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Archival description
University of Toronto Archives and Records Management Services Series
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Filmmaking

This series contains the original film elements for several films made by Kay Armatage.
There are also files documenting this facet of her career including correspondence, film proposals, research notes, clippings, grant applications, budget reports, shot lists and scripts. Several files document her films Striptease, Storytelling and Artist on Fire, as well as Prof. Armatage’s attempt at writing and directing a film about Nell Shipman which did not go beyond development.

Photographs in this series include shots taken during the production of several of her films. There is one file documenting the filming of Storytelling which includes shots of Northrop Frye in New York City. There are also three contact sheets by Babette Mangolte taken during the making of Artist on Fire, with views of Joyce Weiland’s Toronto studio and home. The series also contains one file of printing plates used in the creation of publicity material for Prof. Armatage’s early film Jill Johnson, October 1975.

Professional associations and conferences

This series consists of files on organizations, conferences, symposia and workshops, arranged alphabetically. The most thoroughly documented ones are those in which Professor McLeod was involved in an organizational or executive capacity. The earliest files document his involvement in multicultural issues in Saskatchewan, specifically problems associated with language instruction in French. They contain correspondence, notes, briefs submitted to the Royal Commission on Bilingualism and Biculturalism and to the Saskatchewan Committee on Instruction in Languages other than English, associated
reports, and a seminar on bilingual education (1964-1966). Later, in Ontario, his overlapping duties as chair of the Ontario Multicultural Education Conference Committee (1980-1983) and president of the Canadian Council for Multicultural and Intercultural Education (1981-1985), for example, enabled him to play a central role in organizing the early national conferences on multicultural education. He organized and chaired two colloquiums on “Multiculturalism – Teaching and Learning”, sponsored by FEUT (1990, 1991), and was a co-organizer of the International Colloquium on Ethnicity, Conflict and Cooperation held in Moscow in 1992. McLeod also attended a number of international conferences as a Canadian representative. These include four (1977-1987) world congresses of the Comparative and International Education Association, and the Circumpolar Conference of Indigenous People in Iceland (1993).

McLeod was involved in an executive capacity in many organizations, the files for which contain the correspondence, notes and memoranda, minutes and reports that reveal the extent of his involvement. The principal bodies, for which there is extensive documentation, are the Canadian Association for Second Language Teachers (CASALT), Canadian Ethnic Studies Association (CESA), Canadian Council for Multicultural and Intercultural Education (CCMIE), Canadian History of Education Association (CHEA), Multicultural Health Coalition (MHC), the Multiculturalism and Aging Seniors Coordinating Committee (MASCC), and the Ontario Multicultural Association (OMAMO). He was also frequently asked to advise governments on policy. He gave, for example, evidence to the House of Commons Standing Committee on Multiculturalism and served on the Ontario Advisory Committee on Multiculturalism.

Audio and visual material

Series consists of audio and video material that documents Prof. Venkatacharya’s community activity, teaching, and family life. Video recordings capture Venkatacharya’s presentations, many of these given at community centres and individuals’ homes. The topics of these talks generally focus on spiritual texts and understanding, though also include some academic presentations, including an event at the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library. Other videos document the community involvement of both Prof. Venkatacharya and his wife, Vijaya. These include an event recognizing the contributions of Venkatacharya to the Hindu Institute of Learning, the organization’s fundraising initiatives, as well as Diwali celebrations at the AWIC Community and Social Services. Home recordings of family gatherings are also included in the material.

Biographical files

This series consists of records documenting Mary O'Brien's life and career as a nurse and midwife in Glasgow and Montreal, and her subsequent academic career as a feminist philosopher. Includes: articles and reviews of Mary O'Brien; records related to her involvement with the Feminist Party of Canada; letters from faculty, staff, academic community-at-large, and former students in support of Mary O'Brien for the 1987 OCUFA Teaching Award; sound recordings of an interview and awards ceremony; and obituaries and tributes to O'Brien following her death.

Research and writing

This series consists of unpublished and published manuscripts written by Mary O'Brien over the course of her career. Includes: coursework and M.A. dissertation proposal from her studies at York University; miscellaneous unpublished drafts; material relating to her books The Politics of Reproduction (Boston: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1981) and Reproducing the World: Essays in Feminist Theory (Boulder, CO.: Westview Press, 1989); French and Greek translations of The Politics of Reproduction; book reviews of works by other feminist scholars; drafts of journal articles and book chapters in edited volumes; and drafts of conference addresses, keynotes, and lectures given by O'Brien.

Also included is a sound recording of an address given by O'Brien at the Centre for Women's Studies in Education at OISE in 1985.

