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People and organizations

Dignan, Alan

  • Person

Alan Dignan was a Victoria University graduate, Class of 1931.

Nimmons, Phil

Nimmons (clarinetist, composer, arranger, and band leader) was born in Kamloops, British Columbia on June 3, 1923, and raised in Vancouver. His life-long career in music began with playing clarinet in high school, and leading a small band in his Point Grey neighbourhood. Nimmons studied at the University of British Columbia 1940-1944 in preparation for a career in medicine. At this time, he played in local dance bands (Sandy DeSantis, Stan Patton, Barney Potts, Wilf Wylie, and Dal Richards) and joined the jazz quintet of the guitarist Ray Norris, where he actively arranged a substantial body of music. He subsequently studied clarinet 1945-1947 at the Juilliard School with Arthur Christmann and composition 1948-1950 at the Royal Conservatory of Music with Richard Johnston, Arnold Walter, and John Weinzweig.

In 1953, Nimmons formed his own jazz band (which took the name Nimmons 'N' Nine in 1957). Early broadcasts on CBC and its concert debut in 1956 at the Stratford Festival marked the beginning of this venture. Through various iterations, including Nimmons ‘N’ Nine Plus Six, this ensemble continued in some form much of the rest of his career. Subsequently, Nimmons has performed with David Braid, billing themselves as Nimmons ‘N’ Braid. In November 2013, Nimmons performed in a concert billed as “Nimmons ‘N’ 90” in celebration of his 90th year. Nimmons joined the University of Toronto in 1973 as instructor in jazz techniques and is now Director Emeritus of Jazz Studies.

Nimmons, and his ensembles, toured widely, including many engagements around the world. Nimmons is known to create works in both the jazz and classical vein. Nimmons was a founding member of the Canadian League of Composers and an associate of the Canadian Music Centre. He also founded jazz programs at several schools and universities, including the Banff School of Fine Arts (1970), the University of Toronto (1973), the University of Western Ontario (1978), the Courtney Youth Music Centre (1982), and the InterProvincial Music Camp, near Parry Sound, Ontario (1987).

Nimmons was awarded the first Juno in the Jazz category in 1976 for the recording of his Atlantic Suite (1974) by Nimmons ‘N’ Nine Plus Six. Nimmons has received many commissions including “Transformations” (premiered by Nimmons ‘N’ Nine Plus Six), which was commissioned jointly by the CBC and the Ontario Arts Council for World Music Week Conference (1975), hosted by the Canadian Music Council on behalf of the International Music Council (UNESCO). “Invocation” was commissioned jointly by COJO and the Ontario Arts Council and was premiered by Nimmons ‘N’ Nine Plus Six in the 1976 Olympic Games. “Plateaus: Cartiboo Country Tone Poem,” commissioned by the CBC Vancouver Orchestra and premiered in 1986, was subsequently recorded by that ensemble for CBC Classics. The Olympic Arts Festival of the 1986 Winter Games commissioned “The Torch,” and the work was premiered in Calgary by an Olympic Jazz Band, directed by Rob McConnell.

Stroh, Jack

Jack Stroh is a retired lawyer and lives in Erie, PA.
Stroh met Henri Nouwen through his wife, Sue Stroh, president of L'Arche Erie (Erie, PA). Nouwen counselled Stroh from 1991-96 and they become friends.

Emmanuel College (Toronto, Ont.). Registrar’s Office

  • Corporate body
  • 1928-

The first Registrar of Emmanuel College was John Fletcher McLaughlin who served as Dean from 1928 until his death in 1932. The Reverend Frederick.W. Langford held the position afterwards and was named as Registrar. Following him, the duties of Registrar were carried out by the Dean or faculty members.

After 1955, the position of Registrar was restored and held by:
-Rev. K.H. Cousland (1955)
-Rev. W.O Fennell (1956-1959)
-Rev. C.D. Jay (1960-1966)
-Rev. A.G. Reynolds (1966-1973)
-Rev. G.W. Boyce (1974-1976)
-Rev. S.V. Fawcett (1977-1985)
-Jackie Lautens
-Shirley Wilfong
-Margaret Grisdale
-Wanda Chin (present)

University of Toronto. Faculty of Music

The Faculty of Music was created in 1918. The Senate of the University withdrew its affiliations with various music schools (Toronto College of Music and Royal Hamilton College of Music) and inaugurated a Faculty of Music to teach music and administer examinations. Along with his duties as music director of the Toronto Conservatory, Augustus Stephen Vogt was appointed Dean. “Courses of Instruction” were introduced, the first courses to be taught at the Faculty; which grew to offer courses with a full range of aspects involved with western music, including Jazz performance, ethnomusicology, and music and medicine.

