Practising musicians, deterred from pursuing music degrees in British universities which had arts prerequisites, requested that Trinity hold music examinations in England. Since Trinity's charter allowed it 'all such and like privileges as are enjoyed by the Universities of our United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland,' Trinity felt entitled legally to decide in favour of simultaneous London and Toronto examinations. In the same year it rejected an application for affiliation from London's Trinity College, a music school. It appointed a former Trinity professor of mathematics,
Edward K. Kendall, to serve as acting registrar in England and subsequently named as examiners for England and Canada Edward John Hopkins, William Henry Longhurst, and Edwin Matthew Lott, all prominent English church organists on whom Trinity conferred honorary doctorates in 1886. The program began after stiffening its matriculation requirements to meet British standards. Students had to produce certificates of character, 'satisfactory evidence of attainments' in general education, and certificates showing five years of musical study and practice.

In 1889 the College's Faculty of Music became affiliated with the Toronto Conservatory of Music. This affiliation exempted conservatory students from having to take some of the faculty’s examinations. In 1890 the Faculty of Music also held examinations in New York. By the end of that year the Faculty had granted 5 honorary and 9 in-course doctorates as well as 1 honorary and 86 in-course bachelor degrees, the majority to British candidates.

The intrusion of a Canadian university into Britain occasioned the publication of increasingly numerous complaints in British music journals. In 1890, 35 prominent musicians submitted to Lord Knutsford, the colonial secretary, "memorials" condemning Trinity's practice of granting in absentia degrees in England and stating that Trinity was lowering standards by not requiring literary examinations. As well, these musicians felt that Trinity had overstepped its powers and that its activities could open the door to bogus degrees. In addition to the memorials, music journals and newspapers took up the cause against the Trinity degrees. Trinity College's provost, C.W.E. Body, hurried to England but failed to counter the criticism and as of 1 February 1891 the University of Trinity College decided to discontinue the examinations in London and New York.

In 1900 Trinity established a board of musical studies to oversee the affairs of the faculty and to name examiners. However, when Trinity became a federated college of the University of Toronto in 1904, its Faculty of Music came to an end after having granted 161 B.Mus. degrees (including 1 honorary) and 34 D.Mus. degrees (including 6 honorary). Affiliation with the Toronto Conservatory of Music was also terminated at this time.

Charles E. Stanbury

  • F2234
  • Person
  • 1863-1938

Dr. Charles Edward Stanbury, raised and educated in Toronto, was a practicing physician in Chicago, Illinois during the later part of his life. He was born in 1863 in Cornwall, England, son of Henry Stanbury and Susanne Free, who settled in the town of Yorkville. In 1881 Stanbury was living in the St. James Ward area of Toronto and in 1891 was employed as a stenographer. He graduated from Trinity College Medical School in 1897, at the age of 34. About 1904 Charles left Toronto. According to Ellis Island Passenger arrival lists, Dr. Stanbury arrived in the United States from Vera Cruz, Mexico in 1904. He subsequently settled and practiced in Chicago.

Stanbury was married to Amanda Nourse and had four children in Toronto: Charles H., Amanda Joy, Ewart D., and Bessie Bernice. Dr. Stanbury returned to the United States from Mexico accompanied by a second wife, Olive (nee Peterson). Amanda Nourse Stanbury remained in Toronto with their children and died in Toronto at age 73. Charles Stanbury died in Chicago on July 12, 1938 and is buried in the Rosehill Cemetery.

St Hilda's Alumnae Association/St Hilda's College Council

  • F2142
  • Corporate body
  • 1888-2007

On 5 June 1897 a group of alumnae decided that there were now enough graduates of St Hilda’s College (namely 22) to form an alumnae association. The first official meeting of the St Hilda’s College Alumnae Association (SHCAA) took place on 17 November 1897. The objectives of the association set out at that meeting were to assist (1) in placing the College on a self-supporting basis, (2) in acquiring a suitable building for the College, (3) in providing a scholarship fund, (4) in fostering among graduates a spirit of interest in College affairs. It was also agreed that women who had been students at the College would be eligible to be associate members of the association. The annual fee was to be 50 cents (June 1898) but it was also urged that members donate one book a year to the library and in 1900 the association agreed to furnish one room in the new building which opened in 1938. The association’s constitution was revised many times over the years as it developed more and more activities. The association was represented in various other organizations and was active in raising funds through its own social activities (eg teas, lectures, art shows) and through support for the general activities of Trinity College. During the war the association was deeply involved in support of the St. Hilda’s School (Whitby England) which had been evacuated to Canada in 1940. In 1921 the St Hilda’s College Council was created to deal with of the work of the executive committee but in 1965 that council was dissolved and its activities reverted to the SHCAA (see series 2). In June 1981 it was proposed that the St Hilda’s Board of Trustees (whose function was to deal with monies specifically linked to St Hilda’s) be more formally constituted. The SHCAA remained active during subsequent decades but as of 2016 it is dormant.

Senior Common Room

  • F2244
  • Corporate body
  • 1945-2010

The Senior Common Room (SCR) constitutes a distinct entity within Trinity College, subject only to the authority of the Board of Trustees, to which it reports (if necessary) through the Provost. The Senior Common Room controls the use of the rooms known as the Senior Common Room, the Combination Room, the Private Dining Room, and the High Table in Strachan Hall, in accordance with its constitution and by-laws as enacted from time to time. The Senior Common Room serves meals and holds events for members and special guests throughout the year.

When the East and West wings of Trinity College were constructed, a Senior Common Room was included in the plans, adjacent to Strachan Hall. According to a “Sub-committee on matters affecting the whole staff with regard to the new building,” the SCR should be open to all members of the staff, men and women, and their personal guests; tea should be served, and a Committee should be set up to make recommendations regarding the SCR. The sub-committee noted that “the high table in Hall is necessarily restricted to men.” In 1942, a Common Room Committee was established, consisting of the Dean of Residence (ex-officio) and three members elected by the College Committee, “of whom one shall retire annually and not be eligible for immediate re-election.” In 1968 the College Committee was renamed the Academic Council and in 1968 this body was split to form the Committee of the Teaching Staff and the Trinity College Council. At this time, it was recommended that the SCR become a self-governing body, with its own constitution. The first meeting of the Senior Common Room as a distinct entity was held on 29 April 1968.

Rupert M . Schieder

  • F2090
  • Person
  • 1915-2008

Rupert Schieder, Professor of English Literature, was born on 8 September 1915, in Fort Frances, Ontario, the son of Francis Joseph and Alice Mary Schieder. His early education was in Atitokan and Port Arthur, after which he attended Trinity College, graduating in 1938. He taught in Princeton, Ontario, and Port Arthur, Ontario, before serving in the RCAF (Radar) from 1942 to 1945. After the war he earned his MA in English from the University of Toronto in 1947. From 1951 to 1948 he taught at the Canadian Services College Royal Roads in Victoria, where he became Head of Department. During this time he completed his doctorate in English at the University of Toronto, graduating in 1954. In 1958 he returned to Trinity College, where he remained until his retirement in 1981, having achieved the rank of full Professor in 1973. After his retirement he taught literary seminars for Trinity graduates through the Office of Convocation.

Professor Schieder’s interest in music led to twenty-five years as head of the Music Committee at Hart House. He was a longstanding member of the Arts and Letters Club, a committee volunteer for the AIDS Committee of Toronto, and an inveterate traveler, visiting former students and friends around the world. He was made an Honorary Fellow of Trinity College in 1993. He served on the Executive Committee of the Friends of the Library, and was President from 1985 to 1991. In 1995 he was given an Arbor Award in recognition of his services to Trinity College and Hart House. He died in Toronto on 3 September 2008.

