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Godfrey Ridout

File consists of programs that included performances of pieces by Godfrey Ridout and copies of newspaper clippings about Ridout. Ridout (1918-1984) began teaching at the Toronto Conservatory of Music in 1940, before joining the Faculty of Music at the University of Toronto (1948-1982).

Queen Victoria's jubilee : for voice and piano

File consists of three publications of the song "Queen Victoria's Jubilee!" with words by John Imrie and music by J.F. Johnstone. The publications include the sheet music by Imrie & Graham of Toronto (1886); a clipping of its publication in the Montreal Daily Star (June 4, 1887); and, a copy of its inclusion in Jubilee Jollities (Grip's Own Library, vol. 1, no. 2, June 1887), page 24.

Songs of Roy Lamont Smith : American composer

File consists of a notebook with the handwritten texts of songs by Roy Lamont Smith, written in alphabetical order. It is not clear whether the texts were handwritten by Smith, or collected by an unnamed individual. The songs include: A Lullaby (My tree Bird); Alone, A Woodland Path; Adoration; Gifts; Heart and Soul; Hearts Blossom; In Love's Tender Keeping; I sing to thee; Lullaby; Lines to an Indian air; Madrigal; My little Bo Peep; My soul shall sing; Nameless Pain; and, Plantation Lullaby. Many of the songs include indications of the author of the lyrics, the key of the music, and who the song was dedicated to, if applicable.

Theme for Adele

File includes photocopied manuscript lead sheets of the piece Theme For Adele by Doug Riley

Prince Edward Island suite: orchestra parts and score

File includes orchestra and soloist parts as well as a photocopied manuscript score for the Prince Edward Island Suite: A Concerto for Orchestra and Jazz Quartet by Doug Riley. Also includes an article written by Riley about the Prince Edward Island Suite and a photocopy of a Toronto Star Review of the Suite by Sid Adilman.

Ohio newspaper clippings and magazine regarding performance of Algala

Item consists of newspaper clippings and a copy of the magazine Akron Topics, autographed by Edward Johnson. Item includes photographs and autographs of the composer and lead singers in the production of Algala: Francesco de Leone (composer), Mabel Garrison (soprano), Cecil Fanning (baritone), Edward Johnson (tenor), F. Karl Grossman (musical director), and Francis J. Sadlier (bass).

Manuscript Scores

Subseries includes manuscript scores. Pieces include Chinese puzzle by Rebecca Clarke; Ritmi by Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco; Violinconcert (Es-Dur) by Erich J. Wolff; Fugue for string quartet by S. Margolian; An old love tale, Op.21, no.1 by Gena Branscombe; Aire classique by Donald Heins; Abendlied by Donald Heins; My lady artful, Frauen-Laune by Franz C. Bornschein; Roses of yester year by Franz C. Bornschein; In Elizabethan days: Old English dance, Op.32, no.2 by A. Walter Kramer; Suite für violine (componi[e]rt fur Kathleen Parlow) by Henri Zagwijn; Concerto pour violon by Alexander Glazounov; Capitan Fracassa ; Tempo marking: Ritmo di marcia erocomica by Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco; Fantasiestück für violine allein by Bernard (Hélèn Joseph) van Dieren; Theme with variations composed by Paganini arr by Henry Holmes; From the south by Gaylord Yost; Chant de “Veslemöy” (mosaique No.4) by Johan Halvorsen; Prière by Mary Helen Brown; Untitled Piece by H. B. Mac; Hüldretoner :Huldresang, Slaat og Dans by Anders Hoegendahl; Immer sein wird mein schlummer by Johaness Brahms Arr. for violin and piano by Emerson Whithorne; Polonaise by Hans Schouwman; Ein welker lavendelzweig = With sweet lavender by Edward MacDowell Arr. for violin and piano by Leopold Auer; Long ago, Op.56 by Edward MacDowell arr. for violin and piano by A. Walter Kramer; Chant nègre : a southern idyl, Op. 32, no.1 by A. Walter Kramer; Wie melodien zieht es mir by Johaness Brahms Arr. for violin and piano by A. Walter Kramer; La source Éternelle, Op. 18 by Victor Küzdo; Caprice saltata by Johan Reich; Parlow valse by Sophie Olsen; Ein wiegenlied, Op.37, no.1 by Emerson Whithorne; Juli-hav-stemning veel aales und by Unknown; Romance by Jan Frederik Jr. Tierie; Idyl ; “fleur immortelle” by From the manuscript of a late composer-No other names mentioned; Symphonic rhapsody in F minor, Op.35 by A. Walter Kramer; Shy one, Op. 31, no.2 by Emerson Whithorne; “Au cabaret” Mazurka Bohème by Christiaan Kriens; Concert für violine by Johan Halvorsen

