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Biographical

This series gives a good overview of Prof. Prentice’s career. It includes biographies, C.V.s, correspondence on appointments, newspaper clippings, honours received and photographs.

Maritime photographs

These photographs of maritime architecture in Canada, include external and internal views of government buildings, historical sites, streetscapes, industrial buildings, churches and old homes. These were most likely taken around 1962 and were used for several publications including Building by the Sea and The Maritimes. Cities most widely represented in this series include Quebec City, St John N.B, St. Andrews N.B., Dorchester N.B., Fredericton N.B., Charlottetown P.E.I, Halifax N.S., Lunenburg N.S., St. Johns Nfld., Petty Harbour Nfld..

This series consists of b&w proofs and larger b&w and colour prints. Proofs are arranged by their original number order and are identified by town and building. Larger prints have been grouped by their geographic location of province and town.

Photographs of European trip

These photographs were taken by Acland during a trip to Europe in 1964 and document the architecture and landscape of various cities. These images would have been used for research and to illustrate several published works including a series of articles entitled “Building and Land:…” in Canadian Architect starting in 1968. Interior photographs of cathedrals and churches would have also formed the basis for his research on vaults, some of which were reproduced in his 1972 book Medieval Structure : The Gothic Vault.

Countries documented in this series include: Central European countries such as Czechoslovakia, Poland, Hungary; England; France; Greece; the Islamic Middle East such as Turkey, Iran and Egypt; Italy, Portugal, Spain and Yugoslavia. There are also photographs of Nigeria taken by a photographer Grant Wanzel. These are included here because they were originally filed with the European photographs.

Vault photographs

These images are those selected mainly for printing in Acland’s book, Medieval Structure : the Gothic Vault. University of Toronto Press, 1972. Some may not have actually made it into the final printing. They show architectural features of various structures throughout Europe, Africa and the Middle East. Originally these were probably taken around the same time as European photographs described in Series 8 – possibly during the same trip since many of the places are common to both series of prints.

This series contains the following arrangement:

/004P 247 photoprints: b&w ; 8x10 or smaller
4 photoprints: colour ; 8x10 or smaller
Mainly 8x10s these prints were identified as “European Arches”. Most are identified by location and have therefore been sorted alphabetically by place name. Except for a small number, Acland was the photographer. Some are numbered and mostly likely correspond to their use in the book but the correlation is unclear since the illustrations in the book are not numbered.

/004P 31 photoprints: b&w ; 8x10
These prints were originally arranged by chapter and this arrangement has been kept. Notations made by Acland on the back often note the page number.

/005P- 197 negatives: b&w ; 8x10

/007P These are enlarged negatives likely used for printing. Each is individually foldered since adhesive from the tape used to border their edges has made them tacky. Originally, all would have been sorted by chapter but this arrangement was lost. Whatever arrangement existed was maintained and where possible folders are annotated with the page number. The original folder has also been kept since it lists all images found in that chapter. Negatives not matched to their chapters are filed in Box /007. It is possible that some of these may not have been used in the book.

/001P 57 negatives : b&w ; 4x3.5 or smaller
29 negatives : colour ; 21/4’ x 21/4”
These are mostly original negatives of vaults many of which Acland identified. Some appear to copy negatives. There is no particular arrangement although original groupings were maintained.

Slides

This series includes slides most likely used to illustrate lectures, publications and possibly CBC programs in which he was involved. Most slides are undated but or identified as to their site location. There is also one box of slides of architectural student projects.

Negatives

These are mainly 35 mm strip negatives mostly likely relating to the photos in series above although a relationship is not easily established. There are two sets:

B2001-0044/003P
515 negatives: colour
Most are European photographs but the number system does not match those found in Series 8 (Europe 1964 photos). Most were probably taken for vault research and have been cut and resorted according to location and architectural characteristics. There are also photographs of proposed plans for Toronto City Hall and other buildings in the Toronto area.

B2001-0044/010P
Approx. 1500-2000 negatives: b&w
These are rolls of black and white negatives. Approximately half are photos and drawn figures for the Gothic Vault. Others are images of various buildings and architectural drawings and models. Unlike most of the images in other series, these are completely unidentified and may have served as a preservation set.

