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People and organizations

MacMillan, Ernest, Sir

  • VIAF ID: 275654
  • Person
  • 1893-1973

Sir Ernest MacMillan, conductor, organist, pianist, composer, educator, writer, administrator, was born in Mimico (Metropolitan Toronto) on August 18, 1893, and died in Toronto on May 6,1973. He was one of the most influential Canadian musicians of the middle 20th century.

Margolin, Gila

Gila Margolin was born into an Orthodox Jewish family in 1951 in London. Her grandparents were from Scotland, Sweden and Russia. In her youth, Margolin was invested in Jewish religious tradition and considered becoming a Cantor. In 1962, she moved to Glasgow and became first acquainted with Christianity. Later she studied at Glasgow University. In 1982, Margolin moved to Cambridge, UK, where she studied Hebrew at Lucy Cavendish College. She converted to Catholicism in 1989.

Gila Margolin (1951 -) founded The Little Sisters of Joy in 1999, initially as a community of prayer, peace and reconciliation within the Catholic Church. In 2004, the Little Sisters of Joy evolved into a foundation.

Margolin has written two books, "The Moving Swan" (2006), and "Where the Woods Meet the Water" (2014).

Little Sisters of Joy

  • Corporate body
  • 1999 -

The Little Sisters of Joy is an ecumenical Foundation of Prayer, Peace and Reconciliation. It was founded in 1999 by Gila Margolin and became a foundation in 2004. The Foundation has over 700 friends in 35 countries.

The Foundation works to build bridges between Jews and Christians, Jews and Arabs, and between Catholics, Protestants and the Orthodox. It aims to effect reconciliation within individuals and has also worked on outreach to the Indigenous Canadian community.

One of its main outreach channels includes regular "Concerts for Peace and Reconciliation" in which Margolin performs songs of the 60s, American folk music and Hebrew music. The Little Sisters of Joy believes that music and the arts are a key part of the healing process.

More information here: https://www.littlesistersofjoy.com/

Arlidge, Joseph Churchill

  • Local
  • Person
  • 1849-1913

J. (Joseph) Churchill Arlidge, flutist, organist, teacher, and composer, was born in Stratford-on-Avon, England on March 17, 1849, and died in Toronto, Ontario on January 22, 1913. Arlidge studied flute with Benjamin Wells and Robert Sydney Pratten, and made his debut in 1859 at the Crystal Palace in a concert given by Sir Julius Benedict for Queen Victoria. He continued to perform in London and studied with George Rudall (flute) and James Coward (piano and organ), before enrolling in the Brussels Conservatory, where he studied with Jacques-Nicholas Lemmens (piano and organ) and Oluf Svendsen (flute). In 1873 or 1874, he appeared as a solo flutist in Gilmore's 22nd New York Regiment Band. In late 1874 he moved to Toronto, where he married Olivia Mary Arlidge.

In Toronto, he performed as a solo flutist with F.H. Torrington, was the first organist and choirmaster at Toronto's Carlton Street Methodist Church, and taught. In late 1875, he returned to England for a teaching position, but returned in 1885 to participate in the First Toronto Musical Festival, from which point he settled permanently with his family in the Toronto area. He served as organist and choirmaster at the Carlton Street Methodist Church, as well as Christ Church Deer Park, Bonar Presbyterian, and St. John the Evangelist. He also continued to appear as a flutist with the Toronto Philharmonic Society, and as accompaniment for singers, including Emma Calve, Marcella Sembrich, Lilli Lehmann and Emma Albani. In the late 1880s, he established the Toronto Flute Quartet with his students Lubraico, J.B. Glionna and Herbert Lye.

Arlidge also taught music at the Toronto College of Music and the Toronto Conservatory of Music, and in 1902, established his own school the Toronto Academy of Music, following controversy with Torrington and Edward Fisher regarding the Associated Board of the Royal Schools of Music (1899). Arlidge was also a composer, although most of his compositions are unpublished.

In the Toronto community, Arlidge was also involved with the YMCA, the Independent Order of Foresters (IOF), and was a member of the Masonic Lodge, Saint George's Society. He was also a member of the newly-formed Canadian Guild of Organists.

Langan, Thomas

Thomas Langan (March 20, 1929 - May 25, 2012) was born in the United States in St. Louis, Missouri. He immigrated to Canada in 1968 but maintained his U.S. citizenship. He received his bachelor’s in philosophy from St. Louis University in 1951 and his Masters in 1952. He then went on to receive his PH.D. in philosophy from Institut Catholique de Paris in 1956. Before his PH.D. education Langan also served in the United States Air Force as a 1st Lieutenant from 1952-1954.

Langan was a teacher and academic for his entire career. He began teaching at St. Louis University in 1956 as an instructor and moved his way up to Assistant Professor and Associate Director until 1960. Langan then taught at Indiana University from 1960 until 1967 as both a professor and Chairman of the Philosophy Department. He began his time at St. Michael’s College in 1967 as a visiting professor before becoming a full-time faculty member the following year. Langan was cross appointed to St. Michael’s College, Trinity College and New College between 1975 to 1978. He was a teacher in the Philosophy and Christianity & Culture programs. His wife Janine Langan was also an Associate Professor at St. Michael’s College and the founder of the Christianity and Culture program.

