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University of Toronto Archives and Records Management Services Series
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Correspondence

The correspondents in this series number just under four hundred individuals, of whom sixty-two read and commented on the entire manuscript (these names are listed on page 723 of the 2002 hardcover edition). The correspondents include Professor Friedland’s research assistants, archivists in the University of Toronto Archives, officials and editors at the University of Toronto Press, other editors, writers and independent researchers with an interest in the University’s history, and members of the public that Professor Friedland met in the course of his research and his giving of talks about the history of the University. The majority of the correspondents are academics and administrative personnel at the University of Toronto and elsewhere who were asked for information or offered their expertise. Some of the correspondence is post-publication reaction to the book.

The research assistants (in addition to those listed in Series I), are Sara Burke, David Bronskill, Colin Grey, Graham Rawlinson and Katrina Wyman. Of the staff in the University of Toronto Archives, Harold Averill was seconded part-time to the project to direct the researchers to the appropriate sources in the University Archives, to offer his knowledge of the history of the University and to read the manuscript. Other correspondents from the Archives are Garron Wells (University Archivist), Marnee Gamble (special media archivist) and Loryl MacDonald (administrative records archivist). The University of Toronto Press, the publisher of the book, is represented by Val Cooke, Ani Deyirmenjian, Malgosia Halliop, Bill Harnum, Anne Laughlin,
Melissa Pitts, and Ron Schoeffel. Presidents (past and current) of the University represented are: Robert Birgeneau, Claude Bissell, George Connell, Robert Prichard, and David Strangway. Some of the academics and university administrators forwarded drafts of articles or excerpts from books they were writing, while others commented on the manuscript or portions thereof. Papers or lengthy memoranda and reports are present on a cross-section of activities, disciplines themes and individuals relating to the University including (with the names of the correspondents in brackets). They include the admission of women (Sara Burke), botanical gardens (John Court), chemistry (Susanne McClelland), Connaught Laboratories (George Connell), engineering (Richard White), fees policy (David Stager), gays and lesbians (David Rayside), Jacob Hirschfelder (Sheldon J. Godfrey), Margaret Eaton School (John Byl), history of medicine (Jacalyn Duffin), medicine (David Bronskill), No. 4 General Hospital at Salonika, Greece during World War I (Mary Louise Gaby), philosophy (John Slater), the proposed Wolfe’s University (D. V. Anderson), women (Katrina Wyman), and women in graduate studies (Natalie Zemon Davis).

In addition to letters, the files may contain articles, notes, memoranda, background documents and publications, and the occasional press clipping A few of the files contain historical items, dating back to 1887, that had belonged early graduates and were forwarded by their descendants, Professor Friedland’s correspondents. The detailed comments on the drafts of the book by the correspondents in this series may, for the most part, be found in Series 4.

Personal and family

This series consists of files documenting Professor Friedland’s personal and family activities. It begins with a number of files documenting Friedland’s activities as a student and professor of law at the University of Toronto, his post-retirement professional and other activities. There follow files relating to members of his family, arranged by name, which focus broadly on family affairs and more specifically on personal lives, including professional and social activities, achievements, births, weddings and deaths. These are followed by other files containing correspondence sent home from England, Europe and Israel, and relating to the Friedland residences on Hillsdale Avenue and Belsize Drive.

The files contain correspondence, appointment books, certificates, curriculum vitae, greeting cards, honours, notes, notices, legal documents such as passports and wills, medical reports, programmes, postcards, photographs, and press clippings (including obituaries).

Honours

The files in this series contain correspondence, addresses, certificates, programmes, and a photoprint relating to honours bestowed in Professor Friedland.

The honours described herein are: Queen’s Council (Canada), 1976; James Marshall Tory Dean’s Chair, Faculty of Law, University of Toronto, 1996; an LLD degree from Cambridge University (2000); and an honorary degree from the University of Toronto (2001).

