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Manuscripts and publications

Series contains manuscripts and publications that McKay either wrote or kept in his files. Although the majority of pieces address scientific matters, the series also includes a Junior Prize Essay (“Fathers Versus Sons”) that McKay wrote while still in high school. A number of pieces, including the aforementioned “Fathers Versus Sons,” are to be found in journals or magazines, which have been included in the fonds both so as to preserve context and because many of them are no longer in print. It is worth noting that four of the articles in the series were coauthored, rather than sole-authored, by McKay. These are: “The Decay of Nitrogen Afterglow,”
“”The Decay of the Populations of Metastable Atoms and Ions from the Same D-C. Discharge in Neon,” “Effect of Previous History on Switching Rate in Ferrites,” and “The Hall Effect and Resistivity in Tellurium.” The series also includes McKay’s PhD dissertation, The Measurement of the Dialectric Constant of Electrolytes, and the high school physics textbook he co-authored with D.G. Ivey and which his sister, Marjorie, illustrated.

Publishing

This series contains mainly galleys of pasted text for what is presumed to be Kaleidoscopes: selected writings of H.S.M. Coxeter. It also includes approximately 150-200 geometrical drawings, some original, others printed, but presumably most drawn by Coxeter for his many publications. Finally one file contains a typescript entitled “Summary of the first six chapters of Coxeter’s Projective Geometry, 1964”.

Series also contains copies of Professor Coxeter's publications on mathematical problems that have been translated into other languages. This series does not contain any manuscripts to any of the 12 books Coxeter wrote. Series 2, Professional Correspondence, contains some correspondence with publishers regarding some of his books.

Education

Omond Solandt attended Mulvey School in Winnipeg from 1915 to November 1920, when his family moved to Toronto. He then attended Rosedale Junior Public School, transferring to Central Technical School in 1922. For his last year of high school he attended Jarvis Collegiate.

He enrolled at the University of Toronto in 1927, as an undergraduate at Victoria College. He graduated with a BA in 1931 with first class honours in biological and medical sciences. Omond

Atomic bomb

In September, 1945 the British Chiefs of Staff were invited by their American counterparts to send a mission to Japan to study the effects of the atomic bomb. Omond Solandt was loaned to the Scientific Advisor to the Army Council in the War Office to go as his representative. He went as a specialist in damage to military installations but, there being none of significance in Hiroshima or Nagasaki, spent most of his time studying the casualties from a medical perspective.

This series includes Dr. Solandt

Operational research

Dr. Solandt was one of the pioneers in operational research, a new sphere of scientific activity which arose from the particular wartime requirements for solutions to complex questions, some highly technical, and most involving the interaction between men and machines. By 1944 Solandt had become head of the British Army

Canadian National Railways

In the latter months of 1955, Omond Solandt began arranging his departure from the Defence Research Board to take up the position of Vice-President, Research and Development of Canadian National Railways, a position he held from 1 March, 1956 to 1 July, 1963.

This series contains correspondence, addresses, press clippings, reports, articles and photoprints (see Series 46) relating largely to the scientific research carried out by the Research and Development Department.

De Havilland Aircraft of Canada Ltd.

Upon leaving Canadian National in 1963, Dr. Solandt became Vice-President, Research and Development for and a director of de Havilland and Hawker-Siddeley Canada Ltd., and Chairman of the Board of DCF Systems Ltd. At the time he left de Havilland in 1966 he was Vice-President, Research and Planning.

This series contains correspondence, diaries, memoranda, and reports relating to his activities with these companies and their parent company, the Hawker Siddeley Group of Great Britain.

Electric Reduction Company of Canada Ltd.

From de Havilland, Dr. Solandt moved on to the position of Vice-Chair of the Electric Reduction Company of Canada (later ERCO), a subsidiary of Allbright & Wilson Ltd. of England, which he held from 1965 until 31 December, 1970.

This series contains correspondence, press clippings, articles, minutes, memoranda, reports, and photoprints.

