Showing 481 results

Archival description
Print preview View:

Artifacts

Acquired with this fonds are two artifacts from early computers. A vacuum tube from FERUT and a tape spool winder.

Walter Frisby Fellowship fonds

  • UTA 1936
  • Fonds
  • 1930-1983

Records of the Walter Frisby Fellowship, formerly known as the Public Speaking Association and now changed name to Dr. Zoltan Mester Fellowship. Include correspondence, minutes of meetings, notices, financial statements, reminiscences and a gavel.

Walter Frisby Fellowship

Education

John Hastings began his education at the Normal Model School in Toronto in 1933, went on to the University of Toronto Schools in 1939, and from there into the pre-medicine program at the University of Toronto in 1945. He received his MD in 1951, then did post-graduate work in the School of Hygiene, receiving his diploma in 1954.

This series documents Hastings’ progress through the educational system and the development of his academic and non-curricular activities. The files on the Normal Model School contain certificates, class assignments, press clippings, drafts of two plays that Hastings wrote, and the school badge. Hastings’ interests in drama were carried over to the University of Toronto Schools, where he wrote a number of plays, drafts of which have survived in this series, and one of which was published in its yearbook, the Twig, in 1943. At UTS, he also honed his public speaking and debating skills; the predominant themes of his public addresses being democracy, the British Empire and World War II. Hastings was a reporter to the Twig for his form and editor in 1943-1944 (his editorial files have survived). He was also a member of the school band and the cadets, developed an early interest in politics and became an active member of the young Progressive Conservatives. At the same time he maintained a high academic standing.

In 1944 Hastings entered a world-wide essay competition sponsored by the Royal Empire Society. His entry was one of three to receive a prize. This encouraged him to enter other essay contests while a pre-medical student at the University of Toronto (1945-1947). At the U of T, he was a member of the Hart House Debates Committee from 1949 to 1951; his notes reveal something of the parry and thrust of debating at that time. Among other activities, Hastings was a member of the Board of Stewards of Hart House and the U of T Historical Club and in 1948 he participated in the Mock Parliament. The remainder of this series contains notes, correspondence, certificates, and photographs relating to Hastings’ acquisition of his medical degree and his post-graduate diploma in public health.

A listing of his activities, academic and otherwise, while a student is found in B2002-0014/014(09).

Other activities

The records in this series underscore the impact of an upbringing where the tenets of Christianity, public service, and duty were emphasized. They begin with thirty years (1937-1969) of files on Camp Kagawong, a privately owned boy’s camp on Balsam Lake, where Dr. Hastings spent his summers as a young boy enjoying the outdoors. The leadership qualities he displayed led to his becoming a camp counsellor (1944-1945) and, from 1946-1950, director of the Bantam Section and instructor in nature, first aid, swimming and games. During those years he dramatized three folk tales for presentation. At the weekly chapel services, he often delivered homilies or ‘sermonettes’, a practice he continued throughout his association with the camp that closed in 1975. Dr. Hastings’ activities at Camp Kagawong are well documented through notes, certificates, correspondence (much of which is in Series 3) scripts for theatrical presentations, chapel service programs and sermonettes, and some of the annual camp catalogues, photographs and artifacts. The arrangement of the files is largely chronological.

The material on Camp Kagawong is followed by files on Canadian Council of Churches and its Vellore/Ludhiana Committee, of which Dr. Hastings was a member from 1962-1975 and to which he was an advisor from 1975 to 1981. These are followed by files on the Christian Medical College in Vellore, India, including extensive ones documenting the work of the international review team that visited Vellore in 1979 and produced a report on its findings in 1980.

Next are files on the coronation of Queen Elizabeth in 1953; the Developing Countries Farm Radio Network, of which Dr. Hastings was a member of the board; Emmanuel College, where he was a University representative on its council and a member of its curriculum committee; the King’s College Fund which in 1985 organized a Canadian study tour of health services in Britain; and on Pickering College in Newmarket, Ontario. A member of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada, Dr. Hastings was active in its youth clubs in the 1940s. He attended the 1948 convention at which George Drew was selected leader and took part in the federal election the following year.

Dr. Hastings’ place of worship for many years was St. Andrew’s United Church at 117 Bloor Street East in Toronto. He played a very active role in its affairs, serving on its board, many of its committees, was a member of its Men’s Club and, on occasion, delivered the sermon of the week. The files cover the years from 1952 to 1973, when St. Andrew’s and the Yonge Street United Church amalgamated and include correspondence, notices of services, minutes of meetings, reports, and drafts of three sermons.

