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Manuscripts and publications

This series consists of unpublished and published manuscripts written by Judith Teichman over the course of her career. Includes: materials related to Teichman’s books (including copies of the books themselves) notably Social Democracy in the Global Periphery: Origins, Challenges, Prospects (Cambridge University Press, 2007), The Politics of Freeing Markets in Latin America (University of North Carolina Press, 2001), Privatization and Political Change in Mexico (University of Pittsburgh Press, 1996), and Policymaking in Mexico: From Boom to Crisis (Allen and Unwin, 1988); journal articles; reviews; reports; workshop presentations; interviews; conference addresses; newspaper and magazine articles. Also includes: grant applications; correspondence with publishers; research related index cards detailing first and second books on Mexico.

Notebooks

This series consists of a set of notebooks Dr. Mastromatteo kept throughout his life that document his daily activities. A small number of the early notebooks contain notes taken by Dr. Mastromatteo during his medical school classes. The vast majority of the notebooks are daily activity logs documenting Dr. Mastromatteo’s travels, meetings, activities, expenditures and interactions with others.

Article

Consists of: Ruble, Blair. ''Moscow's Avant-Garde Architecture of the 1920s: a tour", 1983.

Card indices

These boxes contains card indicies under numerous bibliographic headings on Communism in Czechoslovakia and the history of the Czech Communist party between 1918 and 1958.

Teaching files

This series contains mainly course outlines and lecture notes for the various courses taught by Etkin at the Institute of Aerospace studies, some of which were developed by Etkin and were the first such courses to be formally taught in Canada. A few of the courses documented include Applied Aerodynamics, Dynamics of Atmospheric Flight, Numerical Methods, Fluid Mechanics, Stability and Control, Wing Theory and Social Impact of Technology.

Family and personal

This series contains material relating to the le Riche family generally, to specific members of it – Harding le Riche’s, mother, siblings, wife, children, and grandchildren, personal information about le Riche himself, and his scrapbooks. The files on Professor le Riche contain biographical information, curriculum vitae, and press coverage of his activities, along with files on honours bestowed, memorabilia, a riding accident, and his trip to South Africa in 1964. B2006-0004/004 contains several certificates of awards both loose and in a large album. This series also includes family documents from 1888-1930s. (B2006-0004/001)

The largest single component of this series is the scrapbooks. They contain press clipping of items of family, academic, and political interest, programmes for and invitations to social and professional events, some photographs, the occasional letter, a large number of first day covers, and memorabilia relating to Professor le Riche’s travels and other activities. The first scrapbook (1945-1946) is filed in B2003-0012/001; the later scrapbooks (1964-1966, 1967-1973, 1973-1978, and 1978-1986) are filed in B2003-0012/002 to /005. Scrapbook for 1966-1968 is filed in B2006-0004/004. Loose items associated with scrapbooks dating from 1967 to 1986 are filed in folders in B2003-0012/ 001, /004 and /005, as appropriate.

The series concludes with an album of 9 records, titled “Beyond Antiquity: A series of lectures on the origins of man by Professor Raymond Dart, Professor Emeritus, University of the Witswatersrand, Johnannesburg, South Africa”, with an accompanying printed outline of the lectures. The series was produced by the South African Broadcasting Corporation in 1966, and le Riche was a contributor to it. Raymond Dart had been a professor of anatomy at Wits when le Riche was a student there, and was just beginning his career as an anthropologist. Le Riche was already interested in the subject and some of his friends visited the Sterkfontein caves in August 1936 with Robert Broom, the country’s leading paleontologist, who, a few days later, discovered the first Australopithecus at the site. Dart became famous for his description of the Taung skull, Australopithecus africannus.

University of Toronto

Professor le Riche joined the University in 1957 and served as head of Department of Epidemiology and Biometrics in the School of Hygiene from 1962-1975. With the dissolution of the School of Hygiene, he became a professor in the Department of Preventive Medicine and Biostatistics in the Faculty of Medicine. He retained that status until his retirement in 1982, when he was appointed Professor Emeritus.

The records in this series document Professor le Riche’s employment at and retirement from the University, along with some of his teaching and administrative activities. The series includes, among others, files relating to teaching of tropical medicine and epidemiology, the proceedings of a review committee on community health (1979-1980), a preliminary report on epidemiology prepared by the Research Advisory Committee working group on epidemiological studies (1984), correspondence with and about Dr. Andrew Rhodes, Director of School of Hygiene (1966-69), Faculty of Medicine committees generally (1957-1961), and admission criteria for medical students. There is also a file on the W. Harding le Riche Award in Medical Research at the University of Toronto.