Correspondence

The correspondence files in this series are arranged alphabetically by author. They document Professor Friedland’s activities as a friend, as a student advisor and thesis supervisor, as a colleague assisting in honours bestowed on his peers, as an author, and as an authority on legal matters. They also document the increased leisure that came with official retirement.

The correspondence touches on many aspects of Dr. Friedland’s life, both personal and professional. It reveals his enormous network of contacts in legal and academic circles ranging from Lord Denning down to lowly law students. The letters cover a wide range of topics and issues, including some very topical ones such as international terrorism. Dr. Friedland received numerous requests for references from students and colleagues and, because he sat on the manuscript review committee of the University of Toronto Press, he was also asked to evaluate many manuscripts.

Some of the files contain commentary on legal issues on which Dr. Friedland was working. They may also hold drafts of articles forwarded by colleagues for commentary or presented a complementary copies [published copies have been removed, though the appropriate references have been retained], letters of congratulation and of reference. There is also correspondence regarding and programmes of conferences, and correspondence re and programmes for installation ceremonies. There are numerous invitations to dinners and other events and tributes on the deaths of friends and colleagues and notes on any of the above. Also present are greeting cards and several photographs.

Scholarly papers

In addition to published works, Prof. Richardson made numerous presentations at conferences, symposia, invited lectures, memorials, convocations, and other occasions. The papers contained in this series were, for the most part, prepared for academic and other scholarly activities such as meetings of associations like the Society for Biblical Literature, Canadian Society of Biblical Studies, Canadian Society for the Study of Religion and the SNTS and represent a significant portion of Prof. Richardson’s body of work. Other presentations were made at many Canadian universities as invited lecturer and to various groups at the University of Toronto. A few files contain papers submitted, but never published. Indeed, many of these presentations are on topics that formed the basis of future publications. Researchers are therefore referred to Series 10 for topics of written works not represented in this series.

Files may contain correspondence, manuscripts, and notes.

Research files

These files consist of correspondence, notes, photographs and negatives, articles used for research, and drafts of manuscripts relating to Professor Rouillard's ongoing research about the Turks in French history, thought, and literature.

Correspondence

This series contains a mixture of both personal and professional correspondence belonging to W.E. Gallie. Notable collections within this series include letters written to and from Colonel J.A. MacFarlane, Consulting Surgeon, Canadian Army Overseas, correspondence with Dr. W.G. Bigelow, and correspondence with well-known American Surgeon Dr. Rudolph Matas. The files in this series are arranged chronologically.

Photographs

Panoramic photograph taken on the balcony of Tienamen Square, Beijing, China, 1 May 1962. Dr. Bissell is on the left of the rear row. Identifications on the backing of the photograph.

Ernest Buckler

This series contains extensive documentation on Claude Bissell's research and relationship with Canadian poet Ernest Buckler including a typescript and related publication letters relating to his book Ernest Buckler Remembered (University of Toronto Press, 1989).

Visits and interviews

Ms. Heaton followed up the questionnaire with visits and interviews to selected medical libraries in Canada and the United States. This series consists of correspondence and notes concerning these interviews. Also included are 28 photographs of libraries visited.

Photographs

Images consist mainly of portraits of William Dale including one from 1873 when he received his M.A. and several copies of an engraving done in 1920, one year before his death. There is also one group portrait of the General Committee of the University College, Literary and Scientific Society, 1868-1869.

Biographical materials

This small series consists of two files containing Dr. Fox's curriculum vitae and a single file relating to his University of Toronto grades, notification of Ph.D conferral from the University of London and miscellaneous academic related materials. It provides a valuable guide to Dr. Fox's professional activities and accomplishments. Also included are three portraits of Dr. Fox taken at various times throughout his career (1964-1984) and a cassette tape sound recording of his retirement dinner tribute, 26 March 1986.

Personal and biographical

This series contains copies of Professor Flynn’s curriculum vitae and some correspondence, both personal and professional and including letters of reference, and examination questions for his undergraduate work in Arts at the University of Toronto in the early 1940s. Included are three photographs and a satirical drawing of his receiving his doctorate from the Sorbonne.

