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People and organizations

Murray, Gladstone

  • www.oxforddnb.com/view/article/65430
  • Person
  • 1893-1970

Murray, (William Ewart) Gladstone (1893–1970), publicist and television company executive, was born at Maple Ridge, British Columbia, on 8 April 1893, the son of Paul Murray and Hannah Mackay. He owed his forenames to the Grand Old Man of British Liberalism who had become prime minister for the fourth time the previous year. He was educated at King Edward's High School, Vancouver, and McGill College of British Columbia. After graduating from McGill University in Montreal he worked for a year as a journalist in North and South America; he then went as a Rhodes scholar to New College, Oxford. Between 1914 and 1918 Murray served in the Royal Flying Corps. He logged 2000 hours of combat flying and was several times wounded; he was awarded the DFC, MC, and Croix de Guerre and was also decorated by the Italian government. After the war, he was for two years the aeronautical correspondent of the Daily Express. He subsequently worked briefly as publicity director for the League of Nations Union and as publicity manager of the Radio Communications Company. Murray married in 1923 Eleanor, daughter of John Powell JP, of Wrexham. They had a son and a daughter.

Murray's managing director at the Radio Communications Company, Major Basil Binyon, became one of the founding directors of the British Broadcasting Company. It was partly on Binyon's recommendation, in 1924, that he was taken on by John Reith to be the fledgeling company's director of publicity. Murray was also on friendly terms with Peter Eckersley, the BBC's chief engineer; another who spoke highly of him to Reith was Lord Beaverbrook, his employer at the Express. As was customary in those post-war years, he styled himself Major Gladstone Murray. Asa Briggs, in his History of Broadcasting in the United Kingdom, describes him as ‘colourful’ and ‘convivial’ and gives him credit for the skill and energy with which he watched over BBC interests in those early years. It was at his suggestion, during the 1926 general strike, that the BBC broadcast ‘editorials’ giving nightly appreciations of the strike situation, and Murray shared the writing of these with Reith.

Murray remained at the BBC for eleven years. He was acting controller (programmes) for three months in 1934–5, an appointment that occasioned serious conflict with the then controller (administration), Admiral Carpendale. Later in 1935, following a major reorganization, Murray became one of two assistant controllers in the programme division. He was popular with his subordinates. One of them, Maurice Gorham, wrote later that they felt better off under him than under any other chief in the BBC: ‘Throughout my time at Savoy Hill he remained the most talked-about of BBC personalities, rumoured simultaneously to be about to replace Reith and to be about to leave’ (Gorham, 38–9).

Such rumours were not calculated to improve Murray's relations with a director-general always jealously watchful of his own position and profoundly mistrustful of the whole breed of journalists. ‘The Beaverbrook press have resumed their filthy personal articles’, Reith noted in his diary in March 1934, adding, ‘I am more than disgusted with Murray's complete ineffectiveness’ (Reith diaries, 23 March 1934). And a year later, more ominously:
I have had Dawnay get out of Murray an exposé of his so-called ‘intelligence’ work, with respect to the press. It is a most damning document and confirms all the suspicions and uneasiness which I have felt with respect to him for all these years. (ibid., 3 April 1935)
In March 1936 Reith persuaded the board to require Murray's resignation. The ground had been well prepared by the classic BBC device of character assassination by annual report. ‘He is a bad case’, Reith wrote in his diary, ‘and it is monstrous, and not my fault, that he has been tolerated for so long’ (Reith diaries, 1 April 1936)—a curious observation for a famously autocratic chief executive. Murray appealed, was granted grace leave, and before his dismissal took effect was appointed general manager of the newly formed Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC). (Three years previously he had been seconded to the commission set up to advise the Canadian government on the development of broadcasting.)

Murray did the job for six years, and did it well. In 1942, however, the CBC came under the scrutiny of the committee on broadcasting of the Canadian House of Commons. Although they praised Murray's work, they also reported that the CBC board had felt some lack of confidence in his ability in financial matters. He was replaced as general manager and appointed director-general of broadcasting, Canada. It was a grandiloquent title for a non-job; he sensibly resigned from it the following year. At the age of fifty, Murray's career in public service was effectively over.

Murray then founded the Responsible Enterprise Movement. He lectured for several years on its behalf, and contributed frequently to reviews and magazines in North America on a range of topics. There was a strong emphasis on free market economics and industrial relations, but he also addressed himself to more nebulous subjects, under such headings as ‘Will freedom survive?’ and ‘Canada's place in civilization’.

Murray was a life associate of the Royal Society of St George and he had an honorary LLD from Florida Southern College. In his youth he was a notable track athlete; he also played squash, tennis, and golf. His health in later years was indifferent. He died in hospital in Toronto on 28 February 1970, aged seventy-six.