Biographical

This series gives researchers a good overview of Prof. Hume’s career and highlights. It includes biographical sketches, C.V., clippings, awards and correspondence regarding his various appointments. Photographs of Prof. Hume and relating to his career have also been placed in this series including portraits, a photo of Prof. Hume at a 1969 IFIP meeting and early computer installations in the Computer Centre. Finally, there is one framed painting of the Sanford Fleming building that hung in his office.

Talks and addresses

This series documents Prof. Hume’s talks and addresses on various subjects. General interest topics often discussed the growth of computers in society, changes in technology, and the development of computer languages. These were written for general public consumption at invited lectures. There are also a few talks on physics.

More technical talks and addresses focused on computer programming, computer graphics, and computer languages such as TRANSCODE, FORTRAN and Turing. These were most often delivered at professional meetings and symposiums. Prof. Hume recorded a series of lectures with accompanying slides on FORTRAN and another computer language called LISP. These were recorded as a type of tutorial on how to use the University’s computer and were designed to teach computer programming to a wide range of academic users at the University of Toronto. This series contains a copy of the tapes on reel to reel as well as some of the accompanying slides - although it is not clear exactly how they originally matched up. Of particular note are the very early views of the Computer Center and its computers that were included in the slide lecture showing the IBM 650, the IBM 7090 and the IBM 7094.

Files are arranged chronologically with undated talks placed at the end. They contain notes, copies of the talks, overhead transparencies, related event programs and correspondence. In addition, there is a card index of talks that essentially gives outlines and notes. Some of these are related to files in this series while others are unique talks. Apart from the FORTRAN lectures, there is one taped lecture of Prof. Hume giving a key note address at the New College Honours Students dinner.

Broadcasting and film

Prof. Hume and Prof. Donald Ivey of the Department of Physics were pioneers in educational television, having developed their first 12 part program “Focus on Physics” in 1958. This was co-sponsored by CBC and the University of Toronto. The success of this series was followed up the next year by “Two for Physics”. Both series eventually aired on the National Educational Television (N.E.T.) in the United States. Other programs that followed include:

1960 – 15 short programs on Physics for children produced by CBC in cooperation with N.E.T. for joint use in Canada and United States

1962 – “The Ideas of Physics” – 4 programmes
1963 – “The Nature of Physics” – 5 programmes
1966 – “The Constant of Physics” – 4 programmes
All of these were for in-school broadcasts to Canadian high schools produced by CBC with the National Advisory Council on School Broadcasts

1960-1965 – 18 programmes for “The Nature of Things”, produced by CBC.
The program “The Nature of Things” is still today a staple of Canadian educational television. Hume and Ivey helped lay the foundation for such a successful broadcast run.

By 1960, their success in educational television spilled over into film where they were commissioned by the Physical Science Study Committee (PSSC) in the United States to do four films: “Frames of Reference”, “Periodic Motion”, “Universal Gravitation” and “Random Events”. All of these were created for distribution in high schools. In 1962, “Frames of Reference” won Edison Foundation award for the best science film and “Random Events” received a silver medal from the Scientific Institute in Rome.

This series contains a fairly complete set of scripts for all the titles noted above. Moreover, there is a 16 mm release print for each of the four films and one sound recording of one program from “The Constant of Physics” series. There are also still images from “Frame of Reference” and a file on the Edison Award.

For a good overview, researchers should begin by consulting reports written by Hume and Ivey for most of the television series. They detail the development of each theme. In addition, there is correspondence and contracts with CBC, correspondence with Educational Services Incorporated and the PSSC as well as program guides, clippings, published reviews, correspondence from viewers, and one 1962 audience response report for a “Nature of Things” programme.

University of Toronto

This series documents some of Prof. Israel’s activities as teacher and administrator at the University of Toronto. It includes correspondence regarding his tenure as a University of Toronto professor, especially during the period when he was vice provost (1974-1979), Director of the Graduate Centre for South Asian Studies (1981-1991), and Chairman of the Robert F. Harney Memorial Trust. Also included are files relating to the Sikh studies program, initiated after the Conference on Sikh History and Religion in the Twentieth Century (1987) organized by the Centre for South Asian Studies. According to Prof. Israel “the program became quite controversial and attracted attacks from orthodox Sikh critics both in Canada and outside”. The material on the Sikh community also includes his 1990 report prepared for the 5 Ks Interministerial Committee Government of Ontario entitled “Sikhs and their religious symbols: an Ontario perspective”.

