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Science Council of Canada

Prime Minister Pearson invited Omond Solandt to become the founding chair of the Science Council of Canada in 1966. He held the position until 1972 and remained actively interested in the affairs of the Council until it was disbanded. This is reflected in the correspondence, a collection of the addresses Dr. Solandt gave, minutes, memoranda, reports and photoprints contained in this series.

Included are files on the Gandhi Centenary Conference on Science, Education, and Non-violence, held in Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India in 1969, and, for the post-1972 years, files on the Science Council

Correspondence

Except for one file of correspondence from 1989, covering correspondents filed by surname, I through P and filed in accession B1993-0041, all the correspondence in this series is from accession B1994-0020.

This series has large gaps, particularly for the fifteen years following the Second World War and the 1970s. It begins with Dr. Solandt's wartime letters to his family during the Second World War, where letters from March 1943 to October 1944 are absent, followed by a few letters from 1947, 1954, and 1956. The remainder of the correspondence was arranged by Dr. Solandt in several systems. The first covers the years 1963-1986, the arrangement being alphabetical. A few of the files deal with particular organizations: the Commission on Canadian Studies (1974-1976), the National Radiological Protection Board in the United Kingdom (1976-1981), the Vanier Medal Selection Committee (1975) and York University (1976).

The second system, described as "miscellaneous" correspondence, is filed chronologically between 1955 and 1965. The file for 1955-1962 contains relatively few letters and the file for 1965 is his "personal" correspondence file while employed at Hawkker-Siddeley. These are followed by five files for 1970 (arranged alphabetically, A-S), and one for each year from 1980 to 1992 inclusive. There is a 1989 file on unidentified flying objects (UFOs), about which there are in earlier files some letters from the same correspondents.

Chancellor, University of Toronto

Twenty-nine years after Omond Solandt left the University of Toronto with a gold medal in medicine, he returned as Chancellor, taking up his three-year appointment on 1 July, 1965. It was renewed for a further three years in 1968.

The contents of this series includes correspondence, addresses, minutes, programs, reports and photoprints relating to his ceremonial duties and other activities associated with the office. Included are files on awarding of honorary degrees, the Presidential Search Committee, chaired by Dr. Solandt, for the successor to Claude Bissell, and the new (1971) University of Toronto Act. Included is an audiotape of the proceedings of his installation as chancellor.

Ontario Science Centre

Dr. Solandt was a member of the Board of Directors of the Ontario Science Centre from 1966 to 1984. His involvement is documented in the correspondence, minutes, reports, and photoprints in this series, and includes a

Solandt Commission

The controversy caused by the proposed construction of major power lines through populated southern Ontario resulted in Omond Solandt being appointed in 1972 to head a commission of public inquiry into the transmission of power from Nanticoke to Pickering. The following year the inquiry was extended to include an examination of the proposed route between Lennox and Oshawa. Dr. Solandt held public hearings in the affected municipalities between May, 1974 and January, 1975.

Present are correspondence, press coverage, drafts of papers, and reports relating to the inquiry and to the Ontario Royal Commission on Electric Power.

Institute de la vie

The Institute de la Vie, based in Paris and Geneva, was founded in 1960 by Maurice Marois to safeguard, though science and technology, the

International Federation of Institutes for Advanced Study (IFIAS)

IFIAS was founded in Sweden in 1972 and Solandt, who had been involved in some of the early planning, was appointed to a panel of Special Advisors. Although he was never very active, he gave specific advice when asked. One of his principal contributions was to get the University of Toronto involved in IFIAS through the Institute of Environmental Studies, the first university to receive membership in it. Although his term as Special Advisor ended in 1985, he strongly opposed the move of the headquarters of IFIAS to Canada the following year.

While Dr. Solandt did not keep much of the mass of paper IFIAS produced, the correspondence, minutes, briefs, reports, and publications in this series provide a summary of its activities during his association with it.

University of Toronto. Institute for Environmental Studies

Beginning in 1975, when he left Mitchell Plummer, Dr. Solandt was offered an office at the Institute for Environmental Studies at the University of Toronto by its director, Ken Hare. Although he had to give up his office at the end of 1977, he remained as a consultant, with special interest in the Arctic Program and in toxicology.

The correspondence, notes, minutes, memoranda and reports in this series provide a good overview of the development of certain policies within the Institute and, in particular, the issues associated with establishing an Environmental Health Secretariat at the University of Toronto.

Northwest Territories. Science Advisory Board

Dr. Solandt was the founding chair of the Science Advisory Board, serving between 1976 and 1983. Included is correspondence and minutes of meetings of the Science Advisory Board, 1976-1983; drafts of its publications and reports, 1978-1983; correspondence and reports relating to conferences, task forces, and studies commissioned by the Science Advisory Board or in which it was interested.

