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Administrative resources files

Series consists of administrative resources files which were maintained for Nouwen by Nouwen's administrative staffs from 1983 to 1997. These files contain materials collected by Nouwen in order to assist him with his roles as pastor, writer, researcher, and friend. In addition to subject-based material such as newspaper clippings and brochures, it is evident that Nouwen's administrative assistants at Daybreak used these files to hold administrative material related to liturgical events such as Christmas, Lent, and Easter, as well as other aspects of Nouwen's duties in the community. These files were likely maintained as a resource for Nouwen regarding his daily work.

The titles of the files are taken directly from the file labels created by Nouwen and his administrative assistants, unless otherwise noted. The files are arranged by subject or topic (such as Latin America, Vincent van Gogh, or Abbey of the Genesee), are in alphabetical order, and materials within the files have been maintained chronologically. Many of the materials have been placed in this series because they contain annotations, either by Nouwen or an assistant, saying "File" with the subject or name or "File - Resource files."

Ephemera and artifacts

  • CA ON00389 F4-14
  • Series
  • [1957 - 1996], predominant 1980 - 1996
  • Part of Henri Nouwen fonds

Series consists of ephemera and artifacts collected by or given to Nouwen throughout his lifetime, including awards and honorary degrees, materials kept in his office and home, promotional materials, artwork, postcards, religious artifacts, and personal artifacts.

Series has been arranged in the following seven sub-series according to their function:
1.14.1. Awards and honourary degrees;
1.14.2. Contents of Nouwen's office;
1.14.3. Promotional material for lectures, workshops and special events;
1.14.4. Collected artwork;
1.14.5. Personal effects;
1.14.6. Postcards, cards and prints;
1.14.7. Religious artifacts.

Promotional materials and memorabilia

Series consists of a promotional booklet and poster, which feature the same photograph and include excerpts of newspaper reviews of his performances. Series also includes his wooden conductor's baton.

Correspondence and family records

Series consists of letters to J. Churchill Arlidge concerning his performances; family correspondence; Arlidge's wedding certificate; and a jewel pendant that belonged to his mother.

Photographic Prints

Series C: Photographic Prints contains all of photograph prints that were housed in paper folders and filing cabinets in the office of Ken Jones. The folders were arranged by subject. For the most part, folders are labelled by subject but the folders and some photographs were out of order when the records were transferred to UTSC Library. In some cases, folders contain photos that do not reflect the subject of the original folder label.

University of Toronto Governing Council

Series A, University of Toronto Governing Council, covers the years 1963 through 2002. The Governing Council is the highest governing body of the University of Toronto. In 1963, the Governing Council drafted A Provisional Plan for Two Off-Campus Colleges in the University of Toronto, which established Scarborough College (later UTSC) and also Erindale College (later the University of Toronto Mississauga, or UTM). The series includes correspondence and address lists for various council members, by-laws for the council, and council minutes from 1973 to 2002. Also included are documents relating to the opening of the College in 1964 for extension courses and the formal opening in 1966. Materials regarding the design and construction of the College, including architectural drawings, are included as well, since the Governing Council oversaw the construction of the initial buildings.

Menus

The series comprises menus from around the world featuring a variety of cuisines including Afghan, American Argentinian, Armenian, Asian, Bangladeshi, Brazilian, Burmese, Cambodian, Caribbean, Chinese (Peking, Szechuan, Shanghai, Yunnan, Mandarin, Cantonese, Hunan and Jiangnan), Colombian, Cuban, Dutch, Ecuadorian, Egyptian, European, Filipino, Finnish, French, Hong Kong style, Indian, Indochinese, Indonesian, Islamic, Israeli, Italian, Jamaican, Japanese, Korean, Laotian, Latin American, Lebanese, Malaysian, Mediterranean, Mexican, Middle Eastern, Mongolian, Moroccan, Mughlai, Nepalese, Pakistani, Pan-Asian, Peruvian, Russian, Scandinavian, Singaporean, Southwestern, Spanish, Taiwanese, Thai, Tibetan, Turkish, Venezuelan, Vietnamese, seafood and vegetarian.

Menus are from restaurants located in Kenya, Morocco, South Africa, China (Beijing, Hangzhou and Shanghai), Egypt, Guam, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Israel, Japan, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand, Tibet, Turkey, Vietnam, Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Denmark, England, Finland, France, Germany, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Malta, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Russia, Scotland, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Wales, Antigua and Barbuda, the Bahamas, Bermuda, Canada (British Columbia, Manitoba, Newfoundland and Labrador, Northwest Territories, Nova Scotia, Ontario, Quebec, Saskatchewan and Yukon Territory), Costa Rica, Cuba, Curaçao, El Salvador, Greenland, Guatemala, Mexico, Panama, the United States (Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin and Wyoming), Australia, New Caledonia (France) New Zealand, Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Peru and Venezuela.