Ian McIntyre

Locke Family

  • ottca-f2310
  • Family
  • [1885]-2003

The Locke family patriarch was Robert Shaw Locke (1837-1911), a direct descendant of United Empire Loyalist Sir John Johnson. He married Florence Adelaide Sheldon in 1871 and the couple had four children, Sheldon, Robert Henry, Florence Alice and Herbert Alfred Edwin. The first two attended Trinity College. Theodore Sheldon Locke matriculated in 1890 At some point after he began at Trinity College he was the victim of an unfortunate hazing incident and suffered a nervous breakdown. He left the College, returning in 1892, but was never awarded a degree. He became a teacher, but his later years were spent in a retirement home. Robert Henry Locke, his brother, graduated in 1904, became a lawyer and was appointed to the American Supreme Court..Herbert Locke married Irene Anthes of Parkdale, a 1903 graduate, along with her sister Libby Anthes, of St. Hilda’s. Their brother Laurence did not attend Trinity but was active in dramatic productions at the College. Herbert and Irene Locke had four daughters; the eldest, Elizabeth Sheldon Locke (Lambe), was a 1933 graduate of St. Hilda’s. Her daughter Laurie Lambe Wallace graduated from Trinity College in 1968.

Altman, Nathan

  • https://www.wikidata.org/wiki/Q1358816
  • Person
  • 1889-1970

Nadelman, Elie

  • https://www.google.com/url?q=http://viaf.org/viaf/47654143&sa=D&source=editors&ust=1660067075206519&usg=AOvVaw0bVB2VnykK8I4IBaxbMDb-
  • Person
  • 1882-1946

Iser, Iosif

  • https://www.google.com/url?q=http://viaf.org/viaf/34729821&sa=D&source=editors&ust=1659969266546918&usg=AOvVaw1eCiXCsTtQasPibFR-EjpP
  • Person
  • Iser, Iosif

Fichmann, Yaacov

  • https://www.google.com/url?q=http://viaf.org/viaf/34615650&sa=D&source=editors&ust=1659631028637464&usg=AOvVaw0B5yLo90ZBhQ63-g1HCqtS
  • Person
  • 1881-1958

Lee, Richard B.

  • https://viaf.org/viaf/9875169
  • Person
  • 1937-

Professor Richard B. Lee is an internationally known anthropologist who studies hunting and gathering societies and is particularly famous for his work on the !Kung San of Botswana. Born in Canada, Prof. Lee graduated from the University of Toronto in Anthropology with a B.A. in 1959 and an M.A. in 1961. He pursued his studies at the University of California Berkley, graduating with a Ph.D. in 1965. Concurrently, he was employed by Harvard University as a Graduate Research Anthropologist from 1963 to 1965 during which time (1963-64) he did his first of many field trips among the !Kung San bushmen of the Kalahari. From 1965 to 1967, he was a lecturer in Social Anthropology at Harvard and from 1967-70 was a research fellow in the Department of Social Relations and Centre for Behavioral Sciences at Harvard. For two years from 1970-72, he was associate professor of anthropology at Rutgers University before returning to the University of Toronto to take on the same position. By 1976 he had risen to the rank of professor and in 1999 was honored with the appointment to University Professor, a position he still holds.

Field research and grants to support them have been a significant part of Prof. Lee’s career and success. As part of the Kalahari Research Group out of Harvard, he studied and lived among the !Kung San numerous times including the 1963-64 year mentioned above, as well as a three year study funded by the N.I.M.H (National Institute of Mental Health) from 1967-70 with Harvard Anthropologist Irven DeVore. In 1982-83, he was Connaught Senior Fellow and took leave to study “Agriculture, the State and Capitalism: A Study of Large Scale Social Change”. He has been the recipient of funds from various other sources including the Canada Council and the Humanities and Social Science Research Council. His study of foraging societies has extended well beyond the !Kung San to include peoples in Tanzania, Namibia, Alaska, Australia, British Columbia, the Yukon and Labrador. Most recently his research has focused on the anthropology of health and the cultural and social factors in AIDS epidemic in southern Africa for which he has received funds from the National Institutes of Health (U.S.) via Columbia University School of Public Health as well as directly from the University of Toronto.

Prof. Lee has published over 100 articles and chapters in books. He has authored several books including Man the Hunter (1968), Kalahari Hunter Gathers (1976), Politics and History in Band Societies (1982) and The Dobe Ju/’hoansi (2003). Most recognized is his 1979 , The !Kung San: Men and Women and Work in a Foraging Society, listed in American Scientist list of the 100 most important works in science of the 20th century. Prof. Lee won the Anisfield-Wolf Award in Racial Relations for this same work from the Cleveland Foundation. He has also given numerous lectures at symposiums and meetings and is a sought after keynote speaker for groups worldwide.

