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Archival description
University of Toronto Archives and Records Management Services Series
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Filmmaking

This series contains the original film elements for several films made by Kay Armatage.
There are also files documenting this facet of her career including correspondence, film proposals, research notes, clippings, grant applications, budget reports, shot lists and scripts. Several files document her films Striptease, Storytelling and Artist on Fire, as well as Prof. Armatage’s attempt at writing and directing a film about Nell Shipman which did not go beyond development.

Photographs in this series include shots taken during the production of several of her films. There is one file documenting the filming of Storytelling which includes shots of Northrop Frye in New York City. There are also three contact sheets by Babette Mangolte taken during the making of Artist on Fire, with views of Joyce Weiland’s Toronto studio and home. The series also contains one file of printing plates used in the creation of publicity material for Prof. Armatage’s early film Jill Johnson, October 1975.

Film

This series consists of five films made by Dr. Black. Four are home movies documenting his children, Davy and Nevitt; one is of the Summer Palace and Elliott Smith in Peking in 1930.

Audio and visual material

Series consists of audio and video material that documents Prof. Venkatacharya’s community activity, teaching, and family life. Video recordings capture Venkatacharya’s presentations, many of these given at community centres and individuals’ homes. The topics of these talks generally focus on spiritual texts and understanding, though also include some academic presentations, including an event at the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library. Other videos document the community involvement of both Prof. Venkatacharya and his wife, Vijaya. These include an event recognizing the contributions of Venkatacharya to the Hindu Institute of Learning, the organization’s fundraising initiatives, as well as Diwali celebrations at the AWIC Community and Social Services. Home recordings of family gatherings are also included in the material.

Professional organizations, associations and societies

This series documents Dr. Mastromatteo’s participation in organizations, associations and societies. These groups pertain mainly to medicine, occupational health and safety, and labour conditions. The largest amounts of material are from the Ontario Medical Association, the International Labor Office, the Industrial Accident Prevention Association, the Canadian Public Health Association, the Canadian Medical Association, and the Atomic Energy Control Board.

Records in this series include notes, drafts, papers, correspondence, minutes, reports and memoranda.

Sound and moving image material

This series is mainly films made by Rappaport relating to the liver. Some titles include: Pathologic Circulation in the Mammalian Liver, The Effects of Mouse Hepatitis Virus on the Microcirculation of the Liver (2 copies on video), Experimental Hepatic Vino-Occlusive Disease, and Normal Circulation of the Mammalian Liver. All films are 16mm format, color and usually silent. Duration of films are from 6 to 30 minutes .

Biographical and personal

This series contains passports, daily agendas (58 volumes) and an address book, as well as files relating to the Banff School of Fine Arts, Professor Peers’ academic life, awards that he received and books that he wrote. Also included are a class photograph of the East Coulee School where Peers taught and was principal from 1939-1942, personal correspondence, photographs of Peers with friends, travel documents and records relating to his 90th birthday and the memorial service held upon his death. The series concludes with a file of records relating to David Rayside, a U of T professor and close friend of Peers.

The “biographical information” file [/003(04)] contains, amongst many other items, several pieces that Professor Peers himself penned between 1980 and 2002 about his family and background and his years as a high school teacher. Included with this is a CD from one of his nieces, Bev Swanton, titled “Acadia Valley Homecoming 2012”, that celebrates the hamlet, the surrounding farms (including that of the Peers family) and includes the centennial parade.

Moving images

"Human Rights and the Helsinki Process", afternoon session, 2-4 pm, Association for the Advancement of Baltic
studies, 8 November 1986.

Videos

‘After the Velvet Revolution’. Berkeley, CA: Moira Productions, 1992. VHS video. Skilling acted as a consultant on this production.

Faculty of Law activities

This series is divided into two sub-series, ‘Activities’ and ‘Correspondence with students’. The first sub-series contains correspondence, memoranda, notes, reports, and lecture material documenting Professor Friedland’s activities within the faculty and the faculty’s affairs generally. The ‘course’ files contain Professor Friedland’s outlines, notes, assignments and examinations for his course in criminal law. There are also files on the publications, Faculty of Law Review and Nexus. The remaining files in this sub-series relate primarily to Professor Friedland’s activities with the ‘Class of 5T8’s fortieth anniversary reunion in 1998 and to the Faculty’s fiftieth anniversary celebrations in 1999-2000. This sub-series ends with files on Professor Friedland’s 1997 report on the grading practices policy at the Faculty and on the Faculty’s marks scandal in 2001.

The records in this sub-series contain correspondence, memoranda and notes and reports; class outlines, assignments and other material; minutes of meetings for anniversary celebrations, along with programmes and publications (including drafts), sheet music and songs, and a video, notices, press releases and press clippings.

