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Photographic Prints

Series C: Photographic Prints contains all of photograph prints that were housed in paper folders and filing cabinets in the office of Ken Jones. The folders were arranged by subject. For the most part, folders are labelled by subject but the folders and some photographs were out of order when the records were transferred to UTSC Library. In some cases, folders contain photos that do not reflect the subject of the original folder label.

Publications

This series includes copies of “The Iron Ring”, a private publication for the Camp Wardens, printed as a kind of historical primer and general information circular. There is also a clipping file of publicity concerning the Ritual, correspondence regarding the various publications, and a printed musical score for a composition by Alice Roger Collins, to the text of the poem “The Sons of Martha” by Rudyard Kipling, dedicated to the “engineering profession”.
Accession B1995-0040 includes additional publicity clippings, more recent editions of “The Iron Ring”, a Manual of Camp Procedures and mark ups for a collection of Kipling poems. Accession B2009-0029 includes a copy of the reprinted Twenty Poems by Rudyard Kipling, issue no.8 of “The Iron Ring”, The Manual of Camp Procedure (1988), various articles and publicity concerning the Canadian postage stamp honouring the 75th anniversary of the creation of the Ritual, issued in April 2000.

Publications and addresses

This series documents only one of Davidson Black’s publications, but more of his addresses, in particular some he delivered in 1925 before his discovery of Peking Man, and the Croonian Lecture in December 1932 that cemented the acceptance of his research.

Manuscripts & publications

This series documents the writing activities of Professor York in terms of publication of papers in scholarly journals. Files contain correspondence, and notes, as well as drafts of articles and unpublished manuscripts. The arrangement is chronological.

Manuscripts and publications

This series documents Professor Lang’s writings, unpublished and published, over a forty-year period. He has written two books, Financing universities in Ontario (2000) and Mergers in higher education: lessons in theory and practice (2001), which was translated into Chinese and published in Shanghai in 2008. He has contributed chapters to eleven books, and had numerous papers published in refereed journals, along with review essays, other publications, papers, and reports. The research files (some contain original documents) for and a copy of his doctoral thesis, are also present in this series. The titles, where they exist, to these research files were those used by Professor Lang.

The listing of manuscripts and publications is not complete. For a complete listing of Professor Lang’s publications, see his curriculum vitae in B2011-0003/001(01). Some of his reports not present in this series can be found in other series.

Digital files from B2018-0001 include correspondence and drafts for his book Mergers in higher education: lessons in theory and practice (2001), as well as a report for the Atkinson Foundation, A Primer on Formula Funding: A Study of Student-focused Funding in Ontario (2003).

The files contain a combination of correspondence, drafts, background and research material and notes. The arrangement is chronological by date of document or date of publication.

Professional activities (other)

This series documents professional activities other than those described in the two previous series. Included is material on consulting and special projects, boards of governors of educational institutions that Professor Lang sat on, and his association with a number of other educational agencies and groups in Canada and elsewhere. Of the last, the most documentation is on the Ontario Council on University Affairs, the Premier’s Council for Economic Renewal, and the Sweden/Ontario Bilateral Exchange Seminar for Senior Academic Administrators (1982-1983). The arrangement in this section is by name of organization or event.

The files may contain any combination of correspondence, memoranda, minutes of meetings, notes, and reports.

Files from B2018-0001 include further records documenting Lang’s active involvement with the Board of Trustees of the Toronto School of Theology (2008 - ; Chair, Institutional Evaluations Committee, 2014-2017) and the Board of Governors of Saint Augustine’s Seminary. His work as Chair of the Strategic Asset Study Committee (2011-2014) for the Archdiocese of Toronto is also documented.

Professional activities: Ontario. Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities

Professor Lang’s first major collaboration with the then Ministry of Colleges and Universities began in 1991 when he was a member of the Minister’s Task Force on University Accountability. Later he was involved in several joint projects with the Ministry and its successors [the Ministry of Education and Training (from 1995) and from 2000, the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities] and the Council of Ontario Universities; in particular, their Steering Committee on Ontario Graduate Survey (1997-), their Joint Steering Committee on OSAP (1998-2001), and their Key Performance Indicators project (2000-2005). In 2006 he became a member of the Ministry’s Joint Working Group on Student Access Guarantee. From 2008 to 2011 he was the Ministry’s Working Group and Steering Committee on Transfer. Not all of these activities are documented in this series.

