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Addresses

This series consists of a single address, “Efficient Pricing of Telecommunication Services and the Ways to Get There”, delivered by Professor Fuss and Leonard Waverman at the National Conference on the Future of Telecommunications in Canada, 1 April 1993.

Personal files

This series consists of a curriculum vitae and a single piece of memorabilia, a program for the fifth annual frosh review presented by the Students’ Association of Carleton College in the fall of 1956, just as Dr. Bissell began his presidency of the College.

Manuscripts and publications

There are only a few files in this series, consisting of some book reviews, and drafts and offprints of articles that appeared between 1968 and the early 1970s. The arrangement of the files is chronological.

Correspondence

This series is made up of personal correspondence relating to his career, honours promotions as well as miscellaneous professional correspondence sorted and filed by decade. This series also includes correspondence filed by individuals, many of whom are famous in their own right.

Ernest Buckler

This series contains extensive documentation on Claude Bissell's research and relationship with Canadian poet Ernest Buckler including a typescript and related publication letters relating to his book Ernest Buckler Remembered (University of Toronto Press, 1989).

Speeches

This series includes typescripts and some notes for talks, addresses, tributes and memorials.

Artistic works

This series contains various types of records that document Claude Bissell's creative mind.

Personal correspondence

Includes hundreds of letters sent to Christine from her mother between 1946 to 1958. Originally from Scotland, Christine Gray married Claude Bissell in September of 1945 and immigrated to Canada soon afterward. These letters, although one sided, will give good insight into this experience and the continued relationship to family in Scotland.

University of Toronto. Administration

Consists of correspondence, reports, minutes, and research notes which reflect the academic and administrative appointments held by Robin Harris and his involvement in the activities of the Joint University and Toronto Board of Education (1960-1961), the Committee of Presidents, the Committee on Research and Planning (1970-71), the Presidential Advisory Committee on Policy and Planning (1958-1961) the Presidential Advisory Committee on Archives (1970-71), the Library Oral History Project (1973-1987), and the Off-campus colleges committee (1963), and the Committee of the Teaching Staff (1975-1976). Also includes records relating to the Presidential Advisory Committee on the status and future of Scarborough College (1970-1971) originally owned by Prof. E. F. Sheffield, and records of the Curriculum Review and Planning Project for the Faculty of Social Work (1977).

The idea of writing a new university history focusing on higher education was a brainchild of Professor Harris and was set in motion through efforts of members of the Sesquicentennial History Project and its advisory committee. The finished product, a university history book, was to be published during the university's 150th year in 1977. As University Historian, his role is documented in the correspondence and minutes of this committee, as well as reports, proposals, drafts and outlines of an unfinished manuscript.

Education and teaching files

This series contains annotated student handbooks, programmes for football and hockey games, and an issue of the Undergrad, all from Brian Land’s undergraduate years; course notes for an MLS college universities library administration course taught largely by Margaret Cockshutt in 1955-1956; a file Land compiled while chairing the constitution revision committee of the Alumni of the Library School (1954-1959); and lecture notes for two courses he gave in the Library School, Ontario College of Education (1961-1963); and correspondence relating to his appointment as its director (1964). There is a final file relating to his Labour Gazette indexing project for the federal Department of Labour (1956-1958).

Dr. Land kept only selected lecture notes. For others, see Series IV of B1993-0026.

1962 election, Eglinton constituency

Brian Land enrolled in the School of Graduate Studies in the fall of 1960 as a political science student. The opportunity for a thesis topic arose in the spring of 1962 as a federal election loomed. He chose to conduct a study of the campaign in the Eglinton constituency in Toronto, partly because he was a resident and because he had a personal acquaintance with a number of the principals involved.