In 1952, The Royal Conservatory of Music and the University of Toronto's Faculty of Music came under the same administration, placing a Dean in charge of both programs. The Conservatory would be known as The School of Music and was headed by a Principal. The Faculty of Music would be headed by a Director. In 1959 plans for an electronic music studio were announced, historically the second in a North American university. The Faculty regularly hosts events in one of its two theatres; MacMillan Theatre consisting of an 815-seat hall, designed for the production of operas and large ensemble concerts and named after former dean, Sir Ernest MacMillan. World-renowned for its excellent acoustics, and Walter Hall which commemorates Arnold Walter, Director of the Faculty from 1952-1968, Walter Hall was designed for chamber concerts and recitals. The house seats 490. The hall also contains a two-manual tracker-action Casavant organ.

In 1991, the School of Music/Royal Conservatory of Music separated and once again became its own institution.

Schmid, Catherine

Catherine Rank Schmid is a Canadian artist based in France. She was born in 1942 in Toronto, Ontario, to Margery Butler and Harold Rank. In 1968 she married Stephen Yeomans. They divorced in 1988. Their son Edward (Ted) Yeomans resides in Peterborough, Ontario. In 1995 she married Gérard Schmid in Switzerland. He passed away in 2003 in France.

Schmid studied Modern Languages at Victoria College, University of Toronto from 1961 to 1965 and received an Honours BA in French and German. During this period, she took part-time courses at the Ontario College of Art, studying painting with Aba Bayefsky. After graduation she taught in Bad Godesberg (Bonn) Germany in Amos Comenius Gymnasium, a Pestalozzi school, travelling extensively as well. Returning to Toronto, she completed her diploma at the Ontario College of Education and taught French, German and Art for many years in Secondary Schools in Toronto and Peterborough Ontario. While in Peterborough she was a founding member of the Art Gallery of Peterborough.

During a Sabbatical leave in 1984, Schmid spent several months in France and Germany drawing and painting. In 1987 she exhibited her work at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education and gave a lecture in the Department of Philosophy of Education on the theme of the creative experience and its relationship to the development of learning. She also exhibited at The Art Gallery of Peterborough and in 1988 at the Here and Now Gallery in Toronto. In 1990 she moved to Saint Gallen, Switzerland, teaching Art at the Institut auf dem Rosenberg, an international private school. Her experiences travelling and living in different surroundings have been a compelling influence on her philosophy and in her artistry.

Schmid has also exhibited internationally. In 1989, she painted in Indonesia and The Cross Cultural Institute in Jakarta exhibited her drawings and paintings “Indonesia: the first impression of a Canadian artist”, sponsored by the Canadian Embassy. In 1990, The Museum of Contemporary Art Nyoman Gunarsa in Yogyakarta invited her to be Artist in Residence, where she had an exhibition “Explorations in Indonesia”. Her work is held in the collections of Victoria University at the University of Toronto, the Art Gallery of Peterborough, the Ontario Secondary School Teachers’ Federation in Toronto, Crédit Suisse in Saint Gallen, Switzerland, the Agung Rai Gallery in Bali, Indonesia, the Art Gallery of Ontario in the art rental collection, and in many private collections.

Since 1994, she has resided in Provence in the south of France, where she has her studio and has given private instruction to students from many countries.

Schmid’s works reflect the elements of chance, surprise, capturing a world full of possibilities, originating in her broad travel experience and exposure to many cultures. Always “looking”, suddenly she “sees”. She is especially interested in the contrast of light and darkness and in architectural forms. The inner space of the mind: a thought, a word, a feeling, are all part of her creative approach.