Books

This series extensively documents the publishing of books researched, written and/or edited by Prof. Rayside. For each of his published monographs, there exist manuscripts of the book at various stages of writing as well as manuscripts of related talks or papers. His ongoing relationship with publishers and grant providers is documented in correspondence, progress reports and grant applications. There is also extensive research documentation in the form of notes, transcripts of interviews and original recordings of interviewees.

Conferences, Talks, Unpublished Papers

Records in this series include notes, drafts, correspondence and flyers related to conferences Professor Rayside attended and/or participated in, unpublished talks and workshops, and unpublished papers, as well as less formal writing. The conferences documented mostly pertain to equity issues faced by gay and lesbian populations. The talks and workshops relate to a variety of topics including political science, labour unions, gendered violence, philanthropy and diversity in the workplace and were delivered mostly at Canadian universities in the form of symposia, guest lectures and public lectures. The unpublished papers in this series relate mainly to equity issues in Canadian and American society. There is also one sound recording of Professor Rayside delivering the Kreeft Lecture on November 28, 2002.

Records in B2017-0024 included talks, panels, and conferences on subjects such as inclusion, religion in the public sphere and positive space. There is also a paper he gave at Spring Reunion in 2016 as well as a memorial for colleagues Stephen Clarkson and David Higgs.

Ph.D. Dissertation

Prof. Rayside received his PhD from the University of Michigan in 1976. During the early to mid 1970’s, he undertook research towards the completion of his dissertation, entitled Linguistic Divisions in the Belgian Social Christian Party and the Liberal Parties of Canada and Quebec. The study examines ethnic conflict in Belgium and Canada, as reflected in divisions within major political parties. Prof. Rayside’s research included conducting interviews with and sending questionnaires to Canadian Liberal Party and Belgian Social Christian politicians. This series documents Prof. Rayside’s doctoral research and includes correspondence, completed questionnaires, sound recordings of interviews, and interview transcripts and sound recordings of thesis advisor Robert Putnam meetings with Rayside.

Sound recordings

-Talk by Skilling on CBC Radio, recorded 10 September 1945 [3 "78" discs]
-Interview on the BBC, "Czechoslovakia", August 1978 [1 reel]
-"Central Europe", CBC Ideas, n.d. [1 cassette tape]

Addresses

The addresses in this series date from Professor Skilling’s return to Canada in 1959. Most were delivered at conferences, with those from 1986 on dealing primarily with Tomas Masaryk. The principal Masaryk conferences represented are those at the University of London (1986) and in Prague (1994 and 2000). Included also is Skilling’s address on Masaryk given on the occasion of his receiving an honorary degree from Charles University in 1990, and the series of lectures he delivered on Masaryk in Prague in 1992. Other conferences represented include the Conference on the Prague Spring in Paris and the Institute for Slovene Emigration Studies in Ljubljana, Slovenia (both in 1998).

An audiotape of a lecture given by Professor Skilling in Prague in April, 1994 is filed as /06S

Personal

This series contains biographical information, address books, business cards, correspondence, greeting cards, notes and passports relating primarily to personal activities, including Gordon and Sally’s friendship with many people in Czechoslovakia, and honours bestowed on him over his lifetime. Included are files relating to the Skilling family generally, biographical sketches and curriculum vitae, and files relating to his 70th and 88th birthday parties (1982 and 2000). There is also a scrapbook of greeting cards and postcards received from friends in Czechoslovakia between 1964 and 1982, and files on honours bestowed – including his festschrift, and Czech awards – Order of the White Lion (1992), Czech Academy of Sciences (1994), and the T. G. Masaryk honorary medal (1999).

In 1933 Gordon hitchhiked and rode freight trains across North America, first to the founding convention of the CCF in Regina, writing letters back to his parents along the way and also describing activities at that famous gathering itself, and then on to the West Coast. His correspondence and the pamphlets, brochures and press coverage he collected survive in this series. He later attributed these experiences as being the seminal event that shaped the evolution of his political views.

Other files in this series provide glimpses of his activities late in the 1930s and in the 1940s, and of his return to Toronto in 1959. They also document of his extra-curricular activities, first as a teenager with the West United Church Club (1926-1927), then as an alumnus of Clinton Street Public School and of Harbord Collegiate in Toronto, and finally as a member of the Canadian Association of Rhodes Scholars. The series ends with selected messages of sympathy and other items relating to the death of his beloved wife, Sally, in 1990.

The scrapbook of greeting cards from friends in Czechoslovakia is filed in box 051.

