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Samuel Hollander fonds
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Samuel Hollander fonds

  • UTA 1386
  • Fonds
  • 1956-2013

These accessions of personal records provide a fairly complete representation of Samuel Hollander’s professional life as an academic. The accessions cover his entire career from his student days at the London School of Economics to his retirement from the University of Toronto in 1998 and his appointment at Ben-Gurion University in Beer-Sheva, Israel in 2000. Correspondence, found in the various series gives a rich commentary on his professional endeavours and gives a good overview of the debates surrounding Hollander’s work. Lecture notes and taped lectures document how his ideas were taught in the classroom and his Ph.D. files found in Series 5 show his dedication to the teaching and mentor roles for which he is so highly regarded.

Hollander, Samuel

Student papers

Course notes, essays and class handouts document Hollander’s undergraduate and graduate education at the London School of Economics (BSc. Econ 1st Class, 1956-1959) and Princeton University (A.M and Ph.D. 1959-1963). He attended the lectures of a number of well-known economists including: from LSE, Lionel Robbins, Ezra Mishan, Kurt Klappholtz, Bernard Cory, E.H. Phelps-Brown and Kelvin Lancaster; and from Princeton, Fritz Machlup, William Baumol, R.E. Quandt, Jabob Viner, L.V. Chandler and Oskar Morgenstern. Whenever possible course notes have been identified according to lecturer and subject of the lecture. Arranged roughly by institution and by course.

Collected Essays IV (Proposed)

This sub-series consists of correspondence and preliminaries for the creation of another text Collected Essays IV (Proposed 2013) with a working title “Adam Smith on ‘Natural Liberty’ and the Correction of Market Failure, and other Essays on Classical and Marxian Political Economy.

Friedrich Engels and Marxian Political Economy

Friedrich Engels and Marxian Political Economy (2011) was derived out of Hollanders extensive research for his 2008 text The Economics of Karl Marx. The book looks at Engels’ earlier contributions to Marx’s economic analysis, and provides background into how Marx developed his theories.

The sub-series includes notes and correspondence related to the work as well as two full annotated drafts of the book. The sub-series also contains annotated chapters of The Economics of Karl Marx which were adapted for use in Friedrich Engels and Marxian Political Economy

The Economics of Karl Marx: Analysis and Application

The Economics of Karl Marx: Analysis and Application (2008) is Hollander’s 6th text on the classical economists. The book is an assessment of Marx's Capital and other writings, and addresses Marx’s thoughts on the transformation and the surplus-value doctrine, the reproduction schemes, the falling real-wage and profit rates, and the trade cycle. The book attempts to present criticisms that Marx would have encountered during the time of his writing.

This sub-series includes rough notes taken by Hollander on Marx and his reviewers, reference lists, drafts of chapters, and correspondence related to the book and its publication.

The Economics of Thomas Robert Malthus

The Economics of Thomas Robert Malthus (1997) is another of Hollander’s books in his continued study of the classical economists and like its predecessors, especially Ricardo, is poised to set off debate. Economist A.M.C. Waterman, in his article “Reappraisal of ‘Malthus the Economist’, 1933-97” (History of Political Economy 30:2 1998 pp 293-334) in which he reviews important literature surrounding Malthus, writes:

It is quite possible that scholars of the twenty-first century will come to regard Hollander on Malthus as the most important book in the history of economic analysis since Schumpeter 1954… And like most other books Hollander has so far produced, his latest will get its fair share of controversy and disagreement.

Included are various generations of drafts as well as early research and papers on Malthus.

Classical Economics

Classical Economics, (1992) was designed as a text book for advanced undergraduate and graduate students and presents many of the ideas Hollander espoused in his books on Smith, Ricardo and Mill. Taped lectures found in Series V formed the starting point of the book.

Included are early and final drafts.