Land offered his services to Donald Fleming, the long-standing Progressive Conservative member from the Toronto riding of Eglinton, and Minister of Finance in John Diefenbaker’s government. It was the first and only time that Land worked for a Conservative candidate. His notebook records that his first meeting was on May 10
and, over the next five weeks, he immersed himself in the strategy sessions, meetings, and envelope stuffing sessions and other activities of electioneering. He attended meetings of the Liberal candidate, Mitchell Sharp, as well as those of Mr. Fleming, and collected campaign literature from all parties.

This series contains background material to the constituency, Land’s notebook, correspondence, notes, membership and voter lists, poll revisions, maps, election results by poll, addresses, campaign literature and buttons, and press coverage. The bulk of the material relates to the Fleming campaign.

The records are grouped by function.

Davenport-Dovercourt Liberal Association

Brian Land’s involvement in party politics was primarily in the Liberal party at the federal level. He was a member of the executive of the Davenport-Dovercourt Liberal Association, for which, in 1965, he carried out a study of the Davenport voting record by conducting a poll analysis for the years 1952-1963. In February of 1968 he was elected as a delegate to the forthcoming Liberal leadership convention that chose Pierre Elliott Trudeau to succeed Lester Pearson as Prime Minister.

This series contains files consisting of: the constitution, lists of executive officers, minutes, correspondence and press clippings documenting the activities of the Davenport-Dovercourt Liberal Association from 1965-1968; the questionnaire, notes, correspondence, maps and report relating to the Davenport voting record; local press coverage, poll results and capitulation sheets for Eglinton riding in 1963 when Mitchell Sharp was elected for the first time (in oversized folders); campaign literature and press clippings relating to Walter Gordon’s successful re-election in 1965; and credentials (including buttons and decals) for and press clippings about the Association’s delegates to the 1968 convention.

Subject files

This series consists of A-Z subject files that are primarily related to Rodney Bobiwash's professional activities as a First Nations and Anti-Racist activist. The series documents the far-right political movement that took place in Toronto, and throughout Canada, in the early and mid-1990s. The series includes profiles of far-right racist agitators, white supremacist newsletters and propaganda such as the Heritage Front's Up Front, documentation of the KKK in Canada, and documents related to the anti-racist resistance mounted by Bobiwash and other activists. The series is arranged alphabetically by subject, with records dating from 1980 through to 1997. Photos of Aryan Fest 1992 can be found in Series 10, Boxes /001P and /004P. Series 1 provides a comprehensive overview of the far-right movement in Toronto, and in Canada, during the 1990s, and an understanding of the role Rodney Bobiwash and other First Nations/anti-racist activists played in combating right-wing hate groups.

Teaching

Series 4 documents Rodney Bobiwash's teaching career at Trent University and at the University of Toronto. The series consists of course notes, lectures, syllabi, presentations and outlines for various Native Studies and Aboriginal Studies courses Bobiwash taught in the 1980s and 1990s. Bobiwash began lecturing at the University of Manitoba before moving on to Trent University and the University of Toronto. The records demonstrate Bobiwash's instructional style, which was both intellectual and practical, where students are encouraged to actively engage with the material being presented. The records also provide a good overview of the issues and challenges facing First Nations peoples in the eighties and nineties. The files are arranged chronologically. For photos from ABS320 see Series 10

Academic activity and teaching

Series consists of administrative and personal records generated by Dr. Galloway. Series includes records of his teaching activity at McGill University and the University of Toronto, research leave proposals, academic exchanges, and funding requests.

Personal and biographical

Files in accession B2005-0001 contain correspondence with family, friends, and colleagues received by Prof. Russell over more than four decades. Unlike the other series of correspondence described below, the contents of letters, cards and notes is more familiar and personal in nature and generally deals with non-professional activities such as trips, seasonal greetings, family matters, neighborhood and church activities, activities of friends and colleagues. Early correspondence discusses his appointment to the University of Toronto as lecturer (1958) correspondence with Oxford University regarding the M.A. exams, and appointment as assistant professor (1965). Some copies of Prof. Russell’s replies are included with incoming letters. Topics among the subject files include the Bathurst/St. Clair Task Force, Hillcrest Neighborhood Resources, Ontario Liberal Association, University Settlement, and Wychwood Park.