Alice Rosamond Lloyd

  • f2343
  • Person
  • 1927-2013

Alice Rosamond ‘Roz’ Lloyd was born in Govan, Saskatchewan, on 13 November 1927. She attended Trinity College, University of Toronto, graduating with her BA in business in 1949. While at Trinity College she played varsity hockey and volleyball. After graduation she worked at Avro Aircraft and De Havilland Aircraft in the guided missile division. In 1954 her interest in aviation led her to get her private pilot’s license. Lloyd was also a member of the Ninety Nines International Women’s Flying Club and met and married her husband, Douglas Edgar Robinson, at the Toronto Flying Club in May 1956. Douglas E. Robinson was born in Vancouver, British Columbia, on 17 June 1923 and was a commercial pilot.

Rosamond Lloyd Robinson and Douglas Edgar Robinson had one child, Diana, in 1961. Douglas Robinson died on 4 December 2001 in Brampton, Ontario. Rosamond Lloyd Robinson died on 25 July 2013 in Orangeville, Ontario.

Mossie May Waddington

  • F2301
  • Person
  • 1907-1985

Mossie May Waddington was born in Toronto, Ontario, on 6 February 1890 to Herbert and Edna (née Dell) Waddington. She attended St Clement’s School and in 1907 matriculated at Trinity College. Waddington received her Bachelor of Arts degree in 1911 in English and History, with the Classical option. She next received her MA degree in English from the University of Toronto in 1913.

In 1915, due to the First World War and the consequent absence of men, she was asked to replace a Greek lecturer at Trinity College and later taught Latin as well. In 1919 she achieved a PhD in Philosophy from the University of Toronto. In the same year Waddington became a lecturer in English at University College, the first woman to hold a permanent teaching position in something other than household science or modern languages. She served as the head of the University College Women’s Union from 1921 until 1923. From 1923 until 1929 she acted as the first Dean of Women at University College. In 1933 she was elected President of the University Women’s Club, but resigned from it in 1936, along with her professorship at University College. In this year she returned to Trinity College as Principal of St Hilda’s and Dean of Women as well as Associate Professor of English. She was an advocate for women’s education and the right for them to have satisfying lives and careers. She also gave evening lectures for women interested in continuing their studies.

In 1953 Kirkwood resigned from her administrative duties but remained in the English Department at Trinity as the first woman to hold a full professorship, and when she retired in 1960 she became the first woman to be named Professor Emeritus. In September of that year the north wing of St Hilda’s College was opened and named in her honour. In 1977
Trinity College bestowed upon her the degree of Doctor of Sacred Letters (honoris causa). Kirkwood was also the author of several books: The Development of British Thought, 1820-1890 (her doctoral dissertation); Duty and Happiness in a Changed World; Women in the Machine Age; For College Women and Men; and Santayana, Saint of the Imagination.

She married William Alexander Kirkwood in August 1923. William A. Kirkwood was born at Rockside in Peel County, Ontario, in April 1873. He attended public and high school in Brampton before attending the University of Toronto where he received an MA in Classics. William A. Kirkwood then went on to study at the University of Chicago and Harvard
University, earning his doctorate. Kirkwood taught high school in Walkerton, Ontario, in 1896 and at Ridley College in St Catharines from 1897 to 1903. In 1909 he became a lecturer in Classics at Trinity College, a position he held until 1939. Kirkwood served as Registrar at Trinity College from 1914 to 1923, Dean of Arts from 1924 to 1943, and Clerk of Convocation from 1939 until his retirement.

Mossie May Kirkwood and William Alexander Kirkwood had three children. David H.W. Kirkwood was born 8 August 1924 and graduated with a BA in Physics from Trinity College in 1945. He married Diana in 1953. Naomi E.M. Kirkwood was born 30 March 1928 and graduated from Trinity College in 1949 (BA in Modern History and Languages) before marrying Tilo Kuhn in 1956. John M.M. Kirkwood was born 7 June 1934 and graduated from Trinity College in 1956.

William A. Kirkwood died 15 October 1960 in Toronto and Mossie May Kirkwood died 19 May 1985.

Michael Keith Hicks

  • F2074
  • Person
  • 1927-

Michael Keith Hicks, clergyman and civil servant, was born ca.1927. He attended University of Toronto Schools and then Trinity College, obtaining a BA in 1949 and an MA in 1950. He worked for the government of Canada and lives in Ottawa with his wife Barbara Findlay. They have three daughters.

Maud Jocelyn Hicks

  • F2074
  • Person
  • 1925-2008

Maud Jocelyn Hicks, broadcaster, teacher, and writer, was born circa 1925. She attended Havergal College, 1942-1943, and then Trinity College, 1945-1946. She married John Smart and then John MacLean. She had three sons. She died in 2008 in Oakville.

Douglas Barcham Hicks

  • F2074
  • Person
  • 1917-1984

Douglas Barcham Hicks, diplomat, was born in 1917. He attended University of Toronto Schools and the University of Toronto, graduating in 1939 with a BA. He was employed by the Department of External Affairs beginning in 1944 and served in important diplomatic posts in a number of African states in the 1970s, including high commissioner to Ghana, 1968-1971, and ambassador to Ethiopia, 1975-1978. He married Elizabeth Maud Stones and they had four children, three daughters and one son. He died in 1984 in Ottawa.

Anthony Rivers Hicks

  • f2074
  • Person
  • 1916-1998

Anthony Rivers Hicks, naval officer, business executive, was born ca.1916. He attended Upper Canada College and entered Trinity College in 1933, graduating with a BA in 1938. He was in active service with the Royal Canadian Navy from August 1940. Later in life, he became an executive with the Sun Life Company and lived in Montreal. He married Jeanne Sargent and they had two children. He died in 1998 in Montreal.

John Edgar Hicks

  • F2074
  • Person
  • 1914-1999

John Edgar Hicks, chartered accountant, was born circa 1914. He attended Lakefield Preparatory School and Upper Canada College and as a teenager worked as a caddy in Jasper, Alberta. He attended the Institute of Chartered Accountants of Ontario until 1941. He worked for the Bank of Montreal, 1931-1932, and for Welch Anderson, Chartered Accountants, 1932-1939, before working for Tropical Oil Company in Colombia, 1939-1941. He developed an interest in aviation, joining the RCAF. He married Catherine (Kiki) Bethune. They had eleven children. He died in 1999 in Chemainus, British Columbia.

Rivers Keith Hicks

  • F2074
  • Person
  • 1878-1964

Rivers Keith Hicks (RKH), university professor, was born in 1878 in Highbury Terrace, London, England, to Rivers Hicks (1854-1940) and Edith (Barcham) Hicks (1857-1904). The family moved soon after to Surrey. He was brother to Graham Barcham (b. 1879), Peter Rivers (b.1881), Ruth (b.1882), Edith (b.1883), Gilbert (b.1885), Louisa (b.1887), and John (b.1891).

RKH was educated at Cranleigh School, Surrey, and Emmanuel College, Cambridge, where he took the Mathematics tripos in 1901. He was assistant master at Routenburn School, Ayrshire, 1901, Cranleigh School, 1901-4, and Highgate School, London, 1904-7.

In 1907, RKH came to Canada and was an assistant master at Upper Canada College until 1911. He obtained an MA from Harvard in 1912. He was an instructor at Harvard and Dartmouth during that time. He returned to Canada to become an associate professor of French at Queen’s University, Kingston, in 1916. He left in 1925 to serve as special investigator for the Canadian Committee on Modern Languages and helped produce the two-volume report Modern Language Instruction in Canada (1928).