Menus types included placemat menus, single sheet menus, trifold and four fold, five fold and seven fold menus and menus in booklet style. Some menus are laminated while others are in vinyl enclosures. Menus range from take away and delivery to eat in and include wine lists as well.

Menus from hotels, cruises and airlines are also included in this series.

The series is divided into 6 subseries: Africa, Asia, Europe, North America, Oceania and South America. The division is based on the 7-continent model, substituting Australia as a continent and replacing it with Oceania for greater geographical coverage.

Filmmaking

This series contains the original film elements for several films made by Kay Armatage.
There are also files documenting this facet of her career including correspondence, film proposals, research notes, clippings, grant applications, budget reports, shot lists and scripts. Several files document her films Striptease, Storytelling and Artist on Fire, as well as Prof. Armatage’s attempt at writing and directing a film about Nell Shipman which did not go beyond development.

Photographs in this series include shots taken during the production of several of her films. There is one file documenting the filming of Storytelling which includes shots of Northrop Frye in New York City. There are also three contact sheets by Babette Mangolte taken during the making of Artist on Fire, with views of Joyce Weiland’s Toronto studio and home. The series also contains one file of printing plates used in the creation of publicity material for Prof. Armatage’s early film Jill Johnson, October 1975.

Other activities

In 1921, Dr. Benson was elected the first president of the Women’s Athletic Association of University of Toronto and was involved from the beginning in the campaign to build an athletic building for women. Among the records relating to this activity are correspondence, notes, financial statements and blueprints of proposed buildings. Also included in this series are correspondence, minutes and reports relating to her work as Chair of the Foreign Committee of the YWCA (Young Women’s Christian Association) focusing primarily on an international survey on leadership (1930-1932). Other documents include two undated and unsigned manuscripts of stories, a collection of cards acquired during a trip to the Chicago World’s Fair in 1893, and a scrapbook of pressed flowers with identification collected by Clara Benson ca 1890’s.

Personal

Davidson Black kept a diary throughout much of his adult life. There are 28 volumes in this series. The earliest is for 1902, the year he entered medicine at the University of Toronto; it includes a tally of monthly expenses. The last diary is for 1934, the final entry being for 9 March, six days before his death. For each of the years 1922 and 1925, there are two volumes of diaries. There are no diaries present for the years 1907, 1908, 1909, 1911, and 1912. The diary Davidson kept while on active service during World War I is filed with his service records in Series 4. Most of the entries are brief as the diaries, except for 1902, are small. Some of the loose entries with the diaries are longer.

A number of items document his personal activities. The earliest is a small well-thumbed copy of 'The Book of Common Prayer', presented to him by his mother on his 9th birthday in 1893. A notebook, a journal, and permits document his early interest in ornithology. Finally, there are files of memorabilia, poems and sketches, and on honours bestowed on him later in life, along with twelve diplomas and certificates.

Education

This series contains certificates and diplomas, correspondence, course and lab notes, term papers and memorabilia documenting aspects of Davidson Black’s education, running from the Wellesley School through Harbord Collegiate and the Faculties of Medicine and Arts at the University of Toronto. There is also a file on Davidson’s summer project in 1907 to earn money for his Bachelor of Arts program, prospecting in the Temagami Forest Reserve.

Employment

Except for photographs, this series contains little documentation on Davidson Black’s employment before 1917 when he enlisted with the Canadian Army Medical Corps and went overseas. The bulk of this series relates to his work in China at the Peking Union Medical College, his anthropological research including his discovery of "Peking man", and his travels within China and to Mongolia, India, Siam, and elsewhere.

The files contain correspondence, photographs, addresses, and publications (including some drafts), and memorabilia. Most of the photographs were taken by Dr. Black himself, though some were taken by Adena and others (especially presentation copies) by friends and colleagues. Dr. Black carefully annotated many of the photos he took, often in considerable detail even to the time of day and the shutter speed used. Included are a few glass-plate negatives and about 50 lantern slides. The negatives are usually dated and were kept except if they were in good condition. On his travels, Dr. Black collected autographed photographs of many of the scientists and academics he met; these are included in this series.

Publications and addresses

This series documents only one of Davidson Black’s publications, but more of his addresses, in particular some he delivered in 1925 before his discovery of Peking Man, and the Croonian Lecture in December 1932 that cemented the acceptance of his research.

Correspondence and biographical

Consists of correspondence with colleagues, publishers, and his wife. Also includes a framed letter from Duncan Campbell Scott, 2 annotated books, educational diplomas and certificates, memoirs, scrapbooks, graduation robes, and various medals.

Biographical and personal

This series gives an overview of Coxeter’s career and honors. It includes several files with biographical information including articles, clippings, tributes and obituaries that discuss his life and contributions to mathematics. There are also copies of his C.V.s, entries in biographical dictionaries, and his own notes on his reviews and publications.

This series also includes correspondence, certificates, diplomas and medals documenting the numerous recognitions and awards he received throughout his lengthy career. For photographs regarding awards, see Series 9: Graphic records. Finally there a few files of personal and family memorabilia as well as an autobiographical notebook in which Coxeter wrote his early recollections of his childhood, his early studies and education as well as professional biographical milestones.