Files in accession B2017-0006 contain records related to the personal life of Prof. Russell. Material covers awards received, family vacation property (Minnicog Company of Jarvises), family reunions, memorial addresses and services for colleagues, and a convocation address.

Correspondence – General

This major series within the fonds documents Prof. Russell’s academic career at the University of Toronto. Correspondence consists mainly of incoming letters from University of Toronto faculty, colleagues, judges, provincial and federal politicians, editors, students, and friends, discussing mostly professional and academic activities relating to teaching, research and publications. This series begins during his period as Associate Professor in the Department of Political Economy and includes correspondence relating to his such activities as research fellowship at Harvard University, acting principal and later principal of Innis College, visiting professorship at Makerere University in Uganda, visiting fellowships at Osgoode Hall, York University, Australian National University, and European University Institute, Fiesole, Italy. Correspondents include Bob Rae, Martin Friedland, Stefan Dupré, James Lorimer, and Justice D.C. McDonald.

This series also includes some correspondence relating to Prof. Russell’s role as director of research for the Royal Commission of Inquiry Into Certain Activities of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, (McDonald Commission). This commission was established in 1977 following allegations of crimes by the RCMP Security Service.

Churchill Society for the Advancement of Parliamentary Democracy

Series consists of material documenting Prof. Russell’s activity within the Churchill Society for the Advancement of Parliamentary Democracy. From 2001 to 2003, Russell served as Chair of the organization and in 2017, he continues his participation on the Board of Directors. Material documents a range of executive functions, surveys of members, event planning, and the activities of the Statue Committee. Records include meeting minutes, correspondence, planning documentation and reports.

Teaching

Prof. Russell taught several courses in political science at both the undergraduate and graduate level at the University of Toronto beginning with his appointment as lecturer in 1958. Additionally, he taught courses outside the University at institutions such as the Royal Canadian Air Force College (1964-1968) and Makerere University College in Uganda, as well as through the Learning to Live in Retirement courses. This series contains correspondence with students as well as lecture notes, course outlines, reading lists, and correspondence with University administration and co-instructors such as Bob Rae. Of particular interest may be POL 299Y, a research directed seminar conducted in 1995-1996 relating to Prof. Russell’s research on the Mabo case for his book Recognizing aboriginal title: The Mabo case and Indigenous resistance to English-Settler Colonialism (2006).

Press

Series consists of commentary and addresses given to the media by Prof. Russell. Material includes opinion pieces and responses to a number of national issues including the prorogation of Parliament in 2008-2009, minority governments, the long-gun registry, and judicial appointments. Series also includes documentation of interviews given on television, radio, and with reporters in both Canada and Australia.

University of Toronto Administration

This series records Prof. Eddie’s personal employment arrangements with the University of Toronto from his appointment to the Department of Economics in 1971 as well as administrative activities relating to course and programme development, and committee activities. Files relating to his employment arrangements include annual activity reports and salary administration. There are also files relating to development of the European Studies programme of which he was Director, the International Relations Programme, the establishment of the Chair in Ukrainian Studies and his role as chair of the search committee, and his work as Academic Co-ordinator of the Joint Initiative in German and European Studies/DAAD (1998-2001). In addition there are three files as member of the Executive Committee of RALUT (Retired Academics and Librarians University of Toronto) (2003-2008).

Books

This series contains records relating to three books by Prof. Eddie. Ami “köztudott”, az igaz is? was published in Hungarian and was based on lectures delivered by Prof. Eddie at the Eötvös Lorand University in Budapest during the Spring of 1994. Files relating to this book include the German manuscript, drafts of lectures one to eight, as well as files relating to the scheduling and delivery of the lectures. Files relating to Historisches Verzeichnis der Grundbesitzer des Burgenlandes include correspondence, applications for grants, reviews and the Hungarian manuscript. The third book, his most recent work, is titled Landownership in Eastern German before the Great War: a quantitative analysis. Files include correspondence as well as drafts of the manuscript.