Wilderness Research Foundation

During the late 1980s the future of the Quetico-Superior Wilderness Research Center at Mukluk Bay, Minnesota was very much in question. The Wilderness Research Foundation, which sponsored it, was assessing its future at a time when its founder was withdrawing from active participation prior to his death in December, 1988. Dr. Solandt was initially a member of the Advisory Committee to the Board of the Foundation and later a member of the Board. He pressed for the continuation of wilderness research at Mukluk Bay and left the Board in 1991 only when he felt that this would be achieved.

The correspondence, minutes, memoranda and reports written by Dr. Solandt and others, along with articles and institutional reports, clearly document the relationship between the Foundation and the Center, the work done by the latter, the problems it faced, and the policies that were developed in an attempt to save it.

Canada/Newfoundland Royal Commission on the Ocean Ranger Marine Disaster

When the Ocean Ranger oil rig tipped over in the Atlantic on 15 April, 1982, it set in motion an inquiry which involved two royal commissions, one federal and the other provincial (Newfoundland) which, due to a public outcry, were forced to amalgamate. David Grenville, secretary of the Commission, drew on advice from Dr. Solandt for the second volume of the report, which addressed safety on the oil rigs. An important part of this exercise was the convening of a conference in St. John

Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical/International Centre for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT)

The Centro Internactional de Agricultura Tropical was founded by the Rockefeller Institute in 1967 in Cali, Columbia. In 1982 a massive fraud was discovered within the organization, with the result that the World Bank in 1984 retained Omond Solandt to conduct a management review of the Centre.

The files in this series provide a good picture of the conduct of the External Management Review and of its results. Included are the Review Team

West African Rice Development Association (WARDA)

The initial aim of WARDA was to have an entirely native West African organization that would apply the latest in rice technology to the problems peculiar to their area, but political interference meant that WARDA never functioned effectively. By the end of 1986, with CGIAR having resolved to continue its support of the organization, Omond Solandt was asked to coach those involved in it on how to operate within a CG style of centre. In 1987 he made three trips to Africa and, while there and in subsequent meetings, worked to ensure that an effective structure and Board were put in place. His official involvement with WARDA ended about August, 1987.

The correspondence, minutes, background papers, reports, photographs and publications provide detailed information about the problems WARDA faced and the problems Solandt and others encountered in resolving them.

Solandt Symposium

The Solandt Symposium on Organizing and Managing the Practical Application of Science to Problems in War and Peace was held in Kingston, Ontario from 8-10 May 1994. Its purpose was to honour and celebrate Dr. Solandt and his achievements relating to various aspects of science and technology and, in particular, operational research.

The files contain correspondence and notes regarding various aspects of organizing the conference, along with minutes of the organizing committee; budget and funding information; files on participants, session chairs and speakers; the programme; files relating to the publication and distribution of the proceedings, and a copy of the published proceedings, Perspectives in science and technology: the legacy of Omond Solandt.

Correspondence

The correspondents in this series number just under four hundred individuals, of whom sixty-two read and commented on the entire manuscript (these names are listed on page 723 of the 2002 hardcover edition). The correspondents include Professor Friedland’s research assistants, archivists in the University of Toronto Archives, officials and editors at the University of Toronto Press, other editors, writers and independent researchers with an interest in the University’s history, and members of the public that Professor Friedland met in the course of his research and his giving of talks about the history of the University. The majority of the correspondents are academics and administrative personnel at the University of Toronto and elsewhere who were asked for information or offered their expertise. Some of the correspondence is post-publication reaction to the book.