In 1927, RKH became Professor of Modern Languages at Trinity College, Toronto, and was named the first W.R. Brock Professor of French. He taught old French, philology, Renaissance literature, and eighteenth-century Literature. He became Registrar in 1943 and Dean of Arts in 1949, holding both positions until 1953. He wrote a number of textbooks, including The Reading Approach to French (1930), A New French Reader (1937), an abridged version of Prosper Mérimée’s Columba (1931), and an abridged version of Valentine Bonhoure’s Le Trésor de Châteauvieux (1935) as well as several standardized grammar tests incorporating the new approaches advocated in the committee’s report. He published an English translation of the first French play ever produced in Canada in 1608, Marc Lescarbot’s Théâtre de Neptune (1947). He also published an English translation of French-Canadian folk songs, Douze chansons canadiennes (1958). He had an interest in poetry and drama, serving as an honorary president of the Trinity College Dramatic Society, a member of the Board of Syndics of Hart House Theatre, and a director of the Crest Theatre. He died on 27 March 1964 in Toronto.

In 1911, RKH met Marjorie Ogilvy Edgar (1886-1951), daughter of Sir James David Edgar (1841-1899) and Matilda Ridout (1845-1910). They married in 1913. Marjorie was an amateur actress and writer, and an avid golfer and badminton player. She died on 21 May 1951 in Toronto. They had five children: John Edgar, Anthony Rivers, Douglas Barcham, Maud Jocelyn, and Michael Keith.

T.A Reed

  • F2173
  • Person
  • 1871-1958

Thomas Arthur Reed, musician, author, and historian, was born on 25 September, 1871 and was raised in Toronto. He was the son of William and Isabella Joyce Reed. He attended Dufferin School and Jarvis Collegiate Institute before entering the Toronto Conservatory of Music, where he obtained an ATCM (Gold Medal, Theory) in 1900. He then entered Trinity College, Toronto, and graduated with a Bachelor of Music in 1901. He became an organist at St. Augustine’s Church and started a choir. Reed had been a pupil of Augustus Vogt, the organist at the Jarvis Street Baptist Church, and in 1894, when Vogt founded the Mendelssohn Choir, Reed become the Choir’s secretary, a position he held for close to thirty years. In 1906 Reed began working at the University of Toronto as a clerk in the bursar’s office and in 1914 was appointed secretary of the Athletic Association, a position he held until his retirement in 1947. Reed also served as a member of the executive committee of the Corporation of Trinity College, president and member of the York Pioneers, and a
member of the Ontario Historical Society.

Reed was an authority on the early history of Toronto and, from 1921, lectured extensively on the history of Toronto to audiences around the city. He used lantern slides during these lectures and was reported to have a collection of over six-hundred pictures and photographs documenting Toronto from its beginnings in the late eighteenth to the mid-twentieth century. He annotated programmes of the Toronto Mendelssohn Choir, 1909-1929. He authored "Our Royal Town of York" (1929); "The Historic Value of Street Names" (1939); "The Scaddings, a Pioneer Family" (1940); "The Blue and White" (1944), a record of fifty years of athletics at the University of Toronto; and "A History of the University of Trinity College, 1852-1952" (1952). His wife, Claudia, established a scholarship in his name at Innis College, University of Toronto.

Reed married Claudia Marguerite Stuttaford (b.1897) on 22 June 1920. Their daughter, Eleanor Margaret, married John Blake Gartshore in 1947.

Thomas Arthur Reed died on 12 March, 1958 in Toronto and Claudia Reed died on 15 April 1988 in Ancaster, Ontario. Eleanor Gartshore died in Ancaster on 11 November 1980.

Carolyn Purden

  • F2336
  • Person
  • 1941-

Carolyn Purden, reporter, editor and communications consultant, was born in 1941 in Solihull, Warwickshire, England, to Patrick and Irene Purden, and has a younger sister Christine. She came to Canada in 1952 and attended Havergal College from 1954 to 1959. She then attended Trinity College, graduating in 1962. She was married to David Greenwood from 1964 to 1973, and to the Rev. Tom Anthony from 1973 to 1980. She has two children, Stephen born in 1976 and Jennifer born in 1979.

As a reporter with the Canadian Churchman, Purden attended the 1968 Lambeth Conference where the ordination of women as deacons was debated. She became a strong advocate of women’s ordination issues through feature articles and editorials. Rising through the ranks at the Canadian Churchman, she covered the issue of women’s ordination as it was debated at the church’s triennial General Synod, National Executive Council (the predecessor of the Council of General Synod), and Canadian diocesan synods. She attended the Church of England General Synod, and other international Anglican gatherings, to cover their debates on the ordination of women. She interviewed archbishops, bishops, and a number of women who felt their vocation as priests had been denied them. In 1974 she attended the irregular ordination of the ‘Philadelphia Eleven’ and reported first hand on that event and its prolonged legal and theological aftermath in the Episcopal Church. She wrote on the subject of ordination to the priesthood for several overseas publications. After Canada began ordaining women as priests, she covered the issue of women in the episcopacy up to and including the ordination of Canada’s first woman bishop, Victoria Matthews.
In 1971 Purden accompanied Rev. Donald Clark, The Anglican Church of Canada’s Asia secretary, on an eight-week trip around the world, visiting Ethiopia, India, Myanmar, Thailand, Hong Kong, Japan and Okinawa. Mr. Clark was visiting Anglican Church-supported projects to review their work. Purden’s assignment was to cover Mr. Clark’s meetings and to visit other relief projects throughout the region.

Carolyn Purden is the president of Purden Communications, a corporate communications consulting service, in Toronto.

Frederick Parker

  • F2328
  • Person
  • 1864-1914

Frederick Parker was born in 1864 in Ellice Township, Perth County, Ontario. He graduated with an MD CM from Trinity Medical School in 1895, the gold medalist for his year. After graduation in 1895, he practiced at Bruce Mines, Algoma, until 1903 where he was also a member of town council. He moved to Milverton for ten years, where he was a member of council and a school trustee. He then practiced in Sault Ste. Marie and retired to Stratford, where he died on 11 July 1914 at the age of 48. He was a member of the Masons, the Oddfellows, Foresters and Orangemen. He married Linnie Margaret Kastner in 1896 and the couple had two daughters, Margaret and Mary.

Derwyn Randolph Grier Owen

  • f2100
  • Person
  • 1914-1997

Derwyn Randolph Grier Owen, Anglican clergyman and administrator, was born on 16 May 1914, the son of Derwyn Owen and Nora Grier Jellet. He attended Ridley College in St. Catharine's from 1928 to 1932 and then Trinity College, where he took honours in Classics, graduating with a BA and the Governor General's Medal in 1936. He studied next at Corpus Christi College, Oxford, 1936-1938, and the Union Theological Seminary, New York, 1940-1941. He was ordained deacon in 1941 and priest in 1942 and completed his PhD in philosophy at the University of Toronto the same year, while teaching at Trinity College. In 1942 he enlisted in the Canadian army and served as chaplain in the Westminster Regiment, 5th Division, on campaigns in Italy and Holland. He returned to Canada in 1946 and resumed his post as lecturer and head of the Department of Religious Knowledge at Trinity. In 1957 he was elected Provost of Trinity College and served in that capacity until 1971 when he resigned to continue teaching. He served as Professor of Religious Studies until his retirement in 1979. Owen published several books, including Scientism, Man and Religion (1952), Body and Soul (1956), Social Thought and Anglican Theology (1980), and Trinity College: Past, Present and Future (1964).

Derwyn Owen married Anne Kathleen Armour in 1942 and they had three children: Laurie, David, and Timothy. He died on 23 April 1997 in Toronto, Ontario.

