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University of Toronto Archives and Records Management Services Martin Lawrence Friedland fonds Subseries
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Law School: Student, Professor, and Dean

The four boxes in this sub-series contain documents relating to my experience as a student, my four years at Osgoode Hall Law School, and my time as a law teacher and dean at the University of Toronto Law School.

There are very few documents relating to my student days at law school (files 2 and 3), apart from my moot factum (file 2) and notes and a small paper prepared for Abe Weston’s jurisprudence course and a set of notes taken in Bob McKay’s criminal law course (files 4 and 5). I have included several marked-up texts used as a student, including my international law casebook, the subject that was to be the subject of my graduate studies (file 7). (For a description of why I chose criminal law for my graduate work, see my speech to the Cambridge Boat-Race dinner in box 04, file 42). As I apparently tossed out most of my notes when we went to England in 1960, there is also very little from my articling year and the bar admission course. What has survived is one incorporation I did and a number of cases I argued for the firm of Kimber and Dubin and some legal aid criminal cases that I took on my own (files 8-10). Some of these cases were sensational enough to be covered in the yellow journals of the day, in Hush, Justice Weekly, and Tab.

Similarly, there are very few documents relating to my four years teaching at Osgoode Hall Law School from 1961-1965 (file 11). Research notes and documents relating to the Osgoode years can, however, be found in a number of other boxes, such as those relating to Detention before Trial, Securities Regulation, and Double Jeopardy.

I was appointed to the University of Toronto Faculty of Law commencing on July 1, 1965 (file 12). From that period on there is more material. The files, for example, contain some material on the Law School’s Research Committee and its Long Range Planning Committee, as well as various other memos (files 13-15).

In 1972 I was appointed as the dean and returned from my year as a Law Reform of Canada Commissioner in Ottawa (files 16-20). The files contain a fair amount of correspondence while still in Ottawa relating to the deanship (file 21). There are also various law school plans and speeches made while dean (file 22).

The many files connected with my seven years as dean between 1972 and 1979 will be found in the normal law school files. I did not go through the files to keep any law school records when my term of office was over. There is, however, a fairly lengthy interview done for the student Advocate (file 23). There are also a number of files dealing with student mooting while I was dean which were not part of the law school records but were given to me by some students a number of years later (possibly in the early 1980s) because they didn’t know what to do with them (files 41-44).

In 1975 I started making brief notes of my plans for the coming year (file 24) and kept this up until the present. I usually did these around Labour Day. From about 1980 on I also prepared, as we were required to do, annual reports to the dean on my moonlighting and other activities for the past year (file 27).

Correspondence from 1980 on not found in other boxes is contained in files 28-36. The files also contain material on other aspects of law school life, such as my chairmanship of the Directed Research Committee (files 37 and 38), my involvement as faculty advisor to the Faculty of Law Review (file 40), my membership in the graduate committee (file 48), and my involvement in seeking special salary increases for the faculty (file 39). None of these files is very complete, however. There are also files on my involvement in the law school annual squash tournament, various alumni events, and various talks I gave at the law school (files 45,47, and 51). Other files deal with various sabbatical plans, various media appearances, and ways in which I coped with the changing technology, including the use of the computer (files 46, 49, and 53). A number of law school pictures are contained in file 50.