In 2006-2007 the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities undertook two inter-related research projects “aimed generally at learning about the characteristics of ‘first-generation’ students.” The first, “College Choice”, focused on the factors that influenced students in seeking post-secondary education and their choices of institutions to attend. The second, dubbed Project STAR (Student Achievement and Retention), “sought to determine the factors that influence the academic performance and retention of students in the first year of university.” It was sponsored by the Canada Millenium Scholarship Foundation and Statistics
Canada.

Files in B2018-0001 document Professor Lang's role as Special Advisor to the Deputy Minister, in particular his involvement with the negotiations between the Government of Ontario and Ontario universities regarding the second Strategic Mandate Agreement (SMA2), and Ontario colleges regarding the Colleges Applied Research and Development Fund [CARDF].

Also included are files regarding the creation of a francophone university in Ontario; the Joint Working Group on Student Access Guarantee, regarding the modernization of the Ontario Student Assistance Program (OSAP); and the Steering Committee on Transfer Credits.

Professional activities: Council of Ontario Universities

The Council of Ontario Universities (COU) was formed on December 3, 1962 as the “Committee of Presidents of Provincially Assisted Universities and Colleges of Ontario,” with its current name being adopted in 1971. The mandate of the COU is to “build awareness of the university sector’s contributions to the social, economic and cultural well-being of the province and the country, as well as the issues that impact the sector’s ability to maximize these contributions.” It works with Ontario’s publicly assisted universities and one associate member institution, the Royal Military College of Canada. This series documents the activities of a number of its committees and task forces, which are detailed below, approximately in order of activity.

Professor Lang was a member of the COU’s Committee on Enrolment Statistics and Projections from 1976 to 1990. In 1982-1983 he sat on its Special Committee on BILD Administrative Procedures and from 1987 to 1991 was a member of its Research Advisory Group. In 1991 he was invited to be part of a small task force to present proposals to the government for an income contingent repayment plan for Ontario students. Throughout much of the 1990s, he was involved with the COU’s Committee on University Accountability and the Performance Indicators for the Public Postsecondary System in Ontario project, better known as the Performance Indicators Project, the purpose of which was to assess the overall Ontario postsecondary sector.

He was also a member of four task forces: Audit Guidelines (1998-2000), Secondary School Issues (1998-2005), Student Financial Assistance (2006-), and Quality Assurance (2008-2010).
The Task Force on Secondary School Issues was established to assess the evaluation of students in the new secondary school program of studies and to make recommendations regarding the monitoring of grading practices and standards.

The COU’s Quality and Productivity Task Force work was to outline “all the quality and productivity initiatives” undertaken to “showcase results for the government’s increased investment in universities.” Its report, presented in March 2006, was followed by the COU Task Force on Quality Measurements, chaired by David Naylor of the University of Toronto. It was charged with addressing the “broad issues related to quality measurement, developing the long-term strategies for COU’s work with the government and the Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario (HEQCO).” [1]

Files in B2018-0001 include correspondence with U of T and COU colleagues, as well as further records related to his role on the COU’s Committee on University Accountability. Also included are further records about the COU's Task Force on Quality Assurance (2008-2010), including its subsequent transition and implementation phase.

The files in this series contain correspondence, memoranda, notes, minutes of meetings, drafts of reports, and assorted background reports and other documentation.

NOTES

  1. Task Force on Quality Measurement terms of reference, March 2006, in B2011-0003/043(03).

OISE/UT

This series begins with files that Professor Lang’s broad activities within OISE/UT as recorded in his performance assessments, activity reports and course evaluations. There are followed by files on the Provost’s OISE Committee of the late 1970s through the mid-1980s, which include material on the first pass at the thorny issue of the possible integration of OISE into the University of Toronto. Most of the files relating to the Higher Education Group, with which Professor Lang was primarily associated at OISE, contain material spanning almost 20 years on examination questions.

The bulk of this series, however, relates to the merger of OISE with the U of T to create, in 1995, OISE/UT. Professor Lang’s personal work binders on the merger are present, as are legal and other documents on the merger, followed by implementation files, including those of the Academic Implementation Task Force and on the issues relating to OISE’s property. The series concludes with files on the OISE/UT Joint MPHEd program with the Faculty of Medicine (2003-2004).

Education

This series contains Professor Peers’ yearbooks, diplomas, dissertations for his MA and PhD as well as other records relating to his education.

University of Toronto

This series contains items ranging from University College class reunions to the University of Toronto Overseas Training Company’s “Record of Service” book that Malcolm Wallace compiled while second-in-command of the Company during World War I. There are also files on retirements (William John Alexander), College fees and scholarships, articles about Toronto and U of T history, and Wallace’s copies of publications about King’s College, the University of Toronto Act, the Victoria Club’s curling manual.