Prof. Lee has been active in several professional associations including: the Association of American Anthropologists for which he organized several meetings and symposiums; founding member of Anthropologists for Radical Political Change; past president of the Canadian Anthropologist Society and the Canadian Ethnology Society. He has also been a referee for various publications (American Anthropologist, Current Anthropology) and granting agencies (Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council, Wenner-Gren Foundation and the National Science Foundation). He is a member of the Royal Society of Canada and is a Foreign Honorary Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Prof. Richard Lee lives in Toronto and continues to research, publish and teach in the Department of Anthropology. He is also a sought after scholar for invited lectures world wide.

Schneid, Otto

  • https://viaf.org/viaf/98495941
  • Person
  • 1900-1974

Otto Schneid, born in Jablunkova, Czechoslovakia, January 30, 1900, was an art historian, professor, writer, and artist. During the 1930s he began work on a dictionary of twentieth century Jewish artists to be published in Vienna in 1938, but the plates were confiscated by the Nazis. In 1939 he went to Palestine (Israel) as a research student at Jerusalem University. From 1948-1960 he taught art history at the Technion (Israel Institute of Technology), Haifa, and continued to write about art. In 1960 he decided to concentrate on his creative work (poetry, painting, sculpting) and moved to the United States, where he lived from 1960 to 1963. During that period he had seven one-man shows there and one in Canada. In 1964 he moved to Canada where he continued to paint and to write. He died in Toronto in 1974.

Sternberg, Ricardo da Silveira Lobo

  • https://viaf.org/viaf/98237767
  • Person
  • 1948-

Ricardo da Silveira Lobo Sternberg, Professor Emeritus of the University of Toronto, was a Professor in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese. He taught courses on Brazilian and Portuguese literature between his appointment in 1979 and his retirement in 2015. His main research interests are Brazilian and Portuguese literature and literary figures. Sternberg is also a poet. Four collections of his poetry have been published, and his poems have appeared frequently in poetry magazines and anthologies.

Born in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil in 1948, Ricardo Sternberg moved with his family to the United States in 1963, where he received his B.A. in English literature from the University of California, Riverside (1971). He received his M.A. (1975) and Ph.D. (1978) in Comparative Literature from the University of California, Los Angeles. He was a Junior Fellow with the Society of Fellows at Harvard University between 1975 and 1978.

Professor Sternberg was appointed to the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at the University of Toronto as an Assistant Professor in 1978, and was cross-appointed to the Centre for Comparative Literature from 1984 until 1998. He became an Associate Professor in 1984 and a Professor in 1998. He was a Graduate Advisor for the Centre for Comparative Literature from 1986 to 1998, and the President of the Research Development Commission from 1988 to 1991. From 2004-2005, Professor Sternberg was Acting Director for the Centre for Comparative Literature, and Acting Chair (2007-2008) and Interim Chair (2009-2010) for the Department of Spanish and Portuguese. He became a Professor Emeritus upon retirement in 2015.

He has taught several undergraduate and graduate courses in Brazilian and Portuguese literature, with a focus on 19th and 20th century Luso-Brazilian literature, and literary figures such as Eça de Queirós, Machado de Assis, and José Saramago.

Professor Sternberg has researched and written extensively on Brazilian and Portuguese literature, literary figures and their works, having numerous articles published in scholarly journals. He has also translated the works of poets such as Carlos Drummond de Andrade, Jorge de Lima, and João Cabral de Melo Neto.

He is also a poet. His poems have appeared in magazines such as The Paris Review, The Nation, Poetry (Chicago), Descant, American Poetry Review, The Virginia Quarterly and Ploughshares, as well as in anthologies of Canadian and Latin American literature. He also has four published collections of his work: The Invention of Honey. Montreal: Vehicule (1990); Map of Dreams. Montreal: Vehicule (1996), Bamboo Church. Montreal: McGill-Queen's University Press (1996); and Some Dance. Montreal: McGill-Queen's University Press (2014). He received the National Discovery Prize in 1974, the Pushcart Prize in 1978, and the ‘Blues’ award for Best Canadian Poetry in English in 2012.

Rapoport, Anatol

  • https://viaf.org/viaf/98139915
  • Person
  • 1911-2007

Anatol Rapoport was born in Lozovaya, Russia on May 22, 1911. In 1922 the family emigrated to the United States and settled in Chicago. He initially trained as a classical musician, studying music in Vienna, where he received a diploma in composition, piano and conducting from the Staatsakademie für Musik und darsteellende Kunst (State Academy of Music and Performing Arts) in 1933. While in Vienna, he contributed to the journal Musical Courier, and then performed as a concert pianist and lectured on the semantics of music in Europe and the Americas. He played at concerts in Austria, Poland, Hungary and Italy before returning to the United States the following year. Over the years he also became multilingual and fluent in English, German and Russian, with an oral understanding of French and Spanish.