This series ends with a number of files on Dr. Hastings’ involvement in several activities of the United Church of Canada, centring around his being a member of its task force on health services (1985-1987) and its Division of Mission in Canada’s health task group (1991-1994). Included are correspondence, minutes, memoranda, notes, drafts of reports, and a video, “Taking the pulse of Canadian health care” that grew out of the work of the health task group.

George Templeman Kingston fonds

  • UTA 1454
  • Fonds
  • 1830

First Mathematical Prize medal awarded to George Templeman Kingston, Christmas, 1830 by the Royal Naval College, London. Obverse: Profile of George III; inscription: "Georgius III D.G. Britanniarum Rex 1820". Reverse: Inscription: "First Mathematical Prize, Royal Naval College, London: awarded to George Templeman Kingston, Christmas, 1830".

Kingston, George Templeman

Thomas Kennard Thomson fonds

  • UTA 1826
  • Fonds
  • 1871-1952

Fonds consists of 2 accessions

B1986-0025: Manuscripts and published copies of address and proposal by T. Kennard Thomson, consulting engineer, relating to hydroelectric development including map, plan and photograph of the Peace Bridge and other projects. (1 box, 1917-1920)

B1993-0027: Correspondence, certificates, reports, programmes, articles, photoprints, glass negatives, lantern, slides and architectural drawings documenting Kennard Thomson's career as a consulting engineer in New York and elsewhere and his relationship with the University of Toronto Engineering Society which he founded. (6 boxes and numerous oversize folders, 1871-1952)

Thomson, Thomas Kennard

Mary Beatrice Tatham fonds

  • UTA 1819
  • Fonds
  • 1906-1922

Invitations to University of Toronto social events (1906-07, 1923); examinations for the teacher's course in arts (1921, 1922), and an armband (?) in coloured stripes and bearing the word "Committee".

Tatham, Mary Beatrice

A.F.W. Plumptre fonds

  • CA UTSC 009
  • Fonds
  • 1964-1974

The fonds serves as a representative sample of the activities carried out, and the relationships engendered, during A.F.W. Plumptre's tenure as principal of Scarborough College from 1965 to 1972. Both official papers and personal documents are included. Official documents include: reports, correspondence, transcripts of speeches, and seating plans. Personal documents include: invitations, cards, photograph albums, clippings, publications, books, and artifacts.

Plumptre, A. F. W. (Arthur FitzWalter Wynne)

Jewelry

File includes three items of jewelry: 10K gold double-link charm bracelet; 10K gold charm displaying the old UTSC logo; ring (possibly silver) displaying UTSC logo. The bracelet and charm appear to be unworn, but the ring is heavily tarnishedand has many scratches and other indicators of regular wear. N.B. these items are located in the office of the Head Librarian and may be accessed by request only.

Dan Bender Zoo collection

  • CA UTSC 008
  • Collection
  • [193-]-1966

The collection consists of movie posters, ads, trading cards, postcards, books, magazines and journals, related to Frank Buck (Frank Howard Buck (1884-1950), a renowned American hunter, animal collector, film director, actor author and producer. The collection also consists of material related to zoo displays and architecture, catalogues and books related to zoo and animal collecting, photographs off various zoo related animals found in different parts of America and a board game. The material is divided into five series:

  1. Frank Buck
  2. Chimpanzee performance
  3. Zoo Architecture and display
  4. Miscellaneous printed materials.
  5. Zoo photographs

Bender, Daniel E.

Ernest Fidlar fonds

  • UTA 1267
  • Fonds
  • 1908-1953

Fonds consists of records created by both Ernest Findlar, professor of medicine at the University of Toronto. Includes research, drafts, correspondence, and material related to his service in WWI. Fonds also includes letters written by Gladys Aileen East (his wife) back home when she attended Alma College in the 1920s. Fonds also includes a family tree. See file list for more details.

Fidlar, Ernest

Biographical and personal

This series gives an overview of Coxeter’s career and honors. It includes several files with biographical information including articles, clippings, tributes and obituaries that discuss his life and contributions to mathematics. There are also copies of his C.V.s, entries in biographical dictionaries, and his own notes on his reviews and publications.

This series also includes correspondence, certificates, diplomas and medals documenting the numerous recognitions and awards he received throughout his lengthy career. For photographs regarding awards, see Series 9: Graphic records. Finally there a few files of personal and family memorabilia as well as an autobiographical notebook in which Coxeter wrote his early recollections of his childhood, his early studies and education as well as professional biographical milestones.

