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Case-recording in pastoral education

This item is a 9 page article by Henri Nouwen entitled ‘Case-Recording in Pastoral Education’ published in The Journal of the Academy of Parish Clergy, by the Academy of Parish Clergy, Minneapolis, Mn., 1974, p. 16 – 24. In this article Nouwen is writing about the value for parish clergy of note-making in their interactions with parishioners. Although Nouwen suggests that such note-making is rarely done he outlines in the article a number of reasons why it is valuable and offers some case-studies as evidence. Nouwen first identifies some reasons why there may be resistance in clergy to undertake note-making: 1) That the interactions are private and privileged, 2) That note-taking is a form of creativity which pastors may not see as being relevant to their work 3) That pastors may not see the relevance of what they do to the development of pastoral theology. Nouwen then discusses some values of note-making for pastors: 1) It is a professional task and one which, if the pastor is to be considered a professional among other professionals, must be done.. ‘The pastor cannot seriously claim a place on the professional team if he does not have his case-record by which he presents his work with the patient for discussion, criticism and evaluation. 2) It is a form of self-supervision. Here Nouwen quotes Russell Dick, BD, that note writing ‘is a check upon one’s work; it is a clarifying and developing process; it relieves emotional strains for the writer.’ Preceding the presentation of several case studies Nouwen states the following, ‘ One of the reasons it is so difficult to learn from experience is that the nature of the experience itself often remains obscure, ambiguous or vague. Sometimes the pastor feels happy after a visit, sometimes disappointed, sometimes sad, angry or depressed. In many ways the pastor senses vaguely that something went right or wrong, but cannot put a finger on it. Usually he does not stop to think or reflect but moves on to another experience allowing his feelings to drift into the background, unavailable as a potential source for learning. But if the pastor sits and writes the conversation as he or she remembers it, and tries to formulate personal observations of the situation and reactions to it, the cloud can vanish and the experience can become clear and visible’.

Stranger in paradise

This item is a 6 page article by Henri Nouwen entitled, ‘Stranger in Paradise’, published in The Sign: National Catholic Magazine, Volume 55, No. 7, April 1976, PP. 13 – 18. It is part one of a two-part article. This article is an excerpt from: Nouwen, Henri: Genesee Diary, Doubleday & Co., 1976. Nouwen begins by stating that ‘My desire to live for seven months in a Trappist monastery, not as a guest but as a monk, did not develop overnight’. The remainder of the article describes some of his struggles and insights as he lived the life of a monk. Nouwen states that he had been looking for someone to help him find direction in his life. He then met Father John Eudes Bamberger at the monastery of Our Lady of Gethsemani in Kentucky in whom he says he found what he had been looking for: ‘He listened to me with care and real interest, but he also spoke with deep conviction and a clear vision…’. Three years later Nouwen went to the Abbey of the Genesee where Bamberger had become Abbot. It is the experience of the seven months in which lived as a monk at this Abbey which is the focus of this article and of the book from which it is taken. Nouwen describes his struggle with the rhythms and work of the monastic life; his struggle understanding monastic concepts of obedience and his own depression that followed his first month. Nouwen then outlines some of the areas in which he feels is learning: 1) Wanting to be different- Nouwen describes his lifelong desire to be thought different and his growing discovery that in the monastery one is to be unnoticed, not special, and in this ‘The mystery of God’s love is that in this sameness, we discover our uniqueness’. 2) Sacred Rhythm – ‘One of the things a monastery like this does for you is give a new rhythm, a sacred rhythm’ and in this, Nouwen rediscovers the Saints. 3) Mary – in the monastery Nouwen rediscovers his devotion to Mary that was part of his family life. 4) Love – In his time in this monastery Nouwen says he struggled with the sense that his experience of love had been ‘limited, imperfect and weak’. Nouwen goes on to say ‘I am beginning to experience that an unconditional, total love of God makes a very articulate, alert and attentive love for the neighbor possible’.

