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Co-operative Housing Case Study: background materials & research

In addition to the attendance at meetings of CHAT and ASC board, staff and member meetings, and interviews and surveys of users and non-users, the researchers also collected background material on the Ashworth Square Housing Co-operative, and the United Church of Canada Board of Evangelism and Social Service National Housing Committee as one of its main funding bodies.

The background materials on the Ashworth Square Housing Co-operative itself include architectural drawings of the suite plans, a copy of the original proposal for its development, a copy of the occupancy agreement and by-laws, as well as general publicity for the co-op and information regarding the initial election of members to the Board of Directors. There are also seven b/w photographs of co-op members and children. The background materials on the United Church of Canada Board of Evangelism and Social Service National Housing Committee includes minutes of meetings of both the housing committee and the Technical Subcommittee, correspondence, reports, a brief on housing to Hon Paul Hellyer (Minister of Transport).

Professors Breslauer and Andrews also conducted research into housing issues, and co-op housing alternatives across Canada, the US and abroad. These files include information on the Co-op Housing Foundation, and the Canadian Mortgage and Housing Corporation papers on co-op housing and in particular, on the Ashworth Square Housing Co-op. They also include information on co-op housing conferences, other housing co-operatives and organizations, and general housing issues and research published during this time period. Included in this series is a CBC radio special on housing cooperatives which includes a piece on the ASC.

Co-operative Housing Case Study: interim and final reports

This series includes five bound interim reports to the Ministry of Urban Affairs on the progress of this research study, as well as notes for the sixth interim report. It also includes correspondence, working notes and drafts of the four-volume, eight-chapter final report published in 1975 by the Centre for Urban & Community Studies for the Ministry of Urban Affairs.

Coins

Prof. Heichelheim also became well known as a numismatist. After leaving Germany in 1933, he worked for the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge cataloguing the General and Leake coin collections and preparing a series of catalogues for publication over the next two decades (ca 1937-1950). This series contains drafts of these catalogues (Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum IV (Parts 1-5), photographs of the coins reproduced in the catalogues, correspondence, notes, as well as a report on the Department of Coins and Medals at the Fitzwilliam Museum (ca 1942). There are also two files on the Giessen coin collection and two files which may contain drafts of articles (in German).

Collected materials

Series consists of material collected by Nouwen on topics, people, and issues of interest. Nouwen used this material for articles, books, lectures, talks, sermons, general interest, and as reference for his duties as pastor, friend, researcher, and writer. Includes journal articles, books, sound recordings, newspaper clippings, photographs, newsletters, and manuscripts. See sub-series level descriptions for more detail.

The series has been arranged in the following six sub-series:
1.12.1. Materials regarding Thomas Merton
1.12.2. Circus material (excluding unpublished manuscripts which are located in the Manuscript Series)
1.12.3. Collected articles
1.12.4. Collected audio cassettes
1.12.5. Postcards and icons
1.12.6. Materials regarding Seward Hiltner

Conferences

The series consists of files relating to various conferences attended or organized by Prof. Eddie. Among the conferences documented is the First Conference on German Cliometrics, a joint project of the University of Toronto’s Joint Initiative in German and European Studies and Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München (Institute of Economic History) held in Toronto September 23 to 26, 1999. Prof. Eddie co-ordinated this conference with his colleague, Dr. Joerg Baten. Among the records documenting this conference are 10 cassette tapes of sessions as well as informal digital photographs of participants at sessions and social activities. Photographs were taken by Prof. Eddie and a student.
Other files document conferences held at the University of Toronto, International History Congress at Leuven (1989-1990), the Economic History Congress (IEHA) in Buenos Aires (2002), and the 2nd Conference on German Cliometrics, Tübingen, Germany (2006) and the Economic History Society at the University of Nottingham (2008). Files may contain correspondence, notes, manuscripts of papers delivered both by Prof. Eddie and others, etc.

Conferences and exhibitions

This series documents the conferences on map librarianship in which Ms Winearls participated, exhibitions she prepared, and publications arising from them. It begins with several files containing correspondence and research notes on cartography and the early lithography of maps in Canada that Ms Winearls compiled between 1973 and 1998, and many of her applications to attend the conferences. Then follow the conferences and exhibits, the arrangement for which is generally alphabetical, beginning with the Association of Canadian Map Librarians 1993 workshop on the cataloguing rare maps.

Next is a file on the formative years (1975-1978) of the Canadian Cartographic Association and its History of Cartography Interest Group. This group drew on the formation three years earlier of a working group on the history of cartography within the International Cartographic Association. Ms Winerals was the co-ordinator of the cartobibliography section of the ICA, which organized the 11th International Conference on the History of Cartography in Ottawa in 1985. The files on this conference contain correspondence, notes, programs, and the papers presented by some of the participants. Also included are files on the Working Group on Cartobibliography’s proposal to

publish as a manual Coolie Verner’s manuscript on carto-bibliography. There also files on the ICHC conferences in 1987, 1989, and 1991. This part of the series ends with a file from 1992 for a project on cataloguing maps. All of these files are in B1998-0012, boxes 012 and 013, files 01-04.

In 1984, in conjunction with the sesquicentennial celebrations of the City of Toronto, Ms Winerals was invited to be a guest curator for an exhibit at the Canadiana Gallery of the Royal Ontario Museum, “Mapping Toronto’s first century, 1787-1884.” The files [B1998-0013/013(05) – (13), /014(01) – (02)], trace the development of the exhibition and include drafts of the catalogue and photographs. There is also a diary [B1996-0021/003(05)] that she kept while planning the exhibition.

