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Archival description
University of Toronto Archives and Records Management Services Series
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Books

This series contains records relating to three books by Prof. Eddie. Ami “köztudott”, az igaz is? was published in Hungarian and was based on lectures delivered by Prof. Eddie at the Eötvös Lorand University in Budapest during the Spring of 1994. Files relating to this book include the German manuscript, drafts of lectures one to eight, as well as files relating to the scheduling and delivery of the lectures. Files relating to Historisches Verzeichnis der Grundbesitzer des Burgenlandes include correspondence, applications for grants, reviews and the Hungarian manuscript. The third book, his most recent work, is titled Landownership in Eastern German before the Great War: a quantitative analysis. Files include correspondence as well as drafts of the manuscript.

Teaching and research

This series consists of sample examinations from Cambridge University, University of London, Nottingham University and University of Toronto relating to Classical Studies, as well as lectures in both German and English on Roman History, delivered at the University of Giessen (early 1930’s) and at English language universities in Britain (Cambridge, Nottingham) and Canada (University of Toronto). Also included is a file containing his curriculum vitae ca 1940,and a file with a draft bibliography in German.

Papyrus

This series documents Prof. Heichelheim’s expertise as specialist in Latin and Greek translation. During academic year 1938-1939 he gave lectures on select papyri in the Classical Faculty at Cambridge University. Topics included Pap. Eleph.1, Sentimental papyrus, An ordinance of the salt merchants, Teptynis papyrus, and Pap. Gis 40 [Papyrus of Giessen]. This series also contains manuscripts of translations of various papyri such as Rhosos papyrus, Rylands Papyrus, as well as manuscript on the Adler Papyrus, the Zu Pap. Michigan III, and the Zu Pap. Oslo Inv. 504.

Professional correspondence

This series consists of professional correspondence arranged chronologically. Most of the material dates from 1964. A flood in Sidney Smith Hall in 1958 destroyed or damaged much of Professor Careless’ early records. The correspondence in this series provides an overview of J. M. S. Careless’ activities as an historian, teacher, administrator, and researcher from 1954 to 1997. Topics include: the Canadian Historical Association, conferences, George Brown, Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada, the Multi-Cultural Historical Society of Ontario, professional associations, publications, references, research, sabbaticals, and scholarly support.

Associations

This series documents Professor Careless’ involvement in various associations. The records consist of correspondence, research notes, and reports relating to the following associations: CBC Television Projects; Canadian Historical Association; Ontario Archaeological and Historic Sites Board; Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada; and the Multi-Cultural Historical Society of Ontario.

Ceremonies and obligation lists

This series includes copies of addresses and poems used in homilies during the Ritual, obligation booklets, obligation lists for special ceremonies, statistics on obligated engineers and collected correspondence concerning the preparations for the inaugural ceremonies. Several files also include information on special ceremonies for older candidates and proposed special ceremonies that did not occur.

Material from accession B1995-0040 (1959-1989) also includes a copy of the ceremony book for Camp Wardens, application forms and considerable material concerning the manufacture and distribution of iron rings, as well as preparations made for campus ceremonies. Material from Accession B2009-0029 includes six files (06-11) containing updated ceremony booklets and guidelines, a certificate for the nomination of an Honorary Camp Warden, several speeches and a candidate list. Files are arranged chronologically. White prints, several photographs and two obligation sheets have been removed for separate storage.

Expansion of the ritual

The series contains primarily correspondence with Camps Two through Nine, much of it dealing with the matter of verifying candidate credentials from different jurisdictions. There is also some correspondence of a social nature related to the establishment of authorities and Camp Wardens in new jurisdictions. The system of record keeping by Camp appears to have stopped in 1954, after which correspondence pertaining to the Camps may be found in the individual correspondence files in series 5. Arrangement is by Camp number, followed by the records pertaining to discussions of expanding the Ritual to the United Kingdom, India and the United States.

Camp Ten records pertain to a proposed camp in Ottawa, which was never established. Camp Ten, when it was established, became the camp for the Université Laval in Québec City in 1956. Camp Twelve was established by Carleton University in Ottawa in 1958. The B1995-0040 accession includes one file of material, from 1978-1987, related to the expansion of the “Links” programme of the Order of the Engineer organization, based in the United States. The records for Camp Five contain an example of an early iron ring.