Compassion

This item is a 3 page article by Henri Nouwen entitled Compassion, published in Exchange, Summer 1976, pp. 8 – 10. Nouwen begins this article by saying ‘The word “compassion” always brings to mind a relationship with people…to be with a suffering human being, to suffer with him or her.’ He then asks if it is not possible also to speak about compassion with God which he sees as the basis for our compassion with others. Nouwen sees the dynamic of compassion with God as rooted in Jesus. ‘The great mystery of the spiritual life is that it is a life of union with God. But this union with God is a union through Jesus Christ who suffered all the pains of the world and carried these pains with him into his intimacy with the Father’. Nouwen goes on to say that ‘We cannot carry the pains of our world in our own mind but we can carry [them] in the mind of Jesus Christ’. Nouwen concludes the article by stating ‘Our hearts and minds are too small to carry the burdens of the world but in God’s mind and heart there is room for all that hurts’.

Called to be hosts

This item is a 2 page article by Henri Nouwen entitled: Called to be Hosts, published in Faith/At/Work, September, 1976, p 30-31. Nouwen begins the article by stating ‘The call to ministry is the call to be a host to the many strangers passing by. In this world full of strangers…we search for a hospitable place, where life can be found’. Nouwen speaks then of our ambivalent feelings towards the stranger of both fear and attraction and suggests that ‘during the last years strangers have become more subject to hostility than to hospitality’. Nouwen then goes on to speak of the way in which a minister is to offer healing hospitality to the stranger. He speaks of the need to offer a space where the stranger can grow to be himself. ‘This will come to pass only when ministry is undergirded by spirituality, that is, when the outer movement from hostility to hospitality is supported by an inner movement from property to poverty. Poverty means that my identity in the final analysis is not determined by what I can do or think, but by what God’s Spirit can do, say, and think in me.’ Nouwen concludes, ‘When poverty enables us to create a friendly space for the stranger and to convert hostility into hospitality, then the stranger might be willing to show his real face’.

Compassion

This item is a one page article by Henri Nouwen entitled, ‘Compassion: Bringing us Together’, published in The Sign, October 1976, p. 38. Nouwen begins the article with the example of the monk Thomas Merton’s growth in compassion as he lived his life in the monastery. Though unrecognized by Merton until he began teaching student monks, ‘he realized that they were sent to him to lead him away from his own paralyzing fear into a new and creative relationship with others.This sequence of events in Merton’s life reveals something of the mysterious way in which compassion belongs to the core of any type of community life’. Nouwen describes compassion as a discovery and fellowship with ‘the other’ and it is this which helps creates community. Nouwen suggests however, that we should not be sentimental about people who are compassionate and points to a number of examples of people who were both compassionate and yet in some sense, difficult: Van Gogh, J.H. Newman, Dag Hammarskjold, Merton. Nouwen concludes by stating, ‘The Christian community is a community in which people are sounding through to each other the great love of God which binds them together. The gift of compassion makes it possible for us to recognize this love in each other and bring it to the forefront’.

Compulsions led him to a monastery

This item is a one page article by Henri Nouwen entitled, ‘Compulsions led him to a Monastery’, published in The Catholic Witness, Oct 7, 1976. This article is an excerpt from: Nouwen, Henri, ‘The Genesse Diary, Image Books, Doubleday & Co., Garden City, New York, 1976. Nouwen begins this article by describing his distracted and restless life and his lack of time for prayer and quiet which leads him to spend seven months living the monastic life at the Abbey of the Genesee in upstate New York. He speaks of his desire to be different, sensational but discovers that ‘in recent years, I have become increasingly aware of the dangerous possibility of making the word of God sensational’. During his time at the monastery he asks the Abbot, John Eudes Bamberger, how, when he returns to his busy life, he can develop a deep prayer life. Bamberger’s answer is, he says, simple: ‘ The only solution is a prayer schedule that you will never break without consulting your spiritual director’. This schedule will include setting a firm time which cannot be changed and to remain at prayer however ‘useless’ this time appears to be. Nouwen concludes by suggesting that though he is distracted and unclear what his prayer may be doing for him, in retrospect he senses that he is growing.