International Centre for Research in Dry Areas (ICARDA)

In July of 1975 Dr. Solandt was hired as a consultant to help in the establishment of ICARDA in the Middle East. He was elected as Vice-Chairman of the Board in January, 1976 and remained a member of it until 1981. During this time he carried out numerous duties. As Senior Consultant he was the chief executive officer for ongoing activity. A prominent part of his duties was to recommend to the ICARDA subcommittee specific sites for ICARDA research stations in Lebanon, Syria and Iran. Visits were made and reports written though, in the case of Iran, they were not acted upon. In 1977 he advised the selection committee on the choice of a new Director-General for ICARDA.

This series includes correspondence, background files, memoranda, minutes, reports, site selection reports, maps, press coverage, pamphlets, publications, and a plaque that document in detail Dr. Solandt

Education

Omond Solandt attended Mulvey School in Winnipeg from 1915 to November 1920, when his family moved to Toronto. He then attended Rosedale Junior Public School, transferring to Central Technical School in 1922. For his last year of high school he attended Jarvis Collegiate.

He enrolled at the University of Toronto in 1927, as an undergraduate at Victoria College. He graduated with a BA in 1931 with first class honours in biological and medical sciences. Omond

Centro Internacional de Majorimiente de Maiz y Trigo/International Maize And Wheat Improvement Centre (CIMMYT)

Dr. Solandt was appointed to the Board of CIMMYT in 1976 and remained for ten years, until April, 1986. One his last official acts was to participate in the selection of a new Director-General. He also sat on the Board of another of the CGIAR centres, ICARDA, and two that were similar but not part of CGIAR, the International Centre for Insect Physiology and Ecology in Nairobi and the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Diseases Research in Dhaka, Bangladesh. His experience in CIMMYT was central to all this involvement. After he retired from the Board, he conducted, in April, 1988, a brief management review of the organization as a prelude to a more extensive review by CGIAR later in the year.

This series contains correspondence, agenda books for Board meetings, notes, notices, memo-randa, drafts of reports and reviews, other reports and publications, programs and photoprints that provide detailed coverage of the functions of the organization and Solandt

International Centre for Insect Physiology and Ecology (ICIPE)

ICIPE, based in Nairobi, is one of two important international research centres (the other is WARDA) whose origins lie in the native populations of the area in which they operate. Late in 1976, Omond Solandt was asked to join the Board of ICIPE, which was badly in need of help in management. He formally took his seat in June, 1977 and the reorganization that he engineered addressed problems of efficiency, a lingering colonial mentality, and the appointment of a new chair. A financial crisis forced Solandt to assume the duties as chair in April, 1982, a position he retained for a year. He remained actively associated with ICIPE until 1987 and in 1989 was a one of the founders of its Honorary Alumni Association.

The correspondence, minutes, background papers, reports, programs, publications and photoprints and slides provide a thorough documentation of the complex problems that Dr. Solandt faced at ICIPE, the progress that was made in resolving them, and the impact of many individuals involved in it, especially its founder, Dr. Tom Odhiambo.

International Centre for Diarrhoeal Diseases Research, Bangladesh (ICDDRB)

Dr. Solandt was a member of the original Board of ICDDRB, which inaugurated the new organization to replace the Cholera Research Centre in 1979, and remained on it until 1982. While there he took considerable interest in the financial management of the Centre, and was also concerned with maintaining its international status.

This series contains detailed correspondence, minutes, memoranda and reports documenting the problems that ICDDRB faced and the limited success that was met by Dr. Solandt and others in addressing them. Dr. Solandt

Canadian Forestry Advisory Council

While Dr. Solandt was working on his report for the PPRIC, it became apparent that the amount of forestry research being done in Canada was declining every year. Pierre Gendron proposed that the CFAC should commission a quick survey of the volume of forestry research being done in every agency that could be located in Canada. A Steering Committee was created to execute the study, which was carried out by Dr. Solandt in 1979.

The correspondence, notes, minutes, memoranda, reports, drafts of reports, and replies to questionnaires document the procedures and methodology that Dr. Solandt undertook in preparing his report.

IMASCO/CDC Research Foundation

Late in 1978 Murray Koffler asked Omond Solandt to serve on the Scientific Advisory Committee for the IMASCO/CDC Research Foundation which he had recently established. Solandt stayed until its last farewell luncheon on 25 November, 1985.