Ms Winearls began attending meeting of the Conference on Editorial Problems in 1991 as convenor of its 29th annual conference in 1993 that coincided with the publication of The Historical Atlas of Canada. The title of the conference was “Editing early and historical atlases”. In conjunction with the conference she mounted an exhibition, “The atlas as a book”, in the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library. She also edited a volume of selected conference papers that was published by the University of Toronto Press in 1995. Most of the files are in B1998-0013 but there is one in B2007-0015.

The Conference files contain minutes, correspondence, grant applications, editing notes, drafts of the papers published, and reviews. The exhibition files contain background notes, research files for each exhibition case, collations, and drafts of the catalogue.

Finally, Ms Winearls curated an exhibit in the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library called “Art on the Wing” in 1999. Records includes notes on cases, drafts and final copy of the catalogue as well her lecture. The Conference files contain minutes, correspondence, grant applications, editing notes, drafts of the papers published, and reviews. The exhibition files contain background notes, research files for each exhibition case, collations, and drafts of the catalog.

Conferences, Talks, Unpublished Papers

Records in this series include notes, drafts, correspondence and flyers related to conferences Professor Rayside attended and/or participated in, unpublished talks and workshops, and unpublished papers, as well as less formal writing. The conferences documented mostly pertain to equity issues faced by gay and lesbian populations. The talks and workshops relate to a variety of topics including political science, labour unions, gendered violence, philanthropy and diversity in the workplace and were delivered mostly at Canadian universities in the form of symposia, guest lectures and public lectures. The unpublished papers in this series relate mainly to equity issues in Canadian and American society. There is also one sound recording of Professor Rayside delivering the Kreeft Lecture on November 28, 2002.

Records in B2017-0024 included talks, panels, and conferences on subjects such as inclusion, religion in the public sphere and positive space. There is also a paper he gave at Spring Reunion in 2016 as well as a memorial for colleagues Stephen Clarkson and David Higgs.

Consulting

Records in this series again document Etkin’s research and the application of this research by industry. Files most often contain correspondence, reports, notes and invoices relating to research undertaken. Early in his career, he worked as a consultant for several Canadian aviation firms including DeHavilland, Avro, and Found Brothers Aviation of Malton Ont. . By the early 1960s, professors of the UTIAS founded AERCOL Aerospace Engineering Research Consultants and as a member of this group, Etkin continued consulting work for the aviation industry including companies such as DeHavilland SPAR, General Electric and Goodyear, all of which had aerospace divisions.

Many of the client files documented in this series represent clients such as architectural firms and industrial firms requesting wind tunnel tests on structures, consultation on wind loads and the design and testing of air curtains. Of particular note is the wind tunnel test done for Parkins and Associates on the “new” Toronto City Hall design in 1960. The original award winning design had to be modified after it failed the wind tunnel tests. The initial uproar that ensued at city hall and in the media drew attention to Etkin’s research in his state of the art wind tunnel. For Etkin’s recollection of this event, see his recent talk to the Engineering Alumni Association found in Series 2 - Lectures, Talks and Seminars (B2004-0017/005(42).

Correspondence

This series includes some professional correspondence but much of it consists of letters to and from Dr. Hastings’ parents, his grandmother, his aunts, Bessie Ferguson, Betty Graham and Louise Hastings, and other relatives and friends met over a lifetime of public service and devotion to his church. The last influenced many of his interests outside his academic and administrative work at University of Toronto, and is reflected in thirty years of correspondence arising from visits to India and Japan beginning in the early 1950s.

While most of the correspondence is filed chronologically, the first files contain exchanges of letters with the Drever family (especially Michael Drever), the politician Eugene Forsey, and the relatives mentioned above. Dr. Hastings met the Drevers from Montevideo, Uruguay, in 1959, when he went on a tour of Latin America to observe preventive medicine and public health teaching. He was to return to Uruguay at the end of 1964 as a member of the World Health Organization/Pan American Health Organization program on health planning in Latin America that also entailed visits to Chile and Argentina (he had a regular correspondent from Santiago after that date).

Dr. Hastings first went to India in 1953 as the University of Toronto’s representative to the World University Service International Seminar (the files for which are in Series 5). While there he first visited the Christian Medical College and Hospital in Vellore, near Madras, that received support from the Canadian Council of Churches through its Vellore/Ludhiana Committee, of which he was a member from 1962 to 1975 and to which he was an advisor from 1975 to 1981. Over the years Dr. Hasting was to provide financial support to many young people he met in India, helping some with their education overseas and others to immigrate to Canada. In 1955 he had the opportunity to go abroad again, this time as a faculty member of the WUS International Seminar, Japan, followed by a month for studying medical education and medical care in that country. He wrote a widely praised report on his return, and kept up a voluminous correspondence with many of the people he had met. In later years Dr. Hastings came to regard these two visits as seminal events in his life.

The first files of chronological correspondence is primarily with his parents, consisting largely of letters sent and received while at Camp Kagawong on Balsam Lake near Fenelon Falls, Ontario where Hastings was to spend many summers from about 1937 and where he was sometime counsellor and a director. (Correspondence from his vacation trips to Quebec in 1943 and 1946 is filed in Series 1). From 1953 and his visit to India, the chronological arrangement is divided in each year into the following categories: general, parents (later ‘mother’, India and (from 1955) Japan.

The volume of correspondence tails off in the mid-1970s; one file covers the years 1986-1997.