'What do you know by heart?': learning spirituality

This item is a 3 page article by Henri Nouwen entitled, “‘What do you know by heart?’: Learning Spirituality”, published in Sojourners, August , 1977, pp. 14 – 16. Nouwen begins this article outlining his theme by using a story which he says ‘expresses in a simple but powerful way the importance of spiritual formation in theological education’. Nouwen then goes on to speak of the inadequacy in theological studies of ‘head’ knowledge. What is also needed he says is ‘heart’ knowledge; spiritual formation. Nouwen suggests three themes which he says are important in the context of theological education: Lectio Divina, silence and guidance. By Lectio he means the prayerful, meditative reading of scripture. By silence he suggests the ground for the word to bear fruit. He says, ‘In silence the word of scripture can be received and meditated on.’ Nouwen talks of guidance as the need for someone competent to help the student through the pitfalls of spiritual formation. Nouwen then goes on to stress in addition that ‘Christian spirituality is in essence communal’. ‘All of this suggests strongly that spiritual formation in theological education includes ongoing formation in community life’. Nouwen sees the need then for emphasis on the communal in classroom, worship, and responsibility for one another. He says, ‘So spiritual life is always communal. It flows from community and it creates community’. Nouwen concludes the article by stressing the role of the Holy Spirit in all spiritual life and ends with the following conclusion:’ Spiritual formation gives us a free heart able to see the face of God in the midst of a hardened world and allows us to use our skills to make that face visible to all who live in darkness’.

Article about Nouwen's views about Yale's mission

This item is a one-half page article by Henri Nouwen included in a series entitled, Five Faculty Views of the University’s Mission, published in the Yale Alumni Magazine and Journal, November 1977, p. 10-11. Nouwen begins by asking if it isn’t preposterous to speak about the mission of Yale because mission implies being sent to serve which for missionaries involves not an upward, but a downward movement to the path of pain and suffering. For Yale students however, he suggests the path is directed upward to be successful lawyers, doctors, executives. Nouwen then goes on to say that he does not see the argument as so simple after all. Nouwen says, ‘there is little doubt that Yale is a secular institution. [But] it is also an institution in which the call to service is continually heard.’ At Yale, Nouwen points out, hundreds of students study the sacred scriptures, the sacraments of the church are received, ‘it is a center where people from the most varied religious traditions meet…it is the home where people come together to assist the poor, visit the elderly, to tutor disadvantaged youth…’. Nouwen concludes by saying,’ so there might be a mission for Yale after all: to send men and women into our society who know the world and have acquired the knowledge and the skills to fulfill a task in it, but who also realize that the value of their lives does not depend on what they have been able to acquire, but on how much they have been able to serve their fellow human beings’.

Solitude and community

This item is an 11 page article by Henri Nouwen entitled,‘ Solitude and Community’, published in Worship, January 1978, pp. 13 – 23. Nouwen begins the article by noting that many people who live in community are asking how to find space and time for themselves because the intensity of community life has proved difficult. Nouwen identifies the purpose of this article as; ‘to offer some reflections on solitude in community in the hope that for some communities these ideas may offer new strength to remain faithful to the vision which originally brought them together’. Nouwen begins by identifying two viewpoints about the role of solitude in community which he considers false or too limited: 1) Solitude over against community and 2) Solitude in Service of community. This latter he clarifies solitude considered as simply ‘a tool in the service of life together’. Under the heading, ‘Solitude and Community’ Nouwen suggests what he sees as the real relationship between the two: ‘Solitude without community leads us to loneliness and despair, but community without solitude hurls us into a “void of words and feelings”’. He then goes on to state,’ I now would like to develop this view in more detail by relating solitude to intimacy, clarity and prayer’. In discussing what he intends by ‘intimacy’ Nouwen states that in solitude members of community may grow closer to each other. Nouwen states that constant talking things out without the depth provided by solitude, does not lead to communal growth. He suggests that ‘in solitude we are given the awareness of a unity that is prior to all unifying actions’. With regard to ‘clarity’ Nouwen states, ‘In solitude we begin to see more clearly and are more able to distinguish between what can be shared and what should be left unspoken’. In discussing ‘prayer’ Nouwen says the following ‘When I speak of prayer I refer less to saying prayers than to living a prayerful life in which eating and drinking, sleeping waking, working and praying are all done to the honor and glory of God’. Nouwen concludes the article by pointing out the difficulty of living out what he has said because of the many forces against, it but that it would be important then to consider ‘Education to solitude…is an important task for communities…’

