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University of Toronto Archives and Records Management Services
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Correspondence

This series contains correspondence received by Fredericka (or Frieda) before, during and after her marriage to William Dale and correspondence from her children following the death of her husband in 1921. The letters prior to her marriage predominantly document the period after graduation from Queen’s University when she attempted to find employment as a teacher or companion and her courtship by William Dale. The correspondence from William Dale does not begin until January 1900 when she is in Saranac Lake, New York, and after breaking off her engagement to Jack Munro. In addition to describing his growing love for Frieda, William also describes his teaching duties at McMaster University and his family and life in St. Marys.

The correspondence after their marriage indicates that they were frequently separated, with William teaching in Toronto or at the farm in Blanschard Twp while Frieda stayed with her parents in Cornwall or Kingston. From 1905 to his death in 1921, correspondence from her husband and some Ryckman family members concerns the birth of their children, his participation in the local government in St.Marys, farming matters and trips to Toronto. There is a file of condolence letters on the death of William Dale and includes letters from Maurice Hutton, W. S. Milner (University of Toronto), and F. H. Wallace (Victoria College).

From 1923 to 1930, Margaret (“Marnay”) and then Frances (“Fran”) wrote regularly to their mother while attending the University of Toronto. These letters describe the day to day university life from a woman’s perspective – the lectures, residence life, social activities and include impressions of friends and teachers. The letters from Frances should be read in conjunction with her diaries (See Sous fonds 2, Series 1). It should be noted that there are no letters for 1929, and the 1930 letters are mainly from Frances while she worked at Jasper Park Lodge during the months of June to August and from Margaret describing her trip to Europe that same summer.

George Hoyle Cowan fonds

  • UTA 1181
  • Fonds
  • [n.d.]

Photograph of graduating class from Toronto School of Medicine, 1870/71; also includes diplomas. Red leather unfolding case holding two pair of forceps, needle on an ivory handle, scalpel marked B on a wood handle and another needle in a brass case; labelled "Ingram and Bell Limited Toronto".

Cowan, George Hoyle

Bessie Mabel Scott Lewis fonds

  • UTA 1478
  • Fonds
  • 1889-1976

Diaries of Bessie Mabel Scott Lewis kept during her freshman and sophomore years as student in Faculty of Arts at the University of Toronto 1889-1891; invitation to attend a reception at President Loudon's house, December 13, 1890; her academic gown; article on "College Women" by Bessie Lewis (mss); and copy of article on her and her diaries in "The Chronicle" vol 48 (1975-1976). Bessie Lewis was the first Ottawa woman to attend a Canadian university full-time.

Lewis, Bessie Mabel Scott

University education

This series consists of two files containing his diplomas for Bachelor of Arts (1871) and Master of Arts (1873) degrees from the University of Toronto, and essays written for courses of study in political science.

Teaching and lecture notes

This series contains lecture notes for various courses taught by Prof. Dale, presumably at the University of Toronto, in his position as Lecturer and Associate Professor of Latin and Roman History in the Department of Classics at University College. Files relate to Roman History lectures for third and fourth year students, notes on Livy, Cicero Academica, Caesar, Lucretius, Aristotle's Ethics (with exam questions), and Ancient Greek and Roman History (with exam questions).

University of Toronto and Gymnastics training

Frances Dale’s primary interest as a student and as a teacher was physical education and training. This series contains correspondence, memorabilia, press clippings, essays and other documents relating to her student days at U. of T. and her ongoing interest in physical education. In particular are two files containing correspondence, notes, essays and clippings documenting mainly her trips to Europe to attend English Scandinavian Summer School in 1934, and the Lingaid in Stockholm with the Liverpool Physical Training College in 1939.

Honours

The files in this series contain correspondence, addresses, certificates, programmes, and a photoprint relating to honours bestowed in Professor Friedland.

The honours described herein are: Queen’s Council (Canada), 1976; James Marshall Tory Dean’s Chair, Faculty of Law, University of Toronto, 1996; an LLD degree from Cambridge University (2000); and an honorary degree from the University of Toronto (2001).

Correspondence

The correspondence files in this series are arranged alphabetically by author. They document Professor Friedland’s activities as a friend, as a student advisor and thesis supervisor, as a colleague assisting in honours bestowed on his peers, as an author, and as an authority on legal matters. They also document the increased leisure that came with official retirement.

The correspondence touches on many aspects of Dr. Friedland’s life, both personal and professional. It reveals his enormous network of contacts in legal and academic circles ranging from Lord Denning down to lowly law students. The letters cover a wide range of topics and issues, including some very topical ones such as international terrorism. Dr. Friedland received numerous requests for references from students and colleagues and, because he sat on the manuscript review committee of the University of Toronto Press, he was also asked to evaluate many manuscripts.