A prolific academic, Langan wrote well over seventy published articles in his lifetime and published eight books. Additionally, Langan was a part of a great number of committees, such as the Committee for Superior Education, and was on the editorial boards of several journal publications including Communio and New Scholasticism. He participated in many community organizations, serving on multiple Archdiocese of Toronto committees and co-founding the Catholic Civil Rights League in 1985. Langan received an Alumni Merit Award from St. Louis University in 1982. Langan was also elected to the Catholic Commission on Cultural Affairs in 1984.

Thomas Langan retired in 1994 but continued to be an active member of many community and academic organizations.

In 2006 the Archdiocese of Toronto honoured Langan as a Knight of St. Sylvester for his exemplary professional and societal service.

Bell, L. Richard

  • Local
  • Person
  • 1946-2007

Richard Bell was the son of the Canadian composer and musician, Dr. Leslie Bell, and Leona Bell (born March 5, 1946). He started playing the piano at the age of four and studied music at Canada's Royal Conservatory of Music. Bell's career first gained significance when he joined Ronnie Hawkins as a member of the group "And Many Others," following the departure of Hawkins' previous band (who would gain fame as The Band). Hawkins fired the entire band in early 1970, and they renamed themselves Crowbar, subsequently recording Official Music (as King Biscuit Boy with Crowbar) (1970, Daffodil; 1996, Stony Plain). Bell left Crowbar shortly after this to join Janis Joplin's Full Tilt Boogie Band, making good on an offer made the previous year by her manager.

In the late 1960s, while touring with Hawkins at the Fillmore East, Bell was approached by Janis Joplin's manager Albert Grossman and invited to join her new ensemble. His playing can be heard on her posthumously‐released album Pearl and many bootleg recordings from her 1970 tour, including performances from the Festival Express "train tour" of Canada. Bell was interviewed many years later for the 2003 documentary film of the same name.

Following Joplin's death, Bell moved to Woodstock, New York, where he worked as a session musician. Among those he worked with during this time were Paul Butterfield and John Sebastian. Other acts Bell has worked with include Blackie and the Rodeo Kings, Bruce Cockburn, Judy Collins, Cowboy Junkies, Bob Dylan, Michael Kaeshammer, Bonnie Raitt and Joe Walsh.

Bell moved to Atlanta, Georgia in 1979 and played with various bands, including Pyro, with Jim Weider and Rick Pierce. He did session work also. He married Mary Deacon in 1979. He played with The Convertibles, with bandmates, among others, Scott Boyer and Tommy Talton (Cowboy), Topper Price, Brian Wheeler (Locust Fork) and Rick Kurtz (Delbert McClinton), before returning to Canada and The Band.

In 1991, Bell joined the reconstituted line­‐up of The Band as a keyboardist, replacing Stan Szelest (himself a replacement for original pianist Richard Manuel, who committed suicide in 1986). Bell remained with through their final three albums (Jericho, High on the Hog, and Jubilation), for which Bell also received some songwriting credits. The death of Rick Danko in 1999 essentially ended the association known as The Band.

In the years before his death, Bell performed as keyboard player with Canadian roots-­rock performers such as Colin Linden, Blackie and the Rodeo Kings and Kathleen Edwards. At the time of his death, the Toronto‐based musician performed regularly as a keyboardist/songwriter/occasional vocalist with the Porkbelly Futures and Danny Brooks & the Rockin' Revelators. (He produced two of Brooks' albums.) Bell was also a member of the country­‐rock group, Burrito Deluxe, performing and contributing songs to their CD Disciples Of The Truth. Bell died after a long battle with multiple melanoma on June 15, 2007 in Toronto's Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, at the age of 61.

Wilson, A. Jeyaratnam (Alfred Jeyaratnam)

Alfred Jeyaratnam Wilson was born on October 4, 1928 in Colombo, Sri Lanka, to Kanagasabay Rajaratnam Wilson and Elizabeth Ariammah Dutton. Wilson completed a B.A. in Economics and Political Science from the University of Ceylon in 1950, a Ph.D from the London School of Economics, University of London in 1956, and a DSc. (Econ.) from the University of London in 1977. In 1953, he and Suseelavathy Chelvanayakam (daughter of Samuel James Velupillai Chelvanayakam) were married in Colombo. Wilson taught political science at the University of Peradeniya in Sri Lanka from 1956 to 1972. After completing several fellowships in the UK, Canada, and the US, in 1972 he became professor of Political Science and Chairman of the Department of Political Science at the University of New Brunswick until 1994. From 1978 to 1984 Wilson also acted as an advisor to the Sri Lankan government. He and his family later moved to Toronto, where he passed away on 31 May 2000.

