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Robert William McKay fonds
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Education

Series documents McKay’s time as a university student. The physics and chemistry workbook
belongs to his undergraduate years as do the correspondence and clippings regarding his scholarships. Max Planck’s Treatise on Thermodynamics was gifted to McKay when the British Association for the Advancement of Science awarded him a bronze medal. Although the academic hood does not have a date, McKay most likely received it upon earning his Doctorate in 1934.

Robert William McKay fonds

  • UTA 1626
  • Fonds
  • [192-]-1965

Fonds consists primarily of the academic and professional records of Robert William McKay and
is divided into five series:

  1. National Research Council,
  2. Manuscripts and publications,
  3. Reports,
  4. Education, and
  5. Employment.

Apart from materials from McKay’s time as a student at the University of Toronto, the fonds is
mostly devoid of personal records.

McKay, Robert William

Manuscripts and publications

Series contains manuscripts and publications that McKay either wrote or kept in his files. Although the majority of pieces address scientific matters, the series also includes a Junior Prize Essay (“Fathers Versus Sons”) that McKay wrote while still in high school. A number of pieces, including the aforementioned “Fathers Versus Sons,” are to be found in journals or magazines, which have been included in the fonds both so as to preserve context and because many of them are no longer in print. It is worth noting that four of the articles in the series were coauthored, rather than sole-authored, by McKay. These are: “The Decay of Nitrogen Afterglow,”
“”The Decay of the Populations of Metastable Atoms and Ions from the Same D-C. Discharge in Neon,” “Effect of Previous History on Switching Rate in Ferrites,” and “The Hall Effect and Resistivity in Tellurium.” The series also includes McKay’s PhD dissertation, The Measurement of the Dialectric Constant of Electrolytes, and the high school physics textbook he co-authored with D.G. Ivey and which his sister, Marjorie, illustrated.