Manuscripts and publications

The manuscripts and publications in this series form a small representation of Principal Wallace’s literary output, but they do provide a sense of the breadth of his interests and the activities to which he devoted himself after his retirement in 1944.

Correspondence

The correspondents in this series number just under four hundred individuals, of whom sixty-two read and commented on the entire manuscript (these names are listed on page 723 of the 2002 hardcover edition). The correspondents include Professor Friedland’s research assistants, archivists in the University of Toronto Archives, officials and editors at the University of Toronto Press, other editors, writers and independent researchers with an interest in the University’s history, and members of the public that Professor Friedland met in the course of his research and his giving of talks about the history of the University. The majority of the correspondents are academics and administrative personnel at the University of Toronto and elsewhere who were asked for information or offered their expertise. Some of the correspondence is post-publication reaction to the book.

The research assistants (in addition to those listed in Series I), are Sara Burke, David Bronskill, Colin Grey, Graham Rawlinson and Katrina Wyman. Of the staff in the University of Toronto Archives, Harold Averill was seconded part-time to the project to direct the researchers to the appropriate sources in the University Archives, to offer his knowledge of the history of the University and to read the manuscript. Other correspondents from the Archives are Garron Wells (University Archivist), Marnee Gamble (special media archivist) and Loryl MacDonald (administrative records archivist). The University of Toronto Press, the publisher of the book, is represented by Val Cooke, Ani Deyirmenjian, Malgosia Halliop, Bill Harnum, Anne Laughlin,
Melissa Pitts, and Ron Schoeffel. Presidents (past and current) of the University represented are: Robert Birgeneau, Claude Bissell, George Connell, Robert Prichard, and David Strangway. Some of the academics and university administrators forwarded drafts of articles or excerpts from books they were writing, while others commented on the manuscript or portions thereof. Papers or lengthy memoranda and reports are present on a cross-section of activities, disciplines themes and individuals relating to the University including (with the names of the correspondents in brackets). They include the admission of women (Sara Burke), botanical gardens (John Court), chemistry (Susanne McClelland), Connaught Laboratories (George Connell), engineering (Richard White), fees policy (David Stager), gays and lesbians (David Rayside), Jacob Hirschfelder (Sheldon J. Godfrey), Margaret Eaton School (John Byl), history of medicine (Jacalyn Duffin), medicine (David Bronskill), No. 4 General Hospital at Salonika, Greece during World War I (Mary Louise Gaby), philosophy (John Slater), the proposed Wolfe’s University (D. V. Anderson), women (Katrina Wyman), and women in graduate studies (Natalie Zemon Davis).

In addition to letters, the files may contain articles, notes, memoranda, background documents and publications, and the occasional press clipping A few of the files contain historical items, dating back to 1887, that had belonged early graduates and were forwarded by their descendants, Professor Friedland’s correspondents. The detailed comments on the drafts of the book by the correspondents in this series may, for the most part, be found in Series 4.

Education

Series documents McKay’s time as a university student. The physics and chemistry workbook
belongs to his undergraduate years as do the correspondence and clippings regarding his scholarships. Max Planck’s Treatise on Thermodynamics was gifted to McKay when the British Association for the Advancement of Science awarded him a bronze medal. Although the academic hood does not have a date, McKay most likely received it upon earning his Doctorate in 1934.

Education

This series covers Ruth Church’s education at Mount Royal High School; McGill University, where she graduated with a Bachelor of Library Science the same day as her future husband, Robert Spencer, graduated with a Bachelor of Arts; her subsequent graduate training in librarianship at the University of London in 1945-1946, and her stint as a special student at the University of Toronto from 1984 to 1986.

Included are certificates, programmes, correspondence, and course papers. Ms. Church’s letters home while a graduate student are replete with accounts of her life in immediate post-war London. At the University of Toronto she was a ‘senior citizen student’, part-time, registered at Woodworth College and taking English 262S (‘Detective fiction’) and English 260 (‘Varieties of Biography‘). Her course papers have been kept.

Wartime service, World War II

During World War II, Ruth Church served as Base Librarian with the Women’s Royal Canadian Naval Service (Wrens) from September 1943 to October 1945. She was stationed at HMCS Shelburne (September 1943 – July 1944), HMCS Stadacona in Londonderry, Northern Ireland (July 1944 – May 1945), and at HMCS Niobe at Greenock, Scotland (July – October 1945).