The second sub-series, ‘Correspondence with students’, contains correspondence, memoranda, curriculum vitae (but not student transcripts and marks, which have been removed), greeting cards, postcards and the occasional offprint relating primarily to references requested from Professor Friedland, and a file of memorabilia.

Most of the reference requests relate to applications for graduate school, academic appointments, and positions in legal firms and for clerkships in the Supreme Court of Canada and other courts. Others relate to academic honours – awards, prizes and scholarships. Some of the files also contain correspondence relating to courses taken and theses supervised, though most of this type of correspondence is located in ‘Series III.: Correspondence’ above. Some of the requests are more prosaic, such as asking Professor Friedland to sign passport applications and photos. Also included are memos from Professor Friedland to officials in the Faculty of Law, such as the summer student co-ordinator, about specific students. In their letters, these students and former students provide information about their current activities which sometimes have taken them far afield, examples being the Rwanda genocide case, the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia, and legal work in Japan.

Personal and biographical

Series consists of records documenting Prof. Friedland’s career including aspects of its development as well as professional achievements. Files include job applications, tenure assessment, correspondence regarding cross appointments and research leaves, advocacy work, and biographical material. Also included are awards, correspondence, and presentation material related to honors presented to Prof. Friedland.

Canada. Canadian Officers' Training Corps, University of Toronto Contingent

This series consists of the financial and administrative records of the Board of Trustees, including photographs of special events. It also includes documentation of a project to publish the history of the COTC that was never completed. Spencer subsequently wrote his own history of the COTC, the notes and correspondence of which are included under Series 10: Publications.

Photographs and media

This series contains photographs, glass latern slides, photographic slides and a collection of reel to reel films belonging to MacIntosh. Most of the media covers MacIntosh’s professional life: surgical images, patient photographs, procedure documentation and lecture and statistical slides. There are also a small number of personal and family photographic slides which document various family trips and events. Also included is a set of photographs of the HMS Philante, the escort vessel which MacIntosh served on with Royal Navy during the Second World War.

Wilderness Research Foundation

During the late 1980s the future of the Quetico-Superior Wilderness Research Center at Mukluk Bay, Minnesota was very much in question. The Wilderness Research Foundation, which sponsored it, was assessing its future at a time when its founder was withdrawing from active participation prior to his death in December, 1988. Dr. Solandt was initially a member of the Advisory Committee to the Board of the Foundation and later a member of the Board. He pressed for the continuation of wilderness research at Mukluk Bay and left the Board in 1991 only when he felt that this would be achieved.

The correspondence, minutes, memoranda and reports written by Dr. Solandt and others, along with articles and institutional reports, clearly document the relationship between the Foundation and the Center, the work done by the latter, the problems it faced, and the policies that were developed in an attempt to save it.

Honours and Awards

The series documents the honours and awards received by Francess Halpenny during her career. It also documents the lectures and seminars she gave as Distinguished Visitor at the University of Alberta in 1989.

The series consists of 20 files including correspondence, ceremony proceedings, diplomas, convocation addresses, personal notes and press clippings. The series also contains 92 photographs of Halpenny taken during various convocation ceremonies or with dignitaries.

Sound and Moving Images

Sound recordings and video document Prof. Lee’s research. Reel to reel tapes contain interviews, testimonies with !Kung San bushmen, talks given by Lee on this very topic, taped vocabulary lists of the !Kung San people’s language, native music from Botswana and one radio interview with Prof. Lee. Two videos document a discussion among women academics on the role of women in a hunter and gatherer society. Finally two tapes contain a partial recording of the symposium of Political Struggles of Native Peoples, organized by Prof. Lee in 1972.

Center for Early Learning and Child Care, Inc.

In 1985 Dr. Fowler incorporated his own consulting and educational not for profit company to “…conduct and disseminate research and information about early childhood education”. Based in Cambridge, Massachusetts, Dr. Fowler was president and his daughter Velia as Treasurer. His other daughters, Monique and Josephine, along with his wife, Neva were also involved as directors of the company.

Records in this series consist of administrative files relating to incorporation, correspondence, film scripts, and other files relating to projects conducted in the 1980s and 1990s in particular the production of both the book and videos entitled Talking from infancy. How to nurture & cultivate early language development, and Little Neva learns to talk, other talks and presentations.

Mothercraft –OISE project

In 1968, Dr. Fowler headed up a research team in a joint Canadian Mothercraft Society (CMS) – OISE study to determine the effects of quality child care on disadvantaged children. This two-year joint study formed the basis upon which the Early Childhood Education (ECE) curriculum was written. In particular it involved the development of a model infant day care centre for disadvantaged children from four months to two and one half years of age. It also included a follow up study conducted by Dr. Fowler in 1973-1974.