Photographs

B2002-0009/001P(01)-(05): Sikh Studies Conference: photographs taken at a dinner in the home of Prof. Israel.
B2002-0009/001P (06)-(07): Photographs of the office in the Centre for South Asian Studies, room 2054 Sidney Smith, 1985
B2011-0004/001(18): Photographs of M. Israel at the Indo-Canadian Institute, 1980, with Canadian students, and Resident Director

Addresses, talks and seminars

This series consists of research notes and background materials regarding India, South East Asia and Kashmir. It is arranged by subject.

Research

This series consists of research notes and background materials regarding India, South East Asia and Kashmir. It is arranged by subject.

Early biographical information

The records in this series provide biographical information on Marion Walker’s early life, 1921-1942. Series includes 7 photographs. Subjects are: 5 portraits of Marion Walker; the Phi Beta sorority, 1940; and the University College graduating class, 1942. Also included is a scrapbook of newspaper clippings concerning Ms. Walker’s amateur golfing activities, 1937-1941.

Department of Fine Art

Between 1957 and 1985, Marion Walker was a professor in the history of stage and costume design in the Department of Fine Art and its Graduate Centre for the Study of Drama. In this capacity, she taught Stage Design (FAS 333Y) and 18th Century Stage Design (FAS 435). She also assisted in the staging of the Graduate Centre for the Study of Drama’s 1974 productions of Marsh Hay and T’is a Pity She’s a Whore.

The records in this series document Ms. Walker’s teaching and research activities in the Department of Fine Art. The textual records mainly consist of subject files containing research and lectures notes. Topics covered include: correspondence, Baroque theatre, Ferdinando Bibiena, Comedia dell’ Arte, Elizabethan theatre, Fratelli Galliari, Greek theatre, Filippo Juvarra, Renaissance theatre, opera, research grants and Wagner’s The Ring. Also included is a scrapbook commemorating Ms. Walker’s retirement from the Department in 1985.

This series also consists of approximately 130 slides used to teach the History of Stage and 18th Century Stage Design. Subjects include the stage designs of Marsh Hay, Ferdinando Bibiena, Filippo Juvarra, Fratelli Gallieri and Pietro Gonzaga.

Also included are 10 stage plans created by Ms. Walker for the Graduate Centre for the Study of Drama’s 1974 productions of Marsh Hay and T’is a Pity She’s a Whore.

The series also contains one scrapbook of costume designs for the Graduate Centre for the Study of Drama’s production of Fuente Ovejuna (The Sheep Well), [n.d.].

General correspondence

This series is made up of general correspondence files, arranged alphabetically by the name of the correspondent or by the name of the person about whom Prof. McNeill is corresponding. Incoming and outgoing correspondence cover such areas as research, supervision of graduate students, editing of papers, trips, as well as numerous letters of reference for past students and colleagues seeking recommendations for appointments, tenure, awards and grants. Some correspondence relates to consultancy work such as files on the Ministry of the Solicitor General, Advanced Medical Systems, Inc., and Scintrex Ltd.. There is extensive correspondence with colleagues in Australia regarding his involvement in the development of a body compositional laboratory at Prince Henry Hospital in Melbourne.

The files often contain attached documentation to the correspondence. This is most often the case when corresponding with or about students under his supervision. Files may include drafts of thesis, research reports and Ph.D. oral assessments.

University of Toronto Administrative Committees

This series documents some of Prof. McNeill's administrative positions within the University including member of the Slowpoke Reactor Committee (1970-1991); the Council of the Faculty of Medicine (1962-1967); the Presidential Advisory Committee on Appointments and Terms of Office (Haist Committee) (1964-1968); as well as various administrative positions with Trinity College. The amount and type of records vary from one position to another but usually include copies of minutes, correspondence, reports and memoranda and some original correspondence between Prof. McNeill and other committee members.

Linear Accelerator Committee of the Department of Physics

Records in this series include both the records of this committee as well as the documentation leading up to the design, building and financing of the Electron Linear Accelerator (Linac) in the Department of Physics. The committee itself, of which Prof. McNeill was Chair from 1966-1971, was responsible for overseeing the use of this apparatus for research in nuclear physics, medical biophysics and chemical engineering. This sub-series gives insight into early nuclear research conducted on campus.

