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Dunlap Family fonds

  • UTA 1228
  • Fonds
  • 1931

Video cassette of Dunlap Family home movie of the Royal Visit of Japanese Prince and Princes Takamatsu at their home, 93 Highland Ave., May 1931. VHS format

Dunlap Family

Edgar Vaar fonds

  • UTA 1920
  • Fonds
  • [196-]

Reels of 16 mm film, approx. 3000 ft in total, documenting Canadian and University of Toronto track teams competing at meets. Vaar took the film as a freelance cameraman. Much of the footage was sold to the CBC for news items.

Vaar, Edgar

Broadcasting and film

Prof. Hume and Prof. Donald Ivey of the Department of Physics were pioneers in educational television, having developed their first 12 part program “Focus on Physics” in 1958. This was co-sponsored by CBC and the University of Toronto. The success of this series was followed up the next year by “Two for Physics”. Both series eventually aired on the National Educational Television (N.E.T.) in the United States. Other programs that followed include:

1960 – 15 short programs on Physics for children produced by CBC in cooperation with N.E.T. for joint use in Canada and United States

1962 – “The Ideas of Physics” – 4 programmes
1963 – “The Nature of Physics” – 5 programmes
1966 – “The Constant of Physics” – 4 programmes
All of these were for in-school broadcasts to Canadian high schools produced by CBC with the National Advisory Council on School Broadcasts

1960-1965 – 18 programmes for “The Nature of Things”, produced by CBC.
The program “The Nature of Things” is still today a staple of Canadian educational television. Hume and Ivey helped lay the foundation for such a successful broadcast run.

By 1960, their success in educational television spilled over into film where they were commissioned by the Physical Science Study Committee (PSSC) in the United States to do four films: “Frames of Reference”, “Periodic Motion”, “Universal Gravitation” and “Random Events”. All of these were created for distribution in high schools. In 1962, “Frames of Reference” won Edison Foundation award for the best science film and “Random Events” received a silver medal from the Scientific Institute in Rome.

This series contains a fairly complete set of scripts for all the titles noted above. Moreover, there is a 16 mm release print for each of the four films and one sound recording of one program from “The Constant of Physics” series. There are also still images from “Frame of Reference” and a file on the Edison Award.

For a good overview, researchers should begin by consulting reports written by Hume and Ivey for most of the television series. They detail the development of each theme. In addition, there is correspondence and contracts with CBC, correspondence with Educational Services Incorporated and the PSSC as well as program guides, clippings, published reviews, correspondence from viewers, and one 1962 audience response report for a “Nature of Things” programme.

Other activities

The records in this series underscore the impact of an upbringing where the tenets of Christianity, public service, and duty were emphasized. They begin with thirty years (1937-1969) of files on Camp Kagawong, a privately owned boy’s camp on Balsam Lake, where Dr. Hastings spent his summers as a young boy enjoying the outdoors. The leadership qualities he displayed led to his becoming a camp counsellor (1944-1945) and, from 1946-1950, director of the Bantam Section and instructor in nature, first aid, swimming and games. During those years he dramatized three folk tales for presentation. At the weekly chapel services, he often delivered homilies or ‘sermonettes’, a practice he continued throughout his association with the camp that closed in 1975. Dr. Hastings’ activities at Camp Kagawong are well documented through notes, certificates, correspondence (much of which is in Series 3) scripts for theatrical presentations, chapel service programs and sermonettes, and some of the annual camp catalogues, photographs and artifacts. The arrangement of the files is largely chronological.

The material on Camp Kagawong is followed by files on Canadian Council of Churches and its Vellore/Ludhiana Committee, of which Dr. Hastings was a member from 1962-1975 and to which he was an advisor from 1975 to 1981. These are followed by files on the Christian Medical College in Vellore, India, including extensive ones documenting the work of the international review team that visited Vellore in 1979 and produced a report on its findings in 1980.

Next are files on the coronation of Queen Elizabeth in 1953; the Developing Countries Farm Radio Network, of which Dr. Hastings was a member of the board; Emmanuel College, where he was a University representative on its council and a member of its curriculum committee; the King’s College Fund which in 1985 organized a Canadian study tour of health services in Britain; and on Pickering College in Newmarket, Ontario. A member of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada, Dr. Hastings was active in its youth clubs in the 1940s. He attended the 1948 convention at which George Drew was selected leader and took part in the federal election the following year.