Harris Family

  • F2050
  • Family
  • 1829-1955

Richard Homan Harris (1829-1908) was born in Cork, Ireland. He taught for a time near Cork and also in Montreal and area, having relocated after his family had immigrated to Montreal. He next studied at Trinity College, Toronto, graduating with honours in 1860 from a double course in arts and theology. He was ordained deacon on 14 October 1860 by Bishop John Strachan. Harris chose the mission field, serving parishes in Orillia (Ont.) and region, as well as Omemee, and later Brighton and Weston. While working in Orillia, he met and married Collinette De Grassi, and they had two children. Widowed in May 1874, the following June he married Olivia Colter Cottingham, and they had three children. At the time of his death, he was residing in Toronto. He was buried in Orillia.

Collinette Virginia Beaumaris Harris (1872-1955), daughter of Richard Homan Harris and Collinette De Grassi, was one of the first graduates of the Church of England Deaconess Missionary Training House in Toronto. She served as a missionary in Egypt for 16 years. At the time of her death, she was a resident of Hamilton, Ont. She was buried in Orillia.

Keith MacMillan

  • F2346
  • Person
  • 1920-1991

Keith Campbell MacMillan (1920–1991) was a composer, administrator, writer, editor, and educator. Hewas born in Toronto on September 23, 1920, son of the eminent conductor, composer, organist, and educator Sir Ernest MacMillan and Laura Elsie Keith. He attended Upper Canada College and studied piano, music theory, and organ privately. He enrolled at Trinity College, studying mainly biology.

MacMillan graduated from Trinity College with a BA in 1949 and received an MA in 1951 from the University of Toronto. The following year he founded Hallmark Recordings and became a CBC Radio producer. In 1964, he was named executive director of the Canadian Music Centre. His advocacy of Canadian music included writing, lecturing, and consulting. MacMillan was chair of the music department at the University of Ottawa from 1977 until his retirement in 1985.

Keith MacMillan met his wife, Helen Patricia (“Pat”) Dustan, at Trinity College; they married in 1949. They had four children. Keith died on May 20, 1991 in Toronto.
[Sources include Canadian Encyclopedia and the Toronto Star obituary of Helen Patricia (“Pat”) Dustan: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/thestar/obituary.aspx?pid=182489208]

Frances Isobel Lawson

  • F2103
  • Person
  • 1910-1991

Frances Isobel Lawson (née Garbutt) was born on 30 April 1910 in Percy Township, Ontario. Lawson worked at Trinity College from the 1960s to the 1980s in the Office of Convocation. For much of that period she was responsible for maintaining records on graduates of the College and compiling the personal notices in the “Convocation Bulletin” (later Trinity magazine) as well as organizing such events as the Theological Education Sunday. She came to know clerical graduates of the College in particular very well.

Frances Isobel Garbutt married Arthur Wendell Phillips Lawson on 17 June 1947 in Toronto, Ontario. He died in 1952 in Ohio. Frances Isobel Lawson died on 17 August 1991 in Toronto.

Archibald Lampman and Duncan Campell Scott

  • F2111
  • Person
  • 1861-1899 1862-1947

Archibald Lampman, poet and civil servant, was born on 17 November 1861 in Morpeth, County Kent, Ontario, the son of the Reverend Archibald Lampman and Susannah Charlotte Gesner. He attended a school at Gore's Landing, Ontario (run by Frederick William Barron), Cobourg Collegiate Institute, and Trinity College School, Port Hope, before entering the University of Trinity College, Toronto. He was Wellington Scholar, wrote for the College journal Rouge et Noir (predecessor of Trinity University Review) and was editor in his final year, 1881-82. Lampman was a member of the Trinity College Literary Institute and was Scribe of the two books of Episkopon (the reading of the Episkopon volumes was an annual ritual of the college) in 1881 and 1882. He also contributed to "The Week." He graduated with a BA in 1882. Lampman tried teaching but soon left that profession and entered the Canadian civil service in January of 1883 as a clerk in the Post Office Department.

In 1887 Lampman’s verse began to appear in magazines such as Scribner's, Harper's, Arcadia, Canadian Illustrated News, Atlantic Monthly, and Century. In 1888 he published his first volume, Among the Millet and Other Poems. From February 1892 to July 1893, Lampman, William Wilfred Campbell, and Duncan Campbell Scott wrote a Saturday column for the Toronto Globe titled "At the Mermaid Inn." He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada in 1895, was a member of the Social Science Club in Ottawa and a member of the Fabian Society. He published a second volume, Lyrics of Earth (printed in 1895 and released in 1896) and a third, Alcyone, and other Poems, was in the press at the time of his death. It was held back by Duncan Campbell Scott in favour of a comprehensive memorial volume (1900).

Lampman married Maud Emma Playter on 3 September 1887, in Ottawa, and they had three children: Natalie Charlotte, Arnold Gesner, and Archibald Otto. He died on 10 February 1899 in Ottawa.

Duncan Campbell Scott, author and civil servant, was born on 2 August 1862 in Ottawa, Ontario, the son of the Reverend William Scott and Janet McCallum. He attended public schools and Stanstead Wesley Academy. He became a third-class clerk in the Department of Indian Affairs in 1880. In 1893 he was promoted to Chief Accountant. He was made superintendent of Indian Education in 1909 and was deputy superintendent-general from 1913 to 1932.

Scott was the author of The Magic House and Other Poems (1893), In the Village of Viger (1896), The Magic House: Labor and the Angel (1898), New World Lyrics and Ballads (1905), John Graves Simcoe (1905), Lundy's Lane and Other Poems (1916), Beauty and Life (1921), The Poems of Duncan Campbell Scott (1926), and contributed poetry and prose to many of the same magazines and journals as Lampman. He was a companion of the Order of St. Michael and St. George, a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada (honorary secretary, 1911-1921, and president 1921). He was also a member of the Royal Society of Literature and president of the Canadian Authors Association in 1931.

Beverly Jones

  • F2097
  • Person
  • 1839-1934

Beverley Jones was a lawyer who was born 11 June 1839 in Brockville, Ontario, one of three children of Sidney Jones and Susan Ford. Jones was educated at Brockville Grammar School and Upper Canada College before graduating with a BA in 1860 and an MA in 1877, both from Trinity College. He was called to the bar in 1864 and began working in the office of his cousins, Jones Brothers. In 1961 he enlisted in the volunteers at Brockville during the Trent Excitement and served in the Queen’s Own Rifles during the Fenian Raid of 1866.

In 1864 Jones joined the Canada Permanent Mortgage Co. as a solicitor and remained in an advisory role there until his death. In 1873 Jones became the bursar of Bishop Strachan
School, a private school for girls in Toronto. Jones served as a delegate to the diocesan synod for nearly 50 years as a representative of the congregation of St. George’s Church. He also served as secretary of the Canada Law Amendment Association, and was one of the founders of the Industrial Schools Association, serving as treasurer for 30 years. Jones was
committed to providing homes for children and established industrial schools for boys and girls, founding the Victoria and Alexandra schools in Mimico and East Toronto. In Jones 1888 drafted the bill known as the Juvenile Offenders Act which provided for a separate trial for juveniles and allowed children under age fourteen to be committed to certain institutions or charitable societies to be taken care of and educated.

Beverley Jones died in Toronto, Ontario in 1934, at age 95.