Accession B1995-0021

Consists of correspondence; lecture notes on tropical diseases; drafts of addresses and publications including the proposed second edition of HUMAN ECOLOGY FOR STUDENTS OF MEDICINE AND BIOLOGY (1978) documenting Dr. le Riche's activities as an epidemiologist and administrator in the School of Hygiene and the Department of Preventive Medicine and Biostatistics; biographies and bibliographies of U of T scientists (1922-1977).

Correspondence

This series consists of correspondence files, arranged alphabetically by name of correspondence or organization and chronologically within each file.

Administrative files

The files in this series document some of Professor Warkentin’s activities while a professor in the Department of English at Victoria College and director of the Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies. They relate primarily to the activities of the Combined Departments of English (University College, Victoria College, Trinity College and St. Michael’s College) in the Faculty of Arts and Science. Also included is a portrait of Prof. Warkentin taken in her office in January 1984

Publishing projects

This series includes records created and collected while editing and/or writing literary works. Files contain correspondence with publishers and often with the authors of the original work. There is also correspondence relating to primary sources and with other academics or people familiar with the work being edited as well as with contributors. Files also contain research notes, bibliographies, reviews, publishing contracts and draft manuscripts.

Of particular note is correspondence with poet James Reaney along with his originally designed Christmas cards from him and his wife Colleen Thibaudeau. Early correspondence relates to his book Poems edited by Germaine Warkentin in 1972 but continues well into the 1990s and is often of a personal nature. Photographs of James Reaney at John Warkentin’s retirement party can be found in B2002-0006/001P (01).

In 1976 Uof T Press reprinted The White Savannahs by W.E. Collin as part of the series Literature in Canada: Poetry and Prose in Reprint. Warkentin wrote the introduction and in doing so corresponded with Collin as well as with poets Al Purdy, Leo Kennedy, A.J.M Smith, Frank Scott and Dorothy Livesay.

In 2001 Warkentin’s edited work Decentring the Renaissance: Canada and Europe in multidisciplinary perspective, 1500-1700 was published. This book was based on papers presented at a conference in 1976, organized by Warkentin and sponsored by the Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies at Victoria College. Records in this series document the conference along with the subsequent publication and include files on funding, correspondence with contributors, readers and the publisher.

Warkentin was also involved in the publishing project, The History of the Book in Canada. Included is correspondence, reports, drafts and planning documents.

Graduate students

This small series documents Prof Warkentin relationship two of her Ph.D. students and included mainly correspondence, manuscript revisions and critiques of their dissertations.

Professional activities

This series documents Ham’s activities in professional engineering and academic associations, his extensive work on public boards and committees in the areas of occupational health and safety, science policy and the effects of technology as well as his work as a consultant on matters of engineering and higher education. Records include correspondence, minutes, planning documents, reports and financial remuneration records. They are chronologically arranged by activity i.e. Committee, board, contract etc.

Included are records relating to his trip to the U.S.S.R. in 1960. He was one of the first scientists to visit the Soviet Union under a National Research Council exchange. There is some limited records documenting his role in the Royal Commission on the Health and Safety of Workers in Mines (1974-75), Royal Commission on the “Ocean Ranger “ Marine Disaster, (1982-85) and the Ontario Nuclear Safety Review (1987-88). Original records for these bodies reside at the Archives of Ontario.

There are extensive files documenting the following two bodies and these have been filed after the general files:
-National Research Council - Associate Committee on Automatic Control: Ham was instrumental in founding this committee and served as Chairman from 1959-1964.
-Engineering Centennial of Canada: Technical Program Committee; Ham served as Chairman from 1985-1987.

Addresses and talks

This series contains records relating to Ham’s numerous speaking engagements at conferences, seminars, convocations, meetings of professional groups, luncheons, briefs to committees and government bodies. Files contain notes, working drafts and final copies of talks, as well some related correspondence. Early in his career, addresses were mainly academic in nature relating to his research in automatic control. Throughout his later administrative career, his wisdom and knowledge was sought out on issues relating to higher education, engineering as a profession, occupational health and safety, science and technology and the role of the University in society. Arrangement is chronological according the date the paper was presented.

Appointment books

This series consists of appointment books noting meetings and engagements of both a professional and personal nature. There is a complete run from 1963 to 1993 as well as a second set for the years 1967-1969 while he was Dean of Engineering.