The files include her official record of service, correspondence, base librarian reports, newsletters, memorabilia, copies of period newspapers that she annotated, and post-war correspondence, newsletters, and news items relating to the Wren Association of Toronto. The arrangement is largely chronological.

Canada House

Ruth Church was employed as the head librarian at Canada House in London from September 1945 to March 1950. She was the first permanent librarian hired by the Canadian High Commission and was tasked with building up the library almost from scratch, while serving the demands of the Canadian diplomatic corps and facilitating the use of the library by Canadians based in or travelling through London and interested members of the public.

She nearly lost her job when she married in 1948, as the Civil Service Commission’s policy was that once married, she would be supported by her husband and therefore would be replaced by an unmarried librarian as soon as possible. She appealed on the basis that she would be supporting her husband while he was a student at Oxford and was allowed to remain on with her full salary and allowances. In April 1949, her contract was renewed for six-months and, on request, for a further six months until 28 February 1950, which was extended to 31 March until her replacement arrived from Canada. During this period she fought back against the Department of External Affairs’ decision to reduce her allowance and the Receiver General’s clawback of portions of her salary. Forty-five years later she publicly objected to the closure of the Library and of Canada House and lived to attend its reopening in 1998.

The files in this series contain correspondence, salary stubs, poetry, reports, a manuscript, and articles.

Personal and biographical

This series contains material relating to Professor Spencer’s birth, childhood and later birthdays; childhood stories, plays, and poems; reunions and other post-graduate activities at McGill University and the University of Oxford; honours received; and files relating to the residences that he had owned. Also present are copies of his curriculum vitae, security documents regarding the Department of External Affairs, and material reflecting his long association with the Canadian military in the form of Remembrance Day ceremonies and VE-Day and other celebrations related to World War II.

Travel

This series documents Professor Spencer’s travels, both for pleasure and for academic and other professional purposes. The first of his trips documented here is to New York City in 1946; the last is to Europe in 2011.

The files contain an assortment of flight information, correspondence, itineraries, invitations, notes, postcards, diaries and reports (indicated below where they exist), programmes for a wide variety of events, menus, tickets, passenger lists, booklets, maps, photographs, press clippings, and other memorabilia. The arrangement is chronological by trip. Beginning in April, 1977 and continuing while he was director until his retirement in 1986, a lot of Professor Spencer’s travel was done as an extension of the work of the Centre for International Studies. For the first of these trips, he wrote a detailed report of his activities. The often extensive correspondence in these files ranges from that with Canadian government, consular, and military officials to military officials at NATO and elsewhere in Europe and England, to academic and government personnel in Western Europe. Included are files on Professor Spencer’s involvement with the Atlantic Council of Canada, the Committee on Atlantic Studies, and the Canadian Studies Association.

Some of the folders in this series contain correspondence, postcards, reports, and other items that are well outside the dates of the activities being described.

The photoprints, postcards, and artifacts (pin buttons) have been retained in the relevant files. Files containing receipts only (such as transportation, car rentals, luggage, and accommodation) were not kept and the retention of such material in other files is selective. Fax paper, where present, has been photocopied and the original faxes, most of which had deteriorated badly, have been destroyed.

Additional information about some of these trips can be found in Series 7: Correspondence.

Research

This series comprises the voluminous notes and files assembled by Professor Munro over the course of about fifty years of doing research, initially for his graduate work and then for his books, articles and addresses that appeared in print or online, and the relatively few manuscripts that remained unpublished. This material was also used in the preparation of his lectures to his students, portions of which are occasionally present.

This series is arranged into two sections, “research notes” and “research files”. The first section begins with bibliographic material in the form of card indices of books and articles consulted, along with bibliographic notes. These are followed by research notes taken from the archival and printed sources Professor Munro consulted. The notes include a vast amount and range of information, some of it specific data and some analytical, that he assembled during general research and on his many research trips.

The “research notes” were used for many purposes, including compiling the “research files”. These contain hundreds of tables, charts, maps, and overheads, along with notes, some correspondence and copies of archival material, elements of printed sources, and drafts of manuscripts. Duplicates, where identified, have been removed and destroyed. Some of the files contain photocopies of original material, which have been retained where the originals could not be located.