Course files

This series documents the courses taught by Prof. Nelson in the Department of History. Documents include course outlines, seminar topics, essay topics, exam questions, lecture schedules and reading lists. Less common are statistics on course attendance, discussions on curriculum and course development.

The main courses that Prof. Nelson taught were:

Hist 1620 The First World War: Origins, Course, Consequence
Hist 344 International Relations
Hist 443Peacemakers and Peacemaking: The Quest for Peace 1814, 1919, 1945.

Course notes

Charles Phelps, a native of Sarnia, enrolled in electrical engineering at the University of Toronto in the fall of 1930. He graduated in the spring of 1934 with a BASc.

This series contains the course notes, laboratory notes, test and final examination questions, engineering drawings, and a draft of his BASc thesis that Charles Phelps produced while a student. The arrangement is chronological.

The engineering drawings, which are from the first three years of his degree program, are stored flat in box /005.

Province of Ontario - Statutes

Consists of 3 files:

Notes re Government Statutes, n.d.
Notes: from (1897) Revised Statute of Ontario Cap. 298 [for (1901) 1 Edw. VIII

Cap. 41 (Ont.) An Act Respecting the University of Toronto and University College, 1897-1901

Notes: from Revised Statute of Ontario Cap. 299 [see above] 1897

Personal

This series documents primarily Prof. Chambers employment history beginning with his application to various universities in Canada for appointment to departments of linguistics. It includes correspondence with the University of Toronto which resulted in his appointment in 1970 to the Centre of Linguistics Studies as well as his application for head of the Department of Linguistics at University of British Columbia in 1977. Also included are some of his annual activity reports required for salary determination, appointments records, and up to date curriculum vitae.

Education

This series documents William Irving’s university education at University of Alaska where he received a Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology in 1952, Harvard University (1953-1957) and University of Wisconsin (1959-1964) where he undertook graduate studies, receiving a Ph.D. in Anthropology in 1964. Included are course notes relating to anthropology, statistics, linguistics; correspondence; copies of term papers, research proposals.

Legal documents and administrative records

Series consists of original and copies of legal documents, forms, and other records pertaining to the incorporation of the New Catholic Times in 1976, materials documenting the structure of the corporation and its operating policies and procedures circa 1985, and job descriptions and terms of reference for committees within the organization after 1990. Series is arranged chronologically.

Professional correspondence

This voluminous series documents all aspects of Conacher’s career including such mattters as appointments, salary, editorial projects, research, sabbaticals, professional activities within associations and participation in University administrative units. While there are series devoted entirely to most of these activities quite a lot of correspondence related to them is found filed chronologically in this series. Researchers will also find personal correspondence with friends and at times family members in these files despite the fact that most of this latter type of correspondence was filed separately and makes up Series 2.

The early correspondence from the late 1930s relates to his studies at Queen’s and his move to Harvard. There are several files of World War II correspondence documenting his employment in the Privy Council and in the Canadian Army signal division and historical section. There is a substantial amount of correspondence specifically with C.P. Stacey. At the end of this decade correspondence reflects Conacher’s attempts to establish his career as an historian. It discusses progress on his thesis, administrative issues regarding his employment and the teaching of courses.

Correspondence during the 1950s and 1960s is the most extensive and varied. It documents editorial projects such as a translation of Francois Du Creux’s History of Canada and projects related to the Canadian Historical Review. There is correspondence relating to organizations including: Canadian Historical Association, Atlantic Treaty Association, Frontier College and many others. Correspondents with other historians include (not exclusively): Kitson Clark of the University of Pennsylvania; Gordon O. Rotney of Memorial University (Nfld); C.L. Mowat of the University of Chicago; as well as U of T colleagues Donald Creighton, Archie Thornton and John Buchanan and close friend Kenneth McNaught. Of particular note is extensive correspondence regarding the dismissal of Professor Harry Crowe in 1958 from the United College of Winnipeg. Prof. Crowe was dismissed after the contents of his private letter were read by the Principal of the College and members of the University of Toronto History Department came to his defence.