Correspondence

The correspondents in this series number just under four hundred individuals, of whom sixty-two read and commented on the entire manuscript (these names are listed on page 723 of the 2002 hardcover edition). The correspondents include Professor Friedland’s research assistants, archivists in the University of Toronto Archives, officials and editors at the University of Toronto Press, other editors, writers and independent researchers with an interest in the University’s history, and members of the public that Professor Friedland met in the course of his research and his giving of talks about the history of the University. The majority of the correspondents are academics and administrative personnel at the University of Toronto and elsewhere who were asked for information or offered their expertise. Some of the correspondence is post-publication reaction to the book.

The research assistants (in addition to those listed in Series I), are Sara Burke, David Bronskill, Colin Grey, Graham Rawlinson and Katrina Wyman. Of the staff in the University of Toronto Archives, Harold Averill was seconded part-time to the project to direct the researchers to the appropriate sources in the University Archives, to offer his knowledge of the history of the University and to read the manuscript. Other correspondents from the Archives are Garron Wells (University Archivist), Marnee Gamble (special media archivist) and Loryl MacDonald (administrative records archivist). The University of Toronto Press, the publisher of the book, is represented by Val Cooke, Ani Deyirmenjian, Malgosia Halliop, Bill Harnum, Anne Laughlin,
Melissa Pitts, and Ron Schoeffel. Presidents (past and current) of the University represented are: Robert Birgeneau, Claude Bissell, George Connell, Robert Prichard, and David Strangway. Some of the academics and university administrators forwarded drafts of articles or excerpts from books they were writing, while others commented on the manuscript or portions thereof. Papers or lengthy memoranda and reports are present on a cross-section of activities, disciplines themes and individuals relating to the University including (with the names of the correspondents in brackets). They include the admission of women (Sara Burke), botanical gardens (John Court), chemistry (Susanne McClelland), Connaught Laboratories (George Connell), engineering (Richard White), fees policy (David Stager), gays and lesbians (David Rayside), Jacob Hirschfelder (Sheldon J. Godfrey), Margaret Eaton School (John Byl), history of medicine (Jacalyn Duffin), medicine (David Bronskill), No. 4 General Hospital at Salonika, Greece during World War I (Mary Louise Gaby), philosophy (John Slater), the proposed Wolfe’s University (D. V. Anderson), women (Katrina Wyman), and women in graduate studies (Natalie Zemon Davis).

In addition to letters, the files may contain articles, notes, memoranda, background documents and publications, and the occasional press clipping A few of the files contain historical items, dating back to 1887, that had belonged early graduates and were forwarded by their descendants, Professor Friedland’s correspondents. The detailed comments on the drafts of the book by the correspondents in this series may, for the most part, be found in Series 4.

Correspondence

The correspondence files in this series are arranged alphabetically by author. They document Professor Friedland’s activities as a friend, as a student advisor and thesis supervisor, as a colleague assisting in honours bestowed on his peers, as an author, and as an authority on legal matters. They also document the increased leisure that came with official retirement.

The correspondence touches on many aspects of Dr. Friedland’s life, both personal and professional. It reveals his enormous network of contacts in legal and academic circles ranging from Lord Denning down to lowly law students. The letters cover a wide range of topics and issues, including some very topical ones such as international terrorism. Dr. Friedland received numerous requests for references from students and colleagues and, because he sat on the manuscript review committee of the University of Toronto Press, he was also asked to evaluate many manuscripts.

Some of the files contain commentary on legal issues on which Dr. Friedland was working. They may also hold drafts of articles forwarded by colleagues for commentary or presented a complementary copies [published copies have been removed, though the appropriate references have been retained], letters of congratulation and of reference. There is also correspondence regarding and programmes of conferences, and correspondence re and programmes for installation ceremonies. There are numerous invitations to dinners and other events and tributes on the deaths of friends and colleagues and notes on any of the above. Also present are greeting cards and several photographs.

Correspondence

This series contains a mixture of both personal and professional correspondence belonging to W.E. Gallie. Notable collections within this series include letters written to and from Colonel J.A. MacFarlane, Consulting Surgeon, Canadian Army Overseas, correspondence with Dr. W.G. Bigelow, and correspondence with well-known American Surgeon Dr. Rudolph Matas. The files in this series are arranged chronologically.

Correspondence

Series consists of Laurel MacDowell's correspondence which primarily documents MacDowell's professional activities within universities (the majority of the records pertain to the University of Toronto, however there is also correspondence regarding York and McMaster universities as well). The correspondence documents other aspects of MacDowell's life as well, such as her role as editor of the Ontario History journal and as a publishing academic. Additional correspondence can be found throughout other series within this accession as they pertain directly to the content of those files.

Correspondence

This series consists of personal correspondence between Professor Skilling and his family, friends and colleagues. Most of it is from the last 20 years of his life and relates primarily to his interest in central and east European affairs. Some of the correspondence is arranged chronologically – especially the letters covering the years 1991-2001. Also arranged chronologically and grouped separately are postcards and greeting cards with extensive messages for the years 1939-2001 (a few of the latter have photoprints attached). There are a few letters from Skilling to his parents and Sally from the 1940s, also correspondence with Derek Paton, a former student, and especially with his old Czech friends, Jelka and Olga Haningerova and Vilem Precan. There are also small files of correspondence on the Jan Hus Fund and the issue of public lending rights.