Included are general files containing correspondence, minutes, reports on research, project proposals; grant files; sub-committee files; internal reports; and yearly progress reports. Also included are records relating to its planning and design which took six years from the time it began to be seriously considered in 1960 to the time it opened in 1966.

Records are grouped by type of file and are arranged more or less chronologically. Yearly progress reports, covering the period from 1966 to 1975 are filed at the end.

Archives of Newfoundland Mines Study

This series is a collection of documentation in form of reports, data, research materials and articles relating to the study of radon levels in Newfoundland Mines conducted by the Federal Government in the 1960s. Most of this material is copies given to Prof. McNeill to conduct his research on radon exposure for the Atomic Energy Board of Canada. There is however a scattering of his original notes and correspondence from the 1995 that he produced while writing his report entitled Measurements of Radon Progeny in Canadian Mines before 1968. The report itself can be found in Series 8 – Consultancy, Box B2005-0004/003 (13). The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission has requested that these records remain with Kenneth G. McNeill Fonds since Prof McNeill was their last custodian.

Graphic material

Photographs document members of the Blake and Wrong families including Samuel H. Blake and his wife Rebecca Blake, Edward Blake and Gerald Blake, as well as cousins Murray, Hume and Harold Wrong. Most are studio portraits, some of which are unidentified. There is one album depicting life at the summer residences Point au Pic and Murray Bay.

Photographs

This series consists of photographs belonging to Dr. Welsh representing his professional life.

Elgin Rowland Hastings

This series is comprised almost wholly of material assembled by Elgin Hastings while a student in the then new five-year Bachelor of Medicine program at the University of Toronto between 1908 and 1913. The records consist primarily of a comprehensive collection of course notes, laboratory notes and drawings. Hastings kept detailed notes, dated his notebooks and many of the lectures and exercises, and often recorded the name of the professor or tutor teaching the course. He also preserved a list of all the courses for which he had registered at the beginning of each academic year and the professors who taught them. He did, however, take some additional courses that were not listed; one example is a course in psychiatry taught by Ernest Jones during the Easter term 1912. The course notes are arranged by academic year and alphabetically by name of course within each year.

The series also contains certificates relating to Hastings’ medical education and professional certification, a student handbook, memorabilia of his extra-curricular activities, photographs of some of his classmates, photographs including family members and the graduating Class of 1913 (Medicine), and a transcript of the evidence given in a court case in 1914 (two pages of Hastings’ evidence have been torn out).

Helen Mary Ferguson Hastings

This small series documents her education and her teaching experience up to the time of her marriage. There are several files of letters, mostly from family members, received at the time of and shortly after her marriage; and later correspondence with Elgin, her mother, various relatives and friends and Ulrike Dobe, her future daughter-in-law. There is also a file of correspondence with her sister, Bessie, during the last years of the latter’s life, along with a copy of her will, and correspondence regarding her estate. This is followed by a file of letters to her sister-in-law, Louise Hastings, written in 1959. Other files contain memorabilia and activities with the Women’s Canadian Club of Toronto. Finally, there is a photograph of John Andrew Duff and classmates in civil engineering, School of Practical Science, taken about 1887. Duff was an uncle (his sister, Mary, was Helen’s mother) who received his BA from University College in 1887. In the fall of that year he entered civil engineering at the School of Practical Science, where he was registered for one year.

Personal files

This series contains material documenting the personal side of Dr. Hastings’ life. It begins with genealogical and biographical information about and articles regarding Hastings and his family, followed by copies of his curriculum vitae (1961-1994). Other items include his baby book (1928), membership cards and memorabilia, and miscellaneous writings. There is a file of badges and certificates from the Royal Life Saving Society and files on awards and honours, in particular from the Pan American Health Organization, the University of Toronto alumni, and the Canadian Public Health Association. There are several files on trips, beginning when Hastings was a teenager, and on the deaths of his parents.

The larger part of this series consists of daybooks documenting Dr. Hastings’ activities between 1955 and 1967. These take the form of quarterly volumes, a few of which are missing. There are also a number of casual and formal photographs of Dr. Hastings and slides of his father’s funeral. The arrangement of the daybooks and the photographs is chronological.

