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University of Toronto Archives and Records Management Services Series
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Education and early career

James Guillet registered in mathematics and physics in the Bachelor of Arts program at Victoria College in the autumn of 1944. In second year he switched to honours physics and chemistry, graduating in 1948. In addition to his core honours courses, he took religious knowledge for his first two years, followed by Greek and Roman history. His interest in the latter continued after his graduation with an extra course in 1948-1949. English, French and German (reading courses in French and German his last two years) and physical training rounded out his curriculum. The only extra-curricular activity documented in this series is the Alpha Phi chapter of Delta Kappa Epsilon Fraternity.

The series begins with notebooks containing lectures, laboratory experiments and notes for his undergraduate courses. Guillet kept detailed and careful notes, recording the names of his lecturers, some of whose personal papers have not survived. In this category are Leopold Infeld and B.A. Griffiths (Applied Mathematics); Andrew Gordon and F. R. Lorriman (Chemistry); D. A.. F. Robinson, M. E. G. Waddell, and W. J. Webber (Mathematics); D. S. Ainslee, Colin Barnes and M. F. Crawford (Physics); and W. T. Brown (Religious knowledge/Greek and Roman history). Professors, whose personal papers are in the University Archives, include George F Wright (Chemistry) and Elizabeth Allin and John Satterley (Physics).

The course notes are followed by a file on Delta Kappa Epsilon Fraternity and another of correspondence with camera suppliers while a research chemist with Eastman Kodak in Tennessee.

In 1953 Guillet entered Cambridge University from which he received his doctorate in 1955. This series contains notebooks relating to laboratory projects carried out while studying under R. G. W. Norrish. The series ends with files on a conference Guillet gave on his research in France in 1954, a seminar at Vanderbilt University (1958), and employment at Eastman Kodak in Tennessee in 1959.

SAC Historical Project

Term papers for undergraduate history courses conducted by Professor Ian Radforth on the history of the Students' Administrative Council, University of Toronto, 1930-1950; this project was known as the SAC Historical Project.

Correspondence

This series contains correspondence received by Fredericka (or Frieda) before, during and after her marriage to William Dale and correspondence from her children following the death of her husband in 1921. The letters prior to her marriage predominantly document the period after graduation from Queen’s University when she attempted to find employment as a teacher or companion and her courtship by William Dale. The correspondence from William Dale does not begin until January 1900 when she is in Saranac Lake, New York, and after breaking off her engagement to Jack Munro. In addition to describing his growing love for Frieda, William also describes his teaching duties at McMaster University and his family and life in St. Marys.

The correspondence after their marriage indicates that they were frequently separated, with William teaching in Toronto or at the farm in Blanschard Twp while Frieda stayed with her parents in Cornwall or Kingston. From 1905 to his death in 1921, correspondence from her husband and some Ryckman family members concerns the birth of their children, his participation in the local government in St.Marys, farming matters and trips to Toronto. There is a file of condolence letters on the death of William Dale and includes letters from Maurice Hutton, W. S. Milner (University of Toronto), and F. H. Wallace (Victoria College).

From 1923 to 1930, Margaret (“Marnay”) and then Frances (“Fran”) wrote regularly to their mother while attending the University of Toronto. These letters describe the day to day university life from a woman’s perspective – the lectures, residence life, social activities and include impressions of friends and teachers. The letters from Frances should be read in conjunction with her diaries (See Sous fonds 2, Series 1). It should be noted that there are no letters for 1929, and the 1930 letters are mainly from Frances while she worked at Jasper Park Lodge during the months of June to August and from Margaret describing her trip to Europe that same summer.

University education

This series consists of two files containing his diplomas for Bachelor of Arts (1871) and Master of Arts (1873) degrees from the University of Toronto, and essays written for courses of study in political science.

Teaching and lecture notes

This series contains lecture notes for various courses taught by Prof. Dale, presumably at the University of Toronto, in his position as Lecturer and Associate Professor of Latin and Roman History in the Department of Classics at University College. Files relate to Roman History lectures for third and fourth year students, notes on Livy, Cicero Academica, Caesar, Lucretius, Aristotle's Ethics (with exam questions), and Ancient Greek and Roman History (with exam questions).

University of Toronto and Gymnastics training

Frances Dale’s primary interest as a student and as a teacher was physical education and training. This series contains correspondence, memorabilia, press clippings, essays and other documents relating to her student days at U. of T. and her ongoing interest in physical education. In particular are two files containing correspondence, notes, essays and clippings documenting mainly her trips to Europe to attend English Scandinavian Summer School in 1934, and the Lingaid in Stockholm with the Liverpool Physical Training College in 1939.