Personal correspondence

This series is almost entirely made up of letters of condolence to the Ham Family at the death of Jane Ham, a daughter who was tragically killed by a truck on her way to school. A note written by Mary Ham describing the event and her daughter’s special needs, can be found in a file preceding the correspondence. There are few other items of a personal nature including a letter by Mary Ham to her husband during an Easter holiday at the cottage in 1985 as well as correspondence with the Ham’s Chinese friend Xiansheng Li. There is the odd piece of correspondence with friends from the 1960s and matters relating to the Ham’s Boathouse (1955).

Health

Series documents Ham’s failing health especially from the point that he was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease which eventually claimed his life on September 16 1997. Included are detailed medical records, daily diary, notes, correspondence, negatives of a resonance imaging scan.

Book files

This is a small series containing correspondence and manuscripts relating to various versions of Etkin’s book on flight dynamics. Most records relate to his first book published in 1959 entitled Dynamics of Flight - Stability and Control and his 2nd version Dynamics of Flight published in 1972. In between, Etkin did publish Dynamics of Atmospheric Flight and some correspondence and reviews relate to this as well.

Grants

Files in this series document much of the same research areas documented in Series 3 but relate to those specific projects funded by granting bodies, mainly by the Canadian and American governments. Much of the early research conducted at the Institute of Aerospace Studies by Etkin and his colleagues was funded by Canada’s Defence Research Board, the U.S. Air Force’s Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR), and National Research Council of Canada (NRC) and later by NASA and the Natural Science and Engineering Research Council .

Other government agencies supported research for specific purposes relating to their operation. For example, there are files on air curtain projects for Toronto City Hall, Ontario Hydro and the Ontario Science Centre, a file on noise research for the Toronto Transit Commission, and one file on the aerodynamic stability of helicopters for the Hydro-Electric Power Commission.

Files contain papers, reports, proposals, budgets, contracts and correspondence. They are arranged alphabetically by the name of the granting agency or the subject matter of the research undertaken.

Correspondence

This series consists of personal correspondence between Professor Skilling and his family, friends and colleagues. Most of it is from the last 20 years of his life and relates primarily to his interest in central and east European affairs. Some of the correspondence is arranged chronologically – especially the letters covering the years 1991-2001. Also arranged chronologically and grouped separately are postcards and greeting cards with extensive messages for the years 1939-2001 (a few of the latter have photoprints attached). There are a few letters from Skilling to his parents and Sally from the 1940s, also correspondence with Derek Paton, a former student, and especially with his old Czech friends, Jelka and Olga Haningerova and Vilem Precan. There are also small files of correspondence on the Jan Hus Fund and the issue of public lending rights.

Journals and appointment books

In August of 1941, as Gordon Skilling left United College in Winnipeg for his first academic appointment in the United States, he began to keep a detailed journal of his activities. This journal was continued for the next fifteen years, until June of 1956, and covers the crucial period during which he established himself academically and became recognized as an authority on the Soviet Union and countries behind the Iron Curtain, especially Czechoslovakia.

It was an exciting and challenging time for him; the University of Wisconsin had a reputation as a dynamic liberal institution of higher learning. He arrived, however, just as the United States’ entered World War II amid a rising fear of communism (in spite of the need for co-operation with the Soviet Union, which Skilling advocated), both of which had an impact on the university and on him. From May 1943 until the end of the War, he was back in Canada as director of the CBC’s European short-wave radio broadcasts in its new International Service. On returning to Madison, he discovered a university in decline and his own position in doubt – he was denied promotion to associate professorship and tenure. So, in 1947 he left to accept an assistant
professorship at Dartmouth College in New Hampshire. He spent the summer of 1948 in Czechoslovakia, his first visit since 1939, where he witnessed first-hand the establishment of communist rule in the country and which he described in detail in his journal. Back in the United States a fellowship enabled him to study and research at Columbia. In 1950 he returned to Czechoslovakia to research the emerging system of communist rule there and to experience it through the new bureaucracy, the political show trials, and the constant stream of propaganda. In 1951 he was promoted to full professor in his department and was also given leave to return to the Russian Institute at Columbia for the 1952-1953 academic year. He found, however, that the anti-communist hysteria of the McCarthy era had an impact on his scholarly activities – two of his books were turned down – and on him personally. In 1955 he was questioned by an agent of the US immigration service, had to appear before a state anti-subversive committee. Shortly after the journal ends, Skilling’s green card was cancelled and he
was not permitted to leave the country, even for his brother Andy’s funeral, until he was issued a new visa in June 1958.