An electronic version of Dr. Hastings' CV is attached (in pdf)

Education

John Hastings began his education at the Normal Model School in Toronto in 1933, went on to the University of Toronto Schools in 1939, and from there into the pre-medicine program at the University of Toronto in 1945. He received his MD in 1951, then did post-graduate work in the School of Hygiene, receiving his diploma in 1954.

This series documents Hastings’ progress through the educational system and the development of his academic and non-curricular activities. The files on the Normal Model School contain certificates, class assignments, press clippings, drafts of two plays that Hastings wrote, and the school badge. Hastings’ interests in drama were carried over to the University of Toronto Schools, where he wrote a number of plays, drafts of which have survived in this series, and one of which was published in its yearbook, the Twig, in 1943. At UTS, he also honed his public speaking and debating skills; the predominant themes of his public addresses being democracy, the British Empire and World War II. Hastings was a reporter to the Twig for his form and editor in 1943-1944 (his editorial files have survived). He was also a member of the school band and the cadets, developed an early interest in politics and became an active member of the young Progressive Conservatives. At the same time he maintained a high academic standing.

In 1944 Hastings entered a world-wide essay competition sponsored by the Royal Empire Society. His entry was one of three to receive a prize. This encouraged him to enter other essay contests while a pre-medical student at the University of Toronto (1945-1947). At the U of T, he was a member of the Hart House Debates Committee from 1949 to 1951; his notes reveal something of the parry and thrust of debating at that time. Among other activities, Hastings was a member of the Board of Stewards of Hart House and the U of T Historical Club and in 1948 he participated in the Mock Parliament. The remainder of this series contains notes, correspondence, certificates, and photographs relating to Hastings’ acquisition of his medical degree and his post-graduate diploma in public health.

A listing of his activities, academic and otherwise, while a student is found in B2002-0014/014(09).

Correspondence

This series includes some professional correspondence but much of it consists of letters to and from Dr. Hastings’ parents, his grandmother, his aunts, Bessie Ferguson, Betty Graham and Louise Hastings, and other relatives and friends met over a lifetime of public service and devotion to his church. The last influenced many of his interests outside his academic and administrative work at University of Toronto, and is reflected in thirty years of correspondence arising from visits to India and Japan beginning in the early 1950s.

While most of the correspondence is filed chronologically, the first files contain exchanges of letters with the Drever family (especially Michael Drever), the politician Eugene Forsey, and the relatives mentioned above. Dr. Hastings met the Drevers from Montevideo, Uruguay, in 1959, when he went on a tour of Latin America to observe preventive medicine and public health teaching. He was to return to Uruguay at the end of 1964 as a member of the World Health Organization/Pan American Health Organization program on health planning in Latin America that also entailed visits to Chile and Argentina (he had a regular correspondent from Santiago after that date).

Dr. Hastings first went to India in 1953 as the University of Toronto’s representative to the World University Service International Seminar (the files for which are in Series 5). While there he first visited the Christian Medical College and Hospital in Vellore, near Madras, that received support from the Canadian Council of Churches through its Vellore/Ludhiana Committee, of which he was a member from 1962 to 1975 and to which he was an advisor from 1975 to 1981. Over the years Dr. Hasting was to provide financial support to many young people he met in India, helping some with their education overseas and others to immigrate to Canada. In 1955 he had the opportunity to go abroad again, this time as a faculty member of the WUS International Seminar, Japan, followed by a month for studying medical education and medical care in that country. He wrote a widely praised report on his return, and kept up a voluminous correspondence with many of the people he had met. In later years Dr. Hastings came to regard these two visits as seminal events in his life.

The first files of chronological correspondence is primarily with his parents, consisting largely of letters sent and received while at Camp Kagawong on Balsam Lake near Fenelon Falls, Ontario where Hastings was to spend many summers from about 1937 and where he was sometime counsellor and a director. (Correspondence from his vacation trips to Quebec in 1943 and 1946 is filed in Series 1). From 1953 and his visit to India, the chronological arrangement is divided in each year into the following categories: general, parents (later ‘mother’, India and (from 1955) Japan.

The volume of correspondence tails off in the mid-1970s; one file covers the years 1986-1997.