This series documents this joint study with Mothercraft in general and Dr.Fowler’s role in particular. It includes minutes of meetings of the Board of Mothercraft, and the OISE research staff, correspondence with Mothercraft officials, OISE faculty and staff, municipal, federal and provincial governments, private foundations (like the Atkinson Foundation, Laidlaw Foundation), research proposals, budget and publicity files, papers and progress reports. Also included is the film script for “Joint OISE-Mothercraft Infant Demonstration Program” with text of Dr. Fowler’s commentary (1973).

This series also includes film elements including original negative, sound track and release print to the OISE produced film A Demonstration Program on Infant Care and Education in which Dr. Fowler describes the OISE Infant care and education program and Mothercraft Society with emphasis on learning through play.

Teaching

Dr. Fowler was associated with several universities in the United States and Canada as researcher, administrator and teacher. This series documents his teaching activities from his time as a graduate student and professor at the University of Chicago, through his academic career at OISE and at Tufts University, and in his later career as a consultant. Files contain lecture notes, course materials, and correspondence. He also maintained an ongoing correspondence with many of his students from his years at OISE, providing advice, references and support as they continued their academic careers.

Film

Over several decades, Clara Benson took numerous rolls of 16 mm film documenting her family, her trips, as well as life in Toronto especially during World War II, the University of Toronto and various events. Her collection includes some unique footage of women’s sports at the University of Toronto, convocation ceremonies in the 1940s, and skating shows, one of which identified Barbara Ann Scott. From her trips, there is interesting footage of Egypt and Greece in the late 1920s, the New York World Fair and South America in 1939 as well as Atlantic City in the late 1940s. There are several small rolls of film documenting military parades on the streets of Toronto as well as the Royal Visit of 1939 and 1959.

Film

Film entitled "Undergraduates Presentation and Farewell to Sir Robert Falconer". This is a black and white silent film showing the presentation of a gift book to President Falconer in Convocation Hall.

Film

Film related to milling and refining methods of minerals used more than likely for course instruction in Mining Engineering.

Graphic material and film

Files in this series contain photographs, and graphic materials relating to Gallie’s professional and personal life. Many of the photographs are miscellaneous figures and graphics that may have been used in papers, lectures, and talks. This series also includes a film of one of Gallie’s operations. The files in this series have been arranged chronologically.

Teaching

The records in this series relate to Professor Careless’ teaching activities at the University of Toronto. Between 1945 and 1992, Professor Careless taught various undergraduate and graduate courses on historiography, early Canadian history, urban history, and metropolitanism, The records in this series predominantly consist of mark books, 1945 to 1992. Also included are some course outlines and lecture notes. There is also a Department of History promotional film, created circa late 1950’s, with gratuitous and graphic scenes of Professor Careless at Flavelle House.

Addresses and interviews

Dr. Hastings was much in demand as a public speaker throughout his career. In the early 1960s, for example, he often gave more than one a week and by the late 1990s he himself estimated that he had given well over 1,000 addresses. While the majority were delivered at academic and professional gatherings, he also made time to speak at community events, including graduation exercises.

This series contains lists of addresses, correspondence, notes, drafts of addresses, and, often, press coverage. The arrangement is chronological, with correspondence for which accompanying addresses have not survived being arranged in separate files. There is a substantial file of this type for 1963. Interviews are filed at the end of the addresses.

The earliest extant address is his first professional foray on the international scene, at the American Public Health Association conference in October 1954. The theme was administrative practice in relation to the quality of medical care provided under the Ontario Workmen’s Compensation Board. This address and subsequent ones follow the major themes laid out in the earlier series, especially Series 7. Those that were published are filed, for the most part, in Series 7. Some of the addresses are indicated in Appendix 2, which includes entries up to 1994.

After his retirement, Dr. Hastings’ addresses continued to focus primarily on public and community health issues. One, in 1994, was given on the occasion of the tenth anniversary of the Charles Hastings Co-operative, named after his great-uncle, Toronto’s innovative and pioneering medical officer of health. On another occasion, he spoke about the future of community health centres to the International Conference on Community Health Centres in Montreal (December 1995).

While President of the Canadian Public Health Association in 1996-1997, he travelled widely and was much in demand as a speaker. Four venues included a reception in his honour in Winnipeg, the second National Conference on Communicable Disease Control in Toronto, the World Health Organization’s Intersectional Action for Health conference in Halifax, and the annual general meeting of the Northwest Territories branch of the CPHA in Yellowknife. In 1999, after many years of long distance communication, he flew to Manitoba to address the Hamiota District Health Centre Foundation, and in November was a keynote speaker at the 50th annual conference of the Ontario Public Health Association.

In June 2000, at the annual meeting of the Association of Ontario Health Centres, Dr. Hastings reflected on a turning point in his career in his address, “The Hastings Report – then and now”. This is followed by an address delivered at the opening in October 2001 of the Institute of Population and Health, one of four Toronto-based Institutes of Health Research.