Letting go of all things

This item is a 2 page article by Henri Nouwen entitled, ‘ Letting Go of All Things’, published in Sojourners magazine, May 1979, pp. 5& 6. This article is identified as a ‘response to “The Work of Prayer” a project of Sojourners to pray for peace in face of the arms race. Nouwen begins by asking what this call might mean: does it represent a failure of action? A turning to God because turning to people didn’t help much? A capitulation to quietism? A dramatic gesture? Nouwen believes not: ‘I believe that the Sojourners are discovering a dimension of prayer they did not see before…I see their call not as an invitation to retreat into a familiar piety , but as a challenge to make a radical move toward prayer as “the only necessary thing”’. Nouwen suggests prayer as a dying to self, an opening to God, is the ground from which people move out into the world of action. Nouwen concludes, ‘ When …our act of prayer remains the act from which all actions flow, we can be joyful even when our times are depressing, peaceful even when the threat of war is all around us, hopeful even when we are constantly tempted to despair.

Article about Nouwen's feelings after attending the June 1980 Community of Communities Theological Conference

This item is a one column article by Henri Nouwen with no title but part of a larger article entitled ‘Hearing Heart to Heart, responses to a theological conference on prayer, published in Sojourners, October 1980, p.23,24. Nouwen begins by identifying his physical and emotional tiredness when he arrived at the conference but then states, ‘My week [at Woodland Park] will stick in my mind as one of the most hopeful events of my life’. Nouwen states that he does not speak of hope as optimism but the hope and trust in God who promises ‘unwavering faithfulness’. Nouwen then goes on to state that he learned from the conference that there are two essential aspects to the common life: prayer and resistance. Prayer holds the community steady and resistance is ‘an act of visible protest against the powers who are bent on waging war even at the cost of the destruction of humanity’.

Temptation: the pull toward upward mobility

This item is a 3 page article by Henri Nouwen entitled, ‘Temptation’, published in Sojourners,Vol. 10, No. 7, July , 1981, pp. 25 -27. This is part two of a three part series. Nouwen begins by stating that the spiritual life is ‘the life of the Spirit of Christ within and among us’. He then suggests that there is also the ‘Evil One’ who roams among us and tempts us away from the life of Jesus. This article looks at the three temptations of Jesus in the wilderness. The first temptation Nouwen identifies as the temptation to be relevant. ‘This temptation touches us at the center of our identity. In a variety of ways we are made to believe that we are what we produce’. The second temptation Nouwen identifies as the temptation to be spectacular. ‘We have come to believe that a service is valuable when many attend, a protest meeting is worthwhile when television cameras are present…’ Nouwen suggests that we value things that get a great deal of attention but forget the quiet unobtrusive ways of Jesus. The third temptation is the temptation to be powerful. Nouwen suggests we long for power, but the more we have the less we are satisfied. He goes on to point out that the only power that ‘works’ is the power of God which is often seen as powerlessness. ‘We do not belong to the world. We belong to God’.

Spiritual direction

This item is a 6 page article by Henri Nouwen entitled 'Spiritual Direction' published in Worship, Collegeville, Minnesota, Volume 55, Number 5, September, 1981, pp. 399 - 404.
Nouwen begins this article by stating his definition of spiritual direction. ‘Spiritual direction is direction given to people in their relationship with God’ Nouwen then goes on to say ‘I would like to offer a few ideas which might help in defining the nature of this ministry…which might begin to suggest some concrete ways in which this ministry can be practiced’. Under his first heading which speaks about the movement ‘from absurdity to obedience’ Nouwen defines the first as the root of ‘deaf’ and the second as the root of ‘listening’. Nouwen speaks of the difficulty of moving from the busyness of the absurd/deaf life to being willing to hear and then gain the discipline of obedient following of God. In his second section Nouwen speaks of ‘The three disciplines of the spiritual life’. These disciplines are identified as: the discipline of the church, the discipline of the Book and the discipline of the heart. Nouwen concludes his article by suggesting that at this time in history when many traditional ways of living are breaking down and people are turning to religious leaders for guidance, this is more than ever a time to consider spiritual direction.