Honours

The files in this series contain correspondence, addresses, certificates, programmes, and a photoprint relating to honours bestowed in Professor Friedland.

The honours described herein are: Queen’s Council (Canada), 1976; James Marshall Tory Dean’s Chair, Faculty of Law, University of Toronto, 1996; an LLD degree from Cambridge University (2000); and an honorary degree from the University of Toronto (2001).

Correspondence

The correspondence files in this series are arranged alphabetically by author. They document Professor Friedland’s activities as a friend, as a student advisor and thesis supervisor, as a colleague assisting in honours bestowed on his peers, as an author, and as an authority on legal matters. They also document the increased leisure that came with official retirement.

The correspondence touches on many aspects of Dr. Friedland’s life, both personal and professional. It reveals his enormous network of contacts in legal and academic circles ranging from Lord Denning down to lowly law students. The letters cover a wide range of topics and issues, including some very topical ones such as international terrorism. Dr. Friedland received numerous requests for references from students and colleagues and, because he sat on the manuscript review committee of the University of Toronto Press, he was also asked to evaluate many manuscripts.

Some of the files contain commentary on legal issues on which Dr. Friedland was working. They may also hold drafts of articles forwarded by colleagues for commentary or presented a complementary copies [published copies have been removed, though the appropriate references have been retained], letters of congratulation and of reference. There is also correspondence regarding and programmes of conferences, and correspondence re and programmes for installation ceremonies. There are numerous invitations to dinners and other events and tributes on the deaths of friends and colleagues and notes on any of the above. Also present are greeting cards and several photographs.

Research and publications

This series contains material relating to a number of Professor Friedland’s publications. For four of his books – Double jeopardy, The trials of Israel Lipski, The case of Valentine Shortis, and The death of Old Man Rice – the files contain only a small amount of correspondence, press clippings, and promotional material. The manuscripts for these books, along with the supporting correspondence and related material, are located in Friedland’s earlier accession, B1998-0006.

The series concentrates on three of Friedland’s publications, each of which generated a number of spin-off articles and much commentary. The files for these titles complement the more complete record of activities contained in B1998-0006. Controlling misconduct in the military, his 1997 study for the federal Commission of enquiry into the deployment of Canadian Forces in Somalia, attracted much attention. So did ‘Borderline justice’, his 1992-1996 study with Kent Roach comparing jury selection in the two Niagaras, one Canadian and the other American. Friedland delivered papers on their findings at conferences and articles appeared in several journals and in a festschrift. The third publication, A place apart: Judicial independence and accountability in Canada (1995), continued the spirited public debate over the issue, one that is still going on and which is documented here in conferences, seminars, reports, and even a video, along with supporting correspondence and notes. A file on the Chinese translation of this volume is located in ‘Series VII: Other activities’. There are also drafts of papers on topics such as legal aid and the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, along with drafts of the manuscript for the eighth edition (1997) of his book (co-authored by Kent Roach), Cases and materials on criminal law and procedures.

Other activities

The records in this series document some of Dr. Friedland’s professional activities, mostly outside the Faculty of Law (he retired in 1998 but still teaches). The first three boxes focus on his relationship with the University of Toronto Press where he served on its Board of Directors and has sat on its Manuscripts Review Committee for over twenty years, including being chair since 1995. Nearly all of the files relate to the Committee, and contain extensive correspondence with other committee members and the executive of the Press, including commentary on policy decisions, including manuscripts being considered for publication.

Dr. Friedland has also sat on the board of directors of the Osgoode Society, which promotes the writing of legal history. The five files relating to this society consist principally of memoranda, minutes and supporting documentation and there are few annotations and notes. The original material consists primarily of Dr. Friedland’s 1999 oral history interview conducted as a part of the Society’s Chief Justice Bora Laskin Project and his file on the Society’s twentieth anniversary symposium in June 1999, “History goes to Court”, where he chaired the panel on ‘Other leading cases’.

Dr. Friedland was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada in 1983 (the files relating to his activities prior to 1997 are located in accession B1998-0006). In 1997 and 1999 he chaired the Innis-Gérin Medal selection committee. In 1997 he became a member of the nominating committee of Academy II (Humanities and Social Sciences) of the Royal Society of Canada and in 1998 was elected to the Council of Academy II for a three-year term. These activities, and his involvement in the 1999 RSC symposium in Edmonton, are documented here.

