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Graphic material

Photographs document members of the Blake and Wrong families including Samuel H. Blake and his wife Rebecca Blake, Edward Blake and Gerald Blake, as well as cousins Murray, Hume and Harold Wrong. Most are studio portraits, some of which are unidentified. There is one album depicting life at the summer residences Point au Pic and Murray Bay.

Blake Wrong family fonds

  • UTA 1069
  • Fonds
  • [188-] - [192-]

This accession of the Blake Wrong Family Fonds consists mainly of family portraits, small photographs and one album. Included are portraits of Samuel and Rebecca Blake, Gerald, Margaret, Francis and Vershoyle Blake as well as Harold, Murray and Hume Wrong.

There is also some memorabilia belonging to various members of the Wrong and Blake families including Harold Wrong, Murray Wrong and Gerald Blake. There are items relating to Ridley College (1906, 1923), to the Kappa Alpha Society (1911-1916), as well as two booklets of poems: 1) Verses by Harold Wrong, and 2) By-Products 1911-1919 by Murray Wrong. As well, there are there two pieces of correspondence written by Gerald Blake from the front during World War I.

Blake Wrong family

Archives of Newfoundland Mines Study

This series is a collection of documentation in form of reports, data, research materials and articles relating to the study of radon levels in Newfoundland Mines conducted by the Federal Government in the 1960s. Most of this material is copies given to Prof. McNeill to conduct his research on radon exposure for the Atomic Energy Board of Canada. There is however a scattering of his original notes and correspondence from the 1995 that he produced while writing his report entitled Measurements of Radon Progeny in Canadian Mines before 1968. The report itself can be found in Series 8 – Consultancy, Box B2005-0004/003 (13). The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission has requested that these records remain with Kenneth G. McNeill Fonds since Prof McNeill was their last custodian.

Linear Accelerator Committee of the Department of Physics

Records in this series include both the records of this committee as well as the documentation leading up to the design, building and financing of the Electron Linear Accelerator (Linac) in the Department of Physics. The committee itself, of which Prof. McNeill was Chair from 1966-1971, was responsible for overseeing the use of this apparatus for research in nuclear physics, medical biophysics and chemical engineering. This sub-series gives insight into early nuclear research conducted on campus.

Included are general files containing correspondence, minutes, reports on research, project proposals; grant files; sub-committee files; internal reports; and yearly progress reports. Also included are records relating to its planning and design which took six years from the time it began to be seriously considered in 1960 to the time it opened in 1966.

Records are grouped by type of file and are arranged more or less chronologically. Yearly progress reports, covering the period from 1966 to 1975 are filed at the end.

University of Toronto Administrative Committees

This series documents some of Prof. McNeill's administrative positions within the University including member of the Slowpoke Reactor Committee (1970-1991); the Council of the Faculty of Medicine (1962-1967); the Presidential Advisory Committee on Appointments and Terms of Office (Haist Committee) (1964-1968); as well as various administrative positions with Trinity College. The amount and type of records vary from one position to another but usually include copies of minutes, correspondence, reports and memoranda and some original correspondence between Prof. McNeill and other committee members.

General correspondence

This series is made up of general correspondence files, arranged alphabetically by the name of the correspondent or by the name of the person about whom Prof. McNeill is corresponding. Incoming and outgoing correspondence cover such areas as research, supervision of graduate students, editing of papers, trips, as well as numerous letters of reference for past students and colleagues seeking recommendations for appointments, tenure, awards and grants. Some correspondence relates to consultancy work such as files on the Ministry of the Solicitor General, Advanced Medical Systems, Inc., and Scintrex Ltd.. There is extensive correspondence with colleagues in Australia regarding his involvement in the development of a body compositional laboratory at Prince Henry Hospital in Melbourne.

The files often contain attached documentation to the correspondence. This is most often the case when corresponding with or about students under his supervision. Files may include drafts of thesis, research reports and Ph.D. oral assessments.

Department of Fine Art

Between 1957 and 1985, Marion Walker was a professor in the history of stage and costume design in the Department of Fine Art and its Graduate Centre for the Study of Drama. In this capacity, she taught Stage Design (FAS 333Y) and 18th Century Stage Design (FAS 435). She also assisted in the staging of the Graduate Centre for the Study of Drama’s 1974 productions of Marsh Hay and T’is a Pity She’s a Whore.