Oversized material has been removed from /007 (11) to file .(01).

Photoprints taken in the 1980s and 1990s of Professor Skilling, Helen Hogg, Czech friends and the Jazz Section, a semi-official agency under the Union of Musicians in Prague, are filed in /009(07)-(11).

An audiotape of the presentation of the Order of the White Lion to Professor Skilling on 8 May 1992 and of the Stefanik medal ceremony is filed as /02S. An audiotape relating to Professor Skilling’s birthday (which one?) is filed as /03S; audiotapes documenting the 75th anniversary celebrations of Harbord Collegiate Institute are filed as /04S and 05S.

Presentations and addresses

Series consists of documentation of some of the presentations given by Prof. Thornton in both academic and community settings. Series also includes a recording of an address given by Thornton on the topic of war.

Research notes and documents

In his “Introduction” to this finding aid, Professor Friedland states that this series contains “some [my emphasis] of the research material collected over the past five years”; then describes the arrangement of the files. “Sub-series 7.1 consists of the spiral binders I used to make notes of what I was reading and how I planned to handle the material. Sub-series 2 contains the notes I made as I tackled each chapter. Sub-series 3 is the most extensive collection of material. In it, the subjects are set out in alphabetical order and include persons, places, institutions, and concepts. Individual files may include newspaper articles, research notes, obituaries, academic writings, and many other matters.” Professor Friedland threw out a large quantity of material before transferring his files to the University Archives: “Material that is bulky and easily found elsewhere has been excluded from the files. The series thus provides a unique source of information on topics which would take individual researchers many long days or weeks or months to gather themselves. University of Toronto publications, such as the University of Toronto Monthly, the Bulletin, and the various alumni magazines, were systematically gone through during the course of the project and copies of this material have been included in the relevant files.”

In sub-series 7.2, “Rough research notes”, the files are arranged by chapter (1-42). In sub-series 7.3, “Research materials”, the arrangement is alphabetical, “Abols – Zoology”.

The files, in whole or in part, that contain information not readily found elsewhere and that illustrate the process of research and writing have been retained. The large volume of photocopied material in the files when Professor Friedland turned them over to the University Archives has been substantially reduced. Much of it is already readily accessible in the University Archives, especially the identified textual records, indexed periodicals, and items from its biographical files (especially A1973-0026 and the ‘people files’) and ‘subject files’.

Entries from the widely available Dictionary of Canadian Biography have also not been kept, although entries from some difficult to locate biographical sources have been. Significantly annotated material and references to sources have been retained (some sources were added when the photocopies were culled), as has photocopied material from sources that would be otherwise very difficult for researchers to locate.

In the course of his research Professor Friedland made careful and extensive use of the files assembled by Robin Harris in the 1970s in his ultimately abandoned attempt to write the second of a proposed two-volume history of the University. Much of the material Professor Friedland’s researchers photocopied from this accession (A1983-0036) had earlier been copied from administrative and other sources in the U of T Archives. While references to files in this accession (and others) have been retained, the photocopies themselves, unless annotated, have been removed. Researchers should, in any case, ultimately refer to the original sources, where they are identified, in the University Archives.

Where deemed appropriate, photocopied material in volume has been retained. There are two principal occasions where this was done. First, Professor Friedland had
copied the complete run of Claude Bissell’s diaries and journals from 1934 to 1971, the year he stepped down as president of the University. These Friedland marked for further copying (the resulting elements were then used to bolster files about individuals, events, groups and organizations that were created by his researchers). Only the pages that were earmarked for further copying have survived culling; they contain the entries that were actually used throughout the manuscript and, with the ‘elements’ described above, provide a rough index to the diaries.

In the second instance, where indices do not exist items have largely been retained. Journals that are indexed in the University Archives include the student newspaper, the Varsity (1880-1931,1953-1973), University of Toronto Quarterly (up to 1937, thereafter in the Canadian periodicals index), University of Toronto monthly (1901-1948) and its successors, the Alumni Bulletin (1948-1956), Varsity Graduate (1948-1967), and the University of Toronto Graduate (1967-1972). The last’s successor, University of Toronto Magazine, has been searchable online since 1999. The Department of Development maintains a card index for the University of Toronto Bulletin, a journal about the activities of faculty and staff and events on campus, for the years 1980 to August 2000. As the card index to the Bulletin is not readily available to users, dated items from the years it covers have been kept, along with entries from earlier years. Recent years of the Bulletin are now available online.