In October 2000 Dr. Friedland went to Beijing for ten days to discuss with Chinese judges issues relating to judicial independence. This project consisted of a series of seminars in Canada-China’s Senior Judges Training program sponsored by the Canadian International Development Agency and held at the National Judges College of China. Three different seminars were held – one on ‘judicial ethics’ in October (in which Dr. Friedland participated) and two in November on ‘judicial review’ and ‘case management’. The correspondence, notes, and reports relating to the project are contained in these files, along with drafts, in Chinese, of the published version of Dr. Friedland’s study on judicial independence, A place apart.

The remaining files in the series document a number Dr. Friedland’s other activities between 1995 and 2002. Included are a few addresses, some of his travels, and his membership in or association with a number of professional organizations such as the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research and the Law Commission of Canada. Dr. Friedland was appointed an officer of the Order of Canada in 1990 and awarded the Canada Council’s Molson Prize for ‘outstanding achievements and exceptional contribution to the enrichment of the cultural life of Canada’ in 1995. The files on the Molson Seminar and the Order of Canada reflect his ongoing responsibilities as a recipient of these awards. The last of the files document his continuing involvement in activities and issues at the University of Toronto, ranging from the Centre for International Studies’ program on conflict management to the Sports Hall of Fame selection committee.

Correspondence

The correspondents in this series number just under four hundred individuals, of whom sixty-two read and commented on the entire manuscript (these names are listed on page 723 of the 2002 hardcover edition). The correspondents include Professor Friedland’s research assistants, archivists in the University of Toronto Archives, officials and editors at the University of Toronto Press, other editors, writers and independent researchers with an interest in the University’s history, and members of the public that Professor Friedland met in the course of his research and his giving of talks about the history of the University. The majority of the correspondents are academics and administrative personnel at the University of Toronto and elsewhere who were asked for information or offered their expertise. Some of the correspondence is post-publication reaction to the book.

The research assistants (in addition to those listed in Series I), are Sara Burke, David Bronskill, Colin Grey, Graham Rawlinson and Katrina Wyman. Of the staff in the University of Toronto Archives, Harold Averill was seconded part-time to the project to direct the researchers to the appropriate sources in the University Archives, to offer his knowledge of the history of the University and to read the manuscript. Other correspondents from the Archives are Garron Wells (University Archivist), Marnee Gamble (special media archivist) and Loryl MacDonald (administrative records archivist). The University of Toronto Press, the publisher of the book, is represented by Val Cooke, Ani Deyirmenjian, Malgosia Halliop, Bill Harnum, Anne Laughlin,
Melissa Pitts, and Ron Schoeffel. Presidents (past and current) of the University represented are: Robert Birgeneau, Claude Bissell, George Connell, Robert Prichard, and David Strangway. Some of the academics and university administrators forwarded drafts of articles or excerpts from books they were writing, while others commented on the manuscript or portions thereof. Papers or lengthy memoranda and reports are present on a cross-section of activities, disciplines themes and individuals relating to the University including (with the names of the correspondents in brackets). They include the admission of women (Sara Burke), botanical gardens (John Court), chemistry (Susanne McClelland), Connaught Laboratories (George Connell), engineering (Richard White), fees policy (David Stager), gays and lesbians (David Rayside), Jacob Hirschfelder (Sheldon J. Godfrey), Margaret Eaton School (John Byl), history of medicine (Jacalyn Duffin), medicine (David Bronskill), No. 4 General Hospital at Salonika, Greece during World War I (Mary Louise Gaby), philosophy (John Slater), the proposed Wolfe’s University (D. V. Anderson), women (Katrina Wyman), and women in graduate studies (Natalie Zemon Davis).

In addition to letters, the files may contain articles, notes, memoranda, background documents and publications, and the occasional press clipping A few of the files contain historical items, dating back to 1887, that had belonged early graduates and were forwarded by their descendants, Professor Friedland’s correspondents. The detailed comments on the drafts of the book by the correspondents in this series may, for the most part, be found in Series 4.

Personal and family

This series consists of files documenting Professor Friedland’s personal and family activities. It begins with a number of files documenting Friedland’s activities as a student and professor of law at the University of Toronto, his post-retirement professional and other activities. There follow files relating to members of his family, arranged by name, which focus broadly on family affairs and more specifically on personal lives, including professional and social activities, achievements, births, weddings and deaths. These are followed by other files containing correspondence sent home from England, Europe and Israel, and relating to the Friedland residences on Hillsdale Avenue and Belsize Drive.

The files contain correspondence, appointment books, certificates, curriculum vitae, greeting cards, honours, notes, notices, legal documents such as passports and wills, medical reports, programmes, postcards, photographs, and press clippings (including obituaries).