Hicks Family

  • F2074
  • Family
  • 1898-1979

Rivers Keith Hicks (RKH), university professor, was born in 1878 in Highbury Terrace, London, England, to Rivers Hicks (1854-1940) and Edith (Barcham) Hicks (1857-1904). The family moved soon after to Surrey. He was brother to Graham Barcham (b. 1879), Peter Rivers (b.1881), Ruth (b.1882), Edith (b.1883), Gilbert (b.1885), Louisa (b.1887), and John (b.1891).
RKH was educated at Cranleigh School, Surrey, and Emmanuel College, Cambridge, where he took the Mathematics tripos in 1901. He was assistant master at Routenburn School, Ayrshire, 1901, Cranleigh School, 1901-4, and Highgate School, London, 1904-7.

In 1907, RKH came to Canada and was an assistant master at Upper Canada College until 1911. He obtained an MA from Harvard in 1912. He was an instructor at Harvard and Dartmouth during that time. He returned to Canada to become an associate professor of French at Queen’s University, Kingston, in 1916. He left in 1925 to serve as special investigator for the Canadian Committee on Modern Languages and helped produce the two-volume report Modern Language Instruction in Canada (1928).

In 1927, RKH became Professor of Modern Languages at Trinity College, Toronto, and was named the first W.R. Brock Professor of French. He taught old French, philology, Renaissance literature, and eighteenth-century Literature. He became Registrar in 1943 and Dean of Arts in 1949, holding both positions until 1953. He wrote a number of textbooks, including The Reading Approach to French (1930), A New French Reader (1937), an abridged version of Prosper Mérimée’s Columba (1931), and an abridged version of Valentine Bonhoure’s Le Trésor de Châteauvieux (1935) as well as several standardized grammar tests incorporating the new approaches advocated in the committee’s report. He published an English translation of the first French play ever produced in Canada in 1608, Marc Lescarbot’s Théâtre de Neptune (1947). He also published an English translation of French-Canadian folk songs, Douze chansons canadiennes (1958). He had an interest in poetry and drama, serving as an honorary president of the Trinity College Dramatic Society, a member of the Board of Syndics of Hart House Theatre, and a director of the Crest Theatre. He died on 27 March 1964 in Toronto.

In 1911, RKH met Marjorie Ogilvy Edgar (1886-1951), daughter of Sir James David Edgar (1841-1899) and Matilda Ridout (1845-1910). They married in 1913. Marjorie was an amateur actress and writer, and an avid golfer and badminton player. She died on 21 May 1951 in Toronto. They had five children: John Edgar, Anthony Rivers, Douglas Barcham, Maud Jocelyn, and Michael Keith.

John Edgar Hicks, chartered accountant, was born circa 1914. He attended Lakefield Preparatory School and Upper Canada College and as a teenager worked as a caddy in Jasper, Alberta. He attended the Institute of Chartered Accountants of Ontario until 1941. He worked for the Bank of Montreal, 1931-1932, and for Welch Anderson, Chartered Accountants, 1932-1939, before working for Tropical Oil Company in Colombia, 1939-1941. He developed an interest in aviation, joining the RCAF. He married Catherine (Kiki) Bethune. They had eleven children. He died in 1999 in Chemainus, British Columbia.

Anthony Rivers Hicks, naval officer, business executive, was born ca.1916. He attended Upper Canada College and entered Trinity College in 1933, graduating with a BA in 1938. He was in active service with the Royal Canadian Navy from August 1940. Later in life, he became an executive with the Sun Life Company and lived in Montreal. He married Jeanne Sargent and they had two children. He died in 1998 in Montreal.

Douglas Barcham Hicks, diplomat, was born in 1917. He attended University of Toronto Schools and the University of Toronto, graduating in 1939 with a BA. He was employed by the Department of External Affairs beginning in 1944 and served in important diplomatic posts in a number of African states in the 1970s, including high commissioner to Ghana, 1968-1971, and ambassador to Ethiopia, 1975-1978. He married Elizabeth Maud Stones and they had four children, three daughters and one son. He died in 1984 in Ottawa.

Maud Jocelyn Hicks, broadcaster, teacher, and writer, was born circa 1925. She attended Havergal College, 1942-1943, and then Trinity College, 1945-1946. She married John Smart and then John MacLean. She had three sons. She died in 2008 in Oakville.

Michael Keith Hicks, clergyman and civil servant, was born ca.1927. He attended University of Toronto Schools and then Trinity College, obtaining a BA in 1949 and an MA in 1950. He worked for the government of Canada and lives in Ottawa with his wife Barbara Findlay. They have three daughters.

Harris Family

  • F2050
  • Family
  • 1855-1961

Richard Homan Harris (1829-1908) was born in Cork, Ireland. He taught for a time near Cork and also in Montreal and area, having relocated after his family had immigrated to Montreal. He next studied at Trinity College, Toronto, graduating with honours in 1860 from a double course in arts and theology. He was ordained deacon on 14 October 1860 by Bishop John Strachan. Harris chose the mission field, serving parishes in Orillia (Ont.) and region, as well as Omemee, and later Brighton and Weston. While working in Orillia, he met and married Collinette De Grassi, and they had two children. Widowed in May 1874, the following June he married Olivia Colter Cottingham, and they had three children. At the time of his death, he was residing in Toronto. He was buried in Orillia.

Collinette Virginia Beaumaris Harris (1872-1955), daughter of Richard Homan Harris and Collinette De Grassi, was one of the first graduates of the Church of England Deaconess Missionary Training House in Toronto. She served as a missionary in Egypt for 16 years. At the time of her death, she was a resident of Hamilton, Ont. She was buried in Orillia.

William Bertal Heeney

  • F2059
  • Person
  • 1873-1955

Willam Bertal Heeney, writer and Anglican clergyman, was born 18 February 1873 in Danford Lake, Quebec, and died in 1955. He was the son of Henry Heeney and Eleanor Jane Walsh. He was educated at Lachute Academy and then attended McGill University, where he received a BA in 1899. In 1900 he graduated from the Montreal Diocesan Theological College. He obtained a BD in 1915 from the University of Manitoba and a DD in 1929. He married Eva Marjorie Holland, daughter of R.H. Holland of Montreal, with whom he had a
son, Arnold, and a daughter.

In 1900 Heeney was ordained deacon. He was ordained priest in the following year and was rector of Christ Church, Belleville, from 1901 to 1905. Heeney moved to St George’s, Newport, Rhode Island, and lived there until 1908. He subsequently spent a short time in Barrie, Ontario, before becoming the chaplain of the 100th Winnipeg Grenadiers.

Heeney was the president of the Manitoba Children’s Aid Society, a member of the Executive Council General Synod, a member of the council of St. John’s College, and was made honorary canon of St. John’s Cathedral, Winnipeg. In addition, Heeney also served as the president of the Winnipeg Art Association, governor of the University of Manitoba, and held various administrative positions related to the Province of Rupert’s Land (notably, archivist and commissioner of the Diocese of Rupert’s Land). He was chairman of the Archive’s Committee of the General Synod, authored histories and fiction, and edited several church publications. He served as rector of St Luke’s Church, Winnipeg, from 1909 until his retirement in 1942, when he moved to Montreal. Heeney died in Ottawa on 12 April 1955.

Richard T. Hallock

  • F2157
  • Person
  • 1906-1980

Richard Treadwell Hallock was a scholar and professor who received a BA from Trinity College in 1929. Hallock was born on 5 April 1906 in Passaic, New Jersey, and attended Trinity from 1924 to 1929, receiving a degree in Oriental Languages. While at Trinity, Hallock was head of his year in 1926-1927, assisted at the Trinity Library in 1928-1929, and edited the Trinity Review. Hallock then studied Assyriology at the University of Chicago, receiving an MA in 1931 and a PhD in 1934.