Broadcasting and film

Prof. Hume and Prof. Donald Ivey of the Department of Physics were pioneers in educational television, having developed their first 12 part program “Focus on Physics” in 1958. This was co-sponsored by CBC and the University of Toronto. The success of this series was followed up the next year by “Two for Physics”. Both series eventually aired on the National Educational Television (N.E.T.) in the United States. Other programs that followed include:

1960 – 15 short programs on Physics for children produced by CBC in cooperation with N.E.T. for joint use in Canada and United States

1962 – “The Ideas of Physics” – 4 programmes
1963 – “The Nature of Physics” – 5 programmes
1966 – “The Constant of Physics” – 4 programmes
All of these were for in-school broadcasts to Canadian high schools produced by CBC with the National Advisory Council on School Broadcasts

1960-1965 – 18 programmes for “The Nature of Things”, produced by CBC.
The program “The Nature of Things” is still today a staple of Canadian educational television. Hume and Ivey helped lay the foundation for such a successful broadcast run.

By 1960, their success in educational television spilled over into film where they were commissioned by the Physical Science Study Committee (PSSC) in the United States to do four films: “Frames of Reference”, “Periodic Motion”, “Universal Gravitation” and “Random Events”. All of these were created for distribution in high schools. In 1962, “Frames of Reference” won Edison Foundation award for the best science film and “Random Events” received a silver medal from the Scientific Institute in Rome.

This series contains a fairly complete set of scripts for all the titles noted above. Moreover, there is a 16 mm release print for each of the four films and one sound recording of one program from “The Constant of Physics” series. There are also still images from “Frame of Reference” and a file on the Edison Award.

For a good overview, researchers should begin by consulting reports written by Hume and Ivey for most of the television series. They detail the development of each theme. In addition, there is correspondence and contracts with CBC, correspondence with Educational Services Incorporated and the PSSC as well as program guides, clippings, published reviews, correspondence from viewers, and one 1962 audience response report for a “Nature of Things” programme.

Harold Keith Box

Personal records of Dr. Harold Keith Box including correspondence, lecture and research notes relating to his career in dentistry and as research professor in peridontology in the Faculty of Dentistry.

Speeches and public talks

Consists of drafts and final versions of speeches and public talks, conference programmes and attendee lists, rough notes, related correspondence, secondary sources including newspaper clippings, and workshop materials related to speeches and public talks given by Eichler throughout her career.

Professional activities

This series documents Prof MacDowell's involvement in organizations and associations—primarily those focused on labour relations and the environment. These include the Policy Committee of the Ontario NDP, the Nuclear International Research Group, and the Ontario Historical Society. Also documented here is MacDowell's involvement with the Larry Sefton Memorial Lecture series, for which she delivered the ten year anniversary lecture in 1992. Other conferences attended and presented at are also captured here, including the 1986 North American Labour History conference held at the University of Toronto, which MacDowell organized and which was the only time this conference had been hosted in Canada. This series also includes documentation of roles performed by Prof MacDowell in addition to her regular duties as a professor. These include the 1995 delivery of the citation for the honorary doctorate degree awarded to Lynn Williams; serving as chair of the Canadian History Search Committee (2000); participating in performance reviews; and lectures delivered to classes other than her own.

Correspondence

Series consists of Laurel MacDowell's correspondence which primarily documents MacDowell's professional activities within universities (the majority of the records pertain to the University of Toronto, however there is also correspondence regarding York and McMaster universities as well). The correspondence documents other aspects of MacDowell's life as well, such as her role as editor of the Ontario History journal and as a publishing academic. Additional correspondence can be found throughout other series within this accession as they pertain directly to the content of those files.

Photographs

B2003-0024/001P:

  • Photographs and slides, unidentified and identified, relating to research projects and writings, with no associated textual records. Includes photos for Anderson’s 1968 paper, “The Serpent Mounds site physical anthropology”, Royal Ontario Museum Arts and Archaeology Division Occasional Paper 11.