Correspondence

This series consists of correspondence from individuals and organizations throughout most of his academic career. The correspondence covers a wide variety of subjects and issues, and should be consulted along with other series described in this finding aid.
This series is arranged in 2 groups: correspondence arranged alphabetically by name of writer and correspondence by subject. Writers include colleagues such as David Catchpole, J.D.G. Dunn, Charlie Moule, Ben Meyer, Wayne McCready and Prof. Richardson’s brother, Douglas Richardson, professor of fine art at the University of Toronto. Subject files include correspondence with academic associations, journals and publishers, on individuals such as Victor Graham, John Franklin, George Brooke, Douglas Le Pan, among others. Also included is a file “Honors and Honorarium” which supplements personal information in Series 1.

Book reviews (G.M. Craig)

Gerald M. Craig donated a number of books to the University of Toronto Library which contained a variety of inserts. These have been removed and listed below, along with the name of the book in which they were found.

Academic activity and teaching

Series consists of administrative and personal records generated by Dr. Galloway. Series includes records of his teaching activity at McGill University and the University of Toronto, research leave proposals, academic exchanges, and funding requests.

Book files

This is a small series containing correspondence and manuscripts relating to various versions of Etkin’s book on flight dynamics. Most records relate to his first book published in 1959 entitled Dynamics of Flight - Stability and Control and his 2nd version Dynamics of Flight published in 1972. In between, Etkin did publish Dynamics of Atmospheric Flight and some correspondence and reviews relate to this as well.

Grants

Files in this series document much of the same research areas documented in Series 3 but relate to those specific projects funded by granting bodies, mainly by the Canadian and American governments. Much of the early research conducted at the Institute of Aerospace Studies by Etkin and his colleagues was funded by Canada’s Defence Research Board, the U.S. Air Force’s Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR), and National Research Council of Canada (NRC) and later by NASA and the Natural Science and Engineering Research Council .

Other government agencies supported research for specific purposes relating to their operation. For example, there are files on air curtain projects for Toronto City Hall, Ontario Hydro and the Ontario Science Centre, a file on noise research for the Toronto Transit Commission, and one file on the aerodynamic stability of helicopters for the Hydro-Electric Power Commission.

Files contain papers, reports, proposals, budgets, contracts and correspondence. They are arranged alphabetically by the name of the granting agency or the subject matter of the research undertaken.

Teaching files

This series contains mainly course outlines and lecture notes for the various courses taught by Etkin at the Institute of Aerospace studies, some of which were developed by Etkin and were the first such courses to be formally taught in Canada. A few of the courses documented include Applied Aerodynamics, Dynamics of Atmospheric Flight, Numerical Methods, Fluid Mechanics, Stability and Control, Wing Theory and Social Impact of Technology.

Lecture notes

Most are titled and dated and include pencilled dates of revision on the title pages. Where loose holograph sheets were found, they were placed, in the original order, in small neutral paper folders. The bulk of the material was prepared between 1936 and 1939. The series was not completely organized, but the lectures seem to have been grouped by course.

The lecture notes consist of holograph outlines of lectures of half sheets of paper interspersed with holograph and typewritten sheets of the actual text of the presentation.

Lecture notes filed in black file boxes

Except for their organization in to file boxes, this material is of the same type as that in Series 2. The titles of the file boxes are as follows:

Romantic Poetry
Arnold II [note there is no Arnold I]
English Novel I
English Novel II
Browning
Browning II
Nineteenth Century Minor Prose
Carlyle
Seventeenth Century

Personal and general correspondence

This series contains general correspondence, curriculum vitae, letters of reference for clerical and professional staff broadly documenting his activities as teacher, administrator and author, as well as other professional activities. Correspondence files for example, relate to the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons, Providence Villa, and the University of Toronto Department of Medicine.

Grant applications

While the bulk of funding for the Lipid Research Project came from the US National Institutes of Health (see A2002-0009), funding for additional studies was sought from Canadian sources, mainly the OHF (the Ontario Heart Foundation and now the Ontario Heart and Stroke Foundation) and the national organization, Canadian Heart Foundation (now the Canadian Heart and Stroke Foundation).

Files in this series contain copies of grant applications, correspondence, and curriculum vitae for researchers and fellowship/scholarships applications for research associates involved in these studies. Studies include “Continuing Development of Nutrition Counseling Service for Patients with Hyperlipoproteinemia” and the “Study of Effect of Sugar in Practical Controlled Fat Diets on Serum Lipids in Hyperlipoproteinemia Patients”. Also included are files relating to the GXT (Graded Exercise Test) and ECG (Electrocardiogram) Labs for the purposes of the Prevalence and Coronary Prevention Trial subjects. This series also contains records relating to the first discovery of patients with APO (Apolipoprotein) CII Deficiency.