Correspondence

Dr. Glass was a prolific letter writer and this series represents only a small portion of his total output. The remainder will be found in accession B94-0033. There are two "personal correspondence files" from his office, covering the years 1964-1966 and 1968-1971. The remaining eight files contain extensive personal correspondence for the months of April, 1981 to mid-July, 1982, and October, 1987 through October, 1988, witha few letters for 1983, 1985 and 1993.

The "personal correspondence files" from his office encompass the personal side of his professional work, such as invitations to conferences and speaking engagements, references, and internal reports and meetings.

The personal correspondence for 1981-1982 relates primarily to Dr. Glass being appointed a University Professor, to his part in the campaign on behalf of Andrei Sakharov and other Soviet refusniks and dissidents, to exchange programs between the University of Toronto and other universities, and to conferences. The files for 1987 and 1988 contain much correspondence by the Committee of Concerned Scientists on the extradition of Nazi war criminals, particularly Alois Brunner, and on the campaign to allow Soviet Jewish refusniks to emigrate. Most of the remaining letters are devoted to a discussion to Professor Glass's ongoing research and writings and to his interest in Jews in China.

The arrangement is chronological.

Correspondence

Series contains letters, cards, and correspondence, including letters from George Crumb; John Leberg; Witold Lutoslawski; R. Murray Schafer; Pierre Trudeau (2). Cards: Vera [Frenkel]; Michael [Snow] (2); Veronica Tennant; Grant [?]; and, David [?] (2). Series also contains autographed photographs from Elly Ameling and Philippe Entremont, and a photograph of Taussig with Natalia Granados (Barcelona, 1980).

Correspondence

This series contains professional and personal correspondence covering the years 1952-1990. Topics covered include administrative matters in the Department of Slavic Studies, issues relating more widely to slavic studies, and Professor Luckyj's writings, including correspondence with publishers. Interspersed with this correspondence are drafts of book reviews, articles, and memorials; notes, press clippings, and photoprints. Many of the letters are written in Ukrainian, and there are a few also in Russian and French.

Correspondence

This extensive series contains both personal and professional correspondence received by Prof Berger during his academic career. Some of Prof. Berger’s draft replies will be found in later files. The earliest letters document his doctoral education and his appointment to the Department of History at the University of Toronto. Correspondence from the 1970s through the 1990s document his flourishing career as prominent historian, author, teacher and advisor, etc. Later correspondence is dominated by requests from editors and other scholars relating to his publications, requests for review of other manuscripts, as well as his history of the Royal Society (1996)

Correspondents include, among others, prominent academics such as Prof. Ray MacLean, Dept. of History, St. Francis Xavier University (b 1927 d. 2004), Prof. Ramsay Cook, George (now Sir George) S. Bain, a former classmate at the University of Manitoba and member of Board of Bombardier Aerospace, as well as former students such as Doug Owram (professor, University of Alberta 1976-2006), and colleagues at Canadian and foreign universities. Subjects include personal information about family, friends and colleagues, academic correspondence with students and other academics about research progress, requests for letters of reference and support, comments on recent publications, and other academic activities. Two files at the end of this series contain letters to single correspondents: M. Brook Taylor (1986-2006) former student and faculty member in Department of History, Mount St.Vincent University and Sam Waller, amateur historian and founder of the Sam Waller Museum in The Pas, Manitoba.

Correspondence

This series begins with two files of general personal and professional correspondence, followed by files of correspondence with individuals and organizations, arranged alphabetically. The latter document principally Urban’s professional interests, including donations of copies of some of his portfolios to archival repositories, and with artists such as Brian Boignon, who hand-illustrated his correspondence and with whom Urban co-authored an article, and about Mrozinski, a New York musician and performance artist (with accompanying photographs and slides from a performance in 1978). Included also are letters from E. A. (Betty) Murray while vacationing in Italy in 1973.

Correspondence

This series contains Dr. Glass' extensive correspondence files on a wide variety of personal and professional issues. The arrangement by broad topics (consulting, 1955-1982; "personal" correspondence from his office, 1950-1969), then general correspondence, filed chronologically (1959-1987), and finally by alphabetically by name of organization for the files relating to Dr. Glass' involvement in Jewish issues.

The last category begins with files on Canada-Israel cultural exchange, including the work of the Canada-Israel Chamber of Commerce and Industry (1972-1981). These are followed by files of the University of Toronto chapter of Canadian Professors for Peace in the Middle East (1974-1987), but the greatest volume relates to the conditions of Jews in the Soviet Union. Much of the work on this issue was done through the Canadian Academic Committee for Soviet Jewry and the Committee of Concerned Scientists, including its Canadian branch. Of particular concern was the treatment of the scientist, Benjamin Levich, in whose honour conferences were organized. Dr. Glass played a very active role in these events.

The files on Jewish issues contain, in addition to letters, press coverage, notes, memoranda, and minutes.

Correspondence

Except for one file of correspondence from 1989, covering correspondents filed by surname, I through P and filed in accession B1993-0041, all the correspondence in this series is from accession B1994-0020.

This series has large gaps, particularly for the fifteen years following the Second World War and the 1970s. It begins with Dr. Solandt's wartime letters to his family during the Second World War, where letters from March 1943 to October 1944 are absent, followed by a few letters from 1947, 1954, and 1956. The remainder of the correspondence was arranged by Dr. Solandt in several systems. The first covers the years 1963-1986, the arrangement being alphabetical. A few of the files deal with particular organizations: the Commission on Canadian Studies (1974-1976), the National Radiological Protection Board in the United Kingdom (1976-1981), the Vanier Medal Selection Committee (1975) and York University (1976).