Professional Activities: University of Toronto

In the three years before Dr. Hastings was hired full-time at the University of Toronto in 1956, he combined a donship at South House, Burwash Hall, Victoria College with teaching courses in the Department of Public Health Administration, where he was employed as a fellow in medical care administration without salary (he did have two fellowships). He made enduring friendships from his stint as a don and the relative freedom he was given allowed him, as has been shown in the last series, to travel to India and Japan with the World University Service (further files on his travels with WUS are found in Series 5). In July of 1954 he embarked on a trip to western Canada to gain first-hand experience of the integration of medical care administration with the administration of a provincial health department. He worked in the Medical Services Division of the Department of Health in Saskatchewan until the end of August. Then, for three weeks, he was on the train, first to the West Coast, stopping en route to consult with medical officials in Alberta and British Columbia, and then returning to Toronto.

This first section of this series documents Dr. Hastings’ history of employment at the University, his activities in his early years, some of his teaching experience, and various ceremonial occasions. It begins with detailed files on Dr. Hastings’ two years (1953-1955) as a residence don, including correspondence, notes on residence discipline and items about student life generally. Next are the notebooks, diaries and letters documenting his trip across Canada. These are followed by a file [box 023, file 13] with correspondence and course material relating to his activities as a fellow in public health and preventive medicine and by files documenting the history of his employment at the University of Toronto. Next come the few files of lecture material (ca. 1953-1961, 1981-1982) in this accession, including documentation on a thesis supervised (1989-1991). This portion of the series concludes with files on ceremonies at the University and at York University between 1957 and 1965, including the installation of two chancellors and of Claude Bissell as president, and a file on the honorary doctorate bestowed on Hafldan Mahler in 1990.

The remainder of the files in this series is arranged from the broader University activities to the more specific; they document in detail Dr. Hastings’ role in planning and policy making. The first section contains files [box 025/(01)-(02)] on activities of the Governing Council relating to a sub-committee of its Planning and Resources Committee, of which Hastings was a member, and to the School of Hygiene. They are followed by presidential and presidential advisory committees and task forces on the future of the School of Hygiene (1972); gerontology, which Hastings chaired (1976-1977); the future of health care in Ontario (1991), and health services (1993); provostial reviews of the faculty of medicine (1986-1987 and 1992); and the Decanal Community Health Review task force (1987-1988). This section concludes with a study tour of Lithuanian health care facilities in 1995.

The second section, beginning with box 025, file 11, documents the activities of the Faculty of Medicine, primarily in its relationship to the School of Hygiene and community health programs at the University of Toronto. Included are such activities and events as the 60th anniversary of the School of Hygiene (1988); the Task Force on Professional Masters Programs in Community Health (1975-1977) and the Interfaculty Committee of Heath Science Deans on Outreach Project (1978-1979), both of which Hastings chaired; the Community Health Review and Planning Task Force (1978-1979); the faculty’s external review of the Division of Community Health (1978-1980) and its Decanal Community Health Review Task Force (1987-1988), of which Hastings was a member and which is thoroughly documented [see box 027].

The files relating to activities of the School of Hygiene from the 1950s to the 1970s [box 028], include its comparative study on the health care delivery systems in Sault Ste. Marie and St. Catharines; Dr. Hastings had a deep and long-term interest in the Sault project. Later Dr. Hastings was a member of the advisory committee on the history of the School of Hygiene, Within Reach of Everyone; there are files relating to the second volume. There are also files on the anniversary symposium of the School (1973) and undergraduate students’ reaction to the Hastings report of 1972 (see also Series 7).

Next are a few files documenting Dr. Hastings involvement with the Department of Health Administration, primarily between 1973 and 1981. The principal activity documented is the Canadian Health Administrator Study (1978-1981), for which Dr. Hastings was the principal investigator. Other files document the W. K. Kellogg Foundation grants, seminars and a name change in 2001 to the Department of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation.

The fifth section [box 029] begins with the formation of the Division of Community Health in the Faculty of Medicine in 1975, as the School of Hygiene was being dismantled, and the appointment of Dr. Hastings as associate dean. The principal subsequent activities documented here are the annual refresher course (1978), an advisory task force on the development of a professional master’s degree (1975-1978), a strategic plan for the Division (1990), and the 1992 divisional report. The files on the Graduate Department of Community Health [box 030] concentrate on program changes and reviews between 1979 and 1996 and on student research days (1990, 1997, 1998).