Professional activity

Series consists of records related to Mr. Ezrin’s professional roles. These focus primarily on his time in government, both federal and provincial. Records cover his work in diplomatic roles in New Delhi, Los Angeles and New York, as well as publicity surrounding the Constitution. Three files document Ezrin’s involvement on the Debate Committee preparing Liberal leader John Turner for the federal debate in 1988.

Personal and biographical

This series includes some personal correspondence including many congratulatory letters when Evans was appointed President of the University of Toronto. There is one box of documents that Evan himself pulled together for a possible autobiography. Accompanying these are his notes on various aspects of his career. This series includes documentation including certificates, diplomas, plaque and medals for his many awards and recognitions. Finally, cassette tapes of interviews Dr. Evans did on radio programs including “Voice of the Pioneer and CBC Morningside.

Education and early career

Series consists of records documenting Prof. Friedland’s education and early career as an occupational therapist. Included are files reflecting the span of Prof. Friedland’s education, from high school to her Ph.D., through diplomas, notes and course material, and graduate program applications. Additionally, this series includes notes, patient reports, proposals and correspondence related to Prof. Friedland’s professional practice. Series also includes crafts produced as part of Prof. Friedland’s training. Artifacts include leather and woven belts, and a hammered copper bowl.

Royal Canadian Air Force. Women's Division

The series partially documents Francess Halpenny’s activities with the Women’s Division of the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) as a meteorological observer in Torbay (Newfoundland) in 1943 and 1944, and in Summerside (Prince Edward Island) in 1945. It also partially documents her contribution to the RCAF publication, "Wings Overseas", in 1943 and 1944.

The series consists of 4 files including registration certificates, a library card, personal notes about the life at Torbay, correspondence and copies of "Wings Overseas" and "Summerside" publications. It also includes one copy of publication "Per Ardua: A pictorial History of the RCAF, Torbay 1944" ; a photograph of Halpenny’s class at the weather course for airwomen, RCAF, Toronto, Ontario, December 1942 ; Halpenny’s badges and insignia, [1943-1945] ; and a thank you note received from Theodore L. Wiacek family, after his death in 1998.

Royal Society of Canada

The series partially documents Francess Halpenny’s participation into activities of the Royal Society of Canada, from 1982 to 1991. It partially documents her participation to the Royal Society of Canada centennial celebrations, in 1982 ; her involvement as a member and president of the Academy of Humanities and Social Sciences Council, also called Council Academy II, from 1982 to 1988. The series also partially document Halpenny’s involvement in promoting women’s place in scholarship by participating into activities of the Affirmative Action Committee in 1988 and 1989 ; by giving lectures and talks about women in scholarship during a tour of the Maritimes in 1990 ; by participating in the discussion “Women in scholarship : One step forward, two steps back?” at the Society’s annual meeting in Victoria (British Columbia), in 1990 ; and by participating into the conception of the booklet "Claiming the Future".

The series consists of 10 files including minutes of meetings, personal notes, drafts of reports, correspondence, press releases and press clippings. The series also includes 2 photographs of Dr. Halpenny taken during the Society’s annual meeting in Winnipeg, 1986 ; one photograph with Professor Laurent Dennis during a reception at the Faculty of Library and Information Science reception in honour of her election to the Royal Society of Canada.

Education

John Hastings began his education at the Normal Model School in Toronto in 1933, went on to the University of Toronto Schools in 1939, and from there into the pre-medicine program at the University of Toronto in 1945. He received his MD in 1951, then did post-graduate work in the School of Hygiene, receiving his diploma in 1954.

This series documents Hastings’ progress through the educational system and the development of his academic and non-curricular activities. The files on the Normal Model School contain certificates, class assignments, press clippings, drafts of two plays that Hastings wrote, and the school badge. Hastings’ interests in drama were carried over to the University of Toronto Schools, where he wrote a number of plays, drafts of which have survived in this series, and one of which was published in its yearbook, the Twig, in 1943. At UTS, he also honed his public speaking and debating skills; the predominant themes of his public addresses being democracy, the British Empire and World War II. Hastings was a reporter to the Twig for his form and editor in 1943-1944 (his editorial files have survived). He was also a member of the school band and the cadets, developed an early interest in politics and became an active member of the young Progressive Conservatives. At the same time he maintained a high academic standing.

In 1944 Hastings entered a world-wide essay competition sponsored by the Royal Empire Society. His entry was one of three to receive a prize. This encouraged him to enter other essay contests while a pre-medical student at the University of Toronto (1945-1947). At the U of T, he was a member of the Hart House Debates Committee from 1949 to 1951; his notes reveal something of the parry and thrust of debating at that time. Among other activities, Hastings was a member of the Board of Stewards of Hart House and the U of T Historical Club and in 1948 he participated in the Mock Parliament. The remainder of this series contains notes, correspondence, certificates, and photographs relating to Hastings’ acquisition of his medical degree and his post-graduate diploma in public health.