Some of the files also contain research material, including correspondence, reports and publications, that were forwarded by individuals; these files are identified as discrete units and the material therein has, with few exceptions, been retained in its entirety. George Connell, for example, gave Professor Friedland two large binders of memos, reports, and addresses – some are original handwritten versions – from his years as president (see box 045). Some research material forwarded for use by the

History Project has been scattered throughout this series. The principal example here is the index cards compiled by James Greenlee while writing his biography of Sir Robert Falconer, president of the University from 1907 to 1932. These cards have been retained in their entirety and may be found in boxes 051 to 053 and in those files where the notation in the ‘date(s)’ field is [198-].

-Cassette audiotapes of an oral history interview by James Greenlee with Vincent Bladen have been removed from B2002-0022/042(03) to 001S and 002S;
-Cassette audiotapes of interviews by James Greenlee with Robert D. Falconer, dated 13 July and August 1979 have been removed from B2002-0022/050(12) to /003 - /010S
-A cassette audiotape has been removed from B2002-0022/077(14) - /011S

Professional activity

Series consists of records related to Mr. Ezrin’s professional roles. These focus primarily on his time in government, both federal and provincial. Records cover his work in diplomatic roles in New Delhi, Los Angeles and New York, as well as publicity surrounding the Constitution. Three files document Ezrin’s involvement on the Debate Committee preparing Liberal leader John Turner for the federal debate in 1988.

Manuscripts

In spite of a demanding administrative schedule, Dr. Patterson published frequently. As Director of the Institute of Aerophysics, he wrote the introduction to its Annual Progress Report for twenty years (1954-1974); copies are not included in this series and may be found in the University Archives Print Room. The items listed in this series complement, but do not duplicate, those in similar series in other accessions in this fonds.

Included in this series is drafts of articles and books and selected printed copies, along with covering correspondence. Book titles include: "Pathways to Excellence" (1977), "The Race for Unlimited Energy" (1979), "The Molecular Nature of Aerodynamics" (1981), "Message from Infinity" (1985), and "Priorities in Geolunar Space" (1989).

Also includes six audio cassette tapes of Patterson dictating the contents of his book "Message from Infinity".

Sound recordings

This series includes 2 interviews with le Riche. One relates to South Africa and discusses his childhood, his early education, his family life as well as his opinions on various aspects of South African history, events and people. A second is an interview with Betty Kennedy done in 1967 discussing the problem of obesity and diet. Finally, the third tape is of a Methodist choir of the Basuto people taped by le Riche during a visit to his homeland. The choir is introduced by le Riche at the beginning of the tape.

Family and personal

This series contains material relating to the le Riche family generally, to specific members of it – Harding le Riche’s, mother, siblings, wife, children, and grandchildren, personal information about le Riche himself, and his scrapbooks. The files on Professor le Riche contain biographical information, curriculum vitae, and press coverage of his activities, along with files on honours bestowed, memorabilia, a riding accident, and his trip to South Africa in 1964. B2006-0004/004 contains several certificates of awards both loose and in a large album. This series also includes family documents from 1888-1930s. (B2006-0004/001)

The largest single component of this series is the scrapbooks. They contain press clipping of items of family, academic, and political interest, programmes for and invitations to social and professional events, some photographs, the occasional letter, a large number of first day covers, and memorabilia relating to Professor le Riche’s travels and other activities. The first scrapbook (1945-1946) is filed in B2003-0012/001; the later scrapbooks (1964-1966, 1967-1973, 1973-1978, and 1978-1986) are filed in B2003-0012/002 to /005. Scrapbook for 1966-1968 is filed in B2006-0004/004. Loose items associated with scrapbooks dating from 1967 to 1986 are filed in folders in B2003-0012/ 001, /004 and /005, as appropriate.

The series concludes with an album of 9 records, titled “Beyond Antiquity: A series of lectures on the origins of man by Professor Raymond Dart, Professor Emeritus, University of the Witswatersrand, Johnannesburg, South Africa”, with an accompanying printed outline of the lectures. The series was produced by the South African Broadcasting Corporation in 1966, and le Riche was a contributor to it. Raymond Dart had been a professor of anatomy at Wits when le Riche was a student there, and was just beginning his career as an anthropologist. Le Riche was already interested in the subject and some of his friends visited the Sterkfontein caves in August 1936 with Robert Broom, the country’s leading paleontologist, who, a few days later, discovered the first Australopithecus at the site. Dart became famous for his description of the Taung skull, Australopithecus africannus.