Rapoport found he could not make a career as a musician in North America so turned to mathematics, studying under Nicholas Rashevsky at the University of Chicago, from which he received his doctorate in 1941. During World War II, he served in the United States Air Force in Alaska and India. After demobilization in 1946, he taught mathematics at the Illinois Institute of Technology before, in 1947, joining the Committee of Mathematical Biology at the University of Chicago. In the same year his first scientific papers, dealing with mathematical models of parasitism and symbiosis, appeared in the Bulletin of Mathematical Biophysics. They provided a conceptual basis for his life’s work – the study of conflict and co-operation.

In 1954 he took a year’s leave to go to the Center for Advanced Studies in the Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University’s prestigious “think tank”, where he concentrated on mathematical biophysics and helped found the International Society for General Systems Research. He then moved to the University of Michigan as one of the first three faculty members of the Mental Health Research Institute in the Department of Psychiatry. Here he started research on war and peace, conflict and conflict resolution. He was one of the earliest investigators to use experimental games as tools of research on conflict and co-operation; the famous Prisoner’s Dilemma game has always been associated with him.

In 1968 Rapoport was a visiting professor at the Institut für höhere Studien (Institute for Advanced Studies) in Vienna, and briefly emigrated to Denmark where he was, for 1968-1969, visiting professor at the Technical University of Denmark. The family then came to Canada where he had accepted the position of professor of psychology and mathematics at the University of Toronto. He retired in 1976 but returned to teach for another year, before becoming a roving visiting professor at the Institut für höhere Studien (1976 and 1977), Wissenschaftszentrum in Berlin (1978), the University of Hiroshima (1978) and the University of Louisville (1979). In 1980 he was appointed professor emeritus of psychology at the University of Toronto and then director of the Institut für höhere Studien, a position he held for four years.

Back in Toronto, he was appointed professor of peace studies at the University of Toronto in 1984, where he initiated what evolved into a four-year degree program in peace studies. He held the position until 1996, but continued to teach until 2000. In 1984 he joined the newly-formed organization, Science for Peace, was elected president and remained on its executive until 1998. His wife, Gwen, did administrative work for the organization and edited its newsletter. In the same year he created the famous Tit for Tat strategy for the iterated prisoner’s dilemma tournament held by Robert Axelrod.

Rapoport is the author of twenty books and more than 400 published articles. His books have been translated into Chinese, Dutch, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish. He was editor of General Systems from 1956 to 1977, and associate editor of the Journal of Conflict Resolution, Behavioral Science, and ETC: A Review of General Semantics. He was also a member of the editorial board of about ten journals. He was president of the International Society of General Semantics from 1953-1955, of the Society of General Systems Research in 1965-1966, of the Canadian Peace Research and Education Foundation Association from 1972-1975, and of Science for Peace (1984-1986). In addition to a nomination for the Nobel Prize and honorary degrees from Western Michigan University, the University of Toronto and Royal Military College, he has received the Lenz International Peace Prize and the Harold D. Lasswell Award for Political Psychology. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Science, the American Mathematical Society, and the Society for Mathematical Biology.

In 1949, Rapoport married Gwen Goodrich. They have three children, Anya, Alexander and Anthony.

Merzer, Arieh

  • https://viaf.org/viaf/98052978/
  • Person
  • 1905-1966

Golani, Rivka

  • https://viaf.org/viaf/97852559
  • Person
  • 1946-

Rivka Golani, viola, was born in Tel Aviv March 22, 1946. She moved to Canada in 1974, where she taught at the University of Toronto Faculty of Music (1978-1987, 1994-1996) and Royal Conservatory of Music in Toronto (1978-1987).

Pascin, Jules

  • https://viaf.org/viaf/97262322/
  • Person
  • 1885-1930

Manina

  • https://viaf.org/viaf/9685613/
  • Person

Spertus, Maurice

  • https://viaf.org/viaf/96472835/
  • Person
  • 1901-1986

Tofel, Jennings

  • https://viaf.org/viaf/96406270/
  • Person
  • 1891-1959

Segall, Lasar

  • https://viaf.org/viaf/96207085/
  • Person
  • 1891-1957

Sternberg, Harry

  • https://viaf.org/viaf/96054007/
  • Person
  • 1904-2001

Mundlak, Regina

  • https://viaf.org/viaf/96025029/
  • Person
  • 1887-1942

Sterling, Marc

  • https://viaf.org/viaf/95952086/
  • Person
  • 1895-1976

Kopman, Benjamin

  • https://viaf.org/viaf/95832933/
  • Person
  • 1887-1965

Coxeter, Harold Scott Macdonald

  • https://viaf.org/viaf/95255476
  • Person
  • 1907-2003

Harold Scott MacDonald Coxeter, known as Donald, was born on February 9 1907 in Kensington England to parents Harold Coxeter and Lucy Gee. At an early age, he demonstrated a high level of ability in both music and math. His father, realizing his son’s gifts, sought out the advice of the famous philosopher Bertrand Russell who introduced young Donald to mathematician E.H. Neville. At the advice of Neville, Coxeter left boarding school at the age of 15 and was tutored only in Math and German. He entered Cambridge in 1926 on scholarship and received his B.A. in 1929. He continued to study for his doctorate under Britain’s leading figure in geometry H.F. Baker and was awarded a Ph.D. in 1931. As a Fellow, he continued his research at Cambridge and for two years was a research visitor at Princeton working under Oswald Veblen. In 1936, Coxeter married Rien Brouwer of Holland and they set off together to Toronto where Coxeter accepted an appointment to the mathematical department at the University of Toronto. Toronto is where their life settled. They had two children Susan and Edgar.