In 1932 Hallock worked as an assistant on the Assyrian Dictionary project at the Oriental Institute of Chicago. In 1941 he was a civilian employee working on cryptography at the War Department. After the United States entered World War II, Hallock was a second lieutenant in military intelligence where he played an essential role in decrypting Soviet messages in the Verona project. Hallock continued to work in intelligence in Washington until 1947 when he returned to the University of Chicago Oriental Institute as a research fellow. Hallock was named associate professor in 1963, professor in 1970, and retired as professor emeritus in 1971.

From 1937 Hallock was part of a team that worked on the Persepolis Fortification tablets, publishing several articles and Persepolis Fortification Tablets (1969).

Richard T. Hallock married Dr Barbara Hull with whom he had two children: Gene and Nancy. Hallock died on 20 November 1980 in Chicago, Illinois.

Rachel Grover

  • F2014
  • Person
  • 1922-2015

Rachel K. Elmhurst was born in Birdsall, Ontario, in 1922, daughter of Gilbert J. Elmhurst. She was educated at Norwood High School and Trinity College, University of Toronto, and graduated in 1943 with a BA in English language and literature. She obtained her Bachelor of Library Science from the University of Toronto in 1963. She worked at the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library, University of Toronto, until her retirement.

In 1942 she married John Carleton Grover who predeceased her in 1993. They had one daughter, Charlotte Isabel Grover, who died 1 October 2003 at the age of 50, and one son, Tom. Rachel Grover died in Peterborough on 28 April 2015.

Charles Davidson Gossage

  • f2153
  • Person
  • 1901-1985

Charles Davidson Gossage was a medical doctor born about 1901 in Toronto to C.A. Gossage and Georgina Davidson. Gossage attended Jarvis Collegiate Institute before entering Trinity College in September 1917. Gossage entered medical school in 1919 and graduated from the University of Toronto with an MB in 1924. In September 1939 Gossage went into active service with the Royal Canadian Army Medical Corps and received the Order of the British Empire in December 1944. In 1950, Gossage, then director of the University Health Service, announced that he would give free medical care for injuries suffered in almost any university-sponsored athletic activity. In 1971 Gossage was appointed Esquire Bedell of Trinity College.

Gossage married Shirley West on 20 June 1934 in Westminster Central Church, Toronto. They had three children, Richard Cheyne, John, and Charles Patrick (BA Trinity College, 1961). Dr. Gossage died on 3 September, 1985.

George Grey

  • f2134
  • Person
  • 1915-1984

George Grey Falle, professor of English literature, was born on 12 May 1915 in Montreal to Georges Hoyles Falle and Janet Alice Pettigrew. He attended McGill University where he obtained a BA in 1935 and an MA in 1937. He then studied late 17th century literature with a particular emphasis on Dryden, receiving his PhD in 1952. The title of his doctoral thesis was ‘The Place of Letters in English Thought and Criticism between Hobbes and Locke: A Study in Critical Commentary.’ From 1941 to 1945 Falle served in the Royal Canadian Air Force.

Falle was a lecturer at McGill University, 1945 to1948, a teaching assistant at the University of Wisconsin, 1948 to 1951, and instructor and assistant professor at the University of New Hampshire, 1951 to 1954. He became assistant professor at Trinity College 1954, associate professor in 1961 and professor in 1968.

Falle was secretary of the Combined Departments of English, University of Toronto, 1964 to 1966 and chairman 1968 to 1970. He was a visiting fellow at King's College, Cambridge, in 1966, and chairman of the Music Committee at Hart House at the University of Toronto from 1966 to 1970. At the University of Toronto he was on the Library Committee; MA Committee; Programme Committee; Woodhouse Prize Committee in 1974, and a member of Senate. At Trinity College he was an active member of the Executive Committee of Corporation, sitting on its Policy and Planning Committee and the General Committee of Faculty Council and Academic Standards. He was Chairman of the Board of Stewards, and the Study Group. He served as President of the Johnson Society, Central Region. In honour of Falle a scholarship in undergraduate English was set up in his name at Trinity College.

Falle published Three Restoration Comedies (1964), several articles and essays and was assistant editor of Journals and Letters of Fanny Burney, Madame d'Arblay, Vols. V and VI.

George Grey Falle died on 11 December 1984 in Toronto, Ontario.

Duckworth Family

  • f2062
  • Family
  • 1834-1927

Robinson Duckworth, clergyman, was born at Liverpool, 4 December 1834 and died 20 September 1911. He was the second son of Robinson Duckworth and Elizabeth Forbes Nicol (1803-1868) (daughter of William Nicol, M.D.). He attended the Royal Institution School, Liverpool, and Liverpool College. Duckworth matriculated 19 March 1853 and was elected to an open scholarship at University College, Oxford. He attained a first class Classics BA in 1857 and was Assistant Master at Marlborough from 1857 to 1860. He achieved an MA 1859 and was fellow at Trinity from 1860 to 1876 (tutor until 1866). He was made examining Chaplain to Bishop of Peterborough in 1864. In 1867, at the special request of Queen Victoria, he was made tutor to HRH the Duke of Albany (Prince Leopold) and was the Prince's Governor from 1867-70. He was Vicar of St. Mark's, Hamilton Terrace, London 1870-1906, Chaplain in Ordinary to Queen Victoria, 1870-90, and to the Prince of Wales, 1875-1901. He accompanied the Prince of Wales on his tour through India 1875-76. He was Sub-Dean and Canon of Westminster (appointed to the later position in 1875). He obtained a BD and DD 1879. Duckworth was Rural Dean of St. Marylebone from 1891 to 1905. He was select Preacher at Cambridge in 1906 and made Chaplain in Ordinary to the King in 1910. He was buried near the entrance to the choir, Westminster Abbey. [Sources: Foster, J. Oxford Men & their Colleges, 1893; Pratt, A.T.C. People of the Period, 1897; Men of the Time: a dictionary.., 1897; Men and Women of the Time, 1899; Schaff, P. and S. M. Jackson Encyclopedia of Living Divines, 1887; Who Was Who 1897-1916, 1920]

Henry Thomas Forbes Duckworth, academic, was born 29 November 1868 at Grassendale, Lancashire, England, and died in 1927 in Rouen, Seine-Maritime, France. He was the son of Henry Duckworth (1836-19--) and Mary Bennett of Chester, England (1939-1916) and the grandson of Robinson Duckworth and Elizabeth Forbes Nicol. He attended Birkenhead school and matriculated 22 October 1887 at Merton College Oxford. He obtained his BA, a double first-class honour degree (Classics in 1891, Theology in 1892), was made deacon in 1893, and priest in 1894. He was curate of Witton, Northwich, from 1893 to 1896 and chaplain at Nicosia, Cyprus from 1896 to 1901 (enquiring into the liturgy, worship, and doctrines of the Eastern Church). As a representative of the Eastern Church Association in Cyprus, Duckworth spent his time studying the history of the Cypriot church. He authored Greek Manuals of Church Doctrine (1901), The Church of Cyprus (1901), and Pages of Levantine History (1906). He was English Chaplain at Cairo, Egypt, in 1901 but moved to Toronto and became Professor of Divinity at Trinity College. He held that post until 1907, was Lecturer and Professor of Classics from 1904 to 1927 (Greek in 1907 and Ancient History from 1912 until his death) and Dean of Residence from 1903 to 1914. In 1914, the position of Dean of Arts was created and he held that post until 1923. He married Hope Holland Hunt in 1908 [Sources: Foster, J. Oxford Men 1880-1892, 1893; Morgan Canadian Men and Women of the Time, 1912; Reed, T. A. The History of Trinity College, Toronto 1852-1952; The Clergy List, 1914]