Canadian General Hospital No. 4 (University of Toronto)

  • Corporate body
  • 1914-1918

The No. 4 Canadian General Hospital was a 1,040 bed base hospital that was approved on 26 March 1915 and shipped via England to Salonika in Greece on 15 May. Before this could happen, the Hospital had to be equipped and funds raised to pay for supplies. An immediate appeal was made by the UofT to 13,000 alumni, using envelopes that had been prepared for a now abandoned appeal for funds for a hockey rink. The work was organized by two committees. The first, representing the Board of Governors, Senate, and staff, arranged for the purchase of medical, surgical, and laboratory apparatus. The second, formed on 17 March as the Women's University Hospital Supply Association, was composed of ladies from the U of T and McMaster. It worked with a ‘large number of societies both in Toronto and throughout the Province to provide everything in the way of bed linen, surgical dressings and garments for patients.’ The two committees combined their efforts for fundraising.

Gattoni, Giuliana

Giuliana Gattoni was born on February 27, 1947 in Lissone, Italy. She trained as an architect in Italy before emigrating to Canada with her husband, where she helped him run his practice and was an active freelance writer in Toronto (ca. 1985-1993). Among others, she wrote (in Italian) for the Balletto Oggi magazine (published as Ballet 2000 in English), and for Corriere Canadese, the Italian-language daily newspaper in Toronto. In addition to reviewing performances in Toronto, she traveled regularly to festivals in Italy, including opera in Versilia, Spoleto's Festival dei due Mondi, and the ballet festival in Nervi. In the early 1990s, she went back to school at the University of Toronto, where she received her Master of Arts in art history. She passed away in 1996 whilst working on her PhD in art history.

Ward, Muriel Alma

  • Person
  • 1925-1998

Muriel Alma Ward was born on September 6, 1925. She graduated in 1947 from the School of Nursing, Hamilton General Hospital. Her nursing career included being an operating room nurse, and both teaching and nursing at the Toronto Western Hospital and the Nightingale School of Nursing. She held a Bachelor of Science of Nursing and a Master's degree both from the University of Toronto. She died on January 9, 1998.

Crone, Robert & Violet

  • Family

Robert and Violet Crone are Canadian pioneers in the film and television industry. They have each had very influential careers and have worked across the globe. Their resumes are extensive, each with their own long list of awards.

Robert (Bob) Crone grew up in Peterborough, Ontario as the son of a minister. It was in high school where he began to take steps towards his future career behind the camera. He made his first film there, but quickly moved to Toronto to work for CBC, which had just begun national television broadcasting. After a short time there, Robert began to work as a free-lance cameraman, and then a film producer. He would supply publicity shots, news stories, and interviews to Pan-American Airways, Time-Life, CBC, and other Canadian magazines.

His career then took him across the globe. He spent seven years traversing Asia, Africa, Europe, and coming home to Canada every so often. He covered news, and was often calmly entering divided cities, and politically charged situation to capture each areas story on film. With a custom-made sound mixing console in his Toronto home basement, he was able to produce a complete audio-visual package for his clients.

In 1964, Robert decided, with the support of his wife Vi, to open a film processing house. At the time, there were no film laboratories in Canada. Film House Limited began, serving visiting film producers and Canadians alike. Film House sales took off, doubling about every 18 months. By 1968, they were processing 75 to 125 orders a day. After ten years of success, Robert Crone sold the company to an ad agency and returned to shooting.

Robert Crone, along with help from his son David Crone, has been credited for bring the Steadicam to Canada, being the top operators of the invention. The entry of the Steadicam to the film scene revolutionized how many shot, as the camera stabilizing system allowed for free camera movement.

Violet (Vi) Crone grew up in Peterborough, Ontario. She was the first female camera operator in Canada and has studied at the New York Institute of Photography

Octapixx Worldwide

  • Corporate body
  • 1995-

Octapixx Worldwide was established in 1995 as a broadcast distribution company. Located in Toronto, Ontario, they represent producers from around the world. As of 2019, they represent over 100 producers, and hosts over 3000 hours of content. Octapixx Worldwide carries programing from a multitude of genres, including factual, military, wildlife, history, science, lifestyle, travel, children’s, animation, sports, educational and other documentaries. Their dedication to quality content has led to partnerships and agreements with broadcasters such as ABC, A&E, Al Jazeera, AMC Networks, American Public Television, Canal+, CCTV, Crime + Investigation Network, Czech TV, Discovery Channel, DR, Fox, Foxtel, France 5, Globosat, Groupe AB, The History Channel, KBS, National Geographic Channels Worldwide, NHK, NRK, PBS, Planete, RAI, Red Bull Media House, RTE, RTL Disney, RTVE, SVT, Ten Network, and TRT.