The second system, described as "miscellaneous" correspondence, is filed chronologically between 1955 and 1965. The file for 1955-1962 contains relatively few letters and the file for 1965 is his "personal" correspondence file while employed at Hawkker-Siddeley. These are followed by five files for 1970 (arranged alphabetically, A-S), and one for each year from 1980 to 1992 inclusive. There is a 1989 file on unidentified flying objects (UFOs), about which there are in earlier files some letters from the same correspondents.

Correspondence

The letters in this series consists of letters received by Frieda from Bud, from her friends and family. Frieda and Bud were separated for long periods in the 1920s and the 1930s and did not live together until the end of the 1930s, following the death of Frieda's grandmother. The house they shared, on the Niagara escarpment near Burlington, had been purchased by Frieda's mother some years earlier. Built in 1834, it was sited on a large acreage with an orchard on the slope behind. When apart they wrote to each frequently, often every day and sometimes more than once a day.

Some of the correspondence in undated, but only a few letters pre-date 1925 and these are from Frieda's college friends. Most of the letters were written by Bud to Frieda, between about 1925 and 1942. They cover all aspects of their lives, including relationships with their families and friends and how same-sex love was perceived.

For the period up to 1950, the remainder of the correspondence is from friends whom Frieda retained in adulthood, along with a few letters from and about members of her family, including relatives in Germany. There are fewer than a half-dozen letters for the period between 1950 and the mid-1960s.

Nearly all the later correspondence dates from 1976 to 1979, the very trying years during which Bud struggled with the effects of her stroke. Letters and cards poured in from concerned colleagues, friends, and relatives. Those addressed to Frieda and Bud jointly are filed in this series; those addressed to Bud alone are filed in Series 2 in Sous-fonds 3. Only a representative sampling of the cards have been retained.

Correspondence

The letters at the beginning of this series (in accession B2013-0005) consist of Spencer’s letters home while on military training and active duty (1941-1946), beginning with letters sent from Canada (June 1941 – March 1943) and then from overseas (June 1943 – July 1946). Spencer began numbering his letters home on 28 February 1943 when he was about to be stationed at Camp Debert, Nova Scotia. Between then and 23 March 1945 he wrote at least 312 letters home; then started, but did not maintain, a new numbering system.

These are followed by various family letters, including some sent by Spencer (1943-1947), letters to and from third parties, letters to and from his parents between 1946 and 1950, and letters (1946-1948) between Robert and Ruth Church whom he married on 22 June 1948. Bob’s letters to Ruth were always mailed to the Office of the High Commissioner at Canada House where she worked. The family correspondence, which included some from Robert’s parents (his father, Charles Allan, died on 2 August 1972), his brothers (Colin and Wilson), and later his and Ruth’s children (Charles, Valerie, and Katherine) continues until 2010. From the mid-1990s, there are no letters from Ruth.

The arrangement in this section of correspondence is grouped by correspondents but is largely chronological. Fax paper has been photocopied and the original faxes have been destroyed.

The correspondence in accession B2010-0024 relates mostly to professional, not family, matters. It includes Professor Spencer’s ongoing correspondence and dealings with various government departments, embassies, consulates, international, national and local organizations other than the COTC and Atlantik-Brücke. For more information, also see Series 9, which includes information on Spencer’s extensive roster of speaking engagements, and Series 11, which documents his attendance at various conferences, seminars, roundtables and panel discussions. The arrangement for this section is alphabetical by organization.

Included with the letters are numerous postcards and a few photoprints.

Correspondence

Prof. Heichelheim maintained a regular correspondence with friends, family and colleagues both in Canada and around the world up to the year of his death. His brother’s name was Arthur Heichelheim and he lived in London England. This series dominates this fonds and includes correspondence with classical scholars at Cambridge and Oxford and at the University of Giessen (Prof. Heichelheim’s former employer), as well as at the University of Toronto. Such scholars include many of his co-authors such as E.N. Adler, Prof. F. L. Griffith, J. G. Tait, T. Frank, H. Michel, Prof. Elemer Balogh and Prof. Cedric Yeo. Correspondence is in English or German, depending on the nationality of the correspondent.

During World War II he continued to maintain ongoing correspondence with his brother and other family members, along with other scholars left in Europe and frequently describe living conditions, lost friends, the death camps and establishment of a Jewish state in Palestine. Correspondence with family and friends is often in German.

Correspondence

This series contains letters written to Professor Bay by members of his family and friends, as well as professional correspondence. The correspondence is largely personal in nature in early years but becomes mainly professional in later years. The material includes replies sent by Bay. Approximately a third to half of the material is written in Norwegian.

Boxes B2014-0010/006-/038 were arranged by Professor Bay. This arrangement consists of grouping correspondence by several months at the time and then arranging the correspondence in alphabetical order. The remaining correspondence boxes were then divided by professional or personal nature, and by language when possible, and arranged chronologically. In the correspondence with the notations “Parts I and II”, Professor Bay usually included lists of his correspondents. This system broke down in the last couple of years of his life.

Correspondence and biographical

Consists of correspondence with colleagues, publishers, and his wife. Also includes a framed letter from Duncan Campbell Scott, 2 annotated books, educational diplomas and certificates, memoirs, scrapbooks, graduation robes, and various medals.