Wilson wrote and edited nine books on Sri Lankan politics as well as numerous essays and reviews published in academic journals. His books include: An Introduction to Civics and Government (1954); Politics in Sri Lanka, 1947–1973 (1974); Electoral Politics in an Emergent State: the Ceylon General Election of May 1970 (1975); The Gaullist System in Asia (1980); The States of South Asia: Problems of National Integration: Essays in honour of W.H. Morris-Jones (1982, editor, with Dennis Dalton); The Break-up of Sri Lanka: The Sinhalese-Tamil Conflict (1988); S. J. V. Chelvanayakam and the Crisis of Sri Lankan Tamil Nationalism, 1947–1977: a Political Biography (1994); Sri Lankan Tamil Nationalism: Its Origins and Development in the 19th and 20th Centuries (2000); and The Post-Colonial States of South Asia: Democracy, Development and Identity (2001, editor, with Amita Shastri).

Cee, Joey

  • Person
  • 1946-

Joey Cee has been a figure in the Canadian music scene since his high school days. Starting weekly shows at the “Three Star Club Hall” in 1963, Cee introduced many up and coming Rock ‘n’ Roll and R&B artists to eager listeners. His success in being able to identify groovy new sounds also led his to become a CHUM-AM High School Picker around the same time. It is with this solid background in the music industry from such a young age that has led Cee to the many careers he’s held over the years.
From 1967-1969, Cee was Music Director at CKFH, which allowed him more control over what music hit the airways. His focus was always to bring more new content to Toronto that other stations might not pick up.
The 70’s was spent releasing multiple singles under different labels and pseudonyms. ‘Joseph’, ‘Artsy’, and ‘The Puppies’ where all names he has recorded music under. During this time he also publish multiple magazines and articles: Snowmobile Track & Trail Magazine, Anne Murray: Annie … A Point of View Magazine, Music Canada Quarterly/Flipside Magazine, Glitter Magazine, All About The Stampeders Magazine, Record Week Music Industry, Weekly Trade Magazine, Record Month Magazine, Record Week Music Industry, Weekly Trade Magazine, and many others. He slowly began to produce music as well, and began to focus more on that during the 80’s. The Hot Spots Reports, Toronto CKFM led him to do similar programs for Montreal, New York, and Los Angeles. It then became a magazine, the longest gig Cee has done.
It is also in the late 80’s that Cee began to help produce festivals. Though he began this work producing pageants, he also worked on the Beaches International Jazz Festival. From there his career in festivals took off. The 90’s brought in many new opportunities. Cee became the regular producer and editor for HOToronto Magazine, and co-producer for the annual New Country Music Festival – CISS-FM.
Today, Cee continues to work in the entertainment industry, producing many chocolate festivals, and still publishing HOToronto online, now titled, WOW (What’s On Where) Magazine On-line.

Big Coat Media

  • Corporate body
  • 2000-

Created in 2000 by Catherine Fogarty and Maria Armstrong, Big Coat Media is an award winning television and digital media production company based in Toronto, Ontario. With a focus on un-scripted entertainment, they have produced many beloved programs. With a solid reputation, Big Coat Media has built relationships with many of North America’s major broadcasters.
Their most popular program is Love It or List It, which has had two direct spin offs: Love It or List It Vancouver, and Love It or List It Vacation Homes. The success of Love It or List It can be seen through its longevity, reaching 9 seasons (2008-2015). The program has garnered acclaim, being nominated for two Gemini Awards.

Balfour Bowen, Lisa

  • Person

Lisa Balfour Bowen is a former bilingual Canadian journalist, who is best known for her political correspondence in Quebec. She has had a 35 year career, having been published in The Globe and Mail, The Toronto Star, The Toronto Sun, The Gazette, Montreal Star, Maclean’s, Canadian Art, and others.

Balfour Bowen was born in Hamilton, ON, and studied at the University of Toronto, the Sorbonne, and Harvard. One of the most notable periods in her career was during the 1960s when she reported on political and social issues facing Quebec in the defunct Montreal Star. She was then appointed political correspondent in Quebec City’s National Assembly, making her the first female Anglophone political correspondent appointed to this position. Due to her strong belief in supporting bilingualism, she worked as a bilingual policy adviser to the Government of Ontario’s Federal-Provincial Affairs Secretariat under Premiers John Robarts and Bill Davis.

Her philanthropic work has also been great and far reaching. She has help found French for the Future, and is a former director of the Toronto French School and the Alliance Française de Toronto. Balfour Bowen has had a great impact in the Toronto Arts community, helping to found and/or establish the Toronto Arts Awards, Tarragon Theatre and the Friends of the Library, Trinity College.

Awards and honoraries she has received:

  • Ordre de la Pléiade (2001)
  • Ordre du Mérite Francophile (2001)
  • Queen’s Golden Jubilee Medal (2002)
  • Chevalier dans l’Ordre des Palmes Académiques (2004)
  • Honorary Doctorate, Laurentian University (2008)
  • Queen Elizabeth Diamond Jubilee Medal (2012)
  • Senior Fellow of Massey College (2012)
  • Honorary Doctorate, Université Sainte-Anne (2015)

Saltzman, Paul

  • Person
  • 1943-

Paul Saltzman is a filmmaker, photographer, producer, broadcaster, author, and screenwriter. Born in 1943, Saltzman has made a large impact on Canadian film and television from a young age.