Teaching and research

This series consists of sample examinations from Cambridge University, University of London, Nottingham University and University of Toronto relating to Classical Studies, as well as lectures in both German and English on Roman History, delivered at the University of Giessen (early 1930’s) and at English language universities in Britain (Cambridge, Nottingham) and Canada (University of Toronto). Also included is a file containing his curriculum vitae ca 1940,and a file with a draft bibliography in German.

Papyrus

This series documents Prof. Heichelheim’s expertise as specialist in Latin and Greek translation. During academic year 1938-1939 he gave lectures on select papyri in the Classical Faculty at Cambridge University. Topics included Pap. Eleph.1, Sentimental papyrus, An ordinance of the salt merchants, Teptynis papyrus, and Pap. Gis 40 [Papyrus of Giessen]. This series also contains manuscripts of translations of various papyri such as Rhosos papyrus, Rylands Papyrus, as well as manuscript on the Adler Papyrus, the Zu Pap. Michigan III, and the Zu Pap. Oslo Inv. 504.

Professional correspondence

This series consists of professional correspondence arranged chronologically. Most of the material dates from 1964. A flood in Sidney Smith Hall in 1958 destroyed or damaged much of Professor Careless’ early records. The correspondence in this series provides an overview of J. M. S. Careless’ activities as an historian, teacher, administrator, and researcher from 1954 to 1997. Topics include: the Canadian Historical Association, conferences, George Brown, Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada, the Multi-Cultural Historical Society of Ontario, professional associations, publications, references, research, sabbaticals, and scholarly support.

Associations

This series documents Professor Careless’ involvement in various associations. The records consist of correspondence, research notes, and reports relating to the following associations: CBC Television Projects; Canadian Historical Association; Ontario Archaeological and Historic Sites Board; Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada; and the Multi-Cultural Historical Society of Ontario.

Book reviews (G.M. Craig)

Gerald M. Craig donated a number of books to the University of Toronto Library which contained a variety of inserts. These have been removed and listed below, along with the name of the book in which they were found.

Talks

This series consists of one file only on talks given on the University of Toronto Library to Paul Fox’s class in political science (1a and 1b) when Prof. Land was Assistant Librarian.

Ceremonies and obligation lists

This series includes copies of addresses and poems used in homilies during the Ritual, obligation booklets, obligation lists for special ceremonies, statistics on obligated engineers and collected correspondence concerning the preparations for the inaugural ceremonies. Several files also include information on special ceremonies for older candidates and proposed special ceremonies that did not occur.

Material from accession B1995-0040 (1959-1989) also includes a copy of the ceremony book for Camp Wardens, application forms and considerable material concerning the manufacture and distribution of iron rings, as well as preparations made for campus ceremonies. Material from Accession B2009-0029 includes six files (06-11) containing updated ceremony booklets and guidelines, a certificate for the nomination of an Honorary Camp Warden, several speeches and a candidate list. Files are arranged chronologically. White prints, several photographs and two obligation sheets have been removed for separate storage.

Expansion of the ritual

The series contains primarily correspondence with Camps Two through Nine, much of it dealing with the matter of verifying candidate credentials from different jurisdictions. There is also some correspondence of a social nature related to the establishment of authorities and Camp Wardens in new jurisdictions. The system of record keeping by Camp appears to have stopped in 1954, after which correspondence pertaining to the Camps may be found in the individual correspondence files in series 5. Arrangement is by Camp number, followed by the records pertaining to discussions of expanding the Ritual to the United Kingdom, India and the United States.

Camp Ten records pertain to a proposed camp in Ottawa, which was never established. Camp Ten, when it was established, became the camp for the Université Laval in Québec City in 1956. Camp Twelve was established by Carleton University in Ottawa in 1958. The B1995-0040 accession includes one file of material, from 1978-1987, related to the expansion of the “Links” programme of the Order of the Engineer organization, based in the United States. The records for Camp Five contain an example of an early iron ring.