Addresses

The files in this series consist of Professor Guillet’s surviving addresses (note the gaps) of a professional nature and nearly all relating to polymers. There are several files of notes and abstracts for these addresses, dated and undated, followed by addresses arranged chronologically. Few are accompanied by covering letters; for these and related correspondence, the researcher is directed primarily to Series 1. Some addresses can also be found in the conference files in Series 8. There are also a few lectures on cassette tapes. These date from about 1979 to 1996 and include Guillet’s Canadian Institute lecture in 1990 as well as lectures given at international conferences in Anaheim California, Dallas Texas, Prague, Stockholm, Seoul and Tokyo.

Professor Guillet was in great demand as a public speaker and thus had to turn down many invitations. But he still found time from his busy schedule to speak to groups other than professional ones, including students and community organizations. Such addresses are not represented in this series, but information about them can be gleaned from the correspondence in Series 1.

Research

This series begins with grant applications submitted by Professor Guillet between 1976 and 1996, followed by correspondence and reports on the research projects they funded. Next are notes on research projects at the University of Toronto (1969-1990), notebooks and, especially, his ‘Ideas’ files with voluminous notes taken between 1965 and about 1995. After these there come files on research projects, arranged alphabetically by the name of the project. The series ends with files on projects carried out by Professor Guillet’s students, arranged alphabetically by the name of the student.

The first grant application in the series is for a new drug delivery method for the controlled release of insulin Professor Guillet developed for the Canadian Diabetic Association in 1976-1977. The remainder is primarily to NSERC for research on various characteristics of and applications of polymers, including (after his appointment as Professor Emeritus) the relationship to solar energy, ultraviolet light and the remediation of chemical pollutants in ground water.

Professor Guillet’s notes, notebooks and ‘Ideas’ files cover a wide range of research issues and ideas gleaned from his own research, from notes taken at conferences and in discussions with his colleagues, students, and other scientists. Some of Professor Guillet’s ideas are further explored in the research projects described in this series and in Series 7 to 10.

Professor Guillet kept files on a number of research projects that contained notes and a variety of reports. One of the earliest of these at the University of Toronto was ebuillometry; Guillet’s research extended from the late 1960s to the mid-1990s. Other projects documented here include gamma-ray radiation, glassy polymers, inverse gas chromatography, photochemistry of fibre-forming polymers, photo-oxidation of polymers and silicone polishes, polymer flocculants, and solar energy.

The remaining files in this series consist of research reports, with covering correspondence, carried out by students and post-doctoral fellows, research associates and visiting professors. Included are research notes and notebooks of two individuals mentioned in the previous series: Valery Kuleznev and Guojun Liu.

Chancellor, University of Toronto

Twenty-nine years after Omond Solandt left the University of Toronto with a gold medal in medicine, he returned as Chancellor, taking up his three-year appointment on 1 July, 1965. It was renewed for a further three years in 1968.

The contents of this series includes correspondence, addresses, minutes, programs, reports and photoprints relating to his ceremonial duties and other activities associated with the office. Included are files on awarding of honorary degrees, the Presidential Search Committee, chaired by Dr. Solandt, for the successor to Claude Bissell, and the new (1971) University of Toronto Act. Included is an audiotape of the proceedings of his installation as chancellor.

Defence Research Board

In 1946 Dr. Solandt was called back to Ottawa where he was appointed as Director-General of Defence Research. The following year he was invited to become the founding chair of the Defence Research Board of Canada which was responsible for co-ordinating and directing defence science and research and development for the three armed services.

While most of the records generated by the Defence Research Board are in Ottawa, the correspondence, addresses, press clippings, articles, pamphlets, reports and photoprints (see Series 44) in this series provide a succinct overview of Solandt

Interviews

This series begins with two interviews that were not recorded by Mr. Grenville but were collected by him as a part of his research. The first, “Ten minutes with O. M. Solandt", was a CBC television production recorded on 13 December 1961 when he was vice-president of research and development for Canadian National Railways, and broadcast on 3 April 1962. The second, with interviewer Robert F. Legg, is undated but was recorded when Dr. Solandt was chancellor of the University of Toronto (1965-1971), is described as “his personal reactions…to the situation he finds himself involved both as a Director of a commercial corporation [Electric Reduction Company of Canada]..., also as Chancellor of the University of Toronto and also as Chairman of the National Science Council [sic, Science Council of Canada]…”

A central part of Mr. Grenville’s research on Dr. Solandt was the series of interviews (66 cassette tapes) that he conducted in 1985, 1986 and 1990, including nine with Dr. Solandt. The others were with people who had known him well and/or worked with him at various stages in his long professional life. Accompanying these interviews are two notebooks which contain dated entries on his research activities. There are notes on contacts and sources, brief biographical notes about the interviewees along with detailed notes on Mr. Grenville’s interviews with Dr. Solandt and shorter notes on other interviews. There are also tape summaries prepared by Jason Ridler for each of the interviews. The latter were compiled as a condition of Mr. Grenville’s loaning his material to Mr. Ridler for use in his doctoral thesis on Dr. Solandt. The summaries vary in the amount of detail but provide a very useful guide to the interviews. A cautionary note to researchers is that they contain numerous typos, mostly as a result of Mr. Ridler having a limited amount of time to make the summaries and not having a list of names to compare spellings against, many of whom he was unfamiliar with.