A listing of his activities, academic and otherwise, while a student is found in B2002-0014/014(09).

Other activities

The records in this series underscore the impact of an upbringing where the tenets of Christianity, public service, and duty were emphasized. They begin with thirty years (1937-1969) of files on Camp Kagawong, a privately owned boy’s camp on Balsam Lake, where Dr. Hastings spent his summers as a young boy enjoying the outdoors. The leadership qualities he displayed led to his becoming a camp counsellor (1944-1945) and, from 1946-1950, director of the Bantam Section and instructor in nature, first aid, swimming and games. During those years he dramatized three folk tales for presentation. At the weekly chapel services, he often delivered homilies or ‘sermonettes’, a practice he continued throughout his association with the camp that closed in 1975. Dr. Hastings’ activities at Camp Kagawong are well documented through notes, certificates, correspondence (much of which is in Series 3) scripts for theatrical presentations, chapel service programs and sermonettes, and some of the annual camp catalogues, photographs and artifacts. The arrangement of the files is largely chronological.

The material on Camp Kagawong is followed by files on Canadian Council of Churches and its Vellore/Ludhiana Committee, of which Dr. Hastings was a member from 1962-1975 and to which he was an advisor from 1975 to 1981. These are followed by files on the Christian Medical College in Vellore, India, including extensive ones documenting the work of the international review team that visited Vellore in 1979 and produced a report on its findings in 1980.

Next are files on the coronation of Queen Elizabeth in 1953; the Developing Countries Farm Radio Network, of which Dr. Hastings was a member of the board; Emmanuel College, where he was a University representative on its council and a member of its curriculum committee; the King’s College Fund which in 1985 organized a Canadian study tour of health services in Britain; and on Pickering College in Newmarket, Ontario. A member of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada, Dr. Hastings was active in its youth clubs in the 1940s. He attended the 1948 convention at which George Drew was selected leader and took part in the federal election the following year.

Dr. Hastings’ place of worship for many years was St. Andrew’s United Church at 117 Bloor Street East in Toronto. He played a very active role in its affairs, serving on its board, many of its committees, was a member of its Men’s Club and, on occasion, delivered the sermon of the week. The files cover the years from 1952 to 1973, when St. Andrew’s and the Yonge Street United Church amalgamated and include correspondence, notices of services, minutes of meetings, reports, and drafts of three sermons.

This series ends with a number of files on Dr. Hastings’ involvement in several activities of the United Church of Canada, centring around his being a member of its task force on health services (1985-1987) and its Division of Mission in Canada’s health task group (1991-1994). Included are correspondence, minutes, memoranda, notes, drafts of reports, and a video, “Taking the pulse of Canadian health care” that grew out of the work of the health task group.

Artifacts

Acquired with this fonds are two artifacts from early computers. A vacuum tube from FERUT and a tape spool winder.

Artifacts

First World War artifacts and other items belonging to Harold Innis:
-1 Khaki pouch, with drawstring and Red Cross insignia stitched on the side
-1 Army issue sewing kit, with pencil, pins, needles and buttons, label for “Maw’s” Perforated Court Plaster, and darning wool
-Mess Kit: 1 Army issue fork and spoon
-‘Dog tags’ with ‘H.A. Innis – C.F.A. – 339852’ on one side and “G.P. – Innis, H.A. – 339852 – 4th BTY.CFA – BAPT’ on the other side
-1 bundle of rawhide
-1 enamelled pin with coat of arms of Stirling Scotland
-1 pin for ‘69’ Battery
-2 Artillery cap badges
-1 Signaller’s badge
-1 large and 2 small COTC [U of T] badges
-2 C.F.A. pins
-2 ‘Canada’ pins
-1 Wounded Stripe with inscription ‘The Wounded Stripe, No. 4’
-5 large and 6 small brass tunic buttons with Royal coat of arts
-1 scabbard holder for bayonet worn in half
-1 waterproof (metal) can
-1 brown coloured pencil
-1 key
-1 large and 3 small CEF badges, each with crown superimposed on maple

  • University of Glasgow medal in box [ca. 1951]
  • 1 silver plate inscribed “To Mary Q. Innes [sic] Dean of Women 1955-1964 from University College Literary & Athletic Society”

1962 election, Eglinton constituency

Brian Land enrolled in the School of Graduate Studies in the fall of 1960 as a political science student. The opportunity for a thesis topic arose in the spring of 1962 as a federal election loomed. He chose to conduct a study of the campaign in the Eglinton constituency in Toronto, partly because he was a resident and because he had a personal acquaintance with a number of the principals involved.

Land offered his services to Donald Fleming, the long-standing Progressive Conservative member from the Toronto riding of Eglinton, and Minister of Finance in John Diefenbaker’s government. It was the first and only time that Land worked for a Conservative candidate. His notebook records that his first meeting was on May 10
and, over the next five weeks, he immersed himself in the strategy sessions, meetings, and envelope stuffing sessions and other activities of electioneering. He attended meetings of the Liberal candidate, Mitchell Sharp, as well as those of Mr. Fleming, and collected campaign literature from all parties.