In addition to receiving funding from the OHF, Dr. Little and his team applied for funds from Health and Welfare Canada and the US Department of Health, and the National Institutes of Health, Atkinson Foundation, J.P. Bichell Foundation, Connaught Labs, Medical Research Council of Canada and St. Michael’s Hospital Research Society.

University of Toronto. Administration

Consists of correspondence, reports, minutes, and research notes which reflect the academic and administrative appointments held by Robin Harris and his involvement in the activities of the Joint University and Toronto Board of Education (1960-1961), the Committee of Presidents, the Committee on Research and Planning (1970-71), the Presidential Advisory Committee on Policy and Planning (1958-1961) the Presidential Advisory Committee on Archives (1970-71), the Library Oral History Project (1973-1987), and the Off-campus colleges committee (1963), and the Committee of the Teaching Staff (1975-1976). Also includes records relating to the Presidential Advisory Committee on the status and future of Scarborough College (1970-1971) originally owned by Prof. E. F. Sheffield, and records of the Curriculum Review and Planning Project for the Faculty of Social Work (1977).

The idea of writing a new university history focusing on higher education was a brainchild of Professor Harris and was set in motion through efforts of members of the Sesquicentennial History Project and its advisory committee. The finished product, a university history book, was to be published during the university's 150th year in 1977. As University Historian, his role is documented in the correspondence and minutes of this committee, as well as reports, proposals, drafts and outlines of an unfinished manuscript.

Education and teaching files

This series contains annotated student handbooks, programmes for football and hockey games, and an issue of the Undergrad, all from Brian Land’s undergraduate years; course notes for an MLS college universities library administration course taught largely by Margaret Cockshutt in 1955-1956; a file Land compiled while chairing the constitution revision committee of the Alumni of the Library School (1954-1959); and lecture notes for two courses he gave in the Library School, Ontario College of Education (1961-1963); and correspondence relating to his appointment as its director (1964). There is a final file relating to his Labour Gazette indexing project for the federal Department of Labour (1956-1958).

Dr. Land kept only selected lecture notes. For others, see Series IV of B1993-0026.

1962 election, Eglinton constituency

Brian Land enrolled in the School of Graduate Studies in the fall of 1960 as a political science student. The opportunity for a thesis topic arose in the spring of 1962 as a federal election loomed. He chose to conduct a study of the campaign in the Eglinton constituency in Toronto, partly because he was a resident and because he had a personal acquaintance with a number of the principals involved.

Land offered his services to Donald Fleming, the long-standing Progressive Conservative member from the Toronto riding of Eglinton, and Minister of Finance in John Diefenbaker’s government. It was the first and only time that Land worked for a Conservative candidate. His notebook records that his first meeting was on May 10
and, over the next five weeks, he immersed himself in the strategy sessions, meetings, and envelope stuffing sessions and other activities of electioneering. He attended meetings of the Liberal candidate, Mitchell Sharp, as well as those of Mr. Fleming, and collected campaign literature from all parties.

This series contains background material to the constituency, Land’s notebook, correspondence, notes, membership and voter lists, poll revisions, maps, election results by poll, addresses, campaign literature and buttons, and press coverage. The bulk of the material relates to the Fleming campaign.

The records are grouped by function.

Davenport-Dovercourt Liberal Association

Brian Land’s involvement in party politics was primarily in the Liberal party at the federal level. He was a member of the executive of the Davenport-Dovercourt Liberal Association, for which, in 1965, he carried out a study of the Davenport voting record by conducting a poll analysis for the years 1952-1963. In February of 1968 he was elected as a delegate to the forthcoming Liberal leadership convention that chose Pierre Elliott Trudeau to succeed Lester Pearson as Prime Minister.

This series contains files consisting of: the constitution, lists of executive officers, minutes, correspondence and press clippings documenting the activities of the Davenport-Dovercourt Liberal Association from 1965-1968; the questionnaire, notes, correspondence, maps and report relating to the Davenport voting record; local press coverage, poll results and capitulation sheets for Eglinton riding in 1963 when Mitchell Sharp was elected for the first time (in oversized folders); campaign literature and press clippings relating to Walter Gordon’s successful re-election in 1965; and credentials (including buttons and decals) for and press clippings about the Association’s delegates to the 1968 convention.

Talks

This series consists of one file only on talks given on the University of Toronto Library to Paul Fox’s class in political science (1a and 1b) when Prof. Land was Assistant Librarian.