Hope Holland Hunt Duckworth, was born 17 December 1884 in Brantford, Ontario, and died 28 August 1966. She was the daughter of Wellington Hunt (1838-1903) and Eliza Jane Craig (1851-1920). She attended the Ontario Ladies College, Whitby, and entered Trinity College, Toronto, in 1905. She graduated with a BA (Specialist) in 1908 and married Henry Thomas Forbes Duckworth in September of that year. She was Treasurer of the Women's Historical Society, Toronto in 1917. From 1918 to 1924 the Duckworths lived on Crawford Street and students of Trinity College boarded with them when necessary. After her husband’s death in 1927, Hope travelled back and forth to Cyprus. She is buried in the British cemetery in Kyrenia, Cyprus.
[Sources: Reed, T.A. A History of Trinity, College, Toronto 1852-1952; Trinity College Directory of Graduates and Alumni; Wellington Hunt, www.familysearch.org]

MARY HORE DISHER

  • F2209
  • Person
  • 1916-1979

Mary Morrison Hore, daughter of the geologist and author Reginald Edwin Hore (b.1881, B.A., Trinity College, 1905) and Ruth Hore (b. ca.1891), was born in Oakville, Ontario, ca.1916. She attended Oakville High School and entered Trinity College in 1933, attending until 1935 without receiving her degree. Her sister Catherine Ann Hore (b.1928) also attended Oakville High School and entered Trinity College in 1947, receiving her B.A. in 1950. Mary Hore married Lieutenant Arthur Lyle Disher of the Royal Canadian Dragoons at St. Jude’s Church in Oakville on 14 September 1946. She died 17 December 1979 in St. John’s, Newfoundland.

Desmond J. Conacher

  • F2156
  • Person
  • 1918-2000

Desmond John Conacher, Professor of Classics at Trinity College, was born 27 December 1918 in Kingston, Ontario. His parents were William Morrison Conacher, Professor of French at Queen's University and Madeline Conacher (née Cashel). He earned his BA in Classics from Queen's University in 1941, and MA in 1942, also from Queen's. In 1950 he completed his PhD in Classics at the University of Chicago. His dissertation was titled "Pleasure in Pre-Socratic Philosophy". On 2 August 1952, Conacher married Mary Kathleen Smith. They had two children, Hugh Anthony and Susan Mary.

Desmond Conacher first taught at Dalhousie University as a Special Lecturer in Classics in 1946-1947. He was an Assistant Professor of Classics at the University of Saskatchewan, 1947-1952, and Associate Professor, 1952-1958. In 1958, he joined the Faculty of Trinity College as Associate Professor, becoming Full Professor in 1965. He served as Head of the Department of Classics from 1966-1972, and also Chair of the Intercollegiate Department of Classics, 1966-1972. Retiring in 1984, he became Professor Emeritus at Trinity College. He died on 23 October 2000.

As a scholar, Conacher is most well-known for his work on Greek tragedy. His academic writing includes numerous articles and reviews. Also included are six books on the topic of Greek drama: Euripidean Drama: Myth, Theme and Structure (1967), Aeschylus' Prometheus Bound: A Literary Commentary (1980), Aeschylus' Oresteia: A Literary Commentary (1987), Alcestis / Euripides: Edited with Translation and Commentary (1988), Aeschylus: The earlier Plays and Related Studies (1996), and Euripides and the Sophists: Some Dramatic Treatments of Philosophical Ideas (1998).

In 1976, he was elected Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, and in 1990 Honorary President of the Classical Association of Canada. He was a member of the Board of Directors of the Canadian Federation for the Humanities, 1981-1984. He sat on the Council of the Classical Association of Canada, 1975-1978, and was Director of the American Philological Association, 1974-1977. He served on the Editorial Board of Phoenix, 1968-1973 and 1983-1986, as well as the Advisory Board of the University of Toronto Quarterly, 1975-1982. He received honorary doctorates from four Canadian universities: Dalhousie University (1992), University of Victoria (1993), Queen's University (1995), and University of Saskatchewan (1997).

A more complete list of his published work is found in Appendix 1.

Adam Chapnick

  • F2341
  • Person
  • 1976-

Adam Chapnick was born in Boston, Massachusetts on 1 August 1976, the son of Lorne and Sharon Chapnick (née Ritter). He was the first of three children. He was educated at the University of Toronto Schools, Trent University, the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs (Carleton University), and the University of Toronto. He was a co-director of the University of Toronto’s Teaching Assistants’ Training Programme, 2003-2005. He was a sessional instructor at the University of Toronto between 2003 and 2006, and a sessional instructor at Ryerson University between 2007 and 2009. He has taught defence studies at the Canadian Forces College, a part of the Royal Military College of Canada, since 2006. He is the author or editor of numerous books and scholarly publications.

Jane Carson Champagne

  • F2179
  • Person
  • 1930-2008

Jane Carson Champagne, artist, writer, and teacher, was born on 17 July 1930 in Toronto. She graduated from Trinity College in 1952. She created drawings for the volume Trinity 1852-1952, and exhibited in the Trinity College Art Sale. She became an artist and teacher in Killarney, Ontario, and wrote for magazines such as Macleans, Homemaker, and The Canadian Composer. She was also the founder of the Ontario Outdoor Painting Society. In her book, Painting the Ontario Landscape, published by the University of Toronto Press in 1991, she describes her adventures of painting throughout the countryside.

Jane Carson married Jean-Remi Champagne (born 11 July 1925) and they had two daughters, Sophie and Ann. Jane Champagne died in Southampton, Ontario, on 28 March 2008.

Edward Marion Chadwick

  • F2351
  • Person
  • 1840-1921

Edward Marion Chadwick, lawyer, heraldist, and genealogist, was born on September 22, 1840, near Jerseyville, Ancaster Township, Upper Canada, the son of John Craven Chadwick and Louisa Bell. Marion Chadwick’s father, John Craven Chadwick, immigrated to Canada from Northern Ireland. Marion Chadwick married Ellen Byrne Beatty in Toronto on June 28, 1864. Ellen Byrne Beatty passed away shortly after the marriage. On February 20, 1868, Marion Chadwick married Maria Martha Fisher. Marion Chadwick and Fisher had five sons
and two daughters.

Chadwick studied at Osgoode Hall Law School and was called to the bar in 1863. He began a partnership with William Henry Beatty. Their firm became the largest law firm in the country, thanks to a family connection with Gooderham and Worts. Chadwick’s legal practice focused on conveyance and estates and in 1910 he was awarded the title of “King’s Counsel”. Chadwick was also active in the Church of England. He was very involved with the construction of the Cathedral of St Alban the Martyr in Toronto. Chadwick acted as the lay canon and treasurer of St Alban’s, living near the Cathedral on Howland Avenue. In his later years, Chadwick became increasingly interested in genealogy and published a volume entitled Ontarian Families. A noted heraldist, Chadwick encouraged the use of Canadian flora and fauna in heraldry and was involved in selecting the maple leaf as the Canadian national symbol. Chadwick developed a close relationship with the people of the Six Nations Reserve and was made an honorary chief of the Turtle Clan of the Mohawk. He was given the name “Shagotyohgwisaks”, meaning “one who seeks a gathering of the people”, for his advocacy of the formation of a Six Nations militia regiment. Chadwick collected Native American regalia and wrote The People of the Longhouse about the genealogy, symbols, and customs of the Iroquois.

Chadwick’s diaries in this collection detail and illuminate his lesser-known role as an active participant, observer, and commentator on Toronto society and social events. Chadwick died in Toronto on 15 December 1921.