The research assistants (in addition to those listed in Series I), are Sara Burke, David Bronskill, Colin Grey, Graham Rawlinson and Katrina Wyman. Of the staff in the University of Toronto Archives, Harold Averill was seconded part-time to the project to direct the researchers to the appropriate sources in the University Archives, to offer his knowledge of the history of the University and to read the manuscript. Other correspondents from the Archives are Garron Wells (University Archivist), Marnee Gamble (special media archivist) and Loryl MacDonald (administrative records archivist). The University of Toronto Press, the publisher of the book, is represented by Val Cooke, Ani Deyirmenjian, Malgosia Halliop, Bill Harnum, Anne Laughlin,
Melissa Pitts, and Ron Schoeffel. Presidents (past and current) of the University represented are: Robert Birgeneau, Claude Bissell, George Connell, Robert Prichard, and David Strangway. Some of the academics and university administrators forwarded drafts of articles or excerpts from books they were writing, while others commented on the manuscript or portions thereof. Papers or lengthy memoranda and reports are present on a cross-section of activities, disciplines themes and individuals relating to the University including (with the names of the correspondents in brackets). They include the admission of women (Sara Burke), botanical gardens (John Court), chemistry (Susanne McClelland), Connaught Laboratories (George Connell), engineering (Richard White), fees policy (David Stager), gays and lesbians (David Rayside), Jacob Hirschfelder (Sheldon J. Godfrey), Margaret Eaton School (John Byl), history of medicine (Jacalyn Duffin), medicine (David Bronskill), No. 4 General Hospital at Salonika, Greece during World War I (Mary Louise Gaby), philosophy (John Slater), the proposed Wolfe’s University (D. V. Anderson), women (Katrina Wyman), and women in graduate studies (Natalie Zemon Davis).

In addition to letters, the files may contain articles, notes, memoranda, background documents and publications, and the occasional press clipping A few of the files contain historical items, dating back to 1887, that had belonged early graduates and were forwarded by their descendants, Professor Friedland’s correspondents. The detailed comments on the drafts of the book by the correspondents in this series may, for the most part, be found in Series 4.

Manuscripts, publications, and addresses

This series is a largely complete record of Professor Allemang's writings that, for the most part, resulted in publication. Her literary oeuvre was not a large one, but it contains a number of firsts. Her doctoral thesis was one of the earliest dissertations in clinical nursing and the first such study of Canadian institutions. Her research project in conjunction with Toronto Western Hospital, The experiences of eight cardiac patients during a period of hospitalization in a General Hospital (1960) was the first patient care study of its kind conducted in Canada.

Manuscripts and publications

Professor Urban’s writings focus on the relationship between art and architectural design. Six of his publications are present in this series. Some of those that appeared before 1986 and all published afterward are absent. His earliest writing are based on his involvement with Networks Limited in Halifax, then on collaboration with New York City artist Brian Boigon, and finally on his research in Italy in the 1980s.

Manuscripts and publications

This series consists of unpublished and published manuscripts written by Judith Teichman over the course of her career. Includes: materials related to Teichman’s books (including copies of the books themselves) notably Social Democracy in the Global Periphery: Origins, Challenges, Prospects (Cambridge University Press, 2007), The Politics of Freeing Markets in Latin America (University of North Carolina Press, 2001), Privatization and Political Change in Mexico (University of Pittsburgh Press, 1996), and Policymaking in Mexico: From Boom to Crisis (Allen and Unwin, 1988); journal articles; reviews; reports; workshop presentations; interviews; conference addresses; newspaper and magazine articles. Also includes: grant applications; correspondence with publishers; research related index cards detailing first and second books on Mexico.

Academia and teaching materials

This series documents some of Professor Bay’s academic and associated activities. It includes teaching material (reading lists, syllabi, lectures, and exams) and his work within academia (committee work, appraisals and references, and departmental involvement) at the various universities where he taught. The files on “referees and appraisals” at the University of Toronto include references for academics and students and comments on books and articles forwarded to him for his input. Also included are files on the proposal to abolish the death penalty in California and, in particular, the attempt to stop the execution of convicted murderer and rapist, Caryl Chessman; and copies of "Key List Mailing: Selected Documents of Current and Lasting Interest in the Civil Rights Movement", a biweekly publication produced by the San Francisco Regional Office of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC).

Additional material related to academia and teaching material may be located in the correspondence series. Material related to his research in addresses and publications is located in the publications series. Material related to his involvement in professional associations can be found in the professional association series.

Publications and manuscripts

This series reflects Professor Bay’s research interests that were published in academic journals, as well as sources for public consumption such as magazines and newsletters. The material in this series includes tributes, letters to the editor, commentaries, and publications (books, book chapters, and articles). Related material is arranged with the corresponding manuscript which may include documents such as correspondence, drafts, publication releases, and royalty statements. Additional correspondence related to publications and manuscripts may be located in the correspondence series.