Coxeter was considered a leading mathematician and the greatest geometer of the 20th century. His contributions of fundamental importance have been in the Theory of Polytopes, Non-Euclidean Geometry, Discrete Group and Combinational Theory. Specifically, he is best known among mathematicians for discovering how shapes will behave in higher dimensions – now known as Coxeter groups and Coxeter diagrams. His influence has reached beyond the mathematics world. Coxeter’s work in non-euclidean geometry inspired the “Circle Limits I-IV” by the famous Dutch artist M.C. Escher with whom he shared a life-long friendship. Another strand of his thinking influenced theoretical physics in the area of relativistic quantum field theory. Coxeter numbers and diagrams are used in the study of elementary particle physics. Nobel winning chemists who discovered the Carbon 60 molecule were influenced by Coxeter’s work on iconsahedral symmetries.

Over his expansive career, Coxeter published 12 books – at least four of them classics including Introduction to Geometry which first appeared in 1961 and has since seen many editions and has been translated into six languages. He also published over 200 articles and at various times acted as reviewer and referee. He was editor of the Canadian Journal of Mathematics for nearly a decade from 1948 to 1957. He served as president of the Canadian Mathematical Congress (1962-63), Vice-President of the American Mathematical Society, (1968) and president of the International Congress of Mathematicians, (1974). Coxeter was awarded numerous honorary degrees, was a fellow of the Royal Society of London (1950) and of the Royal Society of Canada (1947). In 1997 he was made a Companion of the Order of Canada.

While Coxeter officially retired from the Department of Mathematics in 1980, as Professor Emeritus he continued his engagement with the mathematical world right up to his death. In July 2002 he gave an invited lecture at a conference in Budapest Hungary. H.S.M., “Donald”, Coxeter died in Toronto at the age of 96 on March 31 2003. He is survived by his two children Susan (Coxeter) Thomas and Edgar Coxeter and several grandchildren. A biography, entitled, The King of Infinite Space, Donald Coxeter and the Magical Omnipotence of Geometry is due to be published by Anansi in September 2006.

Stoicheff, Boris Peter

  • https://viaf.org/viaf/94753567
  • Person
  • 1924-2010

Boris P. Stoicheff was a Professor Emeritus in the Department of Physics at the University of Toronto, a leading authority on Ramen Spectroscopy, and a pioneer in the use of lasers in optical physic and spectroscopy. Stoicheff was also the President of the Optical Society of America and the Canadian Association of Physicists, as well as being a member of the Order of Canada. During his career, Stoicheff published more than 180 papers on the subject of lasers, optical physics and spectroscopy, and was the author of a biography on the life and work of physicist Gerhard Herzberg.

Boris Peter Stoicheff was born in Bitola, Macedonia in 1924. In 1931 he and his family immigrated to Canada and settled in Toronto. Stoicheff attended Jarvis Collegiate Institute (1938-1943) where he excelled in both mathematics and in athletics (he was ranked fifth in Ontario for cross-country while in high school). After high school Stoicheff enrolled in the Engineering Physics program at the University of Toronto where he obtained his B.A.Sc. (1947) and his M.A. (1948) in physics. In 1950, under the supervision of Professor Harry Welsh, Stoicheff completed his Ph.D. on the subject of Ramen Spectroscopy of Gases at High Temperature at the University of Toronto.

In the early 1950s, Stoicheff began working for the National Research Council (N.R.C.) in Ottawa under the general direction of Gerhard Herzberg (Herzberg would go on to win the Noble Prize for Chemistry in 1971). During his time at the National Research Council, Stoicheff became well-known in the world of optical physics for his very precise, high-resolution Ramen spectra and for his patience in obtaining the highest quality spectroscopic results. In all, Stoicheff published more than thirty papers on the topic of Ramen Spectroscopy while working for the National Research Council. In 1954 Stoicheff married Joan Ambridge and in 1956 they had a son, Peter. Near the end of his time at the N.R.C., Stoicheff took an interest in Brillouin scattering; more specifically, how the emerging technology of MASERS and LASERS could aid in carrying out Brillouin spectroscopy. In the early 1960s Stoicheff constructed the first (ruby) laser in Canada. The use of lasers in spectroscopy would become Stoicheff’s primary area of research for the remainder of his career.