After briefly studying engineering science, he became involved in the civil rights movement. Spending time in Washington, DC and Mississippi, Saltzman helped the SNCC with voter registration. He came back to Canada and took a job with CBC in 1965. In this time he held many positions, functioning as a researcher, interviewer, and on-air host. In 1967 Saltzman took a position with the National Film Board, where he was able to interview Buckminster Fuller. 1968 brought great change to Saltzman life. Flying to India to help NFB film the Indian countryside, he fell in love with the country and continued to stay after the shooting was complete.

Needing a personal change in his life, Saltzman approached the Maharishi Mahesh Yogi and asked to learn meditation. This experience changed his life, as he not only learnt meditation, but he became friendly with others who were taking the Maharishi’s course (Saltzman was not). Using his personal camera, Saltzman captured intimate photographs of the Beatles, Mia Farrow, Donovan, Mike Love, and others. He began to hang out with Paul, Ringo, John, and George, and saw firsthand as they wrote and perfected many of their famous tunes. Though Saltzman published a few of these intimate photos once he returned to Canada in Maclean’s magazine, the majority remained packed away until 2000 with the publication of his first book The Beatles in Rishikesh.

1968 continued to be an exciting year for Saltzman. Acting as second-unit director and production manager, he helped create Tiger Child, the first IMAX film, premiered at EXPO ’70 in Osaka Japan.

The next decade offered Saltzman many opportunities. With his company Sunrise Films, he produced and directed many acclaimed works including the series Spread Your Wings. In this time he also tried his hand as writer, editor, cinematographer, and sound recordist. In 1984, Saltzman co-created and produced the popular family action-adventure series Danger Bay, which spanned six years, 123 episodes, and was aired by CBC and the Disney Channel.

Saltzman’s first time as a director in a feature-film was in 2008, with the documentary Prom Night in Mississippi. Teaming up with actor and film narrator Morgan Freeman, the film was a success, premiering at 2009 Sundance Film Festival. In 2012, his second documentary feature The Last White Knight premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival. This film revisited Saltzman’s time in the 1960’s when he helped the SNCC and the KKK member who beat him in front of courthouse for volunteering to help register Black voters.

In 2011, Patricia Aquino and Saltzman founded the non-profit Moving Beyond Prejudice. Its mission is “to directly and positively impact the attitudes, beliefs, and prejudices of students, youth-at-risk and adults using films, seminars, websites, and Internet ARGs”.

Saltzman’s skill and career has be recognized through many awards and nominations, from as early as 1974. He is a two-time Emmy award winner, and is currently based out of Toronto.

Heath, Jeffrey M.

Jeffrey Heath was born in 1943 in London, Ontario, where he completed his elementary and secondary school education. He began his association with Victoria College in 1961, completing a B.A. in English Language and Literature in 1965. He was elected President of the Vic Class of 6T5. After travelling in Europe during 1965-66 he returned to the University of Toronto to begin work on his M.A., completing it in 1967. He started his doctoral studies for U of T while a Resident Junior Fellow of Massey College. He lived there from 1967 to 1968. After spending a year in England doing research on Evelyn Waugh, he returned to teach at Victoria College, where he was a Lecturer from 1969 to 1975. He completed his dissertation, “Evelyn Waugh and the Comic Macabre” in 1971. He received tenure and became an Assistant Professor in 1975. In 1978 he became an Associate Professor. He was a member of the Victoria University Board of Regents from 1984 until 1990, participating actively in Victoria and Department of English committee work. In 1998 he retired to pursue his own research interests, co-editing, for some time, the University of Toronto’s Modern Drama.

In 1982 the McGill-Queen’s University Press and Weidenfeld and Nicolson published Heath’s The Picturesque Prison: Evelyn Waugh and His Writing. It was a study that had little connection with his dissertation but much to do with the research and interviews that he carried out in England later in the 1970s. During the 1980s Heath’s interests turned to Canadian Literature. He edited Profiles in Canadian Literature, Series 1–8 (Toronto: Dundurn Press, 1980, 1982, 1986, 1991), a collection of 124 articles on notable Canadian literary figures. After travelling through northern India in 1985, Heath began to focus his research on the life and work of E.M. Forster. He made a series of trips (1993 to 2004) to examine the Forster papers at the Archive Centre of King’s College, Cambridge and the BBC Written Archives Centre at Caversham Park, Reading. His research has been issued in scholarly articles and in The Creator as Critic and Other Writings by E.M. Forster (Toronto: Dundurn Press, 25 February 2008).

Heath’s academic interests continue to focus on Forster and on twentieth-century British and American literature.

Jeffrey Heath lives and works in Toronto.

Bell, Leslie R.