Department of Veterans Affairs Project: Atherosclerosis Study

In 1952, the Canadian Department of Veterans Affairs authorized a research project to study coronary atherosclerosis, a leading cause of death among veterans [1]. This ten-year study was one of the first to look into the link of blood lipids to heart disease. It was centred at Cardiology Clinic of Sunnybrook Hospital, a teaching hospital of the University of Toronto. The Director of the Cardiology Clinic, Dr. H. E. Rykert appointed doctors J. A. Little and H. M. Shanoff to design and conduct the Atherosclerosis Project. Additional funding was also received from the Ontario Heart Foundation (OHF). A lipid laboratory for determining serum free and ester cholesterol and phospholipids with high accuracy was established at Sunnybrook Hospital. Lipoproteins were determined at the Ultracentrifuge Laboratory at McGill University. “The purpose of the project …was to study a carefully selected group of [male] veterans with proven coronary heart disease. It was proposed to follow these patients over a ten-year period and attempt to correlate the serum lipid factors with the course of their disease. A control group of male veterans without clinical manifestations of atherosclerosis [were] studied in comparison” [2]. Seventy-seven male veterans with proven coronary atherosclerosis and a control group of approximately 25 male veterans were studied. Patients ranged in age from 30 to 83. By the end of the ten-year period the group had been reduced to less than 50% of the original number due to deaths.

There were approximately 25 subjects in each decade from the fourth to eighth. These studies showed that patients with coronary heart disease have higher average serum lipid levels than ‘normal’ subjects especially in the younger decades. During the follow up period after myocardial infarction there appeared to be no relationship between survival and concentrations of total serum cholesterol and …lipoproteins” [3].

While the project ran from 1952 to 1962, articles and correspondence continued to be generated by Dr. Little and his colleagues as interest in the project continued well into the 1970s.

NOTES

  1. Other hospitals running projects were Queen Mary Hospital, Montreal, Westminster Hospital, London, Ont., Shaugnessey Hospital, Vancouver and Camp Hill Hospital, Halifax. However the Project at Sunnybrook did not have any interaction with these. (Dr. J.A. Little to Garron Wells, March 2003.)
    1. B2001-0040/018(22) “Serum lipids in carefully selected ‘atherosclerosis’ and ‘normal’ males” Paper given in Chicago, October 1954. J. A. Little, H.M. Shanoff, R.W. Van der Flier and H.E. Rykert.
  2. Ibid., Eighth Annual Report of the Atherosclerosis project 41-52. By Alick Little, Henry M. Schanoff, November 1960, p. 1

Teaching

Series 4 documents Rodney Bobiwash's teaching career at Trent University and at the University of Toronto. The series consists of course notes, lectures, syllabi, presentations and outlines for various Native Studies and Aboriginal Studies courses Bobiwash taught in the 1980s and 1990s. Bobiwash began lecturing at the University of Manitoba before moving on to Trent University and the University of Toronto. The records demonstrate Bobiwash's instructional style, which was both intellectual and practical, where students are encouraged to actively engage with the material being presented. The records also provide a good overview of the issues and challenges facing First Nations peoples in the eighties and nineties. The files are arranged chronologically. For photos from ABS320 see Series 10

Subject files

This series consists of A-Z subject files that are primarily related to Rodney Bobiwash's professional activities as a First Nations and Anti-Racist activist. The series documents the far-right political movement that took place in Toronto, and throughout Canada, in the early and mid-1990s. The series includes profiles of far-right racist agitators, white supremacist newsletters and propaganda such as the Heritage Front's Up Front, documentation of the KKK in Canada, and documents related to the anti-racist resistance mounted by Bobiwash and other activists. The series is arranged alphabetically by subject, with records dating from 1980 through to 1997. Photos of Aryan Fest 1992 can be found in Series 10, Boxes /001P and /004P. Series 1 provides a comprehensive overview of the far-right movement in Toronto, and in Canada, during the 1990s, and an understanding of the role Rodney Bobiwash and other First Nations/anti-racist activists played in combating right-wing hate groups.

Memos

This series is one file of memos mainly written by Prof. Prentice dealing with issues within the Department of History and Philosophy at the Ontario Institute of Studies in Education. Memos document Prentice’s views on staffing, research direction, and courses being offered.

Letters of recommendation

This series includes both requests received by Prof. Prentice for recommendations for former students and colleagues as well as her responses to these requests.

Student days

This series documents Alison Prentice’s days as a student at Smith College (B.A. 1955), while attending the Ontario College of Education ca. 1958 and during her Ph.D. studies in history at the University of Toronto.

B1999-0017 includes essays and papers written while a student at Smith College as well as field essays written as part of her Ph.D. comprehensive examinations at the University of Toronto. These are arranged chronologically.