Making all things new: an invitation to the spiritual life

Item consists of a book which Nouwen wrote about the spiritual life. The book has been divided into the following: Acknowledgments; Introduction; I. "All These Other Things"; II. "His Kingdom First"; III. "Set Your Hearts"; Conclusion.
As is stated on the front flap: . . . ."If . . .we are willing to live a life of prayer and practice the disciplines of solitude and community, a new hunger will make itself known. This new hunger is the first sign of God's presence. When we remain attentive to this divine presence, we will be led always deeper into the kingdom. There, to our joyful surprise, we will discover that the power of our worries is weakening and all things are being made new."

The way of the heart: desert spirituality and contemporary ministry

Item consists of a book which originated as a seminar Nouwen held at Yale Divinity School on the spirituality of the desert and then as Convocation lectures at Perkins School of Theology in Dallas and at the National Convention of Pastoral Counselors in Denver. The book has been divided into the following: Prologue; Solitude; Silence; Prayer; Epilogue; Notes.
As is stated on the back cover of the book: . . . ."Solitude shows us the way to let our behavior be shaped not by the compulsions of the world but by our new mind, the mind of Christ. Silence prevents us from being suffocated by our wordy world and teaches us to speak the Word of God. Finally, unceasing prayer gives solitude and silence their real meaning. . . . The 'way of the heart' leads us not only to a fuller encounter with God but also to a more creative relationship with our fellow human beings."

A letter of consolation

Item consists of a book which Nouwen wrote as a letter of consolation to his father six months after the death of Henri's mother.

Behold the beauty of the Lord: praying with icons

Item consists of a book which Nouwen wrote about four Russian icons, which first came to his attention when he visited L'Arche in Trosly, France in the fall of 1983. The book has been divided into the following: Introduction; I. The Icon of the Holy Trinity: Living in the House of Love, Introduction, A Gentle Invitation, Where Heart Speaks to Heart, The Circle, The Cross and Liberation, Conclusion; II. The Icon of the Virgin of Vladimir: Belonging to God, Introduction, The Eyes of the Virgin, The Hands of the Virgin, The Child of the Virgin, Conclusion; III. The Icon of the Savior of Zvenigorod: Seeing Christ, Introduction, Seeing a Damaged Image, Seeing a Tender Human Face, Seeing Eyes Which Penetrate both the Heart of God and Every Human Heart, Conclusion; IV. The Icon of the Descent of the Holy Spirit: Liberating the World, Introduction, The God-within, The Community of Faith, The Liberation of the World, Conclusion; Conclusion; References.
As is stated in the introduction: "Like the painting by Chagall, [which his parents bought when they were first married and to which Nouwen has connected his mother's beauty, the icons] . . . have imprinted themselves so deeply upon my inner life that they appear every time I need comfort and consolation."

Brieven aan Marc: over Jezus en de zin van het leven

Item consists of a book of seven letters; the translated title is: Letters to Marc About Jesus. Nouwen wrote this book in response to a publisher friend named Herman Pijfers, and his suggestion that Nouwen write a book in Dutch. As well, the book was written in collaboration with Marc van Campen, Nouwen's nephew, who agreed to share a 'book of letters' about the spiritual life. The book has been divided into the following: Preface; Letter 1. Jesus: the Heart of Our Existence; Letter 2. Jesus: the God Who Sets Us Free; Letter 3. Jesus: the Compassionate God; Letter 4. Jesus: the Descending God; Letter 5. Jesus: the Loving God; Letter 6. Jesus: the Hidden God; Letter 7. Listening to Jesus; Index of Biblical Quotations.

The road to Daybreak: a spiritual journey

Item consists of a book representing Nouwen's day-by-day account of his first year at L'Arche in Trosly, France from August 13, 1985 to July 8, 1986. The book has been divided into the following: Prologue; 1. Parents and Children; 2. Following Jesus; 3. Darkness and Light; 4. First Glimpses of a New Vocation; 5. The Primacy of the Heart; 6. Feeling the Pain; 7. Forgiving the Hurt; 8. Jesus in the Center; 9. The Important and the Urgent; 10. Poverty and Wealth; 11. A Clear Call; 12. Going Home; 13. The Struggle of Prayer; 14. Deep Roots; 15. Choosing Life; 16. The Descending Way; 17. Passion, Death, and Resurrection; 18. Larger Connections; 19. The Gift of Friendship; 20. One Among Many; 21. A Hard but Blessed Vocation; 22. Contrasts and Choices; 23. Endings and Beginnings; Epilogue.
As is stated on the back cover: "The noncompetitive life with mentally handicapped people, their gifts of welcoming me regardless of name or prestige, and the persistent invitation to 'waste some time' with them opened in me a place that until then had remained unavailable to me, a place where I could hear the gentle invitation of Jesus to dwell with Him."