Leslie (Richard) Bell was a choir conductor, educator, writer, arranger, and composer, who was born in Toronto on May 5, 1906 and died there January 19, 1962. He received a Bachelor of Arts (BA) from the University of Toronto (1930); Master of Arts (MA) from the University of Toronto (1931); and a Doctorate of Music (D MUS) from the University of Montreal (1946). While studying with Frederick Horwood and Louis Waizman at the Toronto Conservatory of Music (TCM, now the Royal Conservatory of Music) (1917-1925), he played clarinet and saxophone in the orchestras of Luigi Romanelli and Joe DeCourcy and later led his own dance band. He taught English, history, and music at Parkdale Collegiate Institute (1935-1939), where his pupils included Howard Cable, later an associate at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC), and founded a girls choir there, the Alumnae Singers, later the Leslie Bell Singers. He was president of the music section of the Ontario Education Association (OMEA) from 1938 until 1941; chairman of the music department at the Ontario College of Education (1939-1948) and also taught summers at Queen's University (1946-1952) and at the University of Toronto (1946-1952).

Later in the 1950s, Bell divided his time between conducting (he also formed the short-lived Leslie Bell Gleemen in 1957), writing, and broadcasting. His broad musical interests were reflected in his work as music columnist for the Toronto Daily Star (1946-1962); associate editor in charge of music education for the Canadian Music Journal (1958-1962); contributor to many other publications; and radio commentator for CBC and CFRB in Toronto. In 1959, he was the co-founder and first executive director of the Canadian Music Educators' Association (CMEA) and editor of its journal, the Canadian Music Educator (1959-1962). In the Canadian Music Journal (Spring 1962), Geoffrey Payzant wrote: "It was his driving ambition to close the gap between the art of music and the minds of the many. He took the view that there is popular music good and bad and art music good and bad, and that the best of each had more in common than is generally thought to be the case."

Bell wrote Variations on a French Noël for string quartet; several choral works for female and mixed groups published by Canadian Music Sales and Mills; and many folk song arrangements published by Canadian Music Sales, G.V. Thompson, Shawnee Press, and Summy. After Bell's death, the CBC and the CMEA sponsored the Leslie Bell Memorial Choir Competition in 1963-1964 and 1965 (won by the Tudor Singers of Montreal, Quebec and the Acadia Chapel Choir of Wolfville, Nova Scotia, respectively). The Leslie Bell Prize was established in 1973 to assist a choir conductor in post-graduate training. Administered by the Ontario Choral Federation, it has been awarded to Edward F. Moroney (1973), Robert Cooper (1974), David Christiani (1975), Carole Boyle (1976), Jean Ashworth-Gam (1977), Gerald Neufeld (1978), Brainerd Blyden-Taylor (1981), Richard Dacey (1983), Daniel Hansen (1984), David Fallis (1985), Karen Price-Wallace (1986), Laurence Ewashko (1988), and Andrew Slonetsky (1990).

Monahan, Edward J.

Edward Monahan received a Bachelor of Philosophy from the University of St. Michaels College in 1949. He continued at St. Michaels College and graduated with an M.A in 1950, and a PhD in 1953, both also in Philosophy. He also received a Licentiate in Mediaeval Studies from the Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies in 1953.

Monahan’s career was filled with academic professing and university administration. His teaching appointments include Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Villanova University from 1953-1956; Associate Professor of Philosophy at Xavier University from 1956-1957; and Associate Professor of Philosophy at St. Francis Xavier University from 1957-1964.

Monahan acted as the Associate Executive Secretary of the Canadian Association of University Teachers from 1965-1970, where he co-chaired The Commission of Inquiry on Forty Catholic Related Colleges and Universities. He published the results of this Inquiry as A Commitment to Higher Education in 1970. Monahan later acted as the Executive Assistant to the Principal of Queens University from 1971-1972; the President of Laurentian University from 1972-1977; and the Executive Director/President of the Council of Ontario Universities from 1977-1991. Monahan was awarded an honourary doctorate from Lakehead University in 1981. Monahan also served on the Collegium of the University of St. Michaels College and in 1981-82 chaired a committee to study the function of the Collegium, and published the results in what became known as “The Monahan Report.” In the 1990s Monahan reviewed funding, accountability, and governance in colleges and universities across the Commonwealth, and published the results in several scholarly journals.

During his retirement, Monahan wrote Collective Autonomy: A History of the Council of Ontario Universities, 1962-2000, which was published in 2004. The following year he began researching the history of St. Michaels College, and published Teach me Goodness, Truth and Knowledge: A History of St. Michaels College in 2017.

In 2008, Monahan was awarded an honorary doctorate, the Doctor of Sacred Letters, from the University of St. Michaels College in recognition of his service to higher education in Ontario.

Dignan, Alan

  • Person

Alan Dignan was a Victoria University graduate, Class of 1931.

Nimmons, Phil

Nimmons (clarinetist, composer, arranger, and band leader) was born in Kamloops, British Columbia on June 3, 1923, and raised in Vancouver. His life-long career in music began with playing clarinet in high school, and leading a small band in his Point Grey neighbourhood. Nimmons studied at the University of British Columbia 1940-1944 in preparation for a career in medicine. At this time, he played in local dance bands (Sandy DeSantis, Stan Patton, Barney Potts, Wilf Wylie, and Dal Richards) and joined the jazz quintet of the guitarist Ray Norris, where he actively arranged a substantial body of music. He subsequently studied clarinet 1945-1947 at the Juilliard School with Arthur Christmann and composition 1948-1950 at the Royal Conservatory of Music with Richard Johnston, Arnold Walter, and John Weinzweig.