Ling, Elaine

  • Person
  • 1946-2016

Elaine Ling was born in Hong Kong in 1946, and immigrated to Canada when she was nine with her family. She studied music and medicine, and obtained a medical degree from the University of Toronto. Ling practiced family medicine around the world, including Abu Dhabi, Nepal, and in Canada in more remote places.

Ling continued to practice family medicine in the Greater Toronto Area during her life, and played cello in the community orchestra, Orchestra Toronto. She was an accomplished musician, and could also play the piano, baritone, oboe, and guitar. She was also a fellow at the Royal Canadian Geographical Society. The University of Ryerson offers a Research Fellowship in her name for students perusing photography after receiving a generous donation from Ling. She passed away in 2016 from lung cancer.

Her love for open space, stone, and nature propelled her to seek out places of solitude and places with ancient architecture. Her travels brought her across four continents, capturing the landscapes and beauty of Mongolia, Ethiopia, Madagascar, Timbuktu, Namibia, North Africa, India, South America, Australia, American Southwest; the citadels of Ethiopia, San Agustin, Persepolis, Petra, Cappadocia, Machu Picchu, Angkor Wat, Great Zimbabwe, Abu Simbel; and the Buddhist centers of Myanmar, Laos, Vietnam, Tibet, and Bhutan.

Lingh’s photography, predominantly in Black & White, explored the shifting balance between man-made and nature. Her work has been exhibited all around the world, published in a multitude of collections, and part of many public institutions permanent fine art collections. In Canada, her work is in the collections of the National Gallery of Canada, Ryerson University, Art Gallery of Ontario, Royal Ontario Museum, and the Canadian Museum of Contemporary Photography. She has also published four books of her art: Mongolia, Land of the Deer Stone (2009), Talking Stones (2015), Cuba Chronicles (2015), and Habitacion Cubana (2016).

Bulman, Alan

  • Person
  • 1926-

Alan Bulman was born in 1926 in Cyprus. During the Second World War, he fought for the British Royal Navy and began to become interested in photography. After the war, he began work at British Films Limited where he preserved footage. Bulman immigrated to Canada in 1963 and restored old films and provided stock images for Graphic Consultants Ltd. He continued to work with film and photography throughout his career. His interest and skill in preservation eventually allowed him to open his own company, Colour Prints (1974-1994), which worked with both contemporary and archival prints. Bulman collected photos, text, and film over his lifetime.

Northway, Mary Louise

  • Person
  • 1909-1978

Professor of psychology and supervisor in Institute of Child Studies, University of Toronto.

Smith, Roy Lamont

  • Local
  • Person
  • 1865-1946

Roy Lamont Smith was born on March 4, 1865 in Fremont, Nebraska and died on February 6, 1946 in San Diego, California. He was a pianist and studied at the Hershey School of Musical Art in Chicago (1883). He taught music in Fremont (1891) and was a professor of music at the Cadek Conservatory of Music in Chattanooga (1904-1942). He wrote various songs for voice and piano accompaniment, including one of the Tennessee state songs "My Homeland, Tennessee" (1925).

Borins, Sandford F.

Sandford Borins is Professor of Public Management in the Department of Management, University of Toronto Scarborough, where he was the founding chair, serving in that capacity from 1991 to 2003. He also holds graduate appointments in the Rotman School of Management, School of Public Policy and Governance, and Political Science Department. He has been a visiting professor at the Harvard Kennedy School and the Goldman School of Public Policy, University of California at Berkeley, and Scholar-in-Residence in the Ontario Cabinet Office. He is currently a research fellow at the Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation, Harvard Kennedy School.