This series contains background material to the constituency, Land’s notebook, correspondence, notes, membership and voter lists, poll revisions, maps, election results by poll, addresses, campaign literature and buttons, and press coverage. The bulk of the material relates to the Fleming campaign.

The records are grouped by function.

Master of Arts thesis and Eglinton

The material that Brian Land gathered during the 1962 federal election formed the basis for his MA thesis that was written under the supervision of Paul Fox. The first part of this series comprises correspondence about the thesis and a copy of its second volume, “Appendices”, that contains charts, campaign literature, buttons, and maps (some oversized), and notes for the bibliography.

The second part of this series contains the files relating to the publication, in 1965, of Land’s thesis as Eglinton: the election study of a federal constituency. Included are the author’s contract, a typescript of the text, notes for and drafts of the index, and the galley and page proofs.

Davenport-Dovercourt Liberal Association

Brian Land’s involvement in party politics was primarily in the Liberal party at the federal level. He was a member of the executive of the Davenport-Dovercourt Liberal Association, for which, in 1965, he carried out a study of the Davenport voting record by conducting a poll analysis for the years 1952-1963. In February of 1968 he was elected as a delegate to the forthcoming Liberal leadership convention that chose Pierre Elliott Trudeau to succeed Lester Pearson as Prime Minister.

This series contains files consisting of: the constitution, lists of executive officers, minutes, correspondence and press clippings documenting the activities of the Davenport-Dovercourt Liberal Association from 1965-1968; the questionnaire, notes, correspondence, maps and report relating to the Davenport voting record; local press coverage, poll results and capitulation sheets for Eglinton riding in 1963 when Mitchell Sharp was elected for the first time (in oversized folders); campaign literature and press clippings relating to Walter Gordon’s successful re-election in 1965; and credentials (including buttons and decals) for and press clippings about the Association’s delegates to the 1968 convention.

University of Toronto Blues men's baseball team

This series documents Professor Lang’s years of service to the University of Toronto Blues Men’s Baseball team which he coached from 1994 to 2011. The files contain information on team lists, coaches, financing and fundraising, equipment, rosters and players, and statistical records. There is also some press coverage. There is documentation of tournaments in Columbus, Ohio (1998) and Durham College in Oshawa (1999). Photographs and digital images document the team from 1999-2007, including many images and graphics used to boost the website for the team Also included is an Ontario University Athletics medal for 2001.

Digital files in B2018-0001 include email correspondence with players, university officials, and sponsors; rosters and team photographs; and files related to the construction of a new baseball diamond on the University of Toronto Scarborough campus, which opened in 2006. In 2011, it was renamed the “Dan Lang field” in honour of his many years of service to the Varsity Blues baseball program.

Certificates and artifacts

This series contains several certificates and various diplomas earned by MacIntosh during his career. Included in this series is a set of artifacts: an intricate carved album containing news clippings and various ephemera documenting MacIntosh’s life, a vitallium prosthetic for knee replacement surgery and a hand drawn card presented to MacIntosh after a lecture he gave in Japan. See series 1 for more biographical information.

Artifacts

Includes: two trophies relating to bowling (1929-1930) and U of T Rowing club (1925); Chancellor’s Circle medal for the Spring reunion in1994 of engineering graduates of 1929; collection of pins for University of Toronto.

Artifacts

Brass; engraved with Charles Verdin, France [ca 1878-1900]. Box lid (inside) engraved “JH Chapman Montreal”. Mechanical device used to measure blood pressure in the nineteenth century. It is considered the first external, non-intrusive device used to estimate blood pressure. It may have belonged to a member of the Moffatt family.

Artwork, photographs, and artifact

Series consists of artwork, photographs, printing plates, and an artifact collected by McIlwraith. Material covers a range of subjects and media types. Photographs include images of archaeological digs and sites, collected images such as a cabinet card of a meeting of the Six Nation Chiefs (August 1871) and images of artifacts, as well as postcards and informal snapshots. Series also includes artwork: Inuit drawings identified with the Canadian Northern Survey Department, a series of string figure drawings made by Abel Moses and Margaret Shanoush, as well as some additional collected drawings. Finally there is one carved stone artifact that remains unidentified as to its origins or purpose.

National Research Council

Series contains is composed of records dating from McKay’s time at the National Research Council. During the Second World War, the organization was mobilized to support the Allied war effort. As a result, most of the series’ records relate to military research and development. Canadian Army Operational Research Group (C.A.O.R.G.) reports compose approximately half the files that make up the series. These reports cover subjects ranging from blast measurements for anti-tank mine clearance to the number and distribution of Japanese paper balloons in North America. There are also two summary reports on Japanese balloon incidents.
The remainder of the textual and graphic records are made up of committee minutes, general Department of Defence documents, and a short paper on Canada’s part in the development of the radio proximity fuse, which McKay contributed to as assistant to project leader Professor Arnold Pitt.