Correspondence and committees

Alphabetically arranged files contain correspondence with individuals and groups and give a good overview of Etkin’s professional activities and relationships. Included are files with colleagues at many Canadian and American universities as well as with representatives of the aviation industry including Boeing, DeHavilland and Royal Aircraft Establishment. This series also contains correspondence and related documents for various committees and professional associations such a committee of NATO called AGARD (Advisory Group for Aerospace Research), the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, the Association of Professional Engineers and the Canadian Aeronautical Space Institute. There is documentation on Etkin’s time as chair of the Aeronautics Advisory Board of Transport Canada. Some files relate to professional trips or visits including Etkin’s trip to China in 1982 and the Chinese subsequent visit to IAS.

Also found in this series is correspondence with Ph.D. students and colleagues within the University of Toronto such as G.N. Patterson, Israel Glass, J.B. French, James Gotlieb and many more.

Dale/Ryckman family

This series contains an assortment of documents relating to the Dale and Ryckman families. It includes the diary of Margaret Dale of her trip to Europe in 1930 (see Series 1 above for correspondence), Fredericka Dale’s diary of her trip with her daughter, Frances , to Europe in 1934 (for Frances’ account see Sous Fonds 3, Series 1, marriage certificate for William Dale and Fredericka Ryckman, education diplomas and other memorabilia of Frederika Ryckman, testimonials for her sister Louise Ryckman, Victoria University Senate resolution on the death of her father, Rev. E. B. Ryckman in 1916 and correspondence between the Dale children for three years, 1923, 1924 and 1927. There are four portraits included in this series: one of Fredericka Ryckman Dale (1902), two of her father Rev. Dr. Edward B. Ryckman and one of her mother Emmaline Baird Ryckman (ca. 188-).

Defence Research Board

In 1946 Dr. Solandt was called back to Ottawa where he was appointed as Director-General of Defence Research. The following year he was invited to become the founding chair of the Defence Research Board of Canada which was responsible for co-ordinating and directing defence science and research and development for the three armed services.

While most of the records generated by the Defence Research Board are in Ottawa, the correspondence, addresses, press clippings, articles, pamphlets, reports and photoprints (see Series 44) in this series provide a succinct overview of Solandt

Department of Fine Art

Between 1957 and 1985, Marion Walker was a professor in the history of stage and costume design in the Department of Fine Art and its Graduate Centre for the Study of Drama. In this capacity, she taught Stage Design (FAS 333Y) and 18th Century Stage Design (FAS 435). She also assisted in the staging of the Graduate Centre for the Study of Drama’s 1974 productions of Marsh Hay and T’is a Pity She’s a Whore.

The records in this series document Ms. Walker’s teaching and research activities in the Department of Fine Art. The textual records mainly consist of subject files containing research and lectures notes. Topics covered include: correspondence, Baroque theatre, Ferdinando Bibiena, Comedia dell’ Arte, Elizabethan theatre, Fratelli Galliari, Greek theatre, Filippo Juvarra, Renaissance theatre, opera, research grants and Wagner’s The Ring. Also included is a scrapbook commemorating Ms. Walker’s retirement from the Department in 1985.

This series also consists of approximately 130 slides used to teach the History of Stage and 18th Century Stage Design. Subjects include the stage designs of Marsh Hay, Ferdinando Bibiena, Filippo Juvarra, Fratelli Gallieri and Pietro Gonzaga.

Also included are 10 stage plans created by Ms. Walker for the Graduate Centre for the Study of Drama’s 1974 productions of Marsh Hay and T’is a Pity She’s a Whore.

The series also contains one scrapbook of costume designs for the Graduate Centre for the Study of Drama’s production of Fuente Ovejuna (The Sheep Well), [n.d.].

Diplomas and certificates

This series contains diplomas and certificates, including all honorary degrees and all earned degrees. For some there are related correspondence, programs, invitations, and photoprints.

Files of correspondence, citations, programs and photoprints associated with the diplomas and certificates are interspersed with them. Some diplomas and certificates are not present, but any surviving material associated with them is filed.

Early biographical information

The records in this series provide biographical information on Marion Walker’s early life, 1921-1942. Series includes 7 photographs. Subjects are: 5 portraits of Marion Walker; the Phi Beta sorority, 1940; and the University College graduating class, 1942. Also included is a scrapbook of newspaper clippings concerning Ms. Walker’s amateur golfing activities, 1937-1941.

Early education and biographical

This series consists of records pertaining to the education and career of Prof MacDowell. It includes academic work (notes and papers) produced while MacDowell was an undergraduate and graduate student. The series also documents her tenure and promotion at the University of Toronto, annual activity reports, internal memos at U of T, and other activities related directly to her career at U of T.

Editorial cartoons

Series consists of Canadian editorial cartoons collected by Hershell Ezrin. Illustrators include Brian Gable, Andy Donato, and Patrick Corrigan. They cover various Ontario and federal political events such as 1995 referendum and former government aide Ms. Durcos’ comments regard President George Bush.

Education

Robert Spencer received his elementary, high school, and undergraduate education in Montreal, at Kensington School, the High School of Montreal, and McGill University respectively. The files relating to these stages of Professor Spencer’s education contain correspondence, report cards and certificates, term papers, programmes for student dinners and graduation ceremonies, short stories, student newspapers and yearbooks, flyers and other material relating to student organizations, and social activities.
The basic arrangement is by the institutions that Professor Spencer attended, with some files on teacher training during and after his undergraduate years at McGill.