Henri Nouwen

Item consists of a book containing selections from Nouwen's best published work.

Zeige mir den weg: texte fur alle tage von aschermittwoch bis ostern

Item consists of a book written by Nouwen containing excerpts from his previously published writings. The translated title is: Show Me the Way : Readings for Each Day of Lent. The 40-day Lenten path includes readings for Ash Wednesday, the four weeks of Lent, Passion Week, Holy Week, Good Friday, and Easter Sunday.

Our greatest gift: a meditation on dying and caring

Item consists of a book written by Nouwen about death. The book has been divided into the following: Acknowledgments; Prologue: Befriending Death; Introduction: Grace Hidden in Powerlessness; Part One: Dying Well, Chapter One: We are Children of God, Chapter Two: We are Brothers and Sisters of Each Other, Chapter Three: We are Parents of Generations to Come; Part Two: Caring Well, Chapter Four: You are a Child of God, Chapter Five: You are Brothers and Sisters of Each Other, Chapter Six: You are Parents of Generations to Come; Conclusion: The Grace of the Resurrection; Epilogue: Death: A Loss and a Gift.
As is stated on the flaps: ". . . .When we contemplate with compassion the suffering and pain both around the world and close to home, we receive a gift: a reminder of the 'great human sameness' of 'all of us [who] will die and participate in the same end.'. . . And although the contours of an afterlife are unknowable, when we face death with hope we make the choice of faith. . . ."

With burning hearts: a meditation on the eucharistic life

Item consists of a book written by Nouwen in Chobham, England and Sacramento, California and is about the Eucharist and the Eucharistic life. The book has been divided into the following: Acknowledgments; Introduction; The Road to Emmaus; I. Mourning Our Losses "Lord, Have Mercy"; II. Discerning the Presence "This Is the Word of God"; III. Inviting the Stranger "I Believe"; IV. Entering into Communion "Take and Eat"; V. Going on a Mission "Go and Tell"; Conclusion.
As is stated on the front flap: ". . . . With Burning Hearts seeks a fuller understanding of Eucharist through the story of the disciples on their way to Emmaus from Jerusalem after the crucifixion (Luke 24: 13-35)."

The path of power

Item consists of a book written by Nouwen about "power that oppresses and destroys, . . .power that is disarmed through powerlessness, . . .[and] the true power that liberates, reconciles, and heals" (p. 8).

The path of peace

Item consists of a book written by Nouwen about peace, specifically Adam's peace.

Aging

Item consists of a book which Nouwen co-wrote with Gaffney on aging. The book has been divided into the following: Prologue: The Wagon Wheel; Part One: Aging, Introduction, Aging As a Way to the Darkness, Aging As a Way to the Light, Conclusion; Part Two: Caring, Introduction, Caring As a Way to the Self, Caring As a Way to the Other, Conclusion; Epilogue: The Wagon Wheel; Notes.
As is stated on the back jacket flap: "Only when we begin to feel in touch with our own life cycles will we be able to develop life styles where 'being' is not identified with 'having,' where self-esteem is not measured by success, where goodness is not the same as popularity. Aging show us all how to start fulfilling our lives by giving to others 'so that when we leave this world, we can be what we have given.'"

Love in the open hand

Item consists of a book of quotes in which Nouwen has contributed five excerpts from With Open Hands and Reaching Out : The Three Movements of the Spiritual Life regarding reaching out, pain, noise, compassion, prayer, and healing.