Some of the files contain commentary on legal issues on which Dr. Friedland was working. They may also hold drafts of articles forwarded by colleagues for commentary or presented a complementary copies [published copies have been removed, though the appropriate references have been retained], letters of congratulation and of reference. There is also correspondence regarding and programmes of conferences, and correspondence re and programmes for installation ceremonies. There are numerous invitations to dinners and other events and tributes on the deaths of friends and colleagues and notes on any of the above. Also present are greeting cards and several photographs.

Research and publications

This series contains material relating to a number of Professor Friedland’s publications. For four of his books – Double jeopardy, The trials of Israel Lipski, The case of Valentine Shortis, and The death of Old Man Rice – the files contain only a small amount of correspondence, press clippings, and promotional material. The manuscripts for these books, along with the supporting correspondence and related material, are located in Friedland’s earlier accession, B1998-0006.

The series concentrates on three of Friedland’s publications, each of which generated a number of spin-off articles and much commentary. The files for these titles complement the more complete record of activities contained in B1998-0006. Controlling misconduct in the military, his 1997 study for the federal Commission of enquiry into the deployment of Canadian Forces in Somalia, attracted much attention. So did ‘Borderline justice’, his 1992-1996 study with Kent Roach comparing jury selection in the two Niagaras, one Canadian and the other American. Friedland delivered papers on their findings at conferences and articles appeared in several journals and in a festschrift. The third publication, A place apart: Judicial independence and accountability in Canada (1995), continued the spirited public debate over the issue, one that is still going on and which is documented here in conferences, seminars, reports, and even a video, along with supporting correspondence and notes. A file on the Chinese translation of this volume is located in ‘Series VII: Other activities’. There are also drafts of papers on topics such as legal aid and the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, along with drafts of the manuscript for the eighth edition (1997) of his book (co-authored by Kent Roach), Cases and materials on criminal law and procedures.

Other activities

The records in this series document some of Dr. Friedland’s professional activities, mostly outside the Faculty of Law (he retired in 1998 but still teaches). The first three boxes focus on his relationship with the University of Toronto Press where he served on its Board of Directors and has sat on its Manuscripts Review Committee for over twenty years, including being chair since 1995. Nearly all of the files relate to the Committee, and contain extensive correspondence with other committee members and the executive of the Press, including commentary on policy decisions, including manuscripts being considered for publication.

Dr. Friedland has also sat on the board of directors of the Osgoode Society, which promotes the writing of legal history. The five files relating to this society consist principally of memoranda, minutes and supporting documentation and there are few annotations and notes. The original material consists primarily of Dr. Friedland’s 1999 oral history interview conducted as a part of the Society’s Chief Justice Bora Laskin Project and his file on the Society’s twentieth anniversary symposium in June 1999, “History goes to Court”, where he chaired the panel on ‘Other leading cases’.

Dr. Friedland was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada in 1983 (the files relating to his activities prior to 1997 are located in accession B1998-0006). In 1997 and 1999 he chaired the Innis-Gérin Medal selection committee. In 1997 he became a member of the nominating committee of Academy II (Humanities and Social Sciences) of the Royal Society of Canada and in 1998 was elected to the Council of Academy II for a three-year term. These activities, and his involvement in the 1999 RSC symposium in Edmonton, are documented here.

In October 2000 Dr. Friedland went to Beijing for ten days to discuss with Chinese judges issues relating to judicial independence. This project consisted of a series of seminars in Canada-China’s Senior Judges Training program sponsored by the Canadian International Development Agency and held at the National Judges College of China. Three different seminars were held – one on ‘judicial ethics’ in October (in which Dr. Friedland participated) and two in November on ‘judicial review’ and ‘case management’. The correspondence, notes, and reports relating to the project are contained in these files, along with drafts, in Chinese, of the published version of Dr. Friedland’s study on judicial independence, A place apart.

The remaining files in the series document a number Dr. Friedland’s other activities between 1995 and 2002. Included are a few addresses, some of his travels, and his membership in or association with a number of professional organizations such as the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research and the Law Commission of Canada. Dr. Friedland was appointed an officer of the Order of Canada in 1990 and awarded the Canada Council’s Molson Prize for ‘outstanding achievements and exceptional contribution to the enrichment of the cultural life of Canada’ in 1995. The files on the Molson Seminar and the Order of Canada reflect his ongoing responsibilities as a recipient of these awards. The last of the files document his continuing involvement in activities and issues at the University of Toronto, ranging from the Centre for International Studies’ program on conflict management to the Sports Hall of Fame selection committee.

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