Associations

This series reflects Professor Bay’s involvement in the American Political Science Association and its radical Caucus for a New Political Science which was formed by 200 dissident political scientists, of which Professor Bay was one, at the September, 1967 meeting of the APSA. Bay was president from 1971 to 1972. Material included is minutes of meetings, correspondence, newsletters, memos, and election material. Some material related to addresses presented at panels and conferences can be found in this series. Related material may also be located in the correspondence series.

Manuscripts and publications

Professor Helleiner is the author or editor of 18 books, over 100 refereed articles and contributions to volumes, even more non-refereed publications, many book reviews, and some letters to the editor. This series does not contain a complete record of his output or copies of all of his manuscripts. Some files may contain a comprehensive record of the writing of a particular piece, including correspondence with colleagues (Professor Helleiner habitually ran his drafts by them) and/or publishers, contracts, notes and notebooks, drafts of manuscripts and comments on them, offprints, reviews, and royalty statements. Others may contain only the contract, perhaps a letter or two, or a review, but no manuscripts or offprints.

Some of Professor Helleiner's writing have been translated into other languages, including French, Italian, Japanese, Norwegian, Spanish, and Swedish.

For the three WIDER volumes that Professor Helleiner edited and for which he wrote introductions and/or chapters, see Series 6.

Professional activities: Council of Ontario Universities

The Council of Ontario Universities (COU) was formed on December 3, 1962 as the “Committee of Presidents of Provincially Assisted Universities and Colleges of Ontario,” with its current name being adopted in 1971. The mandate of the COU is to “build awareness of the university sector’s contributions to the social, economic and cultural well-being of the province and the country, as well as the issues that impact the sector’s ability to maximize these contributions.” It works with Ontario’s publicly assisted universities and one associate member institution, the Royal Military College of Canada. This series documents the activities of a number of its committees and task forces, which are detailed below, approximately in order of activity.

Professor Lang was a member of the COU’s Committee on Enrolment Statistics and Projections from 1976 to 1990. In 1982-1983 he sat on its Special Committee on BILD Administrative Procedures and from 1987 to 1991 was a member of its Research Advisory Group. In 1991 he was invited to be part of a small task force to present proposals to the government for an income contingent repayment plan for Ontario students. Throughout much of the 1990s, he was involved with the COU’s Committee on University Accountability and the Performance Indicators for the Public Postsecondary System in Ontario project, better known as the Performance Indicators Project, the purpose of which was to assess the overall Ontario postsecondary sector.

He was also a member of four task forces: Audit Guidelines (1998-2000), Secondary School Issues (1998-2005), Student Financial Assistance (2006-), and Quality Assurance (2008-2010).
The Task Force on Secondary School Issues was established to assess the evaluation of students in the new secondary school program of studies and to make recommendations regarding the monitoring of grading practices and standards.

The COU’s Quality and Productivity Task Force work was to outline “all the quality and productivity initiatives” undertaken to “showcase results for the government’s increased investment in universities.” Its report, presented in March 2006, was followed by the COU Task Force on Quality Measurements, chaired by David Naylor of the University of Toronto. It was charged with addressing the “broad issues related to quality measurement, developing the long-term strategies for COU’s work with the government and the Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario (HEQCO).” [1]

Files in B2018-0001 include correspondence with U of T and COU colleagues, as well as further records related to his role on the COU’s Committee on University Accountability. Also included are further records about the COU's Task Force on Quality Assurance (2008-2010), including its subsequent transition and implementation phase.

The files in this series contain correspondence, memoranda, notes, minutes of meetings, drafts of reports, and assorted background reports and other documentation.

NOTES

  1. Task Force on Quality Measurement terms of reference, March 2006, in B2011-0003/043(03).

Professional activities (other)

This series documents professional activities other than those described in the two previous series. Included is material on consulting and special projects, boards of governors of educational institutions that Professor Lang sat on, and his association with a number of other educational agencies and groups in Canada and elsewhere. Of the last, the most documentation is on the Ontario Council on University Affairs, the Premier’s Council for Economic Renewal, and the Sweden/Ontario Bilateral Exchange Seminar for Senior Academic Administrators (1982-1983). The arrangement in this section is by name of organization or event.