There is a gap in the chronological correspondence files from 1971-1977. During most of this time (1972-1976) he was chair of the history department so it is assumed that much of this correspondence was filed with the office correspondence. Beginning in the late 1960s and continuing in the late 1970s and early 1980s is correspondence relating to issues of university governance as well as changes in curriculum and structure of the Faculty of Arts. There is also correspondence relating to various sabbaticals – London 1977 and Australia 1983. Correspondence nearing the end of his career until the time of his death relate to reviews, requests for recommendations as well as some correspondence relating to editorial and research projects.

Diaries

This series contains 24 appointment book diaries from 1894 to 1962. Most detail events attended but sometimes contain personal observations. Also includes one note book and several loose pages written in pencil in which Clara Benson discusses visits with friends, home life and school activities (1889-1891).

Subject files

This subseries consists of files relating to activities of particular interest to Prof. McNaught during his tenure as professor in the Department of History (1965-1984), and his continuing interest in the faculty’s professional association after his retirement. Included among this small group are files relating to the Faculty Committee on Vietnam (1967-1969), University League for Social Reform (1964-1966), applications for an unfilled one year appointment in American History (1969-1972), and two files on the University of Toronto Faculty Association (1995-1997).

Martin L. Friedland personal records

Records documenting the life of Martin L. Friedland, as a student, professor of law and administrator at the University of Toronto; as an expert on legal matters and a contributor to the formation of public policy at the provincial and federal levels; and as an author of sixteen books and numerous articles.

Included in this accession is correspondence, certificates and diplomas, diaries, course and lecture notes, memoranda, minutes of meetings, notes, research material, manuscripts, transcripts of oral history interviews, audiotapes, radio scripts, book reviews, books, pamphlets, reports, press clippings, photographs and maps.

Law School: Student, Professor, and Dean

The four boxes in this sub-series contain documents relating to my experience as a student, my four years at Osgoode Hall Law School, and my time as a law teacher and dean at the University of Toronto Law School.

There are very few documents relating to my student days at law school (files 2 and 3), apart from my moot factum (file 2) and notes and a small paper prepared for Abe Weston’s jurisprudence course and a set of notes taken in Bob McKay’s criminal law course (files 4 and 5). I have included several marked-up texts used as a student, including my international law casebook, the subject that was to be the subject of my graduate studies (file 7). (For a description of why I chose criminal law for my graduate work, see my speech to the Cambridge Boat-Race dinner in box 04, file 42). As I apparently tossed out most of my notes when we went to England in 1960, there is also very little from my articling year and the bar admission course. What has survived is one incorporation I did and a number of cases I argued for the firm of Kimber and Dubin and some legal aid criminal cases that I took on my own (files 8-10). Some of these cases were sensational enough to be covered in the yellow journals of the day, in Hush, Justice Weekly, and Tab.

Similarly, there are very few documents relating to my four years teaching at Osgoode Hall Law School from 1961-1965 (file 11). Research notes and documents relating to the Osgoode years can, however, be found in a number of other boxes, such as those relating to Detention before Trial, Securities Regulation, and Double Jeopardy.

I was appointed to the University of Toronto Faculty of Law commencing on July 1, 1965 (file 12). From that period on there is more material. The files, for example, contain some material on the Law School’s Research Committee and its Long Range Planning Committee, as well as various other memos (files 13-15).

In 1972 I was appointed as the dean and returned from my year as a Law Reform of Canada Commissioner in Ottawa (files 16-20). The files contain a fair amount of correspondence while still in Ottawa relating to the deanship (file 21). There are also various law school plans and speeches made while dean (file 22).