The Committee generated a great volume of paper but Dr. Solandt was very selective in what he retained, keeping only significant correspondence, minutes, and some reports. These records provide a bird

Wilderness Research Foundation

During the late 1980s the future of the Quetico-Superior Wilderness Research Center at Mukluk Bay, Minnesota was very much in question. The Wilderness Research Foundation, which sponsored it, was assessing its future at a time when its founder was withdrawing from active participation prior to his death in December, 1988. Dr. Solandt was initially a member of the Advisory Committee to the Board of the Foundation and later a member of the Board. He pressed for the continuation of wilderness research at Mukluk Bay and left the Board in 1991 only when he felt that this would be achieved.

The correspondence, minutes, memoranda and reports written by Dr. Solandt and others, along with articles and institutional reports, clearly document the relationship between the Foundation and the Center, the work done by the latter, the problems it faced, and the policies that were developed in an attempt to save it.

Canada/Newfoundland Royal Commission on the Ocean Ranger Marine Disaster

When the Ocean Ranger oil rig tipped over in the Atlantic on 15 April, 1982, it set in motion an inquiry which involved two royal commissions, one federal and the other provincial (Newfoundland) which, due to a public outcry, were forced to amalgamate. David Grenville, secretary of the Commission, drew on advice from Dr. Solandt for the second volume of the report, which addressed safety on the oil rigs. An important part of this exercise was the convening of a conference in St. John

Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical/International Centre for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT)

The Centro Internactional de Agricultura Tropical was founded by the Rockefeller Institute in 1967 in Cali, Columbia. In 1982 a massive fraud was discovered within the organization, with the result that the World Bank in 1984 retained Omond Solandt to conduct a management review of the Centre.

The files in this series provide a good picture of the conduct of the External Management Review and of its results. Included are the Review Team

West African Rice Development Association (WARDA)

The initial aim of WARDA was to have an entirely native West African organization that would apply the latest in rice technology to the problems peculiar to their area, but political interference meant that WARDA never functioned effectively. By the end of 1986, with CGIAR having resolved to continue its support of the organization, Omond Solandt was asked to coach those involved in it on how to operate within a CG style of centre. In 1987 he made three trips to Africa and, while there and in subsequent meetings, worked to ensure that an effective structure and Board were put in place. His official involvement with WARDA ended about August, 1987.

The correspondence, minutes, background papers, reports, photographs and publications provide detailed information about the problems WARDA faced and the problems Solandt and others encountered in resolving them.

University of Cambridge and World War II

Following graduation in medicine from the University of Toronto, Dr. Solandt decided to embark on a career of clinical research in cardiology, using the Ellen Mickle Scholarship. He spent three academic terms in 1936-1937 at the University of Cambridge under the tutilege of Dr. Alan N. Drury, a distinguished researcher in the field of experimental pathology and one of Britain

Atomic bomb

In September, 1945 the British Chiefs of Staff were invited by their American counterparts to send a mission to Japan to study the effects of the atomic bomb. Omond Solandt was loaned to the Scientific Advisor to the Army Council in the War Office to go as his representative. He went as a specialist in damage to military installations but, there being none of significance in Hiroshima or Nagasaki, spent most of his time studying the casualties from a medical perspective.

This series includes Dr. Solandt

Addresses

Dr. Solandt delivered many speeches and formal addresses during his career. This series contains notes for and drafts of them and, occasionally, photographs. Some of his addresses were published, especially those delivered at conferences or as memorial lectures; if so, they may appear in the series

Activities files

These "activity files" (so named by Dr. Solandt) range from the clubs to which he belonged, to professional associations, and to organizations that had scientific and/or social implications in which he was particularly interested, such as the Canadian Nuclear Association. Their scope moves from local to international and several levels in between.

The files contain a corresponding variety of material, ranging from correspondence, manu-scripts, and notes, to memoranda, programs, pamphlets, reports. Their arrangement is alphabetical by name of event, individual or organization. Included are files on the Conference of Experts to Study the Methods of Detecting Violations of a Possible Agreement on the Suspension of Nuclear Weapons Tests (1958), for which Dr. Solandt was a member of the Western delegation.

Personal and biographical

This series contains material relating to Professor Spencer’s birth, childhood and later birthdays; childhood stories, plays, and poems; reunions and other post-graduate activities at McGill University and the University of Oxford; honours received; and files relating to the residences that he had owned. Also present are copies of his curriculum vitae, security documents regarding the Department of External Affairs, and material reflecting his long association with the Canadian military in the form of Remembrance Day ceremonies and VE-Day and other celebrations related to World War II.

Travel

This series documents Professor Spencer’s travels, both for pleasure and for academic and other professional purposes. The first of his trips documented here is to New York City in 1946; the last is to Europe in 2011.