National Research Council

Series contains is composed of records dating from McKay’s time at the National Research Council. During the Second World War, the organization was mobilized to support the Allied war effort. As a result, most of the series’ records relate to military research and development. Canadian Army Operational Research Group (C.A.O.R.G.) reports compose approximately half the files that make up the series. These reports cover subjects ranging from blast measurements for anti-tank mine clearance to the number and distribution of Japanese paper balloons in North America. There are also two summary reports on Japanese balloon incidents.
The remainder of the textual and graphic records are made up of committee minutes, general Department of Defence documents, and a short paper on Canada’s part in the development of the radio proximity fuse, which McKay contributed to as assistant to project leader Professor Arnold Pitt.

Also included in this series are the remains of a Japanese paper balloon. Paper balloons, also known as balloon bombs, were a by-product of an atmospheric experiment by Axis scientists, which discovered a powerful air current traveling across the Pacific at about 30,000 feet [1]. Taking advantage of this knowledge, the Japanese military developed what may well have been the first intercontinental weapon in the form of explosive devices attached to paper balloons. These balloons were released in Japan and carried along the Pacific by a jet stream, ultimately finding their way to North America’s West Coast. Although the Japanese are thought to have released as many as 9,000 paper balloons, only 1,000 or so are thought to have reached North America, resulting in a total of six casualties [2].

NOTES

  1. Johnna Rizzo, “Japan’s secret WWII weapon: Balloon bombs,” National Geographic, 27 May 2013.
  2. Ibid.

Manuscripts and publications

Series contains manuscripts and publications that McKay either wrote or kept in his files. Although the majority of pieces address scientific matters, the series also includes a Junior Prize Essay (“Fathers Versus Sons”) that McKay wrote while still in high school. A number of pieces, including the aforementioned “Fathers Versus Sons,” are to be found in journals or magazines, which have been included in the fonds both so as to preserve context and because many of them are no longer in print. It is worth noting that four of the articles in the series were coauthored, rather than sole-authored, by McKay. These are: “The Decay of Nitrogen Afterglow,”
“”The Decay of the Populations of Metastable Atoms and Ions from the Same D-C. Discharge in Neon,” “Effect of Previous History on Switching Rate in Ferrites,” and “The Hall Effect and Resistivity in Tellurium.” The series also includes McKay’s PhD dissertation, The Measurement of the Dialectric Constant of Electrolytes, and the high school physics textbook he co-authored with D.G. Ivey and which his sister, Marjorie, illustrated.

Correspondence

This series contains a mixture of personal and professional correspondence with friends, colleagues, government departments, publishers and non-governmental organizations relating to all aspects of Metta Spencer's career. The correspondence, in the form of letters, faxes and e-mail, document her network of friendships especially throughout the international peace community as well with other North American sociologists.

Addresses and speeches

This series contains addresses and speeches presented mainly at peace conferences, meetings and professional sociology associations. Most of them relate to the peace movement, advocacy and disarmament. There is also Spencer's speech on accepting the Jus Prize in Human Rights. Again these papers represent only a small fraction of addresses given throughout Spencer's career. Arrangement is chronological for specific titles with general speeches filed at the end.

University of Toronto Administration

Although Prof. Spencer held many administrative positions within the Department of Sociology, including several terms as associate chair for Erindale, this series mainly documents her successful efforts to establish and co-ordinate an interdisciplinary Peace and Conflict Studies Programme at Erindale College. Included are the early proposals and background documentation, minutes of meeting, reports, course and program descriptions and correspondence.