B2003-0024/002P:

  • Basal view of skulls (6), including El Risco and Donaldson sites
  • “Dallas”, site 117 (?). Two panels of six cranial photos each

Education

In the fall of 1960 Frederic Urban entered Merrimack College, a private Roman Catholic institution in North Andover, Massachusetts. In the summer of 1961, he studied Latin at Glastonbury Abbey, a Benedictine abbey in Hingham, Massachusetts, and that autumn entered the Augustinian Good Counsel Novitiate in New Hamburg, New York as a novice monk. In the fall of 1962 he returned to his studies at Merrimack, from which he received an AB (Humanities) in 1964. His other degrees were an MA in literature from Boston College in 1970, a Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) from the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design (NSCAD) in 1978, followed by an independent study program at the Whitney Museum of American Art in 1978-1979. This series documents his studies at the last two institutions. The arrangement is by name of institution.

The files relating to Urban’s studies at NSCAD and the Whitney Museum include his applications, covering correspondence, and material relating to courses taken. There are also a number of slides documenting his time at both institutions. Material on exhibitions and performance pieces done while a student is filed with Series 6. While at the Whitney, one of Frederic’s friends, Colin Lee, had an artwork published in a San Francisco Chinese newspaper. The series ends with a file on the Whitney Museum of American Art Independent Study Program Alumni Association.

Lectures and criticism

Frederic Urban gave a number of addresses as a visiting artist and lecturer. In 1979 he was a visiting artist at Ohio State University, where he photographed a number of student street performances. In October 1981 he was guest lecturer with the Venice Study Abroad Program run by the Department of Architecture at the University of Toronto. The following year he was a guest lecturer at University College in the University of Toronto for Larry Richard’s course, “Introduction to architecture”. In 1984 and 1985 he gave lectures
on his Sacri Monti project at Carleton University and the University of Toronto. In 1991 he
was a visiting lecturer at the University of Wisconsin at Stout. Some of the addresses are documented in this series. For related correspondence, see Series 2.

Professor Urban was a member of the Board of Directors of the Sharon Temple Museum Society from 1996 to 2001 and he and Larry were invited to participate in a series of readings and performances.

Manuscripts and publications

Professor Urban’s writings focus on the relationship between art and architectural design. Six of his publications are present in this series. Some of those that appeared before 1986 and all published afterward are absent. His earliest writing are based on his involvement with Networks Limited in Halifax, then on collaboration with New York City artist Brian Boigon, and finally on his research in Italy in the 1980s.

Lectures and conferences

Series consists of posters for lectures and conferences hosted by university offices, departments, faculties, and student/alumni groups. Topics in include science, astronomy, politics, archaeology, medicine, literature, history, philosophy, theatre, theology, law, current events, and higher education. See item listing for more details.

Academia and teaching materials

This series documents some of Professor Bay’s academic and associated activities. It includes teaching material (reading lists, syllabi, lectures, and exams) and his work within academia (committee work, appraisals and references, and departmental involvement) at the various universities where he taught. The files on “referees and appraisals” at the University of Toronto include references for academics and students and comments on books and articles forwarded to him for his input. Also included are files on the proposal to abolish the death penalty in California and, in particular, the attempt to stop the execution of convicted murderer and rapist, Caryl Chessman; and copies of "Key List Mailing: Selected Documents of Current and Lasting Interest in the Civil Rights Movement", a biweekly publication produced by the San Francisco Regional Office of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC).

Additional material related to academia and teaching material may be located in the correspondence series. Material related to his research in addresses and publications is located in the publications series. Material related to his involvement in professional associations can be found in the professional association series.

Grants

Files in this series document much of the same research areas documented in Series 3 but relate to those specific projects funded by granting bodies, mainly by the Canadian and American governments. Much of the early research conducted at the Institute of Aerospace Studies by Etkin and his colleagues was funded by Canada’s Defence Research Board, the U.S. Air Force’s Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR), and National Research Council of Canada (NRC) and later by NASA and the Natural Science and Engineering Research Council .