Spiritual direction: an invitation to abundant life

Item consists of a book written by Francis W. Vanderwall for which Nouwen has written the foreword and expressed his praise for it being "gutsy." He states, in part, that "[in] the midst of our violent, harsh and often merciless world this gentle, compassionate, non-judgmental and caring book is a true treasure."

Gratefulness, the heart of prayer: an approach to life in fullnes

Item consists of a book in which Nouwen has written the foreword, stating in part that the book "throws a ray of light in our dark world and makes us see that we can live here and now as people who can be constantly surprised and who can let an 'inch of surprise become a mile of gratefulness.'"

Living with apocalypse: spiritual resources for social compassion

Item consists of a book in which Nouwen is interviewed in the chapter beginning on p. 15 titled: "A Conversation with Henri J.M. Nouwen" in which he talks about many subjects including living with the poor in Peru, divine gifts, protest, peacemakers, the mystical life, identity, and suffering.

Modern spirituality: an anthology

Item consists of a book in which Nouwen, Donald P. McNeill, and Douglas A. Morrison have written Chapter 12, beginning on p. 106, titled: "Action" which is a selection from their book Compassion.

Roots and wings: Dreamers and doers of the Christian family movement

Item consists of a book in which Nouwen has written the foreword, stating in part: "It is a great joy for me to recommend this book to the reader because in it I see a strong affirmation that claiming God's gifts, trusting in the power of love and acting in faith are the ways to live a fruitful life in the midst of a power hungry world."

Van Gogh and God: a creative spiritual quest

Item consists of a book in which Nouwen has written the foreword, stating in part: "I am deeply grateful that Van Gogh and God has been written and I am convinced that those who read it will find in Vincent a lasting spiritual companion."

Praying for peace

Item consists of a book in which Nouwen has contributed, on p. 49-50, a prayer titled: "The Bitter Cup."

Discipleship

Item consists of a book in which Nouwen has written the foreword, stating in part: "It is a prophetic book in a time in which few people dare to speak unpopular but truly healing words. What makes Arnold's words so healing is that they are not based on an idea, an ideology or a theory, but on an intimate knowledge of Jesus Christ."

Mijn laatste biecht

Item consists of a book written by Nouwen's father, which includes an excerpt from Henri's book: Met de dood voor ogen = Our Greatest Gift.

Life and holiness

Item consists of a book in which Nouwen has written the introduction. Nouwen states in part: "'What book do I give to someone who wants to know what being-a-Christian looks like?' This is definitely the book. It is not a book about doctrines or dogmas but about the life in Christ."

Practical counseling tools for pastoral workers

Item consists of a book in which, on p. 15, Nouwen is quoted from Reaching Out : The Three Movements of the Spiritual Life. "To live a spiritual life, writes Henri Nouwen, 'means first of all to come to the awareness of the inner polarities between which we are held in tension.'"

Talking together: exploring the Christian year with under fives: themed dialogues, activities, music and prayers

Item consists of a book in which Nouwen has written the foreword, stating in part: "I am deeply convinced that anyone who will use this book to help little toddlers to keep their hearts open to God's gracious presence in their lives not only will offer a great blessing to the little ones but also receive a great blessing for themselves."

Henri Nouwen: prophet of conversion

Item consists of a photocopy of a chapter of Annice Callahan's book Spiritual guides for today : Evelyn Underhill, Dorothy Day, Karl Rahner, Simone Weil, Thomas Merton, Henri Nouwen.

John Davidson Ketchum fonds

  • UTA 1451
  • Fonds
  • [189-]-1970

Fonds consists of 2 accessions

B1969-0004: Collection of songs, poems and skits of a humorous nature directly related to the faculty and students of the Department of Psychology. Most of the work is by J.D. Ketchum, but some is by students and other members of staff. (1 box, 1929-1961)

B1974-0072: Ketchum Family correspondence and papers. Personal correspondence and diaries of John Davidson Ketchum; "Ruhleben" manuscript: drafts of chapters, research materials including articles on Ruhleben Prison Camp, 1914-1918 (c1961); student notes, BA and MA theses. Addresses, papers, articles in psychology. The majority of these papers concern Prof. Ketchum's experiences and research regarding the Ruhleben prison camp. Photographs of Ketchum family members. (41 boxes, 1897-1970)

Ketchum, John Davidson

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