After fourteen years at the N.R.C. Stoicheff accepted a position at the University of Toronto as a Professor of Physics.; in 1977 he was promoted to the position of University Professor. From 1964 until his retirement in 1989 Stoicheff worked out of his lab at the University of Toronto’s Department of Physics, where he completed pioneering research in the area of optical spectroscopy. During his career Stoicheff held numerous positions on various university, national and international committees and boards including: Member of Council of the Royal Society of Canada, Vice-President of the Canadian Association of Physicists, Canadian Correspondent to The Royal Society (London), and Co-Chairman of the 5th International Conference on Laser Spectroscopy, among many others. Stoicheff also received a number of honours and awards. He was a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, Honourary Fellow of the Indian Academy of Sciences, U.K./Canada Rutherford Lecturer for The Royal Societies of London and Canada, the recipient of Centennial Medal of Canada, the Canadian Association of Physics Medal of Achievement, and several honorary degrees from Canadian and international Universities.

After his retirement, Stoicheff remained active in the scientific community and continued to lecture, publish and research in the field of optical physics and spectroscopy. In addition to physics, Stoicheff had a great interest in the humanities, and pursued subjects such as religion, psychology, art and biography. After his retirement, Stoicheff created a course titled “The Riddle of Light” where students explored both scientific and artistic interpretation of light. He was also the author of a biography on the life and career of his former supervisor and mentor Gerhard Herzberg titled Gerhard Herzberg: A Illustrious Life in Science, published in 2002. Boris Stoicheff died in Toronto on April 15, 2010.

McNeill, Kenneth G.

  • https://viaf.org/viaf/94621273
  • Person
  • 1926-2008

Kenneth G. McNeill, a graduate of Oxford University in 1950, came to the University of Toronto as an associate professor of Physics in 1957. In 1963 he was made a Professor of Physics and in 1969 he was cross appointed as Professor of Medicine. In 1993, upon his retirement he became Emeritus Professor of Physics. His area of expertise, on which he has published 7 books and over 200 articles, was in the field of nuclear physics, specifically photodisintegration and the application of nuclear physics to medicine.

During his lengthy career at the University, Prof. McNeill was instrumental in various projects relating to nuclear physics including the building and administration of the "Steel Room" (Series 3) and the operation of the LINAC (linear accelerator) laboratory (Series 6). He also chaired the University of Toronto Radiation Protection Authority from 1977-1986 (Series 7). Other administrative responsibilities include various positions on Governing Council and Trinity College.

Prof. McNeill also served as a private consultant to various firms as well as to various levels of government. Beginning in the 1970s his expertise was sought after by the Ontario government for which he sat on various advisory groups relating to nuclear emergency planning and for about a decade starting in the late 1980s he was Chairman of the Technical Advisory Committee of Emergency Planning Ontario while also sitting on various technical sub-committees.

Pimlott, Douglas H.

  • https://viaf.org/viaf/94506790
  • Person
  • 1920-1978

Douglas Humphreys Pimlott was born in Quyon, Quebec in 1920. After military service in the war, he graduated in 1949 with a Bachelor of Science in Forestry from the University of New Brunswick. During the 1950's he obtained a Master of Science in wildlife management (1954) and a Ph.D. in zoology and wildlife management (1959) from the University of Wisconsin. While earning these degrees, he was employed in wildlife research and management with the Newfoundland Government from 1950-1957. He was in charge of wolf research for the Ontario Department of Lands and Forests from 1958 to 1962 when he joined the Department of Zoology of the University of Toronto. During his career, Prof. Pimlott became best known for his writings on wolves, parks and wilderness and later, on environmental problems in the Arctic.
He was a past president of the Canadian Nature Federation, a founding member and former chairman of the Canadian Arctic Resources Committee and past president of the Canadian Society of Zoology. In 1971 he was invited to become a member of the Survival Service Commission of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) as a leader of a Specialist World Wolf group. In the summer of 1973 he toured Europe lecturing, consulting with government officials and examining wolf habitats. Other associations he was actively involved in were the Canadian Audubon Society, Algonquin Wildlands League and the Wilderness Society.

See http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/douglas-humphreys-pimlott/

Delamont, Gordon

  • https://viaf.org/viaf/94374826
  • Person
  • 1918-1981

Gordon Delamont, teacher, author, composer, and trumpeter was born in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan on October 27, 1918, and died in Toronto, Ontario on January 16, 1981. He performed in dance bands and Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) radio orchestras, taught harmony, counterpoint, composition, and theory. Important pupils include Peter Appleyard, Gustav Ciamaga, Ron Collier, Jimmy Dale, Hagood Hardy, Paul Hoffert, Moe Koffman, Rob McConnell, Ben McPeek, Birnie Piltch, Fred Stone, Norman Symonds and Rick Wilkins, among many others.