In 1953, Nimmons formed his own jazz band (which took the name Nimmons 'N' Nine in 1957). Early broadcasts on CBC and its concert debut in 1956 at the Stratford Festival marked the beginning of this venture. Through various iterations, including Nimmons ‘N’ Nine Plus Six, this ensemble continued in some form much of the rest of his career. Subsequently, Nimmons has performed with David Braid, billing themselves as Nimmons ‘N’ Braid. In November 2013, Nimmons performed in a concert billed as “Nimmons ‘N’ 90” in celebration of his 90th year. Nimmons joined the University of Toronto in 1973 as instructor in jazz techniques and is now Director Emeritus of Jazz Studies.

Nimmons, and his ensembles, toured widely, including many engagements around the world. Nimmons is known to create works in both the jazz and classical vein. Nimmons was a founding member of the Canadian League of Composers and an associate of the Canadian Music Centre. He also founded jazz programs at several schools and universities, including the Banff School of Fine Arts (1970), the University of Toronto (1973), the University of Western Ontario (1978), the Courtney Youth Music Centre (1982), and the InterProvincial Music Camp, near Parry Sound, Ontario (1987).

Nimmons was awarded the first Juno in the Jazz category in 1976 for the recording of his Atlantic Suite (1974) by Nimmons ‘N’ Nine Plus Six. Nimmons has received many commissions including “Transformations” (premiered by Nimmons ‘N’ Nine Plus Six), which was commissioned jointly by the CBC and the Ontario Arts Council for World Music Week Conference (1975), hosted by the Canadian Music Council on behalf of the International Music Council (UNESCO). “Invocation” was commissioned jointly by COJO and the Ontario Arts Council and was premiered by Nimmons ‘N’ Nine Plus Six in the 1976 Olympic Games. “Plateaus: Cartiboo Country Tone Poem,” commissioned by the CBC Vancouver Orchestra and premiered in 1986, was subsequently recorded by that ensemble for CBC Classics. The Olympic Arts Festival of the 1986 Winter Games commissioned “The Torch,” and the work was premiered in Calgary by an Olympic Jazz Band, directed by Rob McConnell.

Stroh, Jack

Jack Stroh is a retired lawyer and lives in Erie, PA.
Stroh met Henri Nouwen through his wife, Sue Stroh, president of L'Arche Erie (Erie, PA). Nouwen counselled Stroh from 1991-96 and they become friends.

Emmanuel College (Toronto, Ont.). Registrar’s Office

  • Corporate body
  • 1928-

The first Registrar of Emmanuel College was John Fletcher McLaughlin who served as Dean from 1928 until his death in 1932. The Reverend Frederick.W. Langford held the position afterwards and was named as Registrar. Following him, the duties of Registrar were carried out by the Dean or faculty members.

After 1955, the position of Registrar was restored and held by:
-Rev. K.H. Cousland (1955)
-Rev. W.O Fennell (1956-1959)
-Rev. C.D. Jay (1960-1966)
-Rev. A.G. Reynolds (1966-1973)
-Rev. G.W. Boyce (1974-1976)
-Rev. S.V. Fawcett (1977-1985)
-Jackie Lautens
-Shirley Wilfong
-Margaret Grisdale
-Wanda Chin (present)

University of Toronto. Faculty of Music

The Faculty of Music was created in 1918. The Senate of the University withdrew its affiliations with various music schools (Toronto College of Music and Royal Hamilton College of Music) and inaugurated a Faculty of Music to teach music and administer examinations. Along with his duties as music director of the Toronto Conservatory, Augustus Stephen Vogt was appointed Dean. “Courses of Instruction” were introduced, the first courses to be taught at the Faculty; which grew to offer courses with a full range of aspects involved with western music, including Jazz performance, ethnomusicology, and music and medicine.

In 1952, The Royal Conservatory of Music and the University of Toronto's Faculty of Music came under the same administration, placing a Dean in charge of both programs. The Conservatory would be known as The School of Music and was headed by a Principal. The Faculty of Music would be headed by a Director. In 1959 plans for an electronic music studio were announced, historically the second in a North American university. The Faculty regularly hosts events in one of its two theatres; MacMillan Theatre consisting of an 815-seat hall, designed for the production of operas and large ensemble concerts and named after former dean, Sir Ernest MacMillan. World-renowned for its excellent acoustics, and Walter Hall which commemorates Arnold Walter, Director of the Faculty from 1952-1968, Walter Hall was designed for chamber concerts and recitals. The house seats 490. The hall also contains a two-manual tracker-action Casavant organ.

In 1991, the School of Music/Royal Conservatory of Music separated and once again became its own institution.

Schmid, Catherine

Catherine Rank Schmid is a Canadian artist based in France. She was born in 1942 in Toronto, Ontario, to Margery Butler and Harold Rank. In 1968 she married Stephen Yeomans. They divorced in 1988. Their son Edward (Ted) Yeomans resides in Peterborough, Ontario. In 1995 she married Gérard Schmid in Switzerland. He passed away in 2003 in France.