He is the author of numerous articles as well as eleven books. The eleven books include Negotiating Business Narratives: Fables from the Information Technology, Automobile Manufacturing, and Financial Trading Industries, with Beth Herst (Palgrave Pivot, 2018), The Persistence of Innovation in Government (Brookings, 2014), Governing Fables: Learning from Public Sector Narratives (Information Age Publishing, 2011), Innovations in Government: Research, Recognition, and Replication (Brookings, 2008), Digital State at the Leading Edge (University of Toronto Press, 2007), “If you build it . . . ” Business, Government, and Ontario’s Electronic Toll Highway, co-authored with Chandran Mylvaganam (University of Toronto Centre for Public Management, 2004), Political Management in Canada, co-authored with Hon. Allan Blakeney, former premier of Saskatchewan (University of Toronto Press, 1998), Innovating with Integrity: How Local Heroes are Transforming American Government (Georgetown University Press, 1998), and The Language of the Skies: The Bilingual Air Traffic Control Conflict in Canada (McGill-Queens University Press, 1983). The Language of the Skies was recognized as one of the twenty best books in English supported by the Social Science Federation of Canada between 1940 and 1990.

Professor Borins has had a wide range of professional experience. He is a frequent conference speaker on public sector innovation and on narrative. He was a member of the board of directors of the Ontario Transportation Capital Corporation, responsible for developing Ontario’s Highway 407. He was the President of the Canadian Association of Programs in Public Administration from 2003 to 2007.

He did his undergraduate studies at Harvard, where he graduated magna cum laude, was elected to Phi Beta Kappa, and received a Woodrow Wilson Fellowship. He then took a Master in Public Policy at the Kennedy School of Government, and received his Ph.D. in Economics at Harvard.

Masucci, Lorraine

  • Person
  • 1924-2018

Sister Lorraine Masucci, RSM (Sister M. Cephas) was born on April 20, 1924. She received her BS in Education from St. Bonaventure College and an MS in Religious Education from Seattle University in Washington. Teaching ministries were at Our Lady of Mt. Camel, St. Mary's, Corning, & St. Louis. She later served as pastoral assistant at St. Paul of the Cross Parish, Honeoye Falls, before moving to Atlanta, Georgia where she was an adult religious education coordinator in the Diocese of Atlanta. She died on November 23, 2018.

Till, Paul

  • Person
  • 1953-

Paul Till was born in London, England in 1953. He immigrated to Canada at age four. He has always had an interest in photography, taking high school art and building his own darkroom to experiment with various ways of manipulating photographs. Here he practiced solarisation, and hand colouring of black & white prints.

In 1974, Till took photographs at the Bob Dylan concert at Maple Leaf Gardens. After extensive manipulation of the images, he sent them to Dylan, who in turn enjoyed them so much he used one for the cover of "Blood on the Tracks" (1975). Doing the same thing at Dylan’s 1975 concert, the photos made their way onto the cover of the book “Bob Dylan: Songs 1966-1977”.

After this success Till's work began to grow. He has continued to shoot album covers, posters, and stage backdrops, especially for musical acts signed with El Mocambo Records. Till has also worked as a freelance photographer for NOW Magazine, beginning in 1982. Because of this position he’s been able to document the Toronto music scene, while also trying new subjects like architecture and art. His work has been exhibited around the world, and some of his work resides in the National Gallery of Canada.

Samuel, Julian

  • Person
  • 1952-

Julian Samuel was born in Lahore, Pakistan in 1952. His family immigrated to Canada from England. Samuel studied English Literature at Trent University, then completed a Master of Fine Arts in photography at Concordia University.
Samuel is an artist of many mediums. A small selection of his visual work resides at the National Gallery of Canada. He is perhaps best known as a documentary filmmaker, with a focus on the race and politics in culture and nationalism. Some of his most popular films include Atheism (2006), Save and Burn (2004) and The Library in Crisis (2002). Samuel is also the author of various published works, including a book of poetry, novels, non-fiction, and academic articles.
He has taught courses on film at both John Abbott College and Concordia during the 30 year period he lived in Montreal. Today, Samuel lives in Toronto.

Branscombe, Gena

Gena Branscombe was born in Picton, Ontario on November 4, 1881. She was a composer and conductor, and left Canada in 1897 to study and work in the United States. Her piano pieces, songs, and choral and orchestral works were published and performed in both countries. In 1934, she founded The Branscombe Choral (1934-1954) in New York, for whom she composed and arranged works. The choir also premiered various musical works by other female composers. Branscombe died in New York on July 26, 1977.

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