Professor Spencer was on military service in Europe from 1942 to 1946. Once back in Canada, he decided to undertake post-graduate work in history. C.P. Stacey, Director of the Historical Section of the General Staff at Canadian Military Headquarters in London, England, for which Spencer had been working since the beginning of 1946 under the direction of Eric Harrison, could not find funds to assist him. Harrison, who in civil life was a professor of history at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario, supported Spencer’s applications for scholarships; he was successful in getting the James C. Cumming Fellowship from Trinity College in the University of Toronto. From 1946 to 1950, he also received ‘university training” funds from the Department of Veterans Affairs. Spencer spent a year (1946-1947) at the U of T, studying under Professors Ralph Flenley and G.P. de T. Glazebrook and reading widely. His MA thesis, “History of the Fifteenth Canadian Field Regiment, Royal Canadian Artillery, 1941-1945”, was essentially the study he had written while with the Canadian Forces in the Netherlands in 1945; 1,000 copies of which had been printed by Elsevier in Amsterdam.

Following his graduation from the University of Toronto, Spencer applied to study modern history at Oxford University and was accepted by St. John’s College. He received funding from McGill University (Moyse Travelling Fellowship worth $350), the Imperial Order of the Daughters of the Empire (Overseas Scholarship, $800), and part (₤30) of a scholarship from the British Council. In September, 1947 he sailed on the Queen Mary to Southampton. He studied under W. Norton Medlicott and A.J.P. Taylor, receiving his B.Litt in 1950. He was then accepted to do a Doctor of Philosophy.

The files relating to his graduate studies contain correspondence, official documents, essays, programmes, flyers, press clippings, booklets relating to Oxford, St. John’s College, and the Bodleian Library, greeting cards and other souvenirs of his time at Oxford.

Education

Omond Solandt attended Mulvey School in Winnipeg from 1915 to November 1920, when his family moved to Toronto. He then attended Rosedale Junior Public School, transferring to Central Technical School in 1922. For his last year of high school he attended Jarvis Collegiate.

He enrolled at the University of Toronto in 1927, as an undergraduate at Victoria College. He graduated with a BA in 1931 with first class honours in biological and medical sciences. Omond

Education

In the fall of 1960 Frederic Urban entered Merrimack College, a private Roman Catholic institution in North Andover, Massachusetts. In the summer of 1961, he studied Latin at Glastonbury Abbey, a Benedictine abbey in Hingham, Massachusetts, and that autumn entered the Augustinian Good Counsel Novitiate in New Hamburg, New York as a novice monk. In the fall of 1962 he returned to his studies at Merrimack, from which he received an AB (Humanities) in 1964. His other degrees were an MA in literature from Boston College in 1970, a Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) from the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design (NSCAD) in 1978, followed by an independent study program at the Whitney Museum of American Art in 1978-1979. This series documents his studies at the last two institutions. The arrangement is by name of institution.

The files relating to Urban’s studies at NSCAD and the Whitney Museum include his applications, covering correspondence, and material relating to courses taken. There are also a number of slides documenting his time at both institutions. Material on exhibitions and performance pieces done while a student is filed with Series 6. While at the Whitney, one of Frederic’s friends, Colin Lee, had an artwork published in a San Francisco Chinese newspaper. The series ends with a file on the Whitney Museum of American Art Independent Study Program Alumni Association.

Education

This series contains certificates and diplomas, correspondence, course and lab notes, term papers and memorabilia documenting aspects of Davidson Black’s education, running from the Wellesley School through Harbord Collegiate and the Faculties of Medicine and Arts at the University of Toronto. There is also a file on Davidson’s summer project in 1907 to earn money for his Bachelor of Arts program, prospecting in the Temagami Forest Reserve.

Education

John Hastings began his education at the Normal Model School in Toronto in 1933, went on to the University of Toronto Schools in 1939, and from there into the pre-medicine program at the University of Toronto in 1945. He received his MD in 1951, then did post-graduate work in the School of Hygiene, receiving his diploma in 1954.

This series documents Hastings’ progress through the educational system and the development of his academic and non-curricular activities. The files on the Normal Model School contain certificates, class assignments, press clippings, drafts of two plays that Hastings wrote, and the school badge. Hastings’ interests in drama were carried over to the University of Toronto Schools, where he wrote a number of plays, drafts of which have survived in this series, and one of which was published in its yearbook, the Twig, in 1943. At UTS, he also honed his public speaking and debating skills; the predominant themes of his public addresses being democracy, the British Empire and World War II. Hastings was a reporter to the Twig for his form and editor in 1943-1944 (his editorial files have survived). He was also a member of the school band and the cadets, developed an early interest in politics and became an active member of the young Progressive Conservatives. At the same time he maintained a high academic standing.

In 1944 Hastings entered a world-wide essay competition sponsored by the Royal Empire Society. His entry was one of three to receive a prize. This encouraged him to enter other essay contests while a pre-medical student at the University of Toronto (1945-1947). At the U of T, he was a member of the Hart House Debates Committee from 1949 to 1951; his notes reveal something of the parry and thrust of debating at that time. Among other activities, Hastings was a member of the Board of Stewards of Hart House and the U of T Historical Club and in 1948 he participated in the Mock Parliament. The remainder of this series contains notes, correspondence, certificates, and photographs relating to Hastings’ acquisition of his medical degree and his post-graduate diploma in public health.

A listing of his activities, academic and otherwise, while a student is found in B2002-0014/014(09).

Education

This series covers the Gordon Skilling’s formal education from his attendance at Grace Street Public School through Harbord Collegiate, the University of Toronto (BA 1934), taking his Rhodes Scholarship at the University of Oxford, and the writing of his doctoral thesis at the University of London. The files are arranged chronologically by degree.