Issues relating to environmental health at the University of Toronto have traditionally been spread across several disciplines. The Faculty of Medicine’s Occupational and Environmental Health Unit was one such body in the early 1980s. In 1988 Dr. Hastings was appointed a member of a task force on environmental and human health, and throughout 1990 a work party on environmental and human health was the venue for discussions between the U of T and McMaster University over the creation of a joint Institute of Environment and Health which emerged during the following two years. Records here document the discussions and planning that took place and include the inaugural workshop in November 1991.

The next three boxes [031-033] contain records detailing the planning for and the first decade (1988-2001) of the Division of Community Health’s Centre for Health Promotion.
Included are initial proposals for the Centre, files on the interim management committee and the search first for an interim and then a permanent director, and meetings of the Centre’s advisory board. There are also files on workshops and seminars and a proposal on devolution submitted to the Premier’s Council on Health, Well-Being and Social Justice in 1993. These are followed by files on the Centre for International Health and the Department of Public Health Sciences, a 1997 merger of the departments of Behavioural Science and Preventive Medicine and Biostatistics. This section concludes with another task force (2002), on the future of the Centre for Health Promotion.

There then follows files documenting two City of Toronto projects from the end of the 1980s, the Board of Health’s Healthy Toronto 2000: a strategy for a healthier city and the city’s health care fund, both of which attracted considerable interest in the Faculty of Medicine, and files on Hastings’ participation in an advisory committee of the Wellesley Hospital relating to its urban community health project.

The series concludes with files on seven research proposals, of which five were rejected. The accepted projects were an annotated bibliography on the rationalization of child and material health services (1990) and of stakeholder perceptions of changes in the health care system (1991).

Other activities

The records in this series underscore the impact of an upbringing where the tenets of Christianity, public service, and duty were emphasized. They begin with thirty years (1937-1969) of files on Camp Kagawong, a privately owned boy’s camp on Balsam Lake, where Dr. Hastings spent his summers as a young boy enjoying the outdoors. The leadership qualities he displayed led to his becoming a camp counsellor (1944-1945) and, from 1946-1950, director of the Bantam Section and instructor in nature, first aid, swimming and games. During those years he dramatized three folk tales for presentation. At the weekly chapel services, he often delivered homilies or ‘sermonettes’, a practice he continued throughout his association with the camp that closed in 1975. Dr. Hastings’ activities at Camp Kagawong are well documented through notes, certificates, correspondence (much of which is in Series 3) scripts for theatrical presentations, chapel service programs and sermonettes, and some of the annual camp catalogues, photographs and artifacts. The arrangement of the files is largely chronological.

The material on Camp Kagawong is followed by files on Canadian Council of Churches and its Vellore/Ludhiana Committee, of which Dr. Hastings was a member from 1962-1975 and to which he was an advisor from 1975 to 1981. These are followed by files on the Christian Medical College in Vellore, India, including extensive ones documenting the work of the international review team that visited Vellore in 1979 and produced a report on its findings in 1980.

Next are files on the coronation of Queen Elizabeth in 1953; the Developing Countries Farm Radio Network, of which Dr. Hastings was a member of the board; Emmanuel College, where he was a University representative on its council and a member of its curriculum committee; the King’s College Fund which in 1985 organized a Canadian study tour of health services in Britain; and on Pickering College in Newmarket, Ontario. A member of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada, Dr. Hastings was active in its youth clubs in the 1940s. He attended the 1948 convention at which George Drew was selected leader and took part in the federal election the following year.

Dr. Hastings’ place of worship for many years was St. Andrew’s United Church at 117 Bloor Street East in Toronto. He played a very active role in its affairs, serving on its board, many of its committees, was a member of its Men’s Club and, on occasion, delivered the sermon of the week. The files cover the years from 1952 to 1973, when St. Andrew’s and the Yonge Street United Church amalgamated and include correspondence, notices of services, minutes of meetings, reports, and drafts of three sermons.

This series ends with a number of files on Dr. Hastings’ involvement in several activities of the United Church of Canada, centring around his being a member of its task force on health services (1985-1987) and its Division of Mission in Canada’s health task group (1991-1994). Included are correspondence, minutes, memoranda, notes, drafts of reports, and a video, “Taking the pulse of Canadian health care” that grew out of the work of the health task group.

Photographs

Photographs of Dr. Rhodes at various professional meetings and functions. There are also several portraits of Dr. Rhodes in his office and at his desk as well as passport shots of himself and his wife Harriette.