Manuscripts and publications

Professor Helleiner is the author or editor of 18 books, over 100 refereed articles and contributions to volumes, even more non-refereed publications, many book reviews, and some letters to the editor. This series does not contain a complete record of his output or copies of all of his manuscripts. Some files may contain a comprehensive record of the writing of a particular piece, including correspondence with colleagues (Professor Helleiner habitually ran his drafts by them) and/or publishers, contracts, notes and notebooks, drafts of manuscripts and comments on them, offprints, reviews, and royalty statements. Others may contain only the contract, perhaps a letter or two, or a review, but no manuscripts or offprints.

Some of Professor Helleiner's writing have been translated into other languages, including French, Italian, Japanese, Norwegian, Spanish, and Swedish.

For the three WIDER volumes that Professor Helleiner edited and for which he wrote introductions and/or chapters, see Series 6.

World Institute for Development Economics Research (WIDER)

In 1984 the director of the World Institute for Development Economics Research (WIDER), newly established by the United Nations University (UNU) and based in Helsinki, invited scholars, of whom Professor Helleiner was one, to organize interesting research projects using WIDER’s funds and under its auspices. The following year, Helleiner, along with Lance Taylor and others, began to develop a research programme on international economic issues and helped organize a high level conference to flesh out its direction. The programme that emerged involved papers on 18 developing countries, the summary volume of which appeared in 1988.

By 1990, Professor Helleiner had assembled a number of developing country authors and empirically-oriented trade/development analysts to work out a research project on trade and industrialization policies. It produced two books which he edited and for which he wrote the introductions. The first, on trade and industrialization reconsidered, appeared as Trade policy and industrialization in turbulent times in 1994. Papers presented at the WIDER conferences on ‘trade and industrialization’ held in Ottawa in September 1991 and on ‘Trade and industrialization reconsidered’ held in Paris in August the same year formed the basis of this volume. Papers on Nigeria, Pakistan and Zimbabwe were not received in time for inclusion in it. A second, shorter volume, containing only five country studies but built on the work of the first, appeared in 1995 as Manufacturing for export in the developing world: problems and possibilities.

A second WIDER project, on new trade theories and industrialization in the developing countries, was begun in 1988 and published as Trade policy, industrialization and development: new perspectives in 1992.

The third project, on non-traditional exporting from Africa, focused on the following countries: Burkino Fasso, Côte d’Ivoire, Ghana, Kenya., Mauritius, South Africa, Tanzania, Uganda and Zimbabwe, with comparative studies on Chile and Costa Rica. Professor Helleiner worked closely with the African Economic Research Consortium’s (AERC) trade liberalization project and with the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD). The project began in July 1996 and ran until late 1999. Papers were presented at a joint UNU/WIDER meeting in Kampala, Uganda, in June 1997 and they were subsequently reworked into chapters for the book, Non-traditional export promotion in Africa: experience and issues, which appeared in 2002. The series ends with a proposed project on the United Nations and the Breton Woods Institutions.

This series contains correspondence, memoranda, notes, minutes of meetings, conference material, drafts of papers, reports and publications.

Professional associations and posts

The records in this series document Professor Helleiner’s association with and involvement in several dozen professional associations and organizations, including consulting contracts with governments and educational bodies. There are also files on many of the journals with which he was associated (he sat on the editorial boards of more than twenty at one time or another, one (World Development) for more than thirty years. Most of the latter contain his comments on papers he was asked to assess. There are also files on some conferences that he attended.

The files contain correspondence, memoranda, notes, minutes of meetings and proceedings of workshops, reports (many written by Helleiner), conference programmes and papers, the occasional interview, and selected newsletters and press clippings. The arrangement is by name of organization or event, filed alphabetically.

The most extensive files are on the following organizations, the binding thread being development economics: African Capacity Building Foundation and the African Economic Research Consortium; with officials and politicians of the Government of Canada and about the Canadian International Development Agency; the Commonwealth Secretariat, the International Development Research Centre (IDRC), and International Lawyers and Economists Against Poverty (ILEAP); the North South Institute, the Overseas Development Council (USA), and the North South Roundtable of the Society for International Development (UK); various activities relating to trade and investment in South Africa (including early opposition to it), and ongoing activities in Tanzania (see below); numerous bodies associated with the United Nations (especially UNICEF and UNCTAD); several universities (Dar es Salaam, Sussex, and the West Indies); the World Bank, and World Development.

The International Development Research Centre (IDRC), founded in Ottawa in 1970, was mandated to support research on the reduction of global poverty and particularly research in (as well as for) developing countries.” It was initially headed by David Hopper, with whom Professor Helleiner worked on the creation of the North-South Institute in 1975-1976. He sat on the Board of the IDRC from 1985 to 1991.