Of all the interviewees, Laurie Chute probably knew Dr. Solandt best, certainly the longest. He was a boyhood friend, fellow student (along with his wife, Helen Reid) and, during World War II, was with the Physiological Research Laboratory at Lulworth in Dorset, England, and, from 1943, commanded the No. 1 Canadian Medical Research Laboratory where he specialized in the medical hazards of tank warfare. He was dean of medicine at the University of Toronto (1966-1973) during much of the time Dr. Solandt was chancellor. Another fellow medical student was Reginald Haist who became a professor of physiology at the U of T. All three had interesting observations on Dr. Solandt’s formative years, including his relationship with Charlie Best. Barbara Griffin, the widow of his brother Donald, provided detailed information about the Solandt family generally and the relationship between the brothers in particular.

Charles Crawley; Anne Ellis Lewis whose husband ‘Tel’ had worked with Dr. Solandt, Wilhelm Feldberg, and Lancelot Fleming, were all Trinity Hall, Cambridge friends and interviewed for their recollections of him while at Trinity and in England generally. Maggie and Patrick Mollison reminisced about their work with him at the South West Blood Supply Depot at Sutton, Surrey. Donald Kaye, George Lindsey, Tony Sargeaunt, Ronnie Shephard, and Ted Treadwell all provided information on their work when Dr. Solandt was director of the Medical Research Council’s Physiological Laboratory at the Armoured Fighting Vehicle School at Lulworth (1941-1942) and subsequently with the Army Operational Research Group there and elsewhere (1942-1945).

Dr. Solandt’s years at the Defence Research Board (1947-1956) were thoroughly reviewed in the interviews with Alec Fordyce, Geoffrey Hatterley-Smith, George Lindsey, Archie Pennie, and Elliot Rodger, and Graham Rowley. His years with the Canadian National Railways (1956-1963) were covered by Herb Bailey, at deHavilland (1963-1966) by Philip Lapp, at the Electric Reduction Company of Canada (1963-1970) by Lloyd Lillico, and science policy generally and Dr. Solandt’s years as founding chair of the Science Council of Canada (1966-1972) by James Mullin. In November 1967 Dr. Solandt accompanied the National Science Foundation (USA) expedition to Antarctica and the South Pole. Raymond Aidie, a geologist from South Africa and an expert on Antarctica, was interviewed about this trip. One of Dr. Solandt’s passions was the Canadian wilderness. Dennis Coolican, president of the Canadian Bank Note Company, and Elliot Rodger were two of the ‘voyageurs’ who made numerous canoe trips with him; both were on the famous 1955 Churchill River trip.

Sound and Moving Images

Sound recordings and video document Prof. Lee’s research. Reel to reel tapes contain interviews, testimonies with !Kung San bushmen, talks given by Lee on this very topic, taped vocabulary lists of the !Kung San people’s language, native music from Botswana and one radio interview with Prof. Lee. Two videos document a discussion among women academics on the role of women in a hunter and gatherer society. Finally two tapes contain a partial recording of the symposium of Political Struggles of Native Peoples, organized by Prof. Lee in 1972.

Mothercraft –OISE project

In 1968, Dr. Fowler headed up a research team in a joint Canadian Mothercraft Society (CMS) – OISE study to determine the effects of quality child care on disadvantaged children. This two-year joint study formed the basis upon which the Early Childhood Education (ECE) curriculum was written. In particular it involved the development of a model infant day care centre for disadvantaged children from four months to two and one half years of age. It also included a follow up study conducted by Dr. Fowler in 1973-1974.

This series documents this joint study with Mothercraft in general and Dr.Fowler’s role in particular. It includes minutes of meetings of the Board of Mothercraft, and the OISE research staff, correspondence with Mothercraft officials, OISE faculty and staff, municipal, federal and provincial governments, private foundations (like the Atkinson Foundation, Laidlaw Foundation), research proposals, budget and publicity files, papers and progress reports. Also included is the film script for “Joint OISE-Mothercraft Infant Demonstration Program” with text of Dr. Fowler’s commentary (1973).