Ricardo. The New View : Collected Essays I and The Literature of Political Economy: Collected Essays II

Arranged together in this sub-series are records relating to Ricardo. The New View : Collected Essays I (1995) and The Literature of Political Economy: Collected Essays II (1998) This small sub-series includes notes on revisions and related correspondence as well as a 1st draft to his introductory memoir “It’s an Ill Wind…” with addendum.

The Economics of John Stuart Mill. Vol.I & II

The Economics of John Stuart Mill. Vol.I & II (1985) was Hollander’s third in the series of studies on classical economists and it is evident in the reviews of the book that the criticisms garnered by Ricardo spilled over into many reviewers assessment of this voluminous work. The introduction to economist A.W. Coates’ (Duke University) review places Mill within the context of Hollander’s other works:

The reviewer of these volumes faces a daunting task, not simply because of their immense size but also because they cannot adequately be considered in isolation. Together with Professor Hollander’s earlier studies of The Economics of Adam Smith (1973, pp. 351) and The Economics of David Ricardo (1979, pp.759) they constitute a sustained campaign to establish the validity of singular unified interpretation of the central tradition of nineteenth-century British economic thought. Moreover, if Hollander’s main thesis is correct, it has direct implications for our understanding of orthodox (or mainstream) twentieth century economic thought.

He concludes:

Like the massively ambitious project of which it forms an integral part, Hollander’s Mill will leave a permanent imprint in the history of economics. (The Manchester School, September 1987 #3, pp.310-316)

Included is a highly annotated and corrected early draft of the work, parts of a middle draft and a complete final draft.

The Economics of David Ricardo

It has been stated that The Economics of David Ricardo (1979) is perhaps Hollander’s most enduring legacy to the history of economic thought if only because of the heated controversy it has produced. It has been described by many as counter-revolutionary to the ideas of great economists such as Schumpter and Sraffa. Common among those who oppose and support Hollander’s unique interpretation of Ricardo is recognition that the book, which is detailed in its analysis and research, is an important addition to the debate on this controversial historical figure.

Included is the 1st draft of the manuscript, research notes, and notes of material omitted and to be used elsewhere.

The Economics of Adam Smith

The Economics of Adam Smith (1973) was Hollander’s first major work in his scholarly pursuit to research the British classical economists. Its reception was widely favourable as a major contribution to Smithonian scholarship. Comments from reviews note that the work is detailed and provides a fresh perspective on Smith, especially with respect to The Wealth of Nations.

Included is a copy of his first draft along with research notes.

Books

This series consists of drafts and research notes relating to each of Hollanders major works which are individually described in the sub-series descriptions.

The Sources of Increased Efficiency: A Study of DuPont Rayon Plants

The Sources of Increased Efficiency: A Study of DuPont Rayon Plants, originally Hollander’s Ph.D. thesis, was a microeconomic study of technological change. In his memoirs “It’s an Ill Wind…”, he remarks that he was advised by his supervisor Fritz Machlup “to undertake one of the forty-odd studies he had listed; and not being interested in any of them, I selected the first: Investment and Innovation. It proved to be an inspired choice.” In 1965, the thesis was published with few revisions by MIT press. Reviews of the
period reveal that Hollander’s propensity for detailed research and analytical thought, which would define many of his later projects, was evident in this, his earliest work.

Included in this series is the final typescript of the final thesis, detailed proposal for research, drafts of chapters, corrections and revisions, notebooks and loose research notes and a bibliographic card index. There is also correspondence relating to the gathering of research, mainly with officials of DuPont.

Publishing

This series documents Hollander’s publishing activities with respect of his major works (See titles listed below) It contains correspondence with his various publishers relating to such matters as progress of a project, contracts, distribution, sales, translations, royalties etc. Records for many of the works are complete enough to document the project from its initial conception to the decision to cease printing. Also included are interesting reports from the publishers’ readers that cover the full range of opinion from high praise to high criticism and reflect the prelude of controversy that ultimately would erupt once a book was published. Also included in this series are copies of published reviews of Hollanders’ works.

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