Also included in this series are the remains of a Japanese paper balloon. Paper balloons, also known as balloon bombs, were a by-product of an atmospheric experiment by Axis scientists, which discovered a powerful air current traveling across the Pacific at about 30,000 feet [1]. Taking advantage of this knowledge, the Japanese military developed what may well have been the first intercontinental weapon in the form of explosive devices attached to paper balloons. These balloons were released in Japan and carried along the Pacific by a jet stream, ultimately finding their way to North America’s West Coast. Although the Japanese are thought to have released as many as 9,000 paper balloons, only 1,000 or so are thought to have reached North America, resulting in a total of six casualties [2].

NOTES

  1. Johnna Rizzo, “Japan’s secret WWII weapon: Balloon bombs,” National Geographic, 27 May 2013.
  2. Ibid.

Education

Series documents McKay’s time as a university student. The physics and chemistry workbook
belongs to his undergraduate years as do the correspondence and clippings regarding his scholarships. Max Planck’s Treatise on Thermodynamics was gifted to McKay when the British Association for the Advancement of Science awarded him a bronze medal. Although the academic hood does not have a date, McKay most likely received it upon earning his Doctorate in 1934.

Biographical and personal

This series contains passports, daily agendas (58 volumes) and an address book, as well as files relating to the Banff School of Fine Arts, Professor Peers’ academic life, awards that he received and books that he wrote. Also included are a class photograph of the East Coulee School where Peers taught and was principal from 1939-1942, personal correspondence, photographs of Peers with friends, travel documents and records relating to his 90th birthday and the memorial service held upon his death. The series concludes with a file of records relating to David Rayside, a U of T professor and close friend of Peers.

The “biographical information” file [/003(04)] contains, amongst many other items, several pieces that Professor Peers himself penned between 1980 and 2002 about his family and background and his years as a high school teacher. Included with this is a CD from one of his nieces, Bev Swanton, titled “Acadia Valley Homecoming 2012”, that celebrates the hamlet, the surrounding farms (including that of the Peers family) and includes the centennial parade.

Education

This series contains Professor Peers’ yearbooks, diplomas, dissertations for his MA and PhD as well as other records relating to his education.

University of Toronto

This series contains records relating to Professor Peers’ activities as a professor and professor emeritus, as an alumnus, and as a very generous donor to the University of Toronto and also to Queen’s University. Included is general information about his retirement, correspondence and related material regarding the Department of Political Science. There are also extensive files of correspondence, donor agreements, endowment reports, and other material regarding scholarships and fellowships that he funded in the Department of Political Science and elsewhere, and a file on the purchase of and later transfer to the University of Toronto of his condominium at 190 St. George St.

Advocacy

Throughout his teaching career at the University of Toronto, Prof. Rayside has been an advocate on gay, lesbian and feminist issues. His university advocacy activities are numerous. Between 1985 and 1987, he served on the Ad Hoc Committee on the Status of Women, University of Toronto. Prof. Rayside was also a Member of the Sexual Harassment Hearing Panel, University of Toronto, 1988-1992. In this capacity, he heard the first case under the new Sexual Harassment Policy, Torfason vs. Hummel. He was a founding member and coordinator of the Committee on Homophobia from 1989-1991 and remained a member until 1994. In addition, between 1989 and 1994, Prof. Rayside was a member of the Men’s Forum. He also served on the Teach-In Committee and was responsible for organising a university-wide teach-in on sexism and violence against women in 1990. Prof. Rayside also participated on the Ad hoc crisis team to handle the case of a U. of T. residence student with AIDS, 1991-1992, and helped prepare a discussion of report on university AIDS policy. He also assisted in the organisation of the “Queer Sites: Studies in Lesbian and Gay Culture” Conference in 1993.

Records in this series document Prof. Rayside’s advocacy activities and leadership on equity issues relating to gender and sexual orientation. Types of records include: correspondence, reports, briefs, notes, meeting minutes, programmes, and conference posters.

Committees documented in B1998-0029 are: Ad Hoc Committee on the Status of Women; Ad hoc crisis team to handle the case of a U. of T. residence student with AIDS; Men’s Forum, Queer Sites Conference Organising Committee; Sexual Harassment Hearing Panel; and Teach-In Committee.

Groups or committees documented in B2008-0023 include: Committee on Homophobia, Men’s Forum, Positive Space Campaign, Lesbian and Gay Academic Society, Toronto Centre for Gay and Lesbian Studies, Working Group on Policy Issues (response to homelessness) and the Equity Committee for the Canadian Federation of Humanities and Social Sciences. Other files generally document Rayside’s involvement on issues of pay equity, diversity, human rights as well a gay and lesbian rights. There are two files that document the Bent on Change conferences in 2000 and 2002 of which Rayside was a key organizer. Finally, filed separately because of restrictions are two files documenting Rayside’s legal challenges against councillor Betty Disero over election funding.