For Grace Street Public School, the files include letters from his classmates at Grace Street Public School and certificates. At Harbord Collegiate, in addition to his studies and piano lessons from the Toronto Conservatory of Music, Skilling was very active in extra-curricular activities: he was president of the Literary Society, editor of the Harbord Review, battalion commander of the cadet corps, and played defence on the basketball team which won the city high school championship in 1928-1929. These activities are documented in the form of term papers, examinations, speeches, scholarship essays, and a scrapbook [box 011] that covers his activities at Harbord Collegiate and the University of Toronto, and documents his trip across North America in the summer of 1933 (see also Series I in this sous-fonds). The scrapbook contains correspondence, dance cards, maps, press clippings, programmes, announcements of student activities, pamphlets, and photographs.

At the University of Toronto, Skilling studied British and colonial history and some modern Canadian and American history, standing first in his class in all but his final year. He was very active in campus politics, including the University College Literary and Athletic Society (of which he was elected president), the Students’ Administrative Council. He helped reorganize the Fabius Club in the autumn of 1932 and a year later, following his momentous trip across North America, was a founder of the CCF Club. Other activities included serving as associate editor of the Varsity and as a member of the Hart House Debates Committee.

His academic activities are well documented in the form of term papers for each of his undergraduate years and in his BA thesis. These files and those on the CCF Club and the Hart House debates are of particular interest. They document his movement from an apolitical period in high school to an activist in the social and political ferment of the time and, soon, to accepting the socialist philosophies promoted by many of his professors at the U of T and, later, at Oxford.

In December 1933 Gordon was informed that he had been awarded a Rhodes scholarship to study at Oxford University. He left for Christ Church, Oxford, in September of 1934, where he remained until 1936. While there, he studied under what he described as “outstanding dons, including Michael Foster and A. J. Ayers, in philosophy; Roy Harrod, in economics; Keith Feiling, in British history; and the Hon. Frank Pakenham in politics and international relations. He also, in the summer of 1935, visited Central Europe for the first time and in the autumn met Sally Bright, then a student at the London School of Economics. In the fall of 1936, having received a high second at Oxford, and having had his scholarship extended, Gordon went to London to complete his doctorate under R. W. Seton-Watson, under whom his growing interest in Czech culture and politics flourished, as did his relationship with Sally. At Easter in 1936 he and Sally spent five weeks in Chepstow in Monmouthshire, a time that is preserved in an album that he compiled (see Series XII, Appendix III). In 1940 Gordon successfully defended his thesis, ‘The German-Czech national conflict in Bohemia, 1879-1893’.

The files on his graduate work contain detailed notes on readings and tutorials, especially on political theory, social philosophy and social psychology. There are also exam questions for his courses at Oxford, correspondence relating to the degrees of BA and MA (Oxon.), and a copy of his doctoral dissertation. Accompanying these files is
a scrapbook, containing press clippings, programmes, photographs and memorabilia covering his years at Oxford and the University of London, with additional material for his visit to London in 1948 [see /012].

Skilling’s diploma from Harbord Collegiate is filed in /003(03).

Photographs relating to his basketball team at Harbord Collegiate have been removed from box 008 (08) to box 009P (01) – (03). Loose photographs relating to his activities at the University of Toronto have been removed from the Harbord Collegiate/ University of Toronto scrapbook [box 011] to box 009P(04) – (07).

Skilling’s University College ‘letter’ [badge] is filed as B2001-0017/008(26).

Education

This series encompasses Dr. Hogg's postsecondary education including her undergraduate schooling at Mount Holyoke College culminating in her earning an A.B. (Magna Cum Laude) in 1926, her graduation from Radcliffe College with an A.M. in 1928 and a Ph.D. in 1931. The series is comprised mainly of course outlines, course and laboratory notes, term papers, examinations, miscellaneous school-related assignments as well as Mount Holyoke and Radcliffe memorabilia. It includes a copy of Dr. Hogg's Ph.D. thesis as well as a critique of it by Harlow Shapley. Some examples of elementary and secondary school notebooks and exercises are also present.

Files B2015-0007/004 (11) & (12) consists of honorary degrees from the University of Toronto (1977), Mount Holyoke College, University of Waterloo, McMaster University, and Saint Mary’s University.

Education and personal activities

The series documents Allan Irving’s activities as a doctoral candidates at the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Social Work, between 1976 and 1983 : his application and registration; the fellowship he received from the department of National Health and Welfare of Canada; lecturer position at the Faculty for Professor Albert Rose; doctoral seminars he attended, papers he prepared during his graduates years and academic results. The series also documents his membership with historical associations such as the Ontario Historical Society and the University of Tennessee’s Social Welfare History Group. The series documents Allan Irving’s applications for teaching positions in Canadian universities, from 1982 to 1994 ; his nomination for the Ontario Confederation of University Faculty Association’s Teaching Award in 1994, nomination prepared by Marion Bogo, associate professor and acting dean of the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Social Work, and Mary Lee. This series also partially documents Irving’s friendship with professors and/or colleagues.

The series consists of 37 files including application for fellowship and report on his doctoral work at the intention of the department of National Health and Welfare of Canada ; statements of academic records ; library card; seminar notes; working notes, bibliographies, drafts and final version of papers (some annotated) ; curriculum vitae ; letters of support ; personal correspondence and press clippings. The series also includes one photograph of Allan Irving with James Gripton’s son, Stuart, at the age of 6 in Calgary (Alberta) ; one photograph of Ernie Lightman’s daughter, Naomi.

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