This series also includes film elements including original negative, sound track and release print to the OISE produced film A Demonstration Program on Infant Care and Education in which Dr. Fowler describes the OISE Infant care and education program and Mothercraft Society with emphasis on learning through play.

Teaching

Dr. Fowler was associated with several universities in the United States and Canada as researcher, administrator and teacher. This series documents his teaching activities from his time as a graduate student and professor at the University of Chicago, through his academic career at OISE and at Tufts University, and in his later career as a consultant. Files contain lecture notes, course materials, and correspondence. He also maintained an ongoing correspondence with many of his students from his years at OISE, providing advice, references and support as they continued their academic careers.

Biographical materials

This small series consists of two files containing Dr. Fox's curriculum vitae and a single file relating to his University of Toronto grades, notification of Ph.D conferral from the University of London and miscellaneous academic related materials. It provides a valuable guide to Dr. Fox's professional activities and accomplishments. Also included are three portraits of Dr. Fox taken at various times throughout his career (1964-1984) and a cassette tape sound recording of his retirement dinner tribute, 26 March 1986.

Co-operative Housing Case Study: background materials & research

In addition to the attendance at meetings of CHAT and ASC board, staff and member meetings, and interviews and surveys of users and non-users, the researchers also collected background material on the Ashworth Square Housing Co-operative, and the United Church of Canada Board of Evangelism and Social Service National Housing Committee as one of its main funding bodies.

The background materials on the Ashworth Square Housing Co-operative itself include architectural drawings of the suite plans, a copy of the original proposal for its development, a copy of the occupancy agreement and by-laws, as well as general publicity for the co-op and information regarding the initial election of members to the Board of Directors. There are also seven b/w photographs of co-op members and children. The background materials on the United Church of Canada Board of Evangelism and Social Service National Housing Committee includes minutes of meetings of both the housing committee and the Technical Subcommittee, correspondence, reports, a brief on housing to Hon Paul Hellyer (Minister of Transport).

Professors Breslauer and Andrews also conducted research into housing issues, and co-op housing alternatives across Canada, the US and abroad. These files include information on the Co-op Housing Foundation, and the Canadian Mortgage and Housing Corporation papers on co-op housing and in particular, on the Ashworth Square Housing Co-op. They also include information on co-op housing conferences, other housing co-operatives and organizations, and general housing issues and research published during this time period. Included in this series is a CBC radio special on housing cooperatives which includes a piece on the ASC.

Co-operative Housing Case Study: non-user interviews

Interviews were conducted with several staff and board members involved in the design, construction and administration of the Ashworth Square Housing Co-operative. Included in this series are the interview transcripts and tapes, as well as some interview notes. These interviews were conducted over two years from 25 May 1972 to 13 May 1974.

Speeches, talks, and addresses

Dr. Evans’ ideas have been disseminated most widely, through the many addresses he has been invited to deliver locally, nationally and internationally. It is here that his genius for analysis, organization and foresight and his breadth of vision and his humanity become most apparent. The addresses range over four decades of professional experience, including many to students, but also encompass tributes to family, friends, and colleagues who have meant so much to him over the years and to religious and social organizations.

There are a few small gaps of up to three or four months in some years, and only one address each for 1972 and 1973. These two are the beginning of a substantial gap that extends to 1989. From 1972 to 1978 Dr. Evans was president of the University of Toronto and speeches given then are located elsewhere in the University of Toronto Archives, primarily in A1979-0042 and A1983-0049. The latter accession also includes some of his addresses while Dean of Medicine at McMaster University. That still leaves, however, a decade of missing addresses.

The files contain correspondence, research files, notes, programs, drafts of addresses (some of which were eventually published – see Series 7). The arrangement is chronological by date of address.

Personal and biographical

This series includes some personal correspondence including many congratulatory letters when Evans was appointed President of the University of Toronto. There is one box of documents that Evan himself pulled together for a possible autobiography. Accompanying these are his notes on various aspects of his career. This series includes documentation including certificates, diplomas, plaque and medals for his many awards and recognitions. Finally, cassette tapes of interviews Dr. Evans did on radio programs including “Voice of the Pioneer and CBC Morningside.

Research files

These files consist of correspondence, notes, photographs and negatives, articles used for research, and drafts of manuscripts relating to Professor Rouillard's ongoing research about the Turks in French history, thought, and literature.