National Research Council

Series contains is composed of records dating from McKay’s time at the National Research Council. During the Second World War, the organization was mobilized to support the Allied war effort. As a result, most of the series’ records relate to military research and development. Canadian Army Operational Research Group (C.A.O.R.G.) reports compose approximately half the files that make up the series. These reports cover subjects ranging from blast measurements for anti-tank mine clearance to the number and distribution of Japanese paper balloons in North America. There are also two summary reports on Japanese balloon incidents.
The remainder of the textual and graphic records are made up of committee minutes, general Department of Defence documents, and a short paper on Canada’s part in the development of the radio proximity fuse, which McKay contributed to as assistant to project leader Professor Arnold Pitt.

Also included in this series are the remains of a Japanese paper balloon. Paper balloons, also known as balloon bombs, were a by-product of an atmospheric experiment by Axis scientists, which discovered a powerful air current traveling across the Pacific at about 30,000 feet [1]. Taking advantage of this knowledge, the Japanese military developed what may well have been the first intercontinental weapon in the form of explosive devices attached to paper balloons. These balloons were released in Japan and carried along the Pacific by a jet stream, ultimately finding their way to North America’s West Coast. Although the Japanese are thought to have released as many as 9,000 paper balloons, only 1,000 or so are thought to have reached North America, resulting in a total of six casualties [2].

NOTES

  1. Johnna Rizzo, “Japan’s secret WWII weapon: Balloon bombs,” National Geographic, 27 May 2013.
  2. Ibid.

Manuscripts and publications

Series contains manuscripts and publications that McKay either wrote or kept in his files. Although the majority of pieces address scientific matters, the series also includes a Junior Prize Essay (“Fathers Versus Sons”) that McKay wrote while still in high school. A number of pieces, including the aforementioned “Fathers Versus Sons,” are to be found in journals or magazines, which have been included in the fonds both so as to preserve context and because many of them are no longer in print. It is worth noting that four of the articles in the series were coauthored, rather than sole-authored, by McKay. These are: “The Decay of Nitrogen Afterglow,”
“”The Decay of the Populations of Metastable Atoms and Ions from the Same D-C. Discharge in Neon,” “Effect of Previous History on Switching Rate in Ferrites,” and “The Hall Effect and Resistivity in Tellurium.” The series also includes McKay’s PhD dissertation, The Measurement of the Dialectric Constant of Electrolytes, and the high school physics textbook he co-authored with D.G. Ivey and which his sister, Marjorie, illustrated.

Correspondence

This series consists of correspondence files, arranged alphabetically by name of correspondence or organization and chronologically within each file.

Publishing projects

This series includes records created and collected while editing and/or writing literary works. Files contain correspondence with publishers and often with the authors of the original work. There is also correspondence relating to primary sources and with other academics or people familiar with the work being edited as well as with contributors. Files also contain research notes, bibliographies, reviews, publishing contracts and draft manuscripts.

Of particular note is correspondence with poet James Reaney along with his originally designed Christmas cards from him and his wife Colleen Thibaudeau. Early correspondence relates to his book Poems edited by Germaine Warkentin in 1972 but continues well into the 1990s and is often of a personal nature. Photographs of James Reaney at John Warkentin’s retirement party can be found in B2002-0006/001P (01).

In 1976 Uof T Press reprinted The White Savannahs by W.E. Collin as part of the series Literature in Canada: Poetry and Prose in Reprint. Warkentin wrote the introduction and in doing so corresponded with Collin as well as with poets Al Purdy, Leo Kennedy, A.J.M Smith, Frank Scott and Dorothy Livesay.

In 2001 Warkentin’s edited work Decentring the Renaissance: Canada and Europe in multidisciplinary perspective, 1500-1700 was published. This book was based on papers presented at a conference in 1976, organized by Warkentin and sponsored by the Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies at Victoria College. Records in this series document the conference along with the subsequent publication and include files on funding, correspondence with contributors, readers and the publisher.

Warkentin was also involved in the publishing project, The History of the Book in Canada. Included is correspondence, reports, drafts and planning documents.

Graduate students

This small series documents Prof Warkentin relationship two of her Ph.D. students and included mainly correspondence, manuscript revisions and critiques of their dissertations.

Administrative files

The files in this series document some of Professor Warkentin’s activities while a professor in the Department of English at Victoria College and director of the Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies. They relate primarily to the activities of the Combined Departments of English (University College, Victoria College, Trinity College and St. Michael’s College) in the Faculty of Arts and Science. Also included is a portrait of Prof. Warkentin taken in her office in January 1984

Biographical materials

This small series consists of two files containing Dr. Fox's curriculum vitae and a single file relating to his University of Toronto grades, notification of Ph.D conferral from the University of London and miscellaneous academic related materials. It provides a valuable guide to Dr. Fox's professional activities and accomplishments. Also included are three portraits of Dr. Fox taken at various times throughout his career (1964-1984) and a cassette tape sound recording of his retirement dinner tribute, 26 March 1986.