ILEAP grew out of concerns Professor Helleiner raised in his Prebisch lecture at UNCTAD in December, 2000 about the lack of lawyers (and economists) “committed…to the specially defence of the rights of the poorest in the global economy’s legal system and the building of their capacity of defend themselves.” His call was taken up by Ron Daniels, dean of Law at the U of T, and others, with initial funding from the IDRC.

Professor Helleiner’s long association with Tanzania is well documented here, beginning in 1978 with the Government of Tanzania Task Force on Export Incentive Schemes, followed by the Tanzania Advisory Group (“Three Wise Men”) in 1981 and ending,
between 1994 and 2000, with the Group of Independent Advisors on Development Cooperation Issues Between Tanzania and its Aid Donors (which Helleiner chaired) and the associated Tanzania Advisory Strategy.

Additional correspondence on many of these organizations may be found filed under the names of the individual members in Series 2: Correspondence, an example being Roy Culpepper of the North-South Institute.

Of the more than twenty editorial boards on which Professor Helleiner sat, the most extensive files are for International Organization and WorldDevelopment. The files together contain primarily specially ng relating to his membership on editorial boards and/or his appraisals of papers presented to the respective journals. Some related correspondence may be found in ‘Series 2: Correspondence’ under the names of editorial board members.

Professor Helleiner’s involvement with the Intergovernmental Group of Twenty-four on International Monetary Affairs (Group of 24 or G-24) is documented in Series 7 and with WIDER (World Institute for Development Economic Research) in Series 6.

In his curriculum vitae [B2010-0005/001(01) and /019(05)], Professor Helleiner provides lists of “Journal editorial boards”, “Other professional honours and posts”, and “sample selected research contracts and consultancies”. Researchers will find these lists very useful in gaining an understanding of the breadth of Professor Helleiner’s professional activities, while some indication of the depth of his involvement can be gleaned from his memoirs, Listening and learning [B2010-0005/079(02)].

Published works

Series consists of published works written and collected by Nouwen during his lifetime. Although there are some of his earliest writings dating from 1956, the series is predominantly dating from 1970 to 1996.

The series has been arranged in the following ten sub-series taking into account the author(s), subject(s), and format of the records:

1.9.1. Articles by Nouwen
1.9.2. Articles co-authored by Nouwen
1.9.3. Interviews of and articles about Nouwen
1.9.4. Book reviews
1.9.5. Scrapbook 1956-1965
1.9.6. Scrapbook 1965-1982
1.9.7. Books by Nouwen
1.9.8. Books contributed to by Nouwen
1.9.9. Books about Nouwen
1.9.10. Guides

A more detailed description of each sub-series, as well as each subseries arrangement can be found in the sub-series descriptions.

Academia and teaching materials

This series documents some of Professor Bay’s academic and associated activities. It includes teaching material (reading lists, syllabi, lectures, and exams) and his work within academia (committee work, appraisals and references, and departmental involvement) at the various universities where he taught. The files on “referees and appraisals” at the University of Toronto include references for academics and students and comments on books and articles forwarded to him for his input. Also included are files on the proposal to abolish the death penalty in California and, in particular, the attempt to stop the execution of convicted murderer and rapist, Caryl Chessman; and copies of "Key List Mailing: Selected Documents of Current and Lasting Interest in the Civil Rights Movement", a biweekly publication produced by the San Francisco Regional Office of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC).

Additional material related to academia and teaching material may be located in the correspondence series. Material related to his research in addresses and publications is located in the publications series. Material related to his involvement in professional associations can be found in the professional association series.

Biographical and personal records

The series consists of biographical and personal records of Professor Bay. The material reflects his personal life, and includes press clippings, articles, and a thesis about him; personal documents such as educational records; documents of identification; personal papers related to life events (baptism, marriage, home ownership, inheritance, death certificates); calendars and a condolence scrapbook.

The arrangement of the material begins with biographical information (press clippings, biographies, curriculum vitae, referees, work about Bay), then personal papers, followed by what he termed “his personal collection”, consisting of items primarily in Norwegian relating to his family and Norway generally. The most intriguing portion of this “collection” is the folders of “illegal papers” [/002(28) – (30)] that Professor Bay buried when he hurriedly left Norway early in World War II and which he dug up sometime after he returned. There are also books about Norwegian resistance, and two books by his uncle.