Sound recordings

These sound tapes were given to Professor Barbeau by Professor Warwick Sawyer at the time of his retirement in the 1970s. Includes two 1964 lectures by professor Edward F. Assmus, Jr. (1931–1998) on Algebraic Coding Theory as well as a talk by Harvard Mathematics Professor Garrett Birkhoff (1911-1996) on the history of computing math. All three lectures were possibly for the same event in February 1964 “lecture to AYI”.

Addresses

Dr. Pimlott's expertise in wildlife preservation and the ecology resulted in requests to speak at conferences, government bodies and meetings of various local groups interested in the environment. These files consist of rough notes prepared for talks in Halifax, Sault Ste Marie, Regina and other unidentified locations on such topics as Arctic ecology and off-shore drilling, history of Algonquin Wildlands League, and wolves and men, among others. Also included is a tape recording of a talk by Stephen Lewis to public meeting of the Algonquin Wildlands League.

Course materials

Dr. Pimlott was appointed to the Department of Zoology in 1962. This series contains all that has survived of course materials and student reports for three courses taught by Dr. Pimlott in zoology. Also included is a tape and transcript of instructions for a new course in Animal ecology dictated shortly before his death in March, 1978.

Speeches and public talks

Consists of drafts and final versions of speeches and public talks, conference programmes and attendee lists, rough notes, related correspondence, secondary sources including newspaper clippings, and workshop materials related to speeches and public talks given by Eichler throughout her career.

Conferences

The series consists of files relating to various conferences attended or organized by Prof. Eddie. Among the conferences documented is the First Conference on German Cliometrics, a joint project of the University of Toronto’s Joint Initiative in German and European Studies and Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München (Institute of Economic History) held in Toronto September 23 to 26, 1999. Prof. Eddie co-ordinated this conference with his colleague, Dr. Joerg Baten. Among the records documenting this conference are 10 cassette tapes of sessions as well as informal digital photographs of participants at sessions and social activities. Photographs were taken by Prof. Eddie and a student.
Other files document conferences held at the University of Toronto, International History Congress at Leuven (1989-1990), the Economic History Congress (IEHA) in Buenos Aires (2002), and the 2nd Conference on German Cliometrics, Tübingen, Germany (2006) and the Economic History Society at the University of Nottingham (2008). Files may contain correspondence, notes, manuscripts of papers delivered both by Prof. Eddie and others, etc.

Consulting

As a recognized expert in linguistics Prof. Chambers was frequently approached by external organizations and private individuals to provide expert advice and testimony in disputes over the use and meaning of language terms. This series documents his activities in two areas of consulting, forensic linguistics and trade marks. Forensic linguistics is the application of linguistic knowledge, methods and insights to the forensic context of law, crime investigation, trial, and judicial procedure. Forensic linguistics applies the theories, constructs and analytical methods of linguistics to questions which arise in civil, criminal and security investigations and adjudication.

This series documents Prof. Chambers work in this area including expert witness and consultant in criminal and civil cases relating to such matters as the language of pornography, morality of language , decoding telephone conversations, etc. (1972-2006) .Also included are subject files relating to his expert testimony by affidavit in the matter of oppositions under the Trade Marks Act. These include such companies as Coca Cola, services to the Chor Pee & Company (Singapore) for analysis of tape recording in case of Republic National Bank and Yap Lip Yeong (992), Levi Strauss, Jane Parker Bakery, among others.

Sound recordings

This series consists of sound records of public and academic addresses as well as interviews. The material primarily reflects the early part of his career prior to joining the University of Toronto. Arrangement is chronological.

Gwynne Dyer tapes

This series consists of tapes given to Spencer by friend and journalist Gwynne Dyer to serve as a source for her research on the soviet dissident network and her work on Bears and Doves. They consist of taped interviews with soviet bureaucrats and politicians as well as taped events such as election meetings that Dyer did in September of 1989 and in January through March 1990. Their significance is that this was period of upheaval in the Soviet Union. In September of 1989 Hungary becomes independent, in Nov. 1989 the Berlin wall falls and in December 1989 the communists government of Czechoslovakia, Bulgaria and Rumania fall marking the end of the Soviet Union. Spencer has made some brief notes on the tapes, some detailing the conversation between the interviewee and Dyer.

Sound recordings

This series consists of 4 files including recording of interviews with social workers.

Publications and writings

This series partially documents Allan Irving’s writing and publishing activities generally relating to social work in Canada from 1978 to 1999. This includes articles, chapter of books, books and/or book reviews published. It also partially documents his work being cited in others’ publications.

The series consists of 28 files including draft (some handwritten) of published and unpublished papers, correspondence and press clippings. It also includes a sound recording of Irving lecturing the paper he prepared for a job interview at the FSW (B2000-0022/004S).

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