The records in this series document Ms. Walker’s teaching and research activities in the Department of Fine Art. The textual records mainly consist of subject files containing research and lectures notes. Topics covered include: correspondence, Baroque theatre, Ferdinando Bibiena, Comedia dell’ Arte, Elizabethan theatre, Fratelli Galliari, Greek theatre, Filippo Juvarra, Renaissance theatre, opera, research grants and Wagner’s The Ring. Also included is a scrapbook commemorating Ms. Walker’s retirement from the Department in 1985.

This series also consists of approximately 130 slides used to teach the History of Stage and 18th Century Stage Design. Subjects include the stage designs of Marsh Hay, Ferdinando Bibiena, Filippo Juvarra, Fratelli Gallieri and Pietro Gonzaga.

Also included are 10 stage plans created by Ms. Walker for the Graduate Centre for the Study of Drama’s 1974 productions of Marsh Hay and T’is a Pity She’s a Whore.

The series also contains one scrapbook of costume designs for the Graduate Centre for the Study of Drama’s production of Fuente Ovejuna (The Sheep Well), [n.d.].

Early biographical information

The records in this series provide biographical information on Marion Walker’s early life, 1921-1942. Series includes 7 photographs. Subjects are: 5 portraits of Marion Walker; the Phi Beta sorority, 1940; and the University College graduating class, 1942. Also included is a scrapbook of newspaper clippings concerning Ms. Walker’s amateur golfing activities, 1937-1941.

William E. Carswell fonds

  • UTA 1125
  • Fonds
  • 1966-1969

Fonds consists of 2 accessions:

B2001-0004: Watercolour paintings by William Carswell, former professor in the School of Architecture. Two of the paintings are of the old School of Practical Science - "old red Skule House" The other, identified as Columbus,Ontario, shows buildings and a church steeple. 1967-1969

B2008-0028: Two framed watercolour paintings by W. E. Carswell, former professor of the School of Architecture at the University of Toronto: 1) Winchester Close, 1966 and 2) Go Home Rapids, 1968

Carswell, William E.

William George Dean fonds

  • UTA 1209
  • Fonds
  • 1961-1982; (predominant 1961-1973)

Correspondence, notes, memoranda, reports, manuscripts, articles, brochures, reviews, photoprints and maps documenting the production of the Economic Atlas of Ontario which appeared in 1969. The project was directed by Professor William Dean of the Department of Geography.

The production of the Economic Atlas of Ontario was undertaken by the Department of Geography at the University of Toronto by a group of staff and graduate students headed by Professor William Dean. The principal financial sponsors were the Ontario Department of Economics and Development and the University of Toronto through the "Varsity Fund".

Its purpose was to provide new insights into the complexity of economic activities in Ontario and their relationship to the physical and behavioural environments. When the Atlas appeared in 1969, it was immediately recognized as a superlative example of its genre, both for the information it provided and for its design. In 1970 it won the world's highest international design award, the gold medal at the International Book Fair in Leipzig. In 1973 it received the Wallace W. Atwood Prize for "the work which is of greatest significance and which has made the greatest contribution to the field of geography in the continent".

Dean, William George

Research

This series consists of research notes and background materials regarding India, South East Asia and Kashmir. It is arranged by subject.

Addresses, talks and seminars

This series consists of research notes and background materials regarding India, South East Asia and Kashmir. It is arranged by subject.

Photographs

B2002-0009/001P(01)-(05): Sikh Studies Conference: photographs taken at a dinner in the home of Prof. Israel.
B2002-0009/001P (06)-(07): Photographs of the office in the Centre for South Asian Studies, room 2054 Sidney Smith, 1985
B2011-0004/001(18): Photographs of M. Israel at the Indo-Canadian Institute, 1980, with Canadian students, and Resident Director

University of Toronto

This series documents some of Prof. Israel’s activities as teacher and administrator at the University of Toronto. It includes correspondence regarding his tenure as a University of Toronto professor, especially during the period when he was vice provost (1974-1979), Director of the Graduate Centre for South Asian Studies (1981-1991), and Chairman of the Robert F. Harney Memorial Trust. Also included are files relating to the Sikh studies program, initiated after the Conference on Sikh History and Religion in the Twentieth Century (1987) organized by the Centre for South Asian Studies. According to Prof. Israel “the program became quite controversial and attracted attacks from orthodox Sikh critics both in Canada and outside”. The material on the Sikh community also includes his 1990 report prepared for the 5 Ks Interministerial Committee Government of Ontario entitled “Sikhs and their religious symbols: an Ontario perspective”.