Groups or committees documented in B2013-0015 include the Bill 7 Coalition, The Body Politic, Canadian Lesbian and Gay Archives, Canadian Union of Public Employees, Community Research Initiative of Toronto, Free the Press Foundation, Committee on Homophobia, Positive Space Campaign, Right to Privacy Committee, and the Toronto Gay Community Council. There are also select files related to court cases and affidavits Prof. Rayside was involved in, or wrote, and files related to activism carried out within the University of Toronto, as well as his work related to gender issues, including the Hummel case. Files are arranged alphabetically by name of the group, organization, or person they pertain to, and in rare cases, the name of the issue they concern, if no group, organization, or person name is available. This series also contains one file of photographs and one file of artifacts.

Correspondence

The correspondence series follows three distinct ordering systems. Those files that were separated as Haultain’s personal correspondence are placed at the front of the series (Box 006) and arranged in chronological order. The “personal” designation appears to have been imposed on the records by the rearrangement of Edith Birkett (see Series 8). Also included in this series are some miscellaneous Haultain correspondence files on a variety of topics, including the Ritual, and some personal correspondence that was filed with the Ritual records.

Boxes 007 through 009 are arranged chronologically and include correspondence between the Wardens and the Camps, some committee correspondence and general Kipling Ritual correspondence. The alphabetical arrangement appears to have been mostly applied following Birkett’s arrangement of the Kipling Ritual files and includes significant correspondence with Camp and Corporate Secretaries and Wardens including Norman Parkinson, Louis Trudel, Robert Marshall and Thomas Hogg. These letters are arranged alphabetically (Boxes 009 through 012).

In later accessions the records are mostly arranged in chronological order and are interspersed with various attachments such as receipts and meeting minutes. Largely these records contain the details of the activity of the office of the Camp One Secretary. For correspondence with the other Camp secretaries see also Series 7. Files (07) and (09) in B1982-0023/006 include early examples of the hand-hammered iron rings.

Expansion of the ritual

The series contains primarily correspondence with Camps Two through Nine, much of it dealing with the matter of verifying candidate credentials from different jurisdictions. There is also some correspondence of a social nature related to the establishment of authorities and Camp Wardens in new jurisdictions. The system of record keeping by Camp appears to have stopped in 1954, after which correspondence pertaining to the Camps may be found in the individual correspondence files in series 5. Arrangement is by Camp number, followed by the records pertaining to discussions of expanding the Ritual to the United Kingdom, India and the United States.

Camp Ten records pertain to a proposed camp in Ottawa, which was never established. Camp Ten, when it was established, became the camp for the Université Laval in Québec City in 1956. Camp Twelve was established by Carleton University in Ottawa in 1958. The B1995-0040 accession includes one file of material, from 1978-1987, related to the expansion of the “Links” programme of the Order of the Engineer organization, based in the United States. The records for Camp Five contain an example of an early iron ring.

Education

This series covers the Gordon Skilling’s formal education from his attendance at Grace Street Public School through Harbord Collegiate, the University of Toronto (BA 1934), taking his Rhodes Scholarship at the University of Oxford, and the writing of his doctoral thesis at the University of London. The files are arranged chronologically by degree.

For Grace Street Public School, the files include letters from his classmates at Grace Street Public School and certificates. At Harbord Collegiate, in addition to his studies and piano lessons from the Toronto Conservatory of Music, Skilling was very active in extra-curricular activities: he was president of the Literary Society, editor of the Harbord Review, battalion commander of the cadet corps, and played defence on the basketball team which won the city high school championship in 1928-1929. These activities are documented in the form of term papers, examinations, speeches, scholarship essays, and a scrapbook [box 011] that covers his activities at Harbord Collegiate and the University of Toronto, and documents his trip across North America in the summer of 1933 (see also Series I in this sous-fonds). The scrapbook contains correspondence, dance cards, maps, press clippings, programmes, announcements of student activities, pamphlets, and photographs.

At the University of Toronto, Skilling studied British and colonial history and some modern Canadian and American history, standing first in his class in all but his final year. He was very active in campus politics, including the University College Literary and Athletic Society (of which he was elected president), the Students’ Administrative Council. He helped reorganize the Fabius Club in the autumn of 1932 and a year later, following his momentous trip across North America, was a founder of the CCF Club. Other activities included serving as associate editor of the Varsity and as a member of the Hart House Debates Committee.

His academic activities are well documented in the form of term papers for each of his undergraduate years and in his BA thesis. These files and those on the CCF Club and the Hart House debates are of particular interest. They document his movement from an apolitical period in high school to an activist in the social and political ferment of the time and, soon, to accepting the socialist philosophies promoted by many of his professors at the U of T and, later, at Oxford.