Schmid studied Modern Languages at Victoria College, University of Toronto from 1961 to 1965 and received an Honours BA in French and German. During this period, she took part-time courses at the Ontario College of Art, studying painting with Aba Bayefsky. After graduation she taught in Bad Godesberg (Bonn) Germany in Amos Comenius Gymnasium, a Pestalozzi school, travelling extensively as well. Returning to Toronto, she completed her diploma at the Ontario College of Education and taught French, German and Art for many years in Secondary Schools in Toronto and Peterborough Ontario. While in Peterborough she was a founding member of the Art Gallery of Peterborough.

During a Sabbatical leave in 1984, Schmid spent several months in France and Germany drawing and painting. In 1987 she exhibited her work at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education and gave a lecture in the Department of Philosophy of Education on the theme of the creative experience and its relationship to the development of learning. She also exhibited at The Art Gallery of Peterborough and in 1988 at the Here and Now Gallery in Toronto. In 1990 she moved to Saint Gallen, Switzerland, teaching Art at the Institut auf dem Rosenberg, an international private school. Her experiences travelling and living in different surroundings have been a compelling influence on her philosophy and in her artistry.

Schmid has also exhibited internationally. In 1989, she painted in Indonesia and The Cross Cultural Institute in Jakarta exhibited her drawings and paintings “Indonesia: the first impression of a Canadian artist”, sponsored by the Canadian Embassy. In 1990, The Museum of Contemporary Art Nyoman Gunarsa in Yogyakarta invited her to be Artist in Residence, where she had an exhibition “Explorations in Indonesia”. Her work is held in the collections of Victoria University at the University of Toronto, the Art Gallery of Peterborough, the Ontario Secondary School Teachers’ Federation in Toronto, Crédit Suisse in Saint Gallen, Switzerland, the Agung Rai Gallery in Bali, Indonesia, the Art Gallery of Ontario in the art rental collection, and in many private collections.

Since 1994, she has resided in Provence in the south of France, where she has her studio and has given private instruction to students from many countries.

Schmid’s works reflect the elements of chance, surprise, capturing a world full of possibilities, originating in her broad travel experience and exposure to many cultures. Always “looking”, suddenly she “sees”. She is especially interested in the contrast of light and darkness and in architectural forms. The inner space of the mind: a thought, a word, a feeling, are all part of her creative approach.

Canadian General Hospital No. 4 (University of Toronto)

  • Corporate body
  • 1914-1918

The No. 4 Canadian General Hospital was a 1,040 bed base hospital that was approved on 26 March 1915 and shipped via England to Salonika in Greece on 15 May. Before this could happen, the Hospital had to be equipped and funds raised to pay for supplies. An immediate appeal was made by the UofT to 13,000 alumni, using envelopes that had been prepared for a now abandoned appeal for funds for a hockey rink. The work was organized by two committees. The first, representing the Board of Governors, Senate, and staff, arranged for the purchase of medical, surgical, and laboratory apparatus. The second, formed on 17 March as the Women's University Hospital Supply Association, was composed of ladies from the U of T and McMaster. It worked with a ‘large number of societies both in Toronto and throughout the Province to provide everything in the way of bed linen, surgical dressings and garments for patients.’ The two committees combined their efforts for fundraising.

Gattoni, Giuliana

Giuliana Gattoni was born on February 27, 1947 in Lissone, Italy. She trained as an architect in Italy before emigrating to Canada with her husband, where she helped him run his practice and was an active freelance writer in Toronto (ca. 1985-1993). Among others, she wrote (in Italian) for the Balletto Oggi magazine (published as Ballet 2000 in English), and for Corriere Canadese, the Italian-language daily newspaper in Toronto. In addition to reviewing performances in Toronto, she traveled regularly to festivals in Italy, including opera in Versilia, Spoleto's Festival dei due Mondi, and the ballet festival in Nervi. In the early 1990s, she went back to school at the University of Toronto, where she received her Master of Arts in art history. She passed away in 1996 whilst working on her PhD in art history.

Ward, Muriel Alma

  • Person
  • 1925-1998

Muriel Alma Ward was born on September 6, 1925. She graduated in 1947 from the School of Nursing, Hamilton General Hospital. Her nursing career included being an operating room nurse, and both teaching and nursing at the Toronto Western Hospital and the Nightingale School of Nursing. She held a Bachelor of Science of Nursing and a Master's degree both from the University of Toronto. She died on January 9, 1998.

Crone, Robert & Violet

  • Family

Robert and Violet Crone are Canadian pioneers in the film and television industry. They have each had very influential careers and have worked across the globe. Their resumes are extensive, each with their own long list of awards.

Robert (Bob) Crone grew up in Peterborough, Ontario as the son of a minister. It was in high school where he began to take steps towards his future career behind the camera. He made his first film there, but quickly moved to Toronto to work for CBC, which had just begun national television broadcasting. After a short time there, Robert began to work as a free-lance cameraman, and then a film producer. He would supply publicity shots, news stories, and interviews to Pan-American Airways, Time-Life, CBC, and other Canadian magazines.