John McCrae fonds

  • UTA 1539
  • Fonds
  • 1906-1962

Photographs of or relating to Lt. Col. John McCrae

McCrae, John

James Barron fonds

  • UTA 1062
  • Fonds
  • [193-]-1975

Personal records of James Barron, student of Forestry at the University of Toronto in the 1930s. Includes notes and exercise books from his student days, as well as some employment records and evidence of work done for the Ontario Department of Lands and Forests and Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources. Also includes some photographs of forestry work and study, depictions of Killala Lake, Abitibi camps, Owakonze, Lake Temagami, Great Lakes Lumber, Long Lake, Marathon Paper Mills, and Manitou Falls.

Barron, James

Broadcasting and film

Prof. Hume and Prof. Donald Ivey of the Department of Physics were pioneers in educational television, having developed their first 12 part program “Focus on Physics” in 1958. This was co-sponsored by CBC and the University of Toronto. The success of this series was followed up the next year by “Two for Physics”. Both series eventually aired on the National Educational Television (N.E.T.) in the United States. Other programs that followed include:

1960 – 15 short programs on Physics for children produced by CBC in cooperation with N.E.T. for joint use in Canada and United States

1962 – “The Ideas of Physics” – 4 programmes
1963 – “The Nature of Physics” – 5 programmes
1966 – “The Constant of Physics” – 4 programmes
All of these were for in-school broadcasts to Canadian high schools produced by CBC with the National Advisory Council on School Broadcasts

1960-1965 – 18 programmes for “The Nature of Things”, produced by CBC.
The program “The Nature of Things” is still today a staple of Canadian educational television. Hume and Ivey helped lay the foundation for such a successful broadcast run.

By 1960, their success in educational television spilled over into film where they were commissioned by the Physical Science Study Committee (PSSC) in the United States to do four films: “Frames of Reference”, “Periodic Motion”, “Universal Gravitation” and “Random Events”. All of these were created for distribution in high schools. In 1962, “Frames of Reference” won Edison Foundation award for the best science film and “Random Events” received a silver medal from the Scientific Institute in Rome.

This series contains a fairly complete set of scripts for all the titles noted above. Moreover, there is a 16 mm release print for each of the four films and one sound recording of one program from “The Constant of Physics” series. There are also still images from “Frame of Reference” and a file on the Edison Award.

For a good overview, researchers should begin by consulting reports written by Hume and Ivey for most of the television series. They detail the development of each theme. In addition, there is correspondence and contracts with CBC, correspondence with Educational Services Incorporated and the PSSC as well as program guides, clippings, published reviews, correspondence from viewers, and one 1962 audience response report for a “Nature of Things” programme.

Talks and addresses

This series documents Prof. Hume’s talks and addresses on various subjects. General interest topics often discussed the growth of computers in society, changes in technology, and the development of computer languages. These were written for general public consumption at invited lectures. There are also a few talks on physics.

More technical talks and addresses focused on computer programming, computer graphics, and computer languages such as TRANSCODE, FORTRAN and Turing. These were most often delivered at professional meetings and symposiums. Prof. Hume recorded a series of lectures with accompanying slides on FORTRAN and another computer language called LISP. These were recorded as a type of tutorial on how to use the University’s computer and were designed to teach computer programming to a wide range of academic users at the University of Toronto. This series contains a copy of the tapes on reel to reel as well as some of the accompanying slides - although it is not clear exactly how they originally matched up. Of particular note are the very early views of the Computer Center and its computers that were included in the slide lecture showing the IBM 650, the IBM 7090 and the IBM 7094.

Files are arranged chronologically with undated talks placed at the end. They contain notes, copies of the talks, overhead transparencies, related event programs and correspondence. In addition, there is a card index of talks that essentially gives outlines and notes. Some of these are related to files in this series while others are unique talks. Apart from the FORTRAN lectures, there is one taped lecture of Prof. Hume giving a key note address at the New College Honours Students dinner.

Biographical

This series gives researchers a good overview of Prof. Hume’s career and highlights. It includes biographical sketches, C.V., clippings, awards and correspondence regarding his various appointments. Photographs of Prof. Hume and relating to his career have also been placed in this series including portraits, a photo of Prof. Hume at a 1969 IFIP meeting and early computer installations in the Computer Centre. Finally, there is one framed painting of the Sanford Fleming building that hung in his office.

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