Books

This series consists of two sets of files. The first set relates to Prof. Nelson’s only published book Land and Power: Britain and Allied Policy on Germany’s Frontiers 1916-1919 (University of Toronto Press and Routledge, Keagan Paul, London, 1963). Included is a full typescript with revisions, as well as some earlier drafts. Some drafts are also interfiled with notes found in Series 6 Research Notes. This series also contains some correspondence with the publishers and a signed publication agreement. There is additional correspondence relating to permissions for use of materials. Finally there is a file of collected reviews of the book and informal comments. In 1963, this book shared the George Lewis Beer Prize given by the American Historical Society for ‘outstanding work in the field of European international history since 1895’.

A second set of files relates to research Prof. Nelson undertook late in his career. It was a book on the trial and conviction of a British citizen, Miss Malecka, in 1912 in Russia on a charge of sedition. While one file of notes is dated 1983, records generally indicate that Prof. Nelson began researching the case in earnest in the early 1990s. He was studying it in reference to the question of ‘nationality’ and what it could reveal about Anglo Russian relations prior to WWI. Entitled simply Malecka Case, typescripts begin in 1993 and go through various drafts up to 2004. There is no evidence in the records that Prof. Nelson had sought out a publisher and it is clear the book was never published. These drafts, revisions, outlines and notes have been arranged chronologically.

Associations and committees

This series consists of files for committee and clubs in which Prof. Nelson was an active member. Files relating to his days as a student show his involvement in the Modern History Club (1938) and the Historical Club (1939-40) at the University of Toronto. In the latter club, he held the position of secretary then president. From those early years, there is also a file documenting his work in the Eglinton Jr. Conservative Club (1939-1943). Files contain memorabilia, notes, minutes, membership lists and correspondence.

Later in his career, there are more professional types committees outside of the framework of the University of Toronto including the Atlantic Treaty Organization (1960-1964), a provincial body called the Ontario Curriculum Institute (1962-1964), as well as the Canada Council Academic Advisory Panel (1975). For all of these later committees, files contain original correspondence, agenda and minutes as well as reports and notes.

Research projects

This series contains files relating to specific research projects in the Departments of Physics and Medicine in which Prof. McNeill was an active participant. Most of the files relate directly to the building and use of a "low background" room, called the Steel Room used to measure low level radiation in humans. He was instrumental in having it built at the university and for providing administrative support for its research use. Included is correspondence, memoranda, research data, grant files, measurements and progress reports. There are also minutes, correspondence and reports of the President's Committee on Background Radiation from which came the impetus for such a laboratory. Experiments and readings conducted in the Steel Room were some of the earliest examples of research in the field of nuclear medicine undertaken at the University of Toronto.

Later research files relate to his research on radon levels, his work developing and patenting a land mine detention device and his personal interest in Stonehenge.

Teaching files

This series consists of lecture notes for courses taught in nuclear physics at the University of Glasgow where he lectured from 1952-1957 and for courses taught at the University of Toronto including:

  • Application of Physics in Medicine
  • Physics Questions for Life Sciences
  • Physics 138 – Nuclear section
  • Physics 238 – Biological Effects of Nuclear Radiation, Heat Engines and Physical Optics

Some files also contain notes on class experiments and assignments as well as some examination questions.

Education records

Includes mainly lecture notes from courses taken while attending Oxford for his B.A. and M.A.. Also includes notes and a copy of his Ph.D. Thesis (1950) and a speech given to the Oxford University Physical Society in 1948.

Administrative files (University of Toronto)

Dr. Glass held several administrative positions in the Institute for Aerospace Studies. From 1961-1966 he was its chairman and from 1968 to 1974 it’s assistant director of education. Most of the records from both of these positions have remained in the respective administrative jurisdictions.

The files in this series include Dr. Glass' "activity reports" (1975-1993), minutes of the Institute's council meetings (1975-1977) and its advisory committee (1976); proposals for buildings, teaching assignments, and post-doctoral fellowships; correspondence concerning visiting professors and exchange students from the Soviet Union (1962-1988) and China (1981-1982), and correspondence about Pathways to Excellence, the history of UTIAS (1976).

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