In December 1933 Gordon was informed that he had been awarded a Rhodes scholarship to study at Oxford University. He left for Christ Church, Oxford, in September of 1934, where he remained until 1936. While there, he studied under what he described as “outstanding dons, including Michael Foster and A. J. Ayers, in philosophy; Roy Harrod, in economics; Keith Feiling, in British history; and the Hon. Frank Pakenham in politics and international relations. He also, in the summer of 1935, visited Central Europe for the first time and in the autumn met Sally Bright, then a student at the London School of Economics. In the fall of 1936, having received a high second at Oxford, and having had his scholarship extended, Gordon went to London to complete his doctorate under R. W. Seton-Watson, under whom his growing interest in Czech culture and politics flourished, as did his relationship with Sally. At Easter in 1936 he and Sally spent five weeks in Chepstow in Monmouthshire, a time that is preserved in an album that he compiled (see Series XII, Appendix III). In 1940 Gordon successfully defended his thesis, ‘The German-Czech national conflict in Bohemia, 1879-1893’.

The files on his graduate work contain detailed notes on readings and tutorials, especially on political theory, social philosophy and social psychology. There are also exam questions for his courses at Oxford, correspondence relating to the degrees of BA and MA (Oxon.), and a copy of his doctoral dissertation. Accompanying these files is
a scrapbook, containing press clippings, programmes, photographs and memorabilia covering his years at Oxford and the University of London, with additional material for his visit to London in 1948 [see /012].

Skilling’s diploma from Harbord Collegiate is filed in /003(03).

Photographs relating to his basketball team at Harbord Collegiate have been removed from box 008 (08) to box 009P (01) – (03). Loose photographs relating to his activities at the University of Toronto have been removed from the Harbord Collegiate/ University of Toronto scrapbook [box 011] to box 009P(04) – (07).

Skilling’s University College ‘letter’ [badge] is filed as B2001-0017/008(26).

Awards and recognition

This series consists of awards, diplomas, certificates, honorary degrees, and medals awarded to Professor Skilling throughout his career—many of which are from the Czech Republic. In May 2012, several items were loaned for an exhibition in Prague (and have been returned).

All items in box /007 are oversize materials and were tightly curled. They are now stored in individual folders within a flat document box.

The medals remain in their original cases and have been indicated below. The boxes have not been numbered individually, however they should be identifiable based on the descriptions below. All medals and other artifacts are boxed together.

When appropriate, the original Czech text has been listed along with approximate English translations in square brackets.

Biographical and personal files

This series is divided into two sections. The first contains biographical sketches and curriculum vitae, press clippings and articles about Dr. Solandt, along with photocopies of his birth certificate and copies of his will and that of his first wife, Elizabeth. There is correspondence with Elizabeth regarding their marriage, with relatives and friends, and relating to appointments. Also present is a cash book detailing personal expenses between 1923 and 1946, a diary of Dr. Solandt’s first trip to Europe in 1929.

The first portion of this series concludes with the programme for the Solandt Symposium on Organizing and Managing the Practical Application of Science to Problems in Peace and War (Queen’s University at Kingston, 1994), programs for dinners of the Royal Canadian Engineers 3rd Field Engineer Regiment and the Royal Canadian Signals 11th Signal Regiment, a presentation copy of Donald Y. Solandt’s Highways to Health, and a resolution by Donald M. Solandt (Omond and Donald’s father) to the Presbyterian Synod of Manitoba in 1915.

The second section of this series consists of diaries and daybooks (largely the latter), beginning with an account of Dr. Solandt’s trip to Europe in the summer of 1929 while he was an undergraduate at the University of Toronto. Dr. Solandt kept only the occasional diary, of which three are represented in this series. The first is for May, 1945 as the war ended in Europe. The last two both cover his trip to Japan in October-December, 1945 to study the effects of the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. These diaries are followed by "CDRB's U.K. Visit" (undated); an account book of Solandt's visit to the United Kingdom in November, 1966, and his American address book.

The remainder of the volumes in this series are daybooks and “pocket diaries”, of which Dr. Solandt created a large number. In the former, usually with the manufacturer’s label of as “diary” or “date book”, he recorded his appointments and, occasionally, his expenses and other related notations. These date from 1941, when he first went to Lulworth, to 1988. The volumes for 1945, 1947,1948, 1957, 1958, 1979, and 1986 are absent, either because they were never kept or, perhaps, were not written up in the same manner. For 1945, for instance, there are entries for January, June, and July in two different volumes, but none for the whole year. For two years (1956; 1971, where the second volume has "Mayo Muir" below Dr. Solandt's name and the entries are not in his hand) there are two volumes.

The "pocket diaries" complement the appointment books. The earliest year represented is 1945, the latest, 1988. There are no volumes for 1948-1951, 1953, 1957, and 1959-1965. For 1958, there are also two volumes containing notes on Dr. Solandt's European trip in March and appointments for another in July, and "at a glance" volumes both for 1958 and 1959.

For accounts of travel experiences, either for pleasure or work, see Series 11: Canoe trips and Series 13: Travel.

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