B2009-0010 contains her correspondence home to her parents while a student at Smith College and during one year at the University of Geneva (1951-1955)

Manuscripts and publications

In the summer of 1983 Professor Barbeau was invited to write an article on mathematical problems for the alumni magazine, University of Toronto Graduate. Thirty-eight columns appeared between September 1984 and the summer of 1993. Associated with it
was the newsletter, After Aftermath, also compiled by Barbeau. Each column contained a cryptic crossword and posed a mathematical problem and, over the years, it drew responses from several hundred readers, including about two dozen “regulars”. The columns were assembled in book format and published as After Math: puzzles and brainteasers in 1995. This column, the resulting correspondence, and the newsletter form the bulk of this series.

Other publications in this series are, in chronological order, The Mathematical Oak, a newsletter of the Department of Mathematics edited by Professor Barbeau between 1986 and 1992; Polynomials (1989), a course book “designed to stand between the high school
and university curricula”2; Power Play (1997), the focus of which is power of numbers; a paper co-authored with P. C. Stangeby, “Some foundations of analysis for engineering science (MAT194F)” (2002); reviews of Pell’s Equations (2003); and a copy of a manuscript by Don Patterson, “University of Toronto – Honours Mathematics and Physics and Chemistry, 1927-1931; some memories as of December 1993.”

The files may contain correspondence, notes, drafts of manuscripts, page proofs, printed columns and newsletters.

Publications

Over his 38-year career, Prof. Israel has written extensively on the history of South Asian people. This series contains records relating primarily to three publication projects: the Safe Haven project for the Multicultural History Society of Ontario (MHSO) and Royal Ontario Museum, Encyclopedia of Canada’s Peoples (1999; also sponsored by the MHSO) and In the future soil: a social history of the Indo-Canadians in Ontario (1994). (See Series 3 for general correspondence related to the MHSO). There is also one file of correspondence and partial manuscript relating to publication of selected articles from History Today, and published as Pax Britannica (1968). Prof. Israel was editor and wrote the introductory essay.

The records relating to “Safe Haven. The refugee experience of five families” consist entirely of the manuscript for the book submitted to Prof. Israel in 1994 for his comments. Prof. Israel also prepared the Preface (not included) and undertook research on the Tamil community. At this time Prof. Israel was Chairman, Board of Directors of the Multicultural History Society. An exhibition was also produced by the MHSO for the new Heritage Gallery of Canada’s peoples at the Royal Ontario Museum.

The records relating to the Encyclopedia of Canada’s Peoples include manuscripts of articles on South Asian people edited by Prof. Israel and files on three of the four articles he prepared for this publication: the Ismailis, South Asians and Pakistanis. The manuscript relating to the article on Ahmadis is not included.

The records relating to In the further soil: a social history of the Indo-Canadians in Ontario consist of correspondence, manuscript, and research notes.

The remaining records deal specifically with his publications on India and Indian migration, especially to Canada. These include notes and correspondence regarding his contribution of chapters in the books, The Congress and Indian Nationalism: Historical Perspectives and Reformers, Writers and Editors: Social Transformation in Maharashtra 1830-1940. They also include notes and research regarding an incomplete work entitled Violence and Empire: James Neill in the Indian Mutiny.

Publications: "Communications and Power"

Correspondence, research material, notes and card files relating to, with drafts of, Milton Israel's book, "Communications and Power: propaganda and the press in the Indian Nationalist Struggle, 1920-1947" (1994).

University of Toronto: Lecture notes and teaching materials

This series documents courses taught by Professor Israel in the Department of History Faculty of Arts and Sciences. It consists of correspondence, course outlines, reading lists, examination questions, and lecture notes. The arrangement is by ascending course number and by lecture topic.

The courses documented in this series are:

HIS 101 : The Emergence of the Third World n.d.
HUM 101 : South Asian Civilization 2001
HIS 232 : The British Imperial Experience 1997
HIS 282 : The History of India 1978-2002
HIS 364 : Studies in the History of Modern India 1986-2005
HIS 394 : South Asian Migration 1996-2004
HIS 491/JHA 1690 : Nationalism in India 1981-2002

Grant applications/reviews

This series contains records documenting Dr. Fowler’s application for funding for various research projects throughout his academic career and then as President of his not-for-profit company, Center for Early Learning Inc. It includes files for successful as well as unsuccessful applications. Files contain correspondence, written research proposal, application and other supporting documentation. Research projects included, among others, cognitive learning, reading and general intellectual training, developmental learning, establishment of an infant early childhood research laboratory, gender differences, and early language stimulation. Note that applications relating to the Mothercraft project will be found in Series 9.

As well, files relating to Dr. Fowler’s assessment of other individual’s applications to funding bodies are also included. These include mainly requests for assessment from the Canada Council (later Social Sciences & Humanities Research Council).