Other government agencies supported research for specific purposes relating to their operation. For example, there are files on air curtain projects for Toronto City Hall, Ontario Hydro and the Ontario Science Centre, a file on noise research for the Toronto Transit Commission, and one file on the aerodynamic stability of helicopters for the Hydro-Electric Power Commission.

Files contain papers, reports, proposals, budgets, contracts and correspondence. They are arranged alphabetically by the name of the granting agency or the subject matter of the research undertaken.

Correspondence

This series consists of personal correspondence between Professor Skilling and his family, friends and colleagues. Most of it is from the last 20 years of his life and relates primarily to his interest in central and east European affairs. Some of the correspondence is arranged chronologically – especially the letters covering the years 1991-2001. Also arranged chronologically and grouped separately are postcards and greeting cards with extensive messages for the years 1939-2001 (a few of the latter have photoprints attached). There are a few letters from Skilling to his parents and Sally from the 1940s, also correspondence with Derek Paton, a former student, and especially with his old Czech friends, Jelka and Olga Haningerova and Vilem Precan. There are also small files of correspondence on the Jan Hus Fund and the issue of public lending rights.

Research files

Over the years, Professor Skilling assembled a large number of research files which contained a great variety of material, including notes, correspondence, press clippings (especially from Czechoslovak, other Eastern European newspapers, and Canadian newspapers written in Czech), photocopies of articles, pamphlets, and books.

A selection of these research files has been retained in this series; the material not kept was turned over to members of the Skilling Seminar for their use. The files are grouped into several subject areas, following Professor Skilling’s arrangement and, for the most part, his file descriptions. The emphasis in selection was on original notes, heavily annotated items, correspondence, memoranda, drafts of papers and addresses, and material from conferences and seminars.

The first research area is on Czechoslovakia generally (1966-2000), with its files on the country’s political culture and political reform, political activists, and conferences [box 031]. The latter include the International Political Science Association roundtable in Zagreb in 1985, ‘Ten years after’ conference in Prague (1999), and the Forum 2000 conference in the same city. There is also material on the breakup of Czechoslovakia. Accompanying these files are two boxes [036, 037] of index card notes – one on Czech politics and one a bibliography of Czech politics.

The second category of files [boxes 033-034] consists of material gathered by Professor Skilling for his numerous writings about Tomas Masaryk, including his T. G. Masaryk: Against the current, published in English and Czech in 1994. The first part consists primarily of general writings about Masaryk, along with accompanying notes, correspondence, etc. The arrangement in the latter portion is by subject areas, of which the principal ones are: ‘the Slovak questions’, ‘the Jewish question’, ‘religion’, ‘the women’s question’ and ‘foreign policy’. Accompanying these files is a index card box of entries on Masaryk generally, on his writings, on works about him and on searches to be carried out [box 038, 038a and 038b].

The final category [box 035] relates to Vaclav Havel. In it is correspondence between him and Professor Skilling and copies of letters to Vilem Precan, along with files of interviews, addresses, and honours bestowed; Havel’s visits abroad (including the University of Toronto in 1990); his writings (with notes by Skilling), and material documenting his involvement with Charter 77.

Oversized material has been removed from /034(10) and (12) to /003(04), and from box 034(27) to box 003(05).

A poster has been removed from /035(23) to folder .(02).

Photoprints have been removed from /032(04) and (05) to box 009P(12).

Personal life

This series consists of personal items belonging to Professor Skilling, including address books, photographs and slides, an identification card, and his marriage certificate issued in Czechoslovakia (with corresponding Canadian documentation).

The photographs have been organized according to portraits, personal and family life, early school, professional life, and slides. The majority of the photographs are annotated and dated on the verso, and the slides are numbered and dated. Two photographs in “Professional life” [B2012-0005/001P(04)] that are not annotated or dated show Professor Skilling receiving an honorary degree (LL.D) from the University of Toronto in 1982. He is flanked by President James Ham and Chancellor George Ignatieff.