The files may contain any combination of correspondence, memoranda, minutes of meetings, notes, and reports.

Files from B2018-0001 include further records documenting Lang’s active involvement with the Board of Trustees of the Toronto School of Theology (2008 - ; Chair, Institutional Evaluations Committee, 2014-2017) and the Board of Governors of Saint Augustine’s Seminary. His work as Chair of the Strategic Asset Study Committee (2011-2014) for the Archdiocese of Toronto is also documented.

Publications and addresses

This series documents only one of Davidson Black’s publications, but more of his addresses, in particular some he delivered in 1925 before his discovery of Peking Man, and the Croonian Lecture in December 1932 that cemented the acceptance of his research.

Print material

Consists of off-prints and clippings from various journals of book reviews and critical articles by E.K. Brown.

United College, Winnipeg

Prof. McNaught was appointed Assistant Professor of history in 1947 at United College (now University of Winnipeg). a college funded by the United Church of Canada. The majority of files in this series document his role in the“Harry Crowe Case” of 1958. Prof. Harry Crowe was a member of the History Department at United College and shared Prof. McNaught’s social democratic views. In April, 1958 the principal of United College, Rev. Wilfrid C. Lockhart, was anonymously sent a letter written by Prof. Crowe to Professor W.A. Packer critical of the College’s administration and the role of the ministers in public administration. Between April and September of that year, the matter escalated culminating in the firing of Prof. Crowe by the Board of Regents in July, 1958. In the fall, three members of the faculty, including Prof. McNaught, threatened to resign over the firing of Prof. Crowe. As a result, the Board accepted their letters of protest as letters of resignation. This resignation from United College led to his eventual appointment at the University of Toronto. Included are correspondence, newspaper and magazine articles, and copies of public statements and one file relating to his research on J. S. Woodsworth for his doctoral dissertation.

Biographical and personal records

The series consists of biographical and personal records of Professor Bay. The material reflects his personal life, and includes press clippings, articles, and a thesis about him; personal documents such as educational records; documents of identification; personal papers related to life events (baptism, marriage, home ownership, inheritance, death certificates); calendars and a condolence scrapbook.

The arrangement of the material begins with biographical information (press clippings, biographies, curriculum vitae, referees, work about Bay), then personal papers, followed by what he termed “his personal collection”, consisting of items primarily in Norwegian relating to his family and Norway generally. The most intriguing portion of this “collection” is the folders of “illegal papers” [/002(28) – (30)] that Professor Bay buried when he hurriedly left Norway early in World War II and which he dug up sometime after he returned. There are also books about Norwegian resistance, and two books by his uncle.

Professional activities: Ontario. Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities

Professor Lang’s first major collaboration with the then Ministry of Colleges and Universities began in 1991 when he was a member of the Minister’s Task Force on University Accountability. Later he was involved in several joint projects with the Ministry and its successors [the Ministry of Education and Training (from 1995) and from 2000, the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities] and the Council of Ontario Universities; in particular, their Steering Committee on Ontario Graduate Survey (1997-), their Joint Steering Committee on OSAP (1998-2001), and their Key Performance Indicators project (2000-2005). In 2006 he became a member of the Ministry’s Joint Working Group on Student Access Guarantee. From 2008 to 2011 he was the Ministry’s Working Group and Steering Committee on Transfer. Not all of these activities are documented in this series.

In 2006-2007 the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities undertook two inter-related research projects “aimed generally at learning about the characteristics of ‘first-generation’ students.” The first, “College Choice”, focused on the factors that influenced students in seeking post-secondary education and their choices of institutions to attend. The second, dubbed Project STAR (Student Achievement and Retention), “sought to determine the factors that influence the academic performance and retention of students in the first year of university.” It was sponsored by the Canada Millenium Scholarship Foundation and Statistics
Canada.

Files in B2018-0001 document Professor Lang's role as Special Advisor to the Deputy Minister, in particular his involvement with the negotiations between the Government of Ontario and Ontario universities regarding the second Strategic Mandate Agreement (SMA2), and Ontario colleges regarding the Colleges Applied Research and Development Fund [CARDF].