Professional correspondence

This series contains correspondence between Dr. Fowler and colleagues, students, associates and others documenting his career as an academic in both Canada and the United States. The first files contain general correspondence in chronological order followed by subject files in alphabetical order. The subject files contain correspondence with particular individuals or organizations or topics. Titles of these files include correspondents such as former students such as Irene Beley, and Amy Swenson, colleagues such as J. McVicker Hunt (University of Illinois), Dr. Alice Honig (Syracuse University), Dr. Myrtle McGraw, Dr. Robert Hess (University of Chicago) and others. Topics and organizations include President’s Committee on Mental Health, and the Telegraph Hill Co-op Nursery School, among others.

Researchers are advised to check both general and subject files for related correspondence as well as other series in this accession.

Research files – Other projects

The principal research project in this series is described by Ms Winearls as “The mapping of western North America in the 19th century with particular reference to the De Fonte fantasy and the earlier ‘Sea of the West’ fantasy”. (The maps showed purported water routes between the west coast
and the Northwest Passage or the central North American plains.) This project was begun in the early 1990s but not completed as planned and led to an article on one particular map, “Thomas Jefferys Map of Canada and the mapping of the western part of North America, 1750-1768’, that appeared in 1996. The second research project is on carto-bibliographic analysis and methodology re 18th century printed maps of North America [1].

The series begins with map bibliography & notes, consisting of preliminary bibliographic entries for Mer de l’Ouest/Riviere Longue de l’Ouest, and an early draft of a bibliography of maps relating to the De Fonte fantasy, followed by files of maps arranged by area: World, Arctic, Western hemisphere, North America, and Canada. There are also source files with notes, correspondence, and copies of documents, maps and other source material, covering De Fonte, early Canadian maps, and archival sources in British Columbia, the United States and Europe. Much of the photocopied material that has been retained is annotated. These files are followed by research notes and correspondence on Northwest-De Fonte and biographical sources, and on related maps, along with requests for microform and maps. Included are reproductive copies of maps and other copies.

The files for the research project on carto-bibliographic analysis and methodology re 18th century printed maps of North America include sample entries, copies of maps and published bibliographies and sources (largely annotated), along with bibliographical analyses and North American maps sources for analysis. Some oversized maps are included.

The series ends with Ms Winearls’ research on book illustration in Canada for the History of the Book in Canada project. Three volumes were planned under the general editorship of Patricia Lockhart Fleming and Yvan Lamonde, and they appeared between 2004 and 2007. Ms Winearls’ contribution was to the first volume. The files contain correspondence, contracts, notes, and source material. Drafts of the manuscript are in Series 8.

B2016-0009 contains research Ms Winearls did on Canadian bird artist J. Fenwick Lansdowne from 2000-2013. Included are original photographs of the artist, interviews, notes, compiled bibliography and exhibition list. There is also collected photocopies of ephemera relating to the artist, reviews of his works and exhibition catalogues. Finally, Winearls collected copies of correspondence and contracts between Lansdowne and his agent Bud Feheley (restricted to 2026).

NOTES

[1] The descriptive portion of this series is drawn largely from notes provided by Ms Winearls in a container list she provided to the compiler of this inventory.

Manuscripts and publications

Ms Winearls has published widely on maps and map librarianship, beginning in 1967. This series consists of book reviews, articles, directories, exhibition catalogues, and chapters in books. A file in this series may contain draft of a manuscript, along with notes, covering correspondence, and reviews. The arrangement is chronological by date of publication.

Very few of Ms Winearls publications are missing from this series. The files relating to the writing of her major bibliographic work, Mapping Upper Canada, 1780-1867, are in Series 9. Files relating to Editing Early and Historical Atlases are found with the Conference on Editorial Problems files in Series 4.

A poster advertising the book, Ontario’s History in Maps (1984), which contains a cartobibliographic essay by Ms Winearls, “Sources for early maps in Ontario,” has been removed from B1998-0013/002(21) to /002(29).

University of Toronto Administration

This series records Prof. Eddie’s personal employment arrangements with the University of Toronto from his appointment to the Department of Economics in 1971 as well as administrative activities relating to course and programme development, and committee activities. Files relating to his employment arrangements include annual activity reports and salary administration. There are also files relating to development of the European Studies programme of which he was Director, the International Relations Programme, the establishment of the Chair in Ukrainian Studies and his role as chair of the search committee, and his work as Academic Co-ordinator of the Joint Initiative in German and European Studies/DAAD (1998-2001). In addition there are three files as member of the Executive Committee of RALUT (Retired Academics and Librarians University of Toronto) (2003-2008).

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