His career then took him across the globe. He spent seven years traversing Asia, Africa, Europe, and coming home to Canada every so often. He covered news, and was often calmly entering divided cities, and politically charged situation to capture each areas story on film. With a custom-made sound mixing console in his Toronto home basement, he was able to produce a complete audio-visual package for his clients.

In 1964, Robert decided, with the support of his wife Vi, to open a film processing house. At the time, there were no film laboratories in Canada. Film House Limited began, serving visiting film producers and Canadians alike. Film House sales took off, doubling about every 18 months. By 1968, they were processing 75 to 125 orders a day. After ten years of success, Robert Crone sold the company to an ad agency and returned to shooting.

Robert Crone, along with help from his son David Crone, has been credited for bring the Steadicam to Canada, being the top operators of the invention. The entry of the Steadicam to the film scene revolutionized how many shot, as the camera stabilizing system allowed for free camera movement.

Violet (Vi) Crone grew up in Peterborough, Ontario. She was the first female camera operator in Canada and has studied at the New York Institute of Photography

Octapixx Worldwide

  • Corporate body
  • 1995-

Octapixx Worldwide was established in 1995 as a broadcast distribution company. Located in Toronto, Ontario, they represent producers from around the world. As of 2019, they represent over 100 producers, and hosts over 3000 hours of content. Octapixx Worldwide carries programing from a multitude of genres, including factual, military, wildlife, history, science, lifestyle, travel, children’s, animation, sports, educational and other documentaries. Their dedication to quality content has led to partnerships and agreements with broadcasters such as ABC, A&E, Al Jazeera, AMC Networks, American Public Television, Canal+, CCTV, Crime + Investigation Network, Czech TV, Discovery Channel, DR, Fox, Foxtel, France 5, Globosat, Groupe AB, The History Channel, KBS, National Geographic Channels Worldwide, NHK, NRK, PBS, Planete, RAI, Red Bull Media House, RTE, RTL Disney, RTVE, SVT, Ten Network, and TRT.

Ling, Elaine

  • Person
  • 1946-2016

Elaine Ling was born in Hong Kong in 1946, and immigrated to Canada when she was nine with her family. She studied music and medicine, and obtained a medical degree from the University of Toronto. Ling practiced family medicine around the world, including Abu Dhabi, Nepal, and in Canada in more remote places.

Ling continued to practice family medicine in the Greater Toronto Area during her life, and played cello in the community orchestra, Orchestra Toronto. She was an accomplished musician, and could also play the piano, baritone, oboe, and guitar. She was also a fellow at the Royal Canadian Geographical Society. The University of Ryerson offers a Research Fellowship in her name for students perusing photography after receiving a generous donation from Ling. She passed away in 2016 from lung cancer.

Her love for open space, stone, and nature propelled her to seek out places of solitude and places with ancient architecture. Her travels brought her across four continents, capturing the landscapes and beauty of Mongolia, Ethiopia, Madagascar, Timbuktu, Namibia, North Africa, India, South America, Australia, American Southwest; the citadels of Ethiopia, San Agustin, Persepolis, Petra, Cappadocia, Machu Picchu, Angkor Wat, Great Zimbabwe, Abu Simbel; and the Buddhist centers of Myanmar, Laos, Vietnam, Tibet, and Bhutan.

Lingh’s photography, predominantly in Black & White, explored the shifting balance between man-made and nature. Her work has been exhibited all around the world, published in a multitude of collections, and part of many public institutions permanent fine art collections. In Canada, her work is in the collections of the National Gallery of Canada, Ryerson University, Art Gallery of Ontario, Royal Ontario Museum, and the Canadian Museum of Contemporary Photography. She has also published four books of her art: Mongolia, Land of the Deer Stone (2009), Talking Stones (2015), Cuba Chronicles (2015), and Habitacion Cubana (2016).

Bulman, Alan

  • Person
  • 1926-

Alan Bulman was born in 1926 in Cyprus. During the Second World War, he fought for the British Royal Navy and began to become interested in photography. After the war, he began work at British Films Limited where he preserved footage. Bulman immigrated to Canada in 1963 and restored old films and provided stock images for Graphic Consultants Ltd. He continued to work with film and photography throughout his career. His interest and skill in preservation eventually allowed him to open his own company, Colour Prints (1974-1994), which worked with both contemporary and archival prints. Bulman collected photos, text, and film over his lifetime.

Northway, Mary Louise

  • Person
  • 1909-1978

Professor of psychology and supervisor in Institute of Child Studies, University of Toronto.

Smith, Roy Lamont

  • Local
  • Person
  • 1865-1946

Roy Lamont Smith was born on March 4, 1865 in Fremont, Nebraska and died on February 6, 1946 in San Diego, California. He was a pianist and studied at the Hershey School of Musical Art in Chicago (1883). He taught music in Fremont (1891) and was a professor of music at the Cadek Conservatory of Music in Chattanooga (1904-1942). He wrote various songs for voice and piano accompaniment, including one of the Tennessee state songs "My Homeland, Tennessee" (1925).

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