Nursing concepts study

Ms. Stanojevic collected raw data from each first-year student by asking them to write down three adjectives to describe nursing. Students from that same graduating year would repeat the exercise again, just before graduation. Stanojevic collected written responses from each student and placed them into a folder or envelope according to graduating class then date. This was done from September 1971 to September 1977.

Files contain word-processed lists of adjectives to describe nursing. The list is based upon responses given by nursing students from the School of Nursing at Toronto General Hospital.

Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto

This series contains a variety of correspondence and subject files containing reports, briefs and studies mainly relating to the School of Nursing (later the Faculty of Nursing). Among the records are files containing copies of studies on the relationship between Sunnybrook Hospital and the School of Nursing (1967), and copies of briefs and submissions prepared by directors of the School of Nursing such as Dr.Helen M. Carpenter to the Government of Ontario and the University in the 1960s and early 1970s. Records relating to her period as Dean (1979-1988) include manuscripts of reports and studies, correspondence on presentation on the Institute of Nursing Science (1988), annual reports and a long term plan. Also included are files relating to the Margaret Allemang Centre.

University of Toronto

This series contains correspondence, notes, reports, relating to Ivey’s career at the University of Toronto, beginning as assistant professor of physics in 1949 through to his appointments as Principal of New College (1963-1974), Associate Chair (Undergraduate Studies) in the Department of Physics, and Vice-president Institutional relations (1980-1984). Correspondence within the Physics Department (1966-1990) is filed separately from various subject files documenting other administrative activities within the University (1955-1991). Included are files on Polyanyi Fund for science and Society (1988-1991), Joint Committee of the Toronto Board of Education and the University of Toronto, Television Committee (1955-1956), Presidential Advisory Committee on undergraduate instruction in Faculty of Arts and Science (1965), among others.

Pre-university education activities

Prof. Ivey was involved in the development of high school curriculum in physics, particularly Grade XIII. Within this series will be found records relating to his role as Examiner-in-chief and examiner for Ontario for the Grade XIII provincial examination. Also documented are his activities with the Physical Science Study Committee (PSSC) developing four teaching films with Dr. J. Hume. The films, produced at the PSSC studio in Boston were: Frames of Reference, Universal Gravitation, Periodic Motion, and Random Events.

Research and teaching materials

This series contains notebooks on polymer research, ca 1949, an expense book relating to his participation on the Canadian High Polymer Forum ca 1950-51 and a notebook on students made at staff meetings ca 1950-51.

Course Files

Includes selective exams, problems, research reports, lecture notes and reference to readings for chemistry courses taught by Yates at the University of Toronto and to a lesser extent Harvard University where he began his career as an academic.

Personal

This series consists of two files containing his curriculum vitae and clippings, some correspondence and published articles on or about Prof. Harney. Included are copies of newspaper clippings quoting his views on Italian Canadians, notices of awards and honours for his book Dalla Frontiera alle Little Italies among others, and a review of posthumously published essays entitled If One were to write a history…Selected writings by Robert F. Harney. Edited by Pierre Anctil and Bruno Ramirez.

Correspondence – letters of recommendation

This series consists of files of chronologically arranged correspondence with students, colleagues, employers, editors etc. relating to requests for formal and informal recommendations from Prof. Harney. Many of these are addressed to Professor Harney in his capacity as Director/ President of the Multicultural History Society of Ontario.

Research materials

This series contains files relating to the production of Prof. Harney’s proposed book on “Italians in Canada”. It includes transcripts of interviews and other biographical information on identifiable individuals, notes, and some drafts documenting Italian Canadians in provinces across the country. It should be noted that some of the transcripts may be copies of records held at the Multicultural History Society of Ontario.

Public lectures and scholarly addresses

Drafts, with some accompanying correspondence and notes, of all but one of the addresses mentioned in Professor Flinn’s 1982 curriculum vitae are documented in this series, along with two other addresses and notice of another.

Broadcasting and film

Prof. Hume and Prof. Donald Ivey of the Department of Physics were pioneers in educational television, having developed their first 12 part program “Focus on Physics” in 1958. This was co-sponsored by CBC and the University of Toronto. The success of this series was followed up the next year by “Two for Physics”. Both series eventually aired on the National Educational Television (N.E.T.) in the United States. Other programs that followed include:

1960 – 15 short programs on Physics for children produced by CBC in cooperation with N.E.T. for joint use in Canada and United States

1962 – “The Ideas of Physics” – 4 programmes
1963 – “The Nature of Physics” – 5 programmes
1966 – “The Constant of Physics” – 4 programmes
All of these were for in-school broadcasts to Canadian high schools produced by CBC with the National Advisory Council on School Broadcasts

1960-1965 – 18 programmes for “The Nature of Things”, produced by CBC.
The program “The Nature of Things” is still today a staple of Canadian educational television. Hume and Ivey helped lay the foundation for such a successful broadcast run.