The many files connected with my seven years as dean between 1972 and 1979 will be found in the normal law school files. I did not go through the files to keep any law school records when my term of office was over. There is, however, a fairly lengthy interview done for the student Advocate (file 23). There are also a number of files dealing with student mooting while I was dean which were not part of the law school records but were given to me by some students a number of years later (possibly in the early 1980s) because they didn’t know what to do with them (files 41-44).

In 1975 I started making brief notes of my plans for the coming year (file 24) and kept this up until the present. I usually did these around Labour Day. From about 1980 on I also prepared, as we were required to do, annual reports to the dean on my moonlighting and other activities for the past year (file 27).

Correspondence from 1980 on not found in other boxes is contained in files 28-36. The files also contain material on other aspects of law school life, such as my chairmanship of the Directed Research Committee (files 37 and 38), my involvement as faculty advisor to the Faculty of Law Review (file 40), my membership in the graduate committee (file 48), and my involvement in seeking special salary increases for the faculty (file 39). None of these files is very complete, however. There are also files on my involvement in the law school annual squash tournament, various alumni events, and various talks I gave at the law school (files 45,47, and 51). Other files deal with various sabbatical plans, various media appearances, and ways in which I coped with the changing technology, including the use of the computer (files 46, 49, and 53). A number of law school pictures are contained in file 50.

Double Jeopardy

During articling in 1959-60, I applied to do graduate work in England and the United States. Although accepted (with funding) at Harvard and Yale (file 4), I accepted the Carswell/ Sweet and Maxwell Scholarship for study at Cambridge University that was being offered for the first time that year (file 2). I also obtained a substantial scholarship that was offered by Osgoode Hall Law School if I promised to teach there for one year after I returned (file 3). My wife and I were therefore comparatively wealthy--she worked at a mental hospital just outside Cambridge-- and we bought a red Sunbeam Alpine that we brought back to Canada with us (file 39).

I was to spend one year getting a Diploma in Comparative Legal Studies. My topic was double jeopardy, although I had at first naively thought that I would cover in that one year several ‘bars to prosecution’. Glanville Williams was my supervisor. The circumstances of choosing my college and my supervisor are set out in an after-dinner talk that I gave several years ago at the annual Cambridge dinner (file 40).

We returned to Canada in the summer of 1961 and I started teaching at Osgoode Hall Law School. I taught there during 1961-62 and then applied for a leave of absence to be able to return to Cambridge to convert my work into a doctorate (files 8 and 9). This time, funding came from the Canada Council (file 5), with some travel funds from the Law Society. I had applied for a Viscount Bennett Scholarship from the Canadian Bar Association, which, as in 1959-60, I did not get. The file includes all the letters of reference relating to the 1959-60 application which the CBA mistakenly returned to me (file 6)!

There is extensive correspondence throughout the 1960s with my supervisor, Glanville Williams, and with Cambridge University (files 8-10). I required dispensation with respect to shortening the number of terms that I had to spend in Cambridge and various extensions that I required. During this same period, I was researching and writing Detention Before Trial (published in 1965) and was involved in the Legal Aid study and the Kimber Committee on Securities Regulation, all of which made it difficult to complete my thesis.

I had thrown out all my research notes many years ago. They were kept in spiral binders and I recall having well over 50 of them. The only hand-written documents that survived are various versions of the preface (files 18 and 20). Four of the chapters of the manuscript were published as articles before the book was published and in some cases before the thesis was completed (files 16 and 17). The thesis was approved in early 1966. I did not have to go back to England to defend it. Sir Rupert Cross was the external examiner. Gooderson and Odgers were the internal examiners (file 19).

The thesis (Box 2) was published by Oxford University Press, having first been turned down by Sweet and Maxwell, whose scholarship had started my association with Cambridge (file 21). There are the usual files connected with publication (files 22-27).

The book came out at the beginning of 1969. It was widely reviewed in legal journals (file 29) and has been frequently cited by various courts (files 33-36). There are files on the citation of the book by the Supreme Court of Canada, the Supreme Court of the United States, and the House of Lords. I have also included a sampling of citation by other courts.