Education and personal activities

The series documents Allan Irving’s activities as a doctoral candidates at the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Social Work, between 1976 and 1983 : his application and registration; the fellowship he received from the department of National Health and Welfare of Canada; lecturer position at the Faculty for Professor Albert Rose; doctoral seminars he attended, papers he prepared during his graduates years and academic results. The series also documents his membership with historical associations such as the Ontario Historical Society and the University of Tennessee’s Social Welfare History Group. The series documents Allan Irving’s applications for teaching positions in Canadian universities, from 1982 to 1994 ; his nomination for the Ontario Confederation of University Faculty Association’s Teaching Award in 1994, nomination prepared by Marion Bogo, associate professor and acting dean of the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Social Work, and Mary Lee. This series also partially documents Irving’s friendship with professors and/or colleagues.

The series consists of 37 files including application for fellowship and report on his doctoral work at the intention of the department of National Health and Welfare of Canada ; statements of academic records ; library card; seminar notes; working notes, bibliographies, drafts and final version of papers (some annotated) ; curriculum vitae ; letters of support ; personal correspondence and press clippings. The series also includes one photograph of Allan Irving with James Gripton’s son, Stuart, at the age of 6 in Calgary (Alberta) ; one photograph of Ernie Lightman’s daughter, Naomi.

University of Toronto. Administrative activities

This series documents Allan Irving’s appointment at the University of Toronto Faculty of Social Work (FWS), his promotions, workload and salary progression from 1985 to 1999; his participation into administrative activities at the FWS as a member of various committees and groups. It also partially documents his exchanges with Faculty colleagues ; his participation into a debate on Faculty fundraising campaign in the corporate sector and over the adoption of the FSW strategic plan ; his participation to some Faculty social events such as retirement reception for Donald Bellamy, Elspeth Latimer and Dot Ross, and other events like graduation parties. This series also documents his participation into activities of the Office of the Governing Council’s Academic board in 1992 and 1994 ; his participation into activities of the University of Toronto Faculty Association as chairperson for the Academic freedom committee in 1996 and 1997, and as FSW’s representatives on the Grievance committee in 1998 ; his participation into activities of the selection committee for the Quality student experience award of the University of Toronto Alumni Association in 1994 ; his participation into activities of various Ph.D. examination committees from 1989 to 1997 ; his participation into activities of the School of Graduate Studies’ committee to examine the SGS leave policy in 1990 and 1991.

The series consists of 41 files including minutes of meetings, diaries, reports, addresses, correspondence and press clippings. It also includes a photograph of a canvas sent by Terence Stone, MSW student ; a photograph of FSW 80th anniversary committee members ; the sound recording of Irving’s address given at the authors’ reception of the 80th anniversary celebration of the Faculty of Social Work (B2000-0022/001S).

Research files

This series partially documents Allan Irving’s research activities and interest in the field of history of social work from 1978 to 1998. Irving used these thematic files in preparing courses and/or publications. It also partially documents his interest in current affairs.

The series consists of 25 files including articles, bibliographies, Irving’s notes and press clippings. It also includes photographs of Toronto disadvantaged neighbourhoods at the beginning of the 20th century ; photographs (slides) of Toronto in the 1940s and 1950s including streets, news papers headlines and advertisements, women at work in war factories, TTC subways and streetcars.

Only significantly annotated published material have been kept as a whole; in all other cases, only the first page and/or the bibliographical reference have been preserved

Peace Magazine

This series documents Spencer's work as editor of Peace Magazine, a responsibility she has had since 1985. Included is correspondence, grant applications, financial statements, as well as agenda and minutes for meetings of the Board of Directors. Correspondence files often have submissions attached or discuss possible articles for publication. There are also an alphabetical photo file documenting people and events in the peace movement and used in the publication.

Student reports and theses

This series consists of student projects collected by van Ginkel over the years. Included are examples of theses, theses programs and drafts, technical reports, mounted exhibits. This is a multimedia series consisting of textual records, architectural drawings, photographs and slides. Along with Series VI, this series best documents what was taught within the Faculty, how it was taught and how this knowledge was interpreted and applied by individual students. Most of the records are from the late 1980s but there are some projects that date back to the early 1960s which were probably collected during the Centenary exhibit, Restatements and Realizations.

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