Satterly, John

  • https://viaf.org/viaf/93399001
  • Person
  • 1879-1963

John Satterly, A.R.Sc., D.Sc., M.A. F.R.S.C was one of the best known and respected figures in Canadian Physics. Born in Ashburton, Devon, England on November 29, 1879, he acquired a strong background in science and mathematics while at Ashburton Grammar School and went on to spend three years (1898-1901) at the Royal College of Science in Kensington. There he studied under Tilden, Reicher, Perry and Judd. From 1901-1903 he acted as Demonstrator at the Royal College of Science and then went on to Cambridge University as Tutor in Physics. At the same time, he worked under Professor J. J. Thompson at the Cavendish Laboratory. His research led to a number of publications on the radioactivity of the atmosphere and its variation with the weather; and on the radioactivity of natural waters and soils. He obtained B.A. and M.A. degrees from Cambridge and a D.Sc. from the University of London.

Satterly became acquainted with a number of Canadian Physicists and was asked to take up a teaching position at the University of Toronto in 1912 where he remained for the next 38 years until his retirement on June 20, 1950. He taught courses on Properties of Matter, Mechanics and Heat to first and third year students. Many of his first year lectures became renowned for their showmanship, especially that which was devoted to Liquid Air. Satterly maintained his interest and research in the area of heat and mechanics and surface tension and viscosity even after his retirement in 1950. A room was reserved for him in the McLennan Laboratory and in the decade following his retirement he could be found there nearly every day working on problems which continued to interest him. Post 1950 inserts into his lecture notes bear witness to the devotion Satterly had in updating and advancing his own interests in physics. The 1950s saw a considerable increase in the number of research papers published by Satterly and it was not until three months before his death that the frequency of his publications ceased. John Satterly died on October 1, 1963, aged 83.

Huppert, Hugo

  • https://viaf.org/viaf/93110741/
  • Person
  • 1902-1982

Fisher, Constance L.

  • https://viaf.org/viaf/92579748
  • Person
  • 1928-

Constance Fisher, stage director, soprano, was born in Hamilton, Ontario October 3, 1928. She studied with Alberto Guerero (piano), and Weldon Kilburn and Irene Jessner (voice) at the Royal Conservatory of Music in Toronto, and with Herman Geiger-Torel and the Opera School. In 1972, she became the stage director and instructor of the University of Toronto Opera Division, and then divisional co-ordinator and resident stage director in 1978. She was married to conductor and coach William James Craig.

Rouillard, Clarence Dana

  • https://viaf.org/viaf/92495865
  • Person
  • 1904-1991

Professor of French, University College.

Nesselroth, Peter W.

  • https://viaf.org/viaf/92265759
  • Person
  • 1935-

Peter William Nesselroth, Professor Emeritus of the University of Toronto, was a Professor of French and Comparative Literature who taught courses on French and Surrealist literature between his appointment in 1969 and his retirement in 1998. His main research interests are 19th and 20th century French and American literature, Dadaism and Surrealism in painting, poetry and film, and structuralism and post-structuralism as both theory and methodology. Nesselroth has researched and written extensively about these subjects throughout his academic career.

Born in the United States in 1935, Peter Nesselroth received his B.A. in Romance Languages from the City College of New York in 1957. He received his M.A. (1958) and Ph.D. (1968) in French and Romance Philology from Columbia University, New York. The title of his M.A. thesis was “Adolphe et Cécile de Benjamin Constant” and that of his Ph.D. thesis was “Lautréamont’s Imagery: a stylistic approach”.

Peter Nesselroth was appointed to the Department of French at the University of Toronto as an Assistant Professor in 1969, and was cross-appointed to the Centre of Comparative Literature in 1977, after having been a lecturer (1958) and then Assistant Professor (1968) at the City College of New York. He became an Associate Professor in 1970 and a Professor in 1979. Professor Nesselroth was the Director for the Centre for Comparative Literature from 1983 to 1997, being reappointed in both 1989 and 1995. Upon retirement he became Professor Emeritus in 1998 and a Senior Fellow for the Centre for Comparative Literature. In 1998, Professor Nesselroth was also a Visiting Professor at the Université Paris 7 – Denis Diderot, as well as receiving from the French government the title of Chevalier de l’Ordre des Palmes académiques. In 2003, he was at the Camargo Foundation in Cassis, France for a research fellowship. Professor Nesselroth became a Senior Fellow of Massey College in 2010.

Over his career as a Professor, he has taught several courses in French and Surrealist literature, with a focus on the 19th and 20th century, and figures such as Isidore Ducasse (Comte de Lautréamont), Jacques Derrida, and Marshall McLuhan.