Wilderness Research Foundation

During the late 1980s the future of the Quetico-Superior Wilderness Research Center at Mukluk Bay, Minnesota was very much in question. The Wilderness Research Foundation, which sponsored it, was assessing its future at a time when its founder was withdrawing from active participation prior to his death in December, 1988. Dr. Solandt was initially a member of the Advisory Committee to the Board of the Foundation and later a member of the Board. He pressed for the continuation of wilderness research at Mukluk Bay and left the Board in 1991 only when he felt that this would be achieved.

The correspondence, minutes, memoranda and reports written by Dr. Solandt and others, along with articles and institutional reports, clearly document the relationship between the Foundation and the Center, the work done by the latter, the problems it faced, and the policies that were developed in an attempt to save it.

Canada/Newfoundland Royal Commission on the Ocean Ranger Marine Disaster

When the Ocean Ranger oil rig tipped over in the Atlantic on 15 April, 1982, it set in motion an inquiry which involved two royal commissions, one federal and the other provincial (Newfoundland) which, due to a public outcry, were forced to amalgamate. David Grenville, secretary of the Commission, drew on advice from Dr. Solandt for the second volume of the report, which addressed safety on the oil rigs. An important part of this exercise was the convening of a conference in St. John

Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical/International Centre for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT)

The Centro Internactional de Agricultura Tropical was founded by the Rockefeller Institute in 1967 in Cali, Columbia. In 1982 a massive fraud was discovered within the organization, with the result that the World Bank in 1984 retained Omond Solandt to conduct a management review of the Centre.

The files in this series provide a good picture of the conduct of the External Management Review and of its results. Included are the Review Team

West African Rice Development Association (WARDA)

The initial aim of WARDA was to have an entirely native West African organization that would apply the latest in rice technology to the problems peculiar to their area, but political interference meant that WARDA never functioned effectively. By the end of 1986, with CGIAR having resolved to continue its support of the organization, Omond Solandt was asked to coach those involved in it on how to operate within a CG style of centre. In 1987 he made three trips to Africa and, while there and in subsequent meetings, worked to ensure that an effective structure and Board were put in place. His official involvement with WARDA ended about August, 1987.

The correspondence, minutes, background papers, reports, photographs and publications provide detailed information about the problems WARDA faced and the problems Solandt and others encountered in resolving them.

Canadian Forestry Advisory Council

While Dr. Solandt was working on his report for the PPRIC, it became apparent that the amount of forestry research being done in Canada was declining every year. Pierre Gendron proposed that the CFAC should commission a quick survey of the volume of forestry research being done in every agency that could be located in Canada. A Steering Committee was created to execute the study, which was carried out by Dr. Solandt in 1979.

The correspondence, notes, minutes, memoranda, reports, drafts of reports, and replies to questionnaires document the procedures and methodology that Dr. Solandt undertook in preparing his report.

IMASCO/CDC Research Foundation

Late in 1978 Murray Koffler asked Omond Solandt to serve on the Scientific Advisory Committee for the IMASCO/CDC Research Foundation which he had recently established. Solandt stayed until its last farewell luncheon on 25 November, 1985.

The Committee generated a great volume of paper but Dr. Solandt was very selective in what he retained, keeping only significant correspondence, minutes, and some reports. These records provide a bird

International Centre for Insect Physiology and Ecology (ICIPE)

ICIPE, based in Nairobi, is one of two important international research centres (the other is WARDA) whose origins lie in the native populations of the area in which they operate. Late in 1976, Omond Solandt was asked to join the Board of ICIPE, which was badly in need of help in management. He formally took his seat in June, 1977 and the reorganization that he engineered addressed problems of efficiency, a lingering colonial mentality, and the appointment of a new chair. A financial crisis forced Solandt to assume the duties as chair in April, 1982, a position he retained for a year. He remained actively associated with ICIPE until 1987 and in 1989 was a one of the founders of its Honorary Alumni Association.

The correspondence, minutes, background papers, reports, programs, publications and photoprints and slides provide a thorough documentation of the complex problems that Dr. Solandt faced at ICIPE, the progress that was made in resolving them, and the impact of many individuals involved in it, especially its founder, Dr. Tom Odhiambo.

University of Toronto. Institute for Environmental Studies

Beginning in 1975, when he left Mitchell Plummer, Dr. Solandt was offered an office at the Institute for Environmental Studies at the University of Toronto by its director, Ken Hare. Although he had to give up his office at the end of 1977, he remained as a consultant, with special interest in the Arctic Program and in toxicology.

The correspondence, notes, minutes, memoranda and reports in this series provide a good overview of the development of certain policies within the Institute and, in particular, the issues associated with establishing an Environmental Health Secretariat at the University of Toronto.