Also included are files regarding the creation of a francophone university in Ontario; the Joint Working Group on Student Access Guarantee, regarding the modernization of the Ontario Student Assistance Program (OSAP); and the Steering Committee on Transfer Credits.

Addresses

Dr. Solandt delivered many speeches and formal addresses during his career. This series contains notes for and drafts of them and, occasionally, photographs. Some of his addresses were published, especially those delivered at conferences or as memorial lectures; if so, they may appear in the series

Chancellor, University of Toronto

Twenty-nine years after Omond Solandt left the University of Toronto with a gold medal in medicine, he returned as Chancellor, taking up his three-year appointment on 1 July, 1965. It was renewed for a further three years in 1968.

The contents of this series includes correspondence, addresses, minutes, programs, reports and photoprints relating to his ceremonial duties and other activities associated with the office. Included are files on awarding of honorary degrees, the Presidential Search Committee, chaired by Dr. Solandt, for the successor to Claude Bissell, and the new (1971) University of Toronto Act. Included is an audiotape of the proceedings of his installation as chancellor.

Solandt Commission

The controversy caused by the proposed construction of major power lines through populated southern Ontario resulted in Omond Solandt being appointed in 1972 to head a commission of public inquiry into the transmission of power from Nanticoke to Pickering. The following year the inquiry was extended to include an examination of the proposed route between Lennox and Oshawa. Dr. Solandt held public hearings in the affected municipalities between May, 1974 and January, 1975.

Present are correspondence, press coverage, drafts of papers, and reports relating to the inquiry and to the Ontario Royal Commission on Electric Power.

Institute de la vie

The Institute de la Vie, based in Paris and Geneva, was founded in 1960 by Maurice Marois to safeguard, though science and technology, the

International Centre for Insect Physiology and Ecology (ICIPE)

ICIPE, based in Nairobi, is one of two important international research centres (the other is WARDA) whose origins lie in the native populations of the area in which they operate. Late in 1976, Omond Solandt was asked to join the Board of ICIPE, which was badly in need of help in management. He formally took his seat in June, 1977 and the reorganization that he engineered addressed problems of efficiency, a lingering colonial mentality, and the appointment of a new chair. A financial crisis forced Solandt to assume the duties as chair in April, 1982, a position he retained for a year. He remained actively associated with ICIPE until 1987 and in 1989 was a one of the founders of its Honorary Alumni Association.

The correspondence, minutes, background papers, reports, programs, publications and photoprints and slides provide a thorough documentation of the complex problems that Dr. Solandt faced at ICIPE, the progress that was made in resolving them, and the impact of many individuals involved in it, especially its founder, Dr. Tom Odhiambo.

Research and Writings

This series consists of unpublished and published manuscripts written by Helen Lenskyj over the course of her career. Includes: materials related to Lenskyj’s books, journal articles, reviews, reports, workshop presentations, conference addresses, and newspaper and magazine articles. Also included are manuals written by Lenskyj while she worked for the Ontario Ministry of Culture and Recreation.

The bulk of these manuscripts are subdivided into their respective subject areas, based on the four primary research interests (gender and sport, sexual education, education, and Olympic critiques) of Lenskyj during her career. This is the arrangement in which the manuscripts where donated and this order has been preserved.

Professional associations and posts

The records in this series document Professor Helleiner’s association with and involvement in several dozen professional associations and organizations, including consulting contracts with governments and educational bodies. There are also files on many of the journals with which he was associated (he sat on the editorial boards of more than twenty at one time or another, one (World Development) for more than thirty years. Most of the latter contain his comments on papers he was asked to assess. There are also files on some conferences that he attended.

The files contain correspondence, memoranda, notes, minutes of meetings and proceedings of workshops, reports (many written by Helleiner), conference programmes and papers, the occasional interview, and selected newsletters and press clippings. The arrangement is by name of organization or event, filed alphabetically.