Personal and university education

The series contains two groups of files: the first, relating to Prof. Richardson’s personal employment history, and the second, relating to his university education. Records relating to academic employment include Loyola College (later Concordia University) and the University of Toronto, as well as a file containing correspondence concerning employment opportunities at other institutions. The files relate mostly to his employment with the University of Toronto and include curriculum vitae, annual activity reports, salary, appointment to Scarborough College as well as his appointment as Principal of University College. Files relating to honours include his nomination by the Department of Religious Studies for the 1996 Northrop Frye Award, and the publication Text and artifact in the religions of Mediterranean Antiquity: essays in honour of Peter Richardson (Wilfrid Laurier University, 2000).

The remaining files document, in part, his undergraduate education in architecture at the University of Toronto, and in divinity at Knox College (an affiliated college at the University of Toronto), followed by graduate study at Cambridge. There is just one file relating to his undergraduate architecture degree containing an essay on “Architecture engineering education” written during the 1956-1957 academic year. This is followed by files containing essays written during his 3 years at Knox College. A file of correspondence (1958-1964) documents his application to various graduate schools following completion of his undergraduate degrees. In April, 1962 he was accepted to the graduate programme in the Faculty of Divinity at the University of Cambridge, Cambridge, England. Files relating to his doctoral studies include class notes, correspondence, papers leading to his dissertation, draft of his dissertation and a final copy entitled The Israel of God in early Christianity.

Writings and publication drafts

Series consists of W. E. Gallie’s writings, manuscripts and reports that eventually went to publication. The series consists of both typed and handwritten reports, drafts, some correspondence related to copying and publishing, and in some cases, medical photographs or images have been attached as figures. A bibliography of many of Gallie’s works is included. Some of the publications in this series are co-authored by Gallie and Dr.’s Robertson, LeMesurier, and Janes. The files in this series have been arranged in chronological order. The titles for the files in this series reflect the given title of each report, if one exists.

Correspondence and biographical material

This series consists of correspondence between Harry and several colleagues regarding awards, his appointment as the Chairman of the Department of Physics (1961-1969), correspondence and reception material from the Oder of Canada ceremony (1971-1972), correspondence and reception material from the inaugural H.L. Welsh Lectureship series (1975), several newspaper clippings (1968-1971), notes taken for Dr. Welsh’s oral interview as part of the University of Toronto Archives Oral History Programme (1978), and biographical information in the form of a eulogy (1985).

Personal and education

This series consists of records such as her curriculum vitae, her association with the Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing, personal documents such as register of birth, certificates and diplomas relating to her nursing education at the University of Toronto, and her association as an elder with St. Andrews Presbyterian Church, Owen Sound. Records relating to her education also include her personal scrapbook of photographs, clippings, correspondence and other documents recording her years as a student of nursing in the diploma programme at the University of Toronto. This series also contains a file relating to her Honorary Doctorate in Nursing Science from the University of Turku in Finland in 1993.

In addition to photographs in the scrapbook, portrait photographs of Prof. Jones as a graduate in nursing in 1950, as Dean (ca 1979-1988) and informal photographs of the honorary degree ceremony at University of Turku will be found in /001P.

Correspondence

This extensive series contains both personal and professional correspondence received by Prof Berger during his academic career. Some of Prof. Berger’s draft replies will be found in later files. The earliest letters document his doctoral education and his appointment to the Department of History at the University of Toronto. Correspondence from the 1970s through the 1990s document his flourishing career as prominent historian, author, teacher and advisor, etc. Later correspondence is dominated by requests from editors and other scholars relating to his publications, requests for review of other manuscripts, as well as his history of the Royal Society (1996)

Correspondents include, among others, prominent academics such as Prof. Ray MacLean, Dept. of History, St. Francis Xavier University (b 1927 d. 2004), Prof. Ramsay Cook, George (now Sir George) S. Bain, a former classmate at the University of Manitoba and member of Board of Bombardier Aerospace, as well as former students such as Doug Owram (professor, University of Alberta 1976-2006), and colleagues at Canadian and foreign universities. Subjects include personal information about family, friends and colleagues, academic correspondence with students and other academics about research progress, requests for letters of reference and support, comments on recent publications, and other academic activities. Two files at the end of this series contain letters to single correspondents: M. Brook Taylor (1986-2006) former student and faculty member in Department of History, Mount St.Vincent University and Sam Waller, amateur historian and founder of the Sam Waller Museum in The Pas, Manitoba.

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