Dr. Hastings’ place of worship for many years was St. Andrew’s United Church at 117 Bloor Street East in Toronto. He played a very active role in its affairs, serving on its board, many of its committees, was a member of its Men’s Club and, on occasion, delivered the sermon of the week. The files cover the years from 1952 to 1973, when St. Andrew’s and the Yonge Street United Church amalgamated and include correspondence, notices of services, minutes of meetings, reports, and drafts of three sermons.

This series ends with a number of files on Dr. Hastings’ involvement in several activities of the United Church of Canada, centring around his being a member of its task force on health services (1985-1987) and its Division of Mission in Canada’s health task group (1991-1994). Included are correspondence, minutes, memoranda, notes, drafts of reports, and a video, “Taking the pulse of Canadian health care” that grew out of the work of the health task group.

Addresses and interviews

Dr. Hastings was much in demand as a public speaker throughout his career. In the early 1960s, for example, he often gave more than one a week and by the late 1990s he himself estimated that he had given well over 1,000 addresses. While the majority were delivered at academic and professional gatherings, he also made time to speak at community events, including graduation exercises.

This series contains lists of addresses, correspondence, notes, drafts of addresses, and, often, press coverage. The arrangement is chronological, with correspondence for which accompanying addresses have not survived being arranged in separate files. There is a substantial file of this type for 1963. Interviews are filed at the end of the addresses.

The earliest extant address is his first professional foray on the international scene, at the American Public Health Association conference in October 1954. The theme was administrative practice in relation to the quality of medical care provided under the Ontario Workmen’s Compensation Board. This address and subsequent ones follow the major themes laid out in the earlier series, especially Series 7. Those that were published are filed, for the most part, in Series 7. Some of the addresses are indicated in Appendix 2, which includes entries up to 1994.

After his retirement, Dr. Hastings’ addresses continued to focus primarily on public and community health issues. One, in 1994, was given on the occasion of the tenth anniversary of the Charles Hastings Co-operative, named after his great-uncle, Toronto’s innovative and pioneering medical officer of health. On another occasion, he spoke about the future of community health centres to the International Conference on Community Health Centres in Montreal (December 1995).

While President of the Canadian Public Health Association in 1996-1997, he travelled widely and was much in demand as a speaker. Four venues included a reception in his honour in Winnipeg, the second National Conference on Communicable Disease Control in Toronto, the World Health Organization’s Intersectional Action for Health conference in Halifax, and the annual general meeting of the Northwest Territories branch of the CPHA in Yellowknife. In 1999, after many years of long distance communication, he flew to Manitoba to address the Hamiota District Health Centre Foundation, and in November was a keynote speaker at the 50th annual conference of the Ontario Public Health Association.

In June 2000, at the annual meeting of the Association of Ontario Health Centres, Dr. Hastings reflected on a turning point in his career in his address, “The Hastings Report – then and now”. This is followed by an address delivered at the opening in October 2001 of the Institute of Population and Health, one of four Toronto-based Institutes of Health Research.

The series concludes with three interviews, one on CBC’s radio and television “Citizen’s Forum” in 1960, a ‘telepole’ on CFTO TV in 1962, and an interview with Jan Brown in February 1997.

Teaching

The records in this series relate to Professor Careless’ teaching activities at the University of Toronto. Between 1945 and 1992, Professor Careless taught various undergraduate and graduate courses on historiography, early Canadian history, urban history, and metropolitanism, The records in this series predominantly consist of mark books, 1945 to 1992. Also included are some course outlines and lecture notes. There is also a Department of History promotional film, created circa late 1950’s, with gratuitous and graphic scenes of Professor Careless at Flavelle House.

Graphic material and film

Files in this series contain photographs, and graphic materials relating to Gallie’s professional and personal life. Many of the photographs are miscellaneous figures and graphics that may have been used in papers, lectures, and talks. This series also includes a film of one of Gallie’s operations. The files in this series have been arranged chronologically.

Film

Film related to milling and refining methods of minerals used more than likely for course instruction in Mining Engineering.

Film

Film entitled "Undergraduates Presentation and Farewell to Sir Robert Falconer". This is a black and white silent film showing the presentation of a gift book to President Falconer in Convocation Hall.

Film

Over several decades, Clara Benson took numerous rolls of 16 mm film documenting her family, her trips, as well as life in Toronto especially during World War II, the University of Toronto and various events. Her collection includes some unique footage of women’s sports at the University of Toronto, convocation ceremonies in the 1940s, and skating shows, one of which identified Barbara Ann Scott. From her trips, there is interesting footage of Egypt and Greece in the late 1920s, the New York World Fair and South America in 1939 as well as Atlantic City in the late 1940s. There are several small rolls of film documenting military parades on the streets of Toronto as well as the Royal Visit of 1939 and 1959.

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