The most extensive files are on the following organizations, the binding thread being development economics: African Capacity Building Foundation and the African Economic Research Consortium; with officials and politicians of the Government of Canada and about the Canadian International Development Agency; the Commonwealth Secretariat, the International Development Research Centre (IDRC), and International Lawyers and Economists Against Poverty (ILEAP); the North South Institute, the Overseas Development Council (USA), and the North South Roundtable of the Society for International Development (UK); various activities relating to trade and investment in South Africa (including early opposition to it), and ongoing activities in Tanzania (see below); numerous bodies associated with the United Nations (especially UNICEF and UNCTAD); several universities (Dar es Salaam, Sussex, and the West Indies); the World Bank, and World Development.

The International Development Research Centre (IDRC), founded in Ottawa in 1970, was mandated to support research on the reduction of global poverty and particularly research in (as well as for) developing countries.” It was initially headed by David Hopper, with whom Professor Helleiner worked on the creation of the North-South Institute in 1975-1976. He sat on the Board of the IDRC from 1985 to 1991.

ILEAP grew out of concerns Professor Helleiner raised in his Prebisch lecture at UNCTAD in December, 2000 about the lack of lawyers (and economists) “committed…to the specially defence of the rights of the poorest in the global economy’s legal system and the building of their capacity of defend themselves.” His call was taken up by Ron Daniels, dean of Law at the U of T, and others, with initial funding from the IDRC.

Professor Helleiner’s long association with Tanzania is well documented here, beginning in 1978 with the Government of Tanzania Task Force on Export Incentive Schemes, followed by the Tanzania Advisory Group (“Three Wise Men”) in 1981 and ending,
between 1994 and 2000, with the Group of Independent Advisors on Development Cooperation Issues Between Tanzania and its Aid Donors (which Helleiner chaired) and the associated Tanzania Advisory Strategy.

Additional correspondence on many of these organizations may be found filed under the names of the individual members in Series 2: Correspondence, an example being Roy Culpepper of the North-South Institute.

Of the more than twenty editorial boards on which Professor Helleiner sat, the most extensive files are for International Organization and WorldDevelopment. The files together contain primarily specially ng relating to his membership on editorial boards and/or his appraisals of papers presented to the respective journals. Some related correspondence may be found in ‘Series 2: Correspondence’ under the names of editorial board members.

Professor Helleiner’s involvement with the Intergovernmental Group of Twenty-four on International Monetary Affairs (Group of 24 or G-24) is documented in Series 7 and with WIDER (World Institute for Development Economic Research) in Series 6.

In his curriculum vitae [B2010-0005/001(01) and /019(05)], Professor Helleiner provides lists of “Journal editorial boards”, “Other professional honours and posts”, and “sample selected research contracts and consultancies”. Researchers will find these lists very useful in gaining an understanding of the breadth of Professor Helleiner’s professional activities, while some indication of the depth of his involvement can be gleaned from his memoirs, Listening and learning [B2010-0005/079(02)].

Photographic Prints

Series C: Photographic Prints contains all of photograph prints that were housed in paper folders and filing cabinets in the office of Ken Jones. The folders were arranged by subject. For the most part, folders are labelled by subject but the folders and some photographs were out of order when the records were transferred to UTSC Library. In some cases, folders contain photos that do not reflect the subject of the original folder label.

Doctoral research and thesis

This series documents Coxeter’s earliest writings and research while a student at Cambridge. It consists of research notes, a draft paper on Schlafli functions and the manuscript to his “old” thesis entitled Petri Polygons: a New Approach to the Study of Regular Polytopes and Skew Polyhedra. There also is a 1930 offprint from the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London and a manuscript of Part II of his post-doctoral thesis. Finally, although it predates his attendance at Cambridge in 1926, a 1924 mathematical notebook has been included in this series.

World Institute for Development Economics Research (WIDER)

In 1984 the director of the World Institute for Development Economics Research (WIDER), newly established by the United Nations University (UNU) and based in Helsinki, invited scholars, of whom Professor Helleiner was one, to organize interesting research projects using WIDER’s funds and under its auspices. The following year, Helleiner, along with Lance Taylor and others, began to develop a research programme on international economic issues and helped organize a high level conference to flesh out its direction. The programme that emerged involved papers on 18 developing countries, the summary volume of which appeared in 1988.