Cartwright and Wood Families

  • F2182
  • Family
  • 1806-

The Cartwrights were a prominent Upper Canadian Loyalist family, living in the Kingston area and later in York (Toronto). The Hon. Richard Cartwright Jr. (1759-1815) had twin sons, Robert David Cartwright (1804-1843), an Anglican minister, and John Solomon Cartwright (1804-1845), a Kingston lawyer who became involved in banking, real estate, and politics. The youngest of John Solomon Cartwright’s children was John Robison Cartwright (1842-1919), a lawyer who became deputy attorney general of Ontario.

In June 1868, John Robison Cartwright married Emily Boulton (1845-1920), in Cobourg, Ontario. Emily’s grandfather, D’Arcy Edward Boulton (1785-1846) had built The Grange in Toronto as his family home. Her father D’Arcy Edward Boulton (1814-1902) and mother Emily Mary Caroline Heath married in 1838 and raised their ten children at their home, known as The Lawn, in Cobourg. D’Arcy was a lawyer active in town affairs, serving as mayor of Cobourg from 1854 to 1857. John Robison Cartwright and Emily Boulton Cartwright had six children: Mabel (1869-1955), John Macaulay Boulton (1872- 1877), Stephen Hayter (1875-1909), Ralph Bingham (1877-1899), Edwin Aubrey (1879-1951), and Winifred Macaulay (1883-1953).

Their first child, Mabel Cartwright, was born in Kingston, Ontario, in 1869. She grew up in Toronto and later went to England where she was educated at Cheltenham Ladies’ College and Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford University. Mabel earned honours in the School of Modern History, taught in Oxford High School and, upon her return to Toronto, at Bishop Strachan School for four years. In 1903 she was appointed the second Lady Principal and in 1925 Dean of Women at St. Hilda’s residence, Trinity College. She taught English at Trinity College until her retirement in 1936. In 1925 she was granted a Doctor of Laws (honoris causa) by the University of Toronto. Through the years she held numerous posts including that of resident of the Women's Auxiliary of the Diocese of Toronto.

After Mabel Cartwright’s retirement from St. Hilda’s, she lived at 32 Prince Arthur Avenue in Toronto with her invalid sister Winifred and her friend and former student, (Hilda) Fern Wood until her death in 1955. Born in Orillia, the daughter of Edward A. Wood and Sarah Weafer Wood, Fern Wood (1889-1962) was the executor of Miss Cartwright’s estate.

Brett Club

  • F2154
  • Corporate body
  • 1946-[199?]

In the autumn of 1946, Trinity College’s Arts and Letters Club became the umbrella organization that coordinated the coeducational recreational activities of several of the College's academic departments. Academic staff and students participated in meetings held by various groups loosely affiliated with a specific faculty. These included meetings of those in the community who were interested in Fine Art, Music, Literature or Philosophy as well as other arts endeavours.
The meetings of the Philosophy discussion group were spearheaded by Dr George Edison and were from the beginning very popular. Because of this unexpected popularity, Edison encouraged students to form a Philosophical Society. Thus began the Brett Club in September 1946, named after George Sidney Brett, Head of the Department of Philosophy at the University of Toronto and a professor active in the Trinity community from 1919 until his death. He died suddenly at his home on 27 October 1944, remembered fondly by many students still attending the College.
Once formed, however, attendance in the Brett Club seemed to decline almost immediately, possibly because of the requirement that the Club was "restricted to those students genuinely interested in Philosophy" (Review, August 1947). The Brett Club failed to form a Constitution in the 1940s. It became known by the college community at large as "a certain species of cult to which new participants are admitted only upon invitation" (Review, Summer 1949).
The Arts and Letters Club included philosophical discussions that were more accessible. During the 1967-1968 academic session, the Brett Club revived through the efforts of its new President, Derek Allen (BA 1968, Head of Arts 1967-1968 and a Rhodes Scholar). It survived in a variety of forms over the intervening years, holding open and closed meetings about sophisticated philosophical questions and concepts.

Mildred Boyes

  • F2121
  • Person
  • 1919-1987

Elizabeth Mildred Boyes, was born in Regina, Saskatchewan, in 1919, the daughter of Mrs. C.M. Johnston. After attending Regina Central Collegiate Institute, she entered Trinity College, Toronto, in 1937, residing in St. Hilda’s College. Graduating in 1941 with a BA, she married George Harold Boyes. Mildred Boyes died 16 July 1987 in Toronto, Ontario. [Source:Trinity Convocation Bulletin, Summer 1987]

Deane, Dorothy Metcalf

  • F2098
  • Person
  • 1913-2008

Dorothy Jane Metcalf Deane, editor, was born on 26 December 1913 to Harry M. Metcalf and Gwendolyn Metcalf. She attended Grimsby High School before entering Trinity College in September 1931. She graduated with a BA in 1934. An active volunteer in the Trinity community, Dorothy Deane served as a member of Trinity Corporation and Trinity’s Governing Council. In recognition of her service Deane was presented with the University of Toronto Arbor Award in 1995 and the Long-Service Award in 1996 for her volunteer work with St Hilda’s.

She married Edward Franklin Borbridge on 14 October 1939 at St Andrew’s Church in Grimsby, Ontario. Edward Borbridge was born in 1913 and received a BA from Trinity College in 1935 and a law degree from Osgoode Hall in 1937. Borbridge practised law in Peterborough and Toronto until his death in Spring Point, Alberta, in 1942.

After the death of Edward Franklin Borbridge, Dorothy Jane Metcalf married Roger Eric Deane, a geology professor at the University of Toronto. In October 1965 Roger Deane drowned near Tobermory, Ontario, while on a research trip.

Dorothy Jane Deane died on 23 December 2008 in Toronto, Ontario.

Clerical Alumni of Trinity College

  • F2233
  • Corporate body
  • 1896-1985

A committee was formed in November 1896 at a meeting of the Missionary and Theological Association to make arrangements for a January Reunion of Divinity Students of Trinity College. This became a yearly event known as the Clerical Alumni and Associates Conference and Reunion. From 1922 the Conference was held in September, except in the years 1931 and 1943 when the General Synod met in Toronto. The lectures endowed by the late Dean George Lothrop Starr were an important feature of these conferences. For nearly 20 years Rev. and Mrs. Harry S. Musson gave a reception for delegates and their wives at the Toronto Hunt Club.

In 1985 the Clerical Alumni became the Trinity College Divinity Associates.

Beare, Francis Wright

  • F2039
  • Person
  • 1902-1986

Francis Wright Beare, educator and clergyman, was born 16 August 1902 in Toronto, Ontario and died in Toronto on 20 May 1986. The son of George and Ellen (Orr) Beare of Belfast, Northern Ireland, Beare was educated at Harbord and Oakwood Collegiate Institutes in Toronto. He received his BA in 1925 from University College, University of Toronto, with the Gold Medal in Classics. He studied at the Universities of Paris and Chicago. From 1931 to 1933 he studied (chiefly papyrology) as a foreign member of the Institute Francais d’Archéologie Orientale in Cairo. He received his PhD from the University of Chicago in 1945.

He studied theology at Knox College, University of Toronto, and was ordained a Presbyterian minister in 1929. From 1929 to 1931 he was Assistant Minister, St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church,Toronto. He became an Anglican priest in 1947; from 1955 to 1965 he was Honorary Assistant, Church of the Holy Trinity, Toronto.
In 1946 Professor Beare became Professor of New Testament Studies at Trinity College, a position he held until his retirement in 1968. In 1980 he received his DD (honoris causa) from the College. He published extensively, including monographs on The Epistle to the Philippians (1959), The Earliest Records of Jesus (1962) and The Gospel According to Matthew (1981).

Professor Beare married Marion Gurd in 1932; after her death he married Marianne Pleus in 1973.