There are four newspaper clippings related to Professor Skilling. The first is a congratulatory message, possibly published in a newsletter issued by the West United Church, about Skilling having won The Gundy-Doran scholarship [dated between 1929-1934]. The second clipping is a photograph of Skilling and his Harbord Collegiate institute junior basketball team [ca. 1928-29]. The third clipping is an article entitled “Viet Nam situation called threat to unity” [1966]. Skilling is quoted and discussed at length in the article. The final clipping is a profile (in English) on H. Gordon Skilling, published in The Prague Post in 1994.

National Research Council

Series contains is composed of records dating from McKay’s time at the National Research Council. During the Second World War, the organization was mobilized to support the Allied war effort. As a result, most of the series’ records relate to military research and development. Canadian Army Operational Research Group (C.A.O.R.G.) reports compose approximately half the files that make up the series. These reports cover subjects ranging from blast measurements for anti-tank mine clearance to the number and distribution of Japanese paper balloons in North America. There are also two summary reports on Japanese balloon incidents.
The remainder of the textual and graphic records are made up of committee minutes, general Department of Defence documents, and a short paper on Canada’s part in the development of the radio proximity fuse, which McKay contributed to as assistant to project leader Professor Arnold Pitt.

Also included in this series are the remains of a Japanese paper balloon. Paper balloons, also known as balloon bombs, were a by-product of an atmospheric experiment by Axis scientists, which discovered a powerful air current traveling across the Pacific at about 30,000 feet [1]. Taking advantage of this knowledge, the Japanese military developed what may well have been the first intercontinental weapon in the form of explosive devices attached to paper balloons. These balloons were released in Japan and carried along the Pacific by a jet stream, ultimately finding their way to North America’s West Coast. Although the Japanese are thought to have released as many as 9,000 paper balloons, only 1,000 or so are thought to have reached North America, resulting in a total of six casualties [2].

NOTES

  1. Johnna Rizzo, “Japan’s secret WWII weapon: Balloon bombs,” National Geographic, 27 May 2013.
  2. Ibid.

Student activities

Personal correspondence with friends and University officials, brochures, flyers, pamphlets, and reports relating to courses in Caribbean studies created and collected during Mr. Pieters undergraduate years (B.A. Political Science, 1993) at New College. Also included is a file on New College Alumni Association containing copies of reports, etc relating to the provostial review of the college, 1996. This series also includes photos documenting his activities as a student including social events, meetings, dinners and his graduation.

Future Teachers Club

The Future Teachers Club is an initiative of the Faculty of Education to encourage African/Canadian students in elementary and secondary schools to consider teaching as a career. The objective is to increase the number of African/Canadian teachers in the classrooms to a level which is reasonably representative of African/Canadians in relation to European/Canadians, Asian/Canadians and Aboriginal/Canadians in the provincial population.

This series consists of correspondence, reports, minutes of meetings, survey forms and results, brochures, and flyers collected by Mr Pieters as an active participant in this club while a student at the Faculty of Education. Also included are records relating to "Promoting equity for the teachers of tomorrow" (PETT), a program "undertaken to encourage students from African Canadian and Portuguese communities to consider teaching as a career. There is also a photo album showing Pieters practice teaching at a local school.

Exhibition files

Files relating to the mounting of exhibits by faculty and students, most notably Connaitre/Reconnaitre Le Corbusier exhibit in 1987 and Restatements and Realizations: Built work of graduates of the School since 1893, put together by van Ginkel as part of the Centenary Celebrations.

The general administrative files around borrowing, lending and mounting exhibits are filed at the beginning of this series, followed by the specific administrative files on the above mentioned exhibits. Finally, files relating to exhibits borrowed and mounted at the Faculty's gallery are arranged in chronological order.

This series contains photographs, negatives and slides documenting the mounting of exhibits in the Faculty of Architecture including the 1983 exhibit on Le Corbusier and the school's centenary exhibit "Restatement and Realizations: Built work of graduates of the School since 1893". All photographs, slides and negatives have been removed, placed in their own files and boxed separately. In such cases, a SEPARATION NOTICE has been inserted to indicate the existence of graphic materials.

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