By 1960, their success in educational television spilled over into film where they were commissioned by the Physical Science Study Committee (PSSC) in the United States to do four films: “Frames of Reference”, “Periodic Motion”, “Universal Gravitation” and “Random Events”. All of these were created for distribution in high schools. In 1962, “Frames of Reference” won Edison Foundation award for the best science film and “Random Events” received a silver medal from the Scientific Institute in Rome.

This series contains a fairly complete set of scripts for all the titles noted above. Moreover, there is a 16 mm release print for each of the four films and one sound recording of one program from “The Constant of Physics” series. There are also still images from “Frame of Reference” and a file on the Edison Award.

For a good overview, researchers should begin by consulting reports written by Hume and Ivey for most of the television series. They detail the development of each theme. In addition, there is correspondence and contracts with CBC, correspondence with Educational Services Incorporated and the PSSC as well as program guides, clippings, published reviews, correspondence from viewers, and one 1962 audience response report for a “Nature of Things” programme.

Art and Letters Club

Since the 1960s, Prof. Hume has been an active member of the Arts and Letters Club of Toronto, serving as its President from 1976-1978. This series documents his participation especially in the Annual Spring Review which he often helped to write, direct and produce.

General documents on the Arts and Letters Club include some correspondence, memorabilia and one file on applications for membership. Most records however relate to the Annual Spring Review. Included are notes detailing concepts and organizational matters, scripts, music scores, programs and correspondence.

Many shows are well documented beginnings in 1965 to 1992, with only a few gaps. Also included in this series is an audio recording of Prof. Hume playing the piano and singing various pieces he composed for Spring Reviews.

Research files

These files consist of correspondence, notes, photographs and negatives, articles used for research, and drafts of manuscripts relating to Professor Rouillard's ongoing research about the Turks in French history, thought, and literature.

Personal and biographical

This series contains copies of Professor Flynn’s curriculum vitae and some correspondence, both personal and professional and including letters of reference, and examination questions for his undergraduate work in Arts at the University of Toronto in the early 1940s. Included are three photographs and a satirical drawing of his receiving his doctorate from the Sorbonne.

Scholarly papers

In addition to published works, Prof. Richardson made numerous presentations at conferences, symposia, invited lectures, memorials, convocations, and other occasions. The papers contained in this series were, for the most part, prepared for academic and other scholarly activities such as meetings of associations like the Society for Biblical Literature, Canadian Society of Biblical Studies, Canadian Society for the Study of Religion and the SNTS and represent a significant portion of Prof. Richardson’s body of work. Other presentations were made at many Canadian universities as invited lecturer and to various groups at the University of Toronto. A few files contain papers submitted, but never published. Indeed, many of these presentations are on topics that formed the basis of future publications. Researchers are therefore referred to Series 10 for topics of written works not represented in this series.

Files may contain correspondence, manuscripts, and notes.

Correspondence

This series contains a mixture of both personal and professional correspondence belonging to W.E. Gallie. Notable collections within this series include letters written to and from Colonel J.A. MacFarlane, Consulting Surgeon, Canadian Army Overseas, correspondence with Dr. W.G. Bigelow, and correspondence with well-known American Surgeon Dr. Rudolph Matas. The files in this series are arranged chronologically.

Other presentations and informal lectures

This series contains files documenting Prof. Richardson’s presentations generally outside the community of scholars associated with pure academic religious studies. As a recognized expert and scholar in his field, Prof. Richardson was frequently invited to speak to groups both inside and outside the University, in informal settings. Files in this series may contain manuscripts, notes, correspondence, programmes and other documents prepared for presentations to church groups like Temple Emanu-El and the Yorkminster Park Baptist Church, members of the general public, students, faculty, associations and others interested in historical or current topics relating to religion. Unlike Series 9 and 10, this series contains works not usually submitted for publication or other scholarly distribution. In addition, one will find some of his earliest presentations, mainly in the form of sermons, delivered while a student in divinity and campus minister at Knox College in the University of Toronto (see /034(01)-(06)).

University College Literary & Athletic Society

Tony Clement was President of the "UC Lit", the students' administrative council of University College from 1981-1982. This series contains minutes of meetings, general and subject arranged correspondence, constitution revisions, and other files relating to functions of the Council such as elections, orientation, and finances.

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