International Centre for Research in Dry Areas (ICARDA)

In July of 1975 Dr. Solandt was hired as a consultant to help in the establishment of ICARDA in the Middle East. He was elected as Vice-Chairman of the Board in January, 1976 and remained a member of it until 1981. During this time he carried out numerous duties. As Senior Consultant he was the chief executive officer for ongoing activity. A prominent part of his duties was to recommend to the ICARDA subcommittee specific sites for ICARDA research stations in Lebanon, Syria and Iran. Visits were made and reports written though, in the case of Iran, they were not acted upon. In 1977 he advised the selection committee on the choice of a new Director-General for ICARDA.

This series includes correspondence, background files, memoranda, minutes, reports, site selection reports, maps, press coverage, pamphlets, publications, and a plaque that document in detail Dr. Solandt

International Centre for Diarrhoeal Diseases Research, Bangladesh (ICDDRB)

Dr. Solandt was a member of the original Board of ICDDRB, which inaugurated the new organization to replace the Cholera Research Centre in 1979, and remained on it until 1982. While there he took considerable interest in the financial management of the Centre, and was also concerned with maintaining its international status.

This series contains detailed correspondence, minutes, memoranda and reports documenting the problems that ICDDRB faced and the limited success that was met by Dr. Solandt and others in addressing them. Dr. Solandt

International Federation of Institutes for Advanced Study (IFIAS)

IFIAS was founded in Sweden in 1972 and Solandt, who had been involved in some of the early planning, was appointed to a panel of Special Advisors. Although he was never very active, he gave specific advice when asked. One of his principal contributions was to get the University of Toronto involved in IFIAS through the Institute of Environmental Studies, the first university to receive membership in it. Although his term as Special Advisor ended in 1985, he strongly opposed the move of the headquarters of IFIAS to Canada the following year.

While Dr. Solandt did not keep much of the mass of paper IFIAS produced, the correspondence, minutes, briefs, reports, and publications in this series provide a summary of its activities during his association with it.

Northwest Territories. Science Advisory Board

Dr. Solandt was the founding chair of the Science Advisory Board, serving between 1976 and 1983. Included is correspondence and minutes of meetings of the Science Advisory Board, 1976-1983; drafts of its publications and reports, 1978-1983; correspondence and reports relating to conferences, task forces, and studies commissioned by the Science Advisory Board or in which it was interested.

Centro Internacional de Majorimiente de Maiz y Trigo/International Maize And Wheat Improvement Centre (CIMMYT)

Dr. Solandt was appointed to the Board of CIMMYT in 1976 and remained for ten years, until April, 1986. One his last official acts was to participate in the selection of a new Director-General. He also sat on the Board of another of the CGIAR centres, ICARDA, and two that were similar but not part of CGIAR, the International Centre for Insect Physiology and Ecology in Nairobi and the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Diseases Research in Dhaka, Bangladesh. His experience in CIMMYT was central to all this involvement. After he retired from the Board, he conducted, in April, 1988, a brief management review of the organization as a prelude to a more extensive review by CGIAR later in the year.

This series contains correspondence, agenda books for Board meetings, notes, notices, memo-randa, drafts of reports and reviews, other reports and publications, programs and photoprints that provide detailed coverage of the functions of the organization and Solandt

Canadian National Railways

In the latter months of 1955, Omond Solandt began arranging his departure from the Defence Research Board to take up the position of Vice-President, Research and Development of Canadian National Railways, a position he held from 1 March, 1956 to 1 July, 1963.

This series contains correspondence, addresses, press clippings, reports, articles and photoprints (see Series 46) relating largely to the scientific research carried out by the Research and Development Department.

De Havilland Aircraft of Canada Ltd.

Upon leaving Canadian National in 1963, Dr. Solandt became Vice-President, Research and Development for and a director of de Havilland and Hawker-Siddeley Canada Ltd., and Chairman of the Board of DCF Systems Ltd. At the time he left de Havilland in 1966 he was Vice-President, Research and Planning.

This series contains correspondence, diaries, memoranda, and reports relating to his activities with these companies and their parent company, the Hawker Siddeley Group of Great Britain.

Electric Reduction Company of Canada Ltd.

From de Havilland, Dr. Solandt moved on to the position of Vice-Chair of the Electric Reduction Company of Canada (later ERCO), a subsidiary of Allbright & Wilson Ltd. of England, which he held from 1965 until 31 December, 1970.

This series contains correspondence, press clippings, articles, minutes, memoranda, reports, and photoprints.

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