The series concludes with three interviews, one on CBC’s radio and television “Citizen’s Forum” in 1960, a ‘telepole’ on CFTO TV in 1962, and an interview with Jan Brown in February 1997.

Other activities

The records in this series underscore the impact of an upbringing where the tenets of Christianity, public service, and duty were emphasized. They begin with thirty years (1937-1969) of files on Camp Kagawong, a privately owned boy’s camp on Balsam Lake, where Dr. Hastings spent his summers as a young boy enjoying the outdoors. The leadership qualities he displayed led to his becoming a camp counsellor (1944-1945) and, from 1946-1950, director of the Bantam Section and instructor in nature, first aid, swimming and games. During those years he dramatized three folk tales for presentation. At the weekly chapel services, he often delivered homilies or ‘sermonettes’, a practice he continued throughout his association with the camp that closed in 1975. Dr. Hastings’ activities at Camp Kagawong are well documented through notes, certificates, correspondence (much of which is in Series 3) scripts for theatrical presentations, chapel service programs and sermonettes, and some of the annual camp catalogues, photographs and artifacts. The arrangement of the files is largely chronological.

The material on Camp Kagawong is followed by files on Canadian Council of Churches and its Vellore/Ludhiana Committee, of which Dr. Hastings was a member from 1962-1975 and to which he was an advisor from 1975 to 1981. These are followed by files on the Christian Medical College in Vellore, India, including extensive ones documenting the work of the international review team that visited Vellore in 1979 and produced a report on its findings in 1980.

Next are files on the coronation of Queen Elizabeth in 1953; the Developing Countries Farm Radio Network, of which Dr. Hastings was a member of the board; Emmanuel College, where he was a University representative on its council and a member of its curriculum committee; the King’s College Fund which in 1985 organized a Canadian study tour of health services in Britain; and on Pickering College in Newmarket, Ontario. A member of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada, Dr. Hastings was active in its youth clubs in the 1940s. He attended the 1948 convention at which George Drew was selected leader and took part in the federal election the following year.

Dr. Hastings’ place of worship for many years was St. Andrew’s United Church at 117 Bloor Street East in Toronto. He played a very active role in its affairs, serving on its board, many of its committees, was a member of its Men’s Club and, on occasion, delivered the sermon of the week. The files cover the years from 1952 to 1973, when St. Andrew’s and the Yonge Street United Church amalgamated and include correspondence, notices of services, minutes of meetings, reports, and drafts of three sermons.

This series ends with a number of files on Dr. Hastings’ involvement in several activities of the United Church of Canada, centring around his being a member of its task force on health services (1985-1987) and its Division of Mission in Canada’s health task group (1991-1994). Included are correspondence, minutes, memoranda, notes, drafts of reports, and a video, “Taking the pulse of Canadian health care” that grew out of the work of the health task group.

Broadcasting and film

Prof. Hume and Prof. Donald Ivey of the Department of Physics were pioneers in educational television, having developed their first 12 part program “Focus on Physics” in 1958. This was co-sponsored by CBC and the University of Toronto. The success of this series was followed up the next year by “Two for Physics”. Both series eventually aired on the National Educational Television (N.E.T.) in the United States. Other programs that followed include:

1960 – 15 short programs on Physics for children produced by CBC in cooperation with N.E.T. for joint use in Canada and United States

1962 – “The Ideas of Physics” – 4 programmes
1963 – “The Nature of Physics” – 5 programmes
1966 – “The Constant of Physics” – 4 programmes
All of these were for in-school broadcasts to Canadian high schools produced by CBC with the National Advisory Council on School Broadcasts

1960-1965 – 18 programmes for “The Nature of Things”, produced by CBC.
The program “The Nature of Things” is still today a staple of Canadian educational television. Hume and Ivey helped lay the foundation for such a successful broadcast run.

By 1960, their success in educational television spilled over into film where they were commissioned by the Physical Science Study Committee (PSSC) in the United States to do four films: “Frames of Reference”, “Periodic Motion”, “Universal Gravitation” and “Random Events”. All of these were created for distribution in high schools. In 1962, “Frames of Reference” won Edison Foundation award for the best science film and “Random Events” received a silver medal from the Scientific Institute in Rome.

This series contains a fairly complete set of scripts for all the titles noted above. Moreover, there is a 16 mm release print for each of the four films and one sound recording of one program from “The Constant of Physics” series. There are also still images from “Frame of Reference” and a file on the Edison Award.

For a good overview, researchers should begin by consulting reports written by Hume and Ivey for most of the television series. They detail the development of each theme. In addition, there is correspondence and contracts with CBC, correspondence with Educational Services Incorporated and the PSSC as well as program guides, clippings, published reviews, correspondence from viewers, and one 1962 audience response report for a “Nature of Things” programme.