Correspondence

The correspondence series follows three distinct ordering systems. Those files that were separated as Haultain’s personal correspondence are placed at the front of the series (Box 006) and arranged in chronological order. The “personal” designation appears to have been imposed on the records by the rearrangement of Edith Birkett (see Series 8). Also included in this series are some miscellaneous Haultain correspondence files on a variety of topics, including the Ritual, and some personal correspondence that was filed with the Ritual records.

Boxes 007 through 009 are arranged chronologically and include correspondence between the Wardens and the Camps, some committee correspondence and general Kipling Ritual correspondence. The alphabetical arrangement appears to have been mostly applied following Birkett’s arrangement of the Kipling Ritual files and includes significant correspondence with Camp and Corporate Secretaries and Wardens including Norman Parkinson, Louis Trudel, Robert Marshall and Thomas Hogg. These letters are arranged alphabetically (Boxes 009 through 012).

In later accessions the records are mostly arranged in chronological order and are interspersed with various attachments such as receipts and meeting minutes. Largely these records contain the details of the activity of the office of the Camp One Secretary. For correspondence with the other Camp secretaries see also Series 7. Files (07) and (09) in B1982-0023/006 include early examples of the hand-hammered iron rings.

Expansion of the ritual

The series contains primarily correspondence with Camps Two through Nine, much of it dealing with the matter of verifying candidate credentials from different jurisdictions. There is also some correspondence of a social nature related to the establishment of authorities and Camp Wardens in new jurisdictions. The system of record keeping by Camp appears to have stopped in 1954, after which correspondence pertaining to the Camps may be found in the individual correspondence files in series 5. Arrangement is by Camp number, followed by the records pertaining to discussions of expanding the Ritual to the United Kingdom, India and the United States.

Camp Ten records pertain to a proposed camp in Ottawa, which was never established. Camp Ten, when it was established, became the camp for the Université Laval in Québec City in 1956. Camp Twelve was established by Carleton University in Ottawa in 1958. The B1995-0040 accession includes one file of material, from 1978-1987, related to the expansion of the “Links” programme of the Order of the Engineer organization, based in the United States. The records for Camp Five contain an example of an early iron ring.

National Research Council

Series contains is composed of records dating from McKay’s time at the National Research Council. During the Second World War, the organization was mobilized to support the Allied war effort. As a result, most of the series’ records relate to military research and development. Canadian Army Operational Research Group (C.A.O.R.G.) reports compose approximately half the files that make up the series. These reports cover subjects ranging from blast measurements for anti-tank mine clearance to the number and distribution of Japanese paper balloons in North America. There are also two summary reports on Japanese balloon incidents.
The remainder of the textual and graphic records are made up of committee minutes, general Department of Defence documents, and a short paper on Canada’s part in the development of the radio proximity fuse, which McKay contributed to as assistant to project leader Professor Arnold Pitt.

Also included in this series are the remains of a Japanese paper balloon. Paper balloons, also known as balloon bombs, were a by-product of an atmospheric experiment by Axis scientists, which discovered a powerful air current traveling across the Pacific at about 30,000 feet [1]. Taking advantage of this knowledge, the Japanese military developed what may well have been the first intercontinental weapon in the form of explosive devices attached to paper balloons. These balloons were released in Japan and carried along the Pacific by a jet stream, ultimately finding their way to North America’s West Coast. Although the Japanese are thought to have released as many as 9,000 paper balloons, only 1,000 or so are thought to have reached North America, resulting in a total of six casualties [2].

NOTES

  1. Johnna Rizzo, “Japan’s secret WWII weapon: Balloon bombs,” National Geographic, 27 May 2013.
  2. Ibid.

Correspondence and biographical

Consists of correspondence with colleagues, publishers, and his wife. Also includes a framed letter from Duncan Campbell Scott, 2 annotated books, educational diplomas and certificates, memoirs, scrapbooks, graduation robes, and various medals.

Doctoral cap and awards

Consists of Prof. Brown's doctoral cap, Governor General Literary Award (1944), Lorne Pierce medal, and Phi Beta Kappa key, (1943).

Artifacts

Includes: two trophies relating to bowling (1929-1930) and U of T Rowing club (1925); Chancellor’s Circle medal for the Spring reunion in1994 of engineering graduates of 1929; collection of pins for University of Toronto.

Artifacts

Brass; engraved with Charles Verdin, France [ca 1878-1900]. Box lid (inside) engraved “JH Chapman Montreal”. Mechanical device used to measure blood pressure in the nineteenth century. It is considered the first external, non-intrusive device used to estimate blood pressure. It may have belonged to a member of the Moffatt family.

Results 1 to 50 of 481