The remainder of the series consists of a broken run of appointment books and calendars for the following years (with number of copies in brackets): 1961, 1962, 1964, 1965, 1989, 1991 (2), 1992 (2), 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999 (2), 2000 (2), and 2001. The entries, though cryptic, provide the researcher with an overview of Professor Skilling’s activities at any one point or over a period of time.

Diaries and travel journals

Gordon Skilling began keeping diaries when he was a boy; the earliest includes accounts of trips to New York City and Montreal respectively in February and October 1921. These diaries, which described later trips to the United States and to Muskoka, continued until 1932, the entries between 1928 and 1932 being intermittent.

There is a gap of 36 years before the next journal begins. Between 1958 and the end of his life, Professor Skilling kept travel journals, relating especially to Czechoslovakia and other destinations in Eastern Europe. These are arranged chronologically, are often accompanied by supporting correspondence, programs and other items picked up along the way, and by photographs (see Series XI). The journals are usually described as ‘notebooks’, though many are in diary format. Professor Skilling often combined the diary format, with dated entries, with notes on what he had seen and with whom he had met, either in the same notebook or separately. These journals should be consulted in conjunction with the relevant chapters in his autobiography, The education of a Canadian, which helps put them in perspective.

Research files

Over the years, Professor Skilling assembled a large number of research files which contained a great variety of material, including notes, correspondence, press clippings (especially from Czechoslovak, other Eastern European newspapers, and Canadian newspapers written in Czech), photocopies of articles, pamphlets, and books.

A selection of these research files has been retained in this series; the material not kept was turned over to members of the Skilling Seminar for their use. The files are grouped into several subject areas, following Professor Skilling’s arrangement and, for the most part, his file descriptions. The emphasis in selection was on original notes, heavily annotated items, correspondence, memoranda, drafts of papers and addresses, and material from conferences and seminars.

The first research area is on Czechoslovakia generally (1966-2000), with its files on the country’s political culture and political reform, political activists, and conferences [box 031]. The latter include the International Political Science Association roundtable in Zagreb in 1985, ‘Ten years after’ conference in Prague (1999), and the Forum 2000 conference in the same city. There is also material on the breakup of Czechoslovakia. Accompanying these files are two boxes [036, 037] of index card notes – one on Czech politics and one a bibliography of Czech politics.

The second category of files [boxes 033-034] consists of material gathered by Professor Skilling for his numerous writings about Tomas Masaryk, including his T. G. Masaryk: Against the current, published in English and Czech in 1994. The first part consists primarily of general writings about Masaryk, along with accompanying notes, correspondence, etc. The arrangement in the latter portion is by subject areas, of which the principal ones are: ‘the Slovak questions’, ‘the Jewish question’, ‘religion’, ‘the women’s question’ and ‘foreign policy’. Accompanying these files is a index card box of entries on Masaryk generally, on his writings, on works about him and on searches to be carried out [box 038, 038a and 038b].

The final category [box 035] relates to Vaclav Havel. In it is correspondence between him and Professor Skilling and copies of letters to Vilem Precan, along with files of interviews, addresses, and honours bestowed; Havel’s visits abroad (including the University of Toronto in 1990); his writings (with notes by Skilling), and material documenting his involvement with Charter 77.

Oversized material has been removed from /034(10) and (12) to /003(04), and from box 034(27) to box 003(05).

A poster has been removed from /035(23) to folder .(02).

Photoprints have been removed from /032(04) and (05) to box 009P(12).

Personal life

This series consists of personal items belonging to Professor Skilling, including address books, photographs and slides, an identification card, and his marriage certificate issued in Czechoslovakia (with corresponding Canadian documentation).

The photographs have been organized according to portraits, personal and family life, early school, professional life, and slides. The majority of the photographs are annotated and dated on the verso, and the slides are numbered and dated. Two photographs in “Professional life” [B2012-0005/001P(04)] that are not annotated or dated show Professor Skilling receiving an honorary degree (LL.D) from the University of Toronto in 1982. He is flanked by President James Ham and Chancellor George Ignatieff.

There are four newspaper clippings related to Professor Skilling. The first is a congratulatory message, possibly published in a newsletter issued by the West United Church, about Skilling having won The Gundy-Doran scholarship [dated between 1929-1934]. The second clipping is a photograph of Skilling and his Harbord Collegiate institute junior basketball team [ca. 1928-29]. The third clipping is an article entitled “Viet Nam situation called threat to unity” [1966]. Skilling is quoted and discussed at length in the article. The final clipping is a profile (in English) on H. Gordon Skilling, published in The Prague Post in 1994.

Publications

Reprints and journal articles by authors other than Harold A. Innis.

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