By 1990, Professor Helleiner had assembled a number of developing country authors and empirically-oriented trade/development analysts to work out a research project on trade and industrialization policies. It produced two books which he edited and for which he wrote the introductions. The first, on trade and industrialization reconsidered, appeared as Trade policy and industrialization in turbulent times in 1994. Papers presented at the WIDER conferences on ‘trade and industrialization’ held in Ottawa in September 1991 and on ‘Trade and industrialization reconsidered’ held in Paris in August the same year formed the basis of this volume. Papers on Nigeria, Pakistan and Zimbabwe were not received in time for inclusion in it. A second, shorter volume, containing only five country studies but built on the work of the first, appeared in 1995 as Manufacturing for export in the developing world: problems and possibilities.

A second WIDER project, on new trade theories and industrialization in the developing countries, was begun in 1988 and published as Trade policy, industrialization and development: new perspectives in 1992.

The third project, on non-traditional exporting from Africa, focused on the following countries: Burkino Fasso, Côte d’Ivoire, Ghana, Kenya., Mauritius, South Africa, Tanzania, Uganda and Zimbabwe, with comparative studies on Chile and Costa Rica. Professor Helleiner worked closely with the African Economic Research Consortium’s (AERC) trade liberalization project and with the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD). The project began in July 1996 and ran until late 1999. Papers were presented at a joint UNU/WIDER meeting in Kampala, Uganda, in June 1997 and they were subsequently reworked into chapters for the book, Non-traditional export promotion in Africa: experience and issues, which appeared in 2002. The series ends with a proposed project on the United Nations and the Breton Woods Institutions.

This series contains correspondence, memoranda, notes, minutes of meetings, conference material, drafts of papers, reports and publications.

Biographical and personal files

This series is divided into two sections. The first contains biographical sketches and curriculum vitae, press clippings and articles about Dr. Solandt, along with photocopies of his birth certificate and copies of his will and that of his first wife, Elizabeth. There is correspondence with Elizabeth regarding their marriage, with relatives and friends, and relating to appointments. Also present is a cash book detailing personal expenses between 1923 and 1946, a diary of Dr. Solandt’s first trip to Europe in 1929.

The first portion of this series concludes with the programme for the Solandt Symposium on Organizing and Managing the Practical Application of Science to Problems in Peace and War (Queen’s University at Kingston, 1994), programs for dinners of the Royal Canadian Engineers 3rd Field Engineer Regiment and the Royal Canadian Signals 11th Signal Regiment, a presentation copy of Donald Y. Solandt’s Highways to Health, and a resolution by Donald M. Solandt (Omond and Donald’s father) to the Presbyterian Synod of Manitoba in 1915.

The second section of this series consists of diaries and daybooks (largely the latter), beginning with an account of Dr. Solandt’s trip to Europe in the summer of 1929 while he was an undergraduate at the University of Toronto. Dr. Solandt kept only the occasional diary, of which three are represented in this series. The first is for May, 1945 as the war ended in Europe. The last two both cover his trip to Japan in October-December, 1945 to study the effects of the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. These diaries are followed by "CDRB's U.K. Visit" (undated); an account book of Solandt's visit to the United Kingdom in November, 1966, and his American address book.

The remainder of the volumes in this series are daybooks and “pocket diaries”, of which Dr. Solandt created a large number. In the former, usually with the manufacturer’s label of as “diary” or “date book”, he recorded his appointments and, occasionally, his expenses and other related notations. These date from 1941, when he first went to Lulworth, to 1988. The volumes for 1945, 1947,1948, 1957, 1958, 1979, and 1986 are absent, either because they were never kept or, perhaps, were not written up in the same manner. For 1945, for instance, there are entries for January, June, and July in two different volumes, but none for the whole year. For two years (1956; 1971, where the second volume has "Mayo Muir" below Dr. Solandt's name and the entries are not in his hand) there are two volumes.

The "pocket diaries" complement the appointment books. The earliest year represented is 1945, the latest, 1988. There are no volumes for 1948-1951, 1953, 1957, and 1959-1965. For 1958, there are also two volumes containing notes on Dr. Solandt's European trip in March and appointments for another in July, and "at a glance" volumes both for 1958 and 1959.

For accounts of travel experiences, either for pleasure or work, see Series 11: Canoe trips and Series 13: Travel.

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