Professor Nesselroth has researched and written extensively on 19th and 20th century French and Surrealist literature, having had numerous articles published in scholarly journals and books throughout his academic career. He is the author of "Lautréamont’s Imagery: a stylistic approach" (Genève: Droz, 1969); "Problems of Textual Analysis" (Paris: Didier, 1971); and "Psychanalyse et langages littéraires" (Paris: Nathan, 1977). While at the Camargo Foundation in Cassis, he wrote the manuscript for a book “Reading Problems: Making Sense of Difficult Texts”. He has also written numerous articles and given several addresses on Isidore Ducasse, Jacques Derrida, and Surrealist texts.

Floch, Joseph

  • https://viaf.org/viaf/91457900/
  • Person
  • 1895-1977

Aide, William

  • https://viaf.org/viaf/91227781
  • Person
  • 1938-

William (John) Aide is a pianist, teacher, and writer born March 27, 1938. He received is LRCT (1959) and Artist Diploma (1959) from the University of Toronto and a B SC in music from Juilliard (1962), studying with Alberto Guerrero and Beveridge Webster respectively.

Aide joined the faculty at the University of Toronto in 1978, and in 2000 became the inaugural holder of the University's R.E. [Rupert E.] Edwards Chair in piano performance, a position that he hed until 2013. Aide was appointed a member of the Order of Canada in 2012.

Zoref, Ephraim

  • https://viaf.org/viaf/90771132/
  • Person
  • 1903-1990

Standard, Paul

  • https://viaf.org/viaf/90634593/
  • Person
  • 1896-1992

Acland, James Headly

  • https://viaf.org/viaf/89947492
  • Person
  • 1917-1976

James Acland was professor of architecture in the University of Toronto School of Architecture from 1958 until his death in 1976. His main research and teaching interest was in historical architecture of the medieval period.

James Acland was born in Toronto in 1917. After attending Ecoles des Beaux Arts and McGill University in Montreal, he graduated from Syracuse University New York with a B.A. in Architecture in 1942. During World War II, he worked on factory designs and from 1942-1945 was with Canadian Army Photo Intelligence. After obtaining an M.A. in Philosophy from Harvard University in 1952, he returned to the study and teaching of architecture and held positions at the University of Utah and the University of British Columbia. In 1956, he returned to his hometown to become associate professor and later professor at the University of Toronto’s, School of Architecture.

Both his research and teaching focused on the history of architecture. Much of his research related to land use and how it affects architecture, the development of complex towns in the medieval period and early European building traditions. His study in these areas resulted in several articles and culminated in his book Medieval Structure: The Gothic Vault, University of Toronto Press, 1972. The subjects he taught related directly to his interest on the history of architecture and included courses such as the History of Medieval Architecture, Renaissance Architecture, European Tradition of Framed Building, Mediterranean Tradition of Mass and Shell Building, Medieval Structures, to list a few.

Starting in 1962, Acland popularized his ideas on the history of architecture by appearing in two CBC television series Man in a Landscape and Wall and Window. In these shows, and many to follow, he was the speaker, actively developed the script and provided photographs, and drawings. Through the 1960s, he continued to be involved in television programming and educational films.

Acland’s interest in the history of architecture led him to become an advocate of architectural and heritage conservation. In the 1960s, he was active in the Stop the Spadina Committee and, as chair of the Friends of Old City Hall, he was instrumental in saving Toronto’s Old City Hall (now the City Court House) from demolition. From 1969-1971, he was president of the Architectural Conservancy of Ontario and organized a computer inventory of historic buildings through the National Historic Sites Service. Many of his articles related to his conservation work. His work with Eric Arthur on maritime architecture most certainly did – Building by the Sea, University of Toronto Press, 1962. James Acland died on June 22, 1976. He was still teaching in the School of Architecture and was writing a history of house and street.

Kraft, Werner

  • https://viaf.org/viaf/89636048/
  • Person
  • 1896-1991

Munk, Zdenka

  • https://viaf.org/viaf/8817155/
  • Person
  • 1912-1985

Tischler, Victor

  • https://viaf.org/viaf/88161071/
  • Person
  • 1890-1951

Shalom, Shin

  • https://viaf.org/viaf/88125993/
  • Person
  • 1904-1990

Soldinger, Antoni

  • https://viaf.org/viaf/86151776729918010076/
  • Person
  • 1882-1942

Gorge, Hugo

  • https://viaf.org/viaf/85892322/
  • Person
  • 1883-1934

Geiger-Torel, Herman

  • https://viaf.org/viaf/8447154260582324480006
  • Person
  • 1907-1976

Herman Geiger-Torel, opera director and teacher was born in Frankfurt-am-Main in 1907. He began his career as a stage director in Czechoslovakia and Germany, and after 1934, in South America. From 1948 until his death in 1976 he was based in Toronto, working with the University of Toronto Opera Division and as general director of the Canadian Opera Company.

De Unger, Edmund

  • https://viaf.org/viaf/84443737/
  • Person
  • 1918-2011
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