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Calvin Gotlieb fonds
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Advocacy and community service

This series documents Gotlieb’s participation in associations outside the academic sphere mainly relating to human rights and peace. Newsletters, correspondence, memos and reports document his involvement in the Committee of Concerned Scientists 1974-1987 and the Council of the Canadian Committee of Scientists and Scholars 1974-1987. There is also one file documenting advocacy for the release of Soviet scientist and human rights activist Anatoly Shcharansky, 1977-1980. Also included in this series are records relating to his work within the Canadian Jewish community. Included are files on Canada-Israel Chamber of Commerce, the Canadian Jewish Congress, the Global Jewish Database and Canadian Friends of the Hebrew University.

Finally, there is one box documenting his membership and activities in Science for Peace. Included are general records such as minutes of board meetings, newsletters, reports and correspondence mainly of the Toronto Group, 1992-1999. Most files relate to his position as chair of the Ethics Committee. The work of this committee resulted in the publication of two papers "The Toronto Resolution” and "Do Scientific and Scholarly Codes of Ethics Take Social Issues into Account?" both published in Accountability in Research.

Gotlieb 2002 accession

Records in this accession document various aspects of Prof. Gotlieb’s career as a leading computer scientist. Most notably early correspondence, association files, publication files and research files document not only Gotlieb’s early work and contributions but shed light on the early development of computer technology in Canada, the emergence of computer scientists as a profession and their subject expertise as a discipline of academic study. Researchers wishing to study these early developments will find these records a rich source.

Several series in this accession document Gotlieb’s work in professional associations and these include Series IV Professional Associations and Series V Conference, Talks and Seminars as well as Series II Correspondence. These records would be useful to anyone researching these associations as well as the relationships among professional computer scientists.

This accession also contains records relating to Gotlieb’s wider social advocacy. For example, Series 9 has records relating to Science for Peace and several Jewish groups. Certain talks and events documented in Series V also give evidence to his active participation in advocacy groups and often, as is the case for many academics, the lines between his role as a scientist is intertwined with his role as a responsible citizen. Thus, researchers will note many of his talks deal with ethics, social responsibility, and consequences of technology.

This accession is only one of three held by the University Archives and therefore has large gaps in documentation. For most records relating to the early Computation Centre, acquisitions of computer hardware for the University of Toronto, and Gotlieb’s overall role in University administration researchers will need to consult B1988-0069. Teaching files in this newest accession document mainly courses in the 1970s and 1980s while the same series of records in B1988-0069 document the early courses developed and taught by Gotlieb. While this accession gives good documentation on Gotlieb’s role in the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), much of his international work in organizations such as International Federation of Information Processing Societies (IFIP) and UNESCO is documented in B1988-0069. For records specifically on his involvement in the McLuhan Program in Culture and Technology and with the Ontario Centre for Large Scale Computing, researchers need to consult accession B1994-0022.

Finally, this accession has several photographs of early computer installations at the University depicting technology that was unique to the world at that time. Included are images of the experimental computer UTEC that was being developed by Gotlieb, Dr. Josef Kates and Dr. Harvey Gellman in the late 1940s, as well at the FERUT (Ferranti Electronic computer) - the first electronic computer to be purchased anywhere. This was in 1952.

Gotlieb 1988 accession

Consists of correspondence, lecture notes, minutes, reports, conference and editorial files, as well as subject files relating Professor Gotlieb's involvement in FERUT, UTEC, Computation Centre, Department of Computer Science, Institute of Computer Science, Library automation, University, national and international committees and organizations, early computer courses, and computer journals.

Gotlieb 1994 accession

Correspondence, surveys, minutes, drafts of reports, reports, notices and addresses related to the work of computing committees at the University of Toronto, especially those focusing on large scale computation and the CRAY X/MP computer (1986-1992); to Professor Gotlieb's activities as colloquium co-ordinator in the Department of Computer Science (1984-1994), and to his role as a director of the McLuhan Program in Culture and Technology (1982-1988).

Calvin Gotlieb fonds

  • UTA 1318
  • Fonds
  • 1942-2001

Fonds consists of 3 accessions:

B1998-0069: Consists of correspondence, lecture notes, minutes, reports, conference and editorial files, as well as subject files relating Professor Gotlieb's involvement in FERUT, UTEC, Computation Centre, Department of Computer Science, Institute of Computer Science, Library automation, University, national and international committees and organizations, early computer courses, and computer journals. (23 boxes, 1947-1987)

B1994-0022: Correspondence, surveys, drafts of reports, reports, minutes, notices and addresses relating, in particular, to computer committees at the University of Toronto focussing on large-scale computation; to Professor Gotlieb's activities as colloquium coordinator in the Department of Computer Science (ca.1984-1994); and to the McLuhan Program in Culture and Technology. (2 boxes, ca. 1984-1994)

B2002-0003: Records in this accession document various aspects of Prof. Gotlieb’s career as a leading computer scientist. Most notably early correspondence, association files, publication files and research files document Gotlieb’s early work and contributions. These along with records relating to his role as a teacher shed light on the early development of computer technology in Canada, the emergence of computer scientists as a profession and their subject expertise as a discipline of academic study. This accession also contains records relating to Gotlieb’s wider social advocacy demonstrated in his involvement in Science for Peace and several Jewish groups. Finally, this accession has several photographs of early computer installations at the University depicting technology that was unique to the world at that time. Included are images of the experimental computer UTEC as well at the FERUT (Ferranti Electronic computer) - the first electronic computer to be purchased anywhere (1952). (23 boxes, 1942-2001)

Gotlieb, C. C.

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