The files contain an assortment of flight information, correspondence, itineraries, invitations, notes, postcards, diaries and reports (indicated below where they exist), programmes for a wide variety of events, menus, tickets, passenger lists, booklets, maps, photographs, press clippings, and other memorabilia. The arrangement is chronological by trip. Beginning in April, 1977 and continuing while he was director until his retirement in 1986, a lot of Professor Spencer’s travel was done as an extension of the work of the Centre for International Studies. For the first of these trips, he wrote a detailed report of his activities. The often extensive correspondence in these files ranges from that with Canadian government, consular, and military officials to military officials at NATO and elsewhere in Europe and England, to academic and government personnel in Western Europe. Included are files on Professor Spencer’s involvement with the Atlantic Council of Canada, the Committee on Atlantic Studies, and the Canadian Studies Association.

Some of the folders in this series contain correspondence, postcards, reports, and other items that are well outside the dates of the activities being described.

The photoprints, postcards, and artifacts (pin buttons) have been retained in the relevant files. Files containing receipts only (such as transportation, car rentals, luggage, and accommodation) were not kept and the retention of such material in other files is selective. Fax paper, where present, has been photocopied and the original faxes, most of which had deteriorated badly, have been destroyed.

Additional information about some of these trips can be found in Series 7: Correspondence.

Education

This series covers Ruth Church’s education at Mount Royal High School; McGill University, where she graduated with a Bachelor of Library Science the same day as her future husband, Robert Spencer, graduated with a Bachelor of Arts; her subsequent graduate training in librarianship at the University of London in 1945-1946, and her stint as a special student at the University of Toronto from 1984 to 1986.

Included are certificates, programmes, correspondence, and course papers. Ms. Church’s letters home while a graduate student are replete with accounts of her life in immediate post-war London. At the University of Toronto she was a ‘senior citizen student’, part-time, registered at Woodworth College and taking English 262S (‘Detective fiction’) and English 260 (‘Varieties of Biography‘). Her course papers have been kept.

Wartime service, World War II

During World War II, Ruth Church served as Base Librarian with the Women’s Royal Canadian Naval Service (Wrens) from September 1943 to October 1945. She was stationed at HMCS Shelburne (September 1943 – July 1944), HMCS Stadacona in Londonderry, Northern Ireland (July 1944 – May 1945), and at HMCS Niobe at Greenock, Scotland (July – October 1945).

The files include her official record of service, correspondence, base librarian reports, newsletters, memorabilia, copies of period newspapers that she annotated, and post-war correspondence, newsletters, and news items relating to the Wren Association of Toronto. The arrangement is largely chronological.

Canada House

Ruth Church was employed as the head librarian at Canada House in London from September 1945 to March 1950. She was the first permanent librarian hired by the Canadian High Commission and was tasked with building up the library almost from scratch, while serving the demands of the Canadian diplomatic corps and facilitating the use of the library by Canadians based in or travelling through London and interested members of the public.

She nearly lost her job when she married in 1948, as the Civil Service Commission’s policy was that once married, she would be supported by her husband and therefore would be replaced by an unmarried librarian as soon as possible. She appealed on the basis that she would be supporting her husband while he was a student at Oxford and was allowed to remain on with her full salary and allowances. In April 1949, her contract was renewed for six-months and, on request, for a further six months until 28 February 1950, which was extended to 31 March until her replacement arrived from Canada. During this period she fought back against the Department of External Affairs’ decision to reduce her allowance and the Receiver General’s clawback of portions of her salary. Forty-five years later she publicly objected to the closure of the Library and of Canada House and lived to attend its reopening in 1998.

The files in this series contain correspondence, salary stubs, poetry, reports, a manuscript, and articles.

Manuscripts and publications

This series consists of unpublished and published manuscripts written by Judith Teichman over the course of her career. Includes: materials related to Teichman’s books (including copies of the books themselves) notably Social Democracy in the Global Periphery: Origins, Challenges, Prospects (Cambridge University Press, 2007), The Politics of Freeing Markets in Latin America (University of North Carolina Press, 2001), Privatization and Political Change in Mexico (University of Pittsburgh Press, 1996), and Policymaking in Mexico: From Boom to Crisis (Allen and Unwin, 1988); journal articles; reviews; reports; workshop presentations; interviews; conference addresses; newspaper and magazine articles. Also includes: grant applications; correspondence with publishers; research related index cards detailing first and second books on Mexico.

Research

Frederick Urban had a passionate interest in the art and architecture of Italy and much of his research, after his studies at the Whitney Museum of Modern Art, was focussed on that country. He received grants for two projects in Italy, “The Sacri Monti of Northern Italy” (1985-1989) and for his “House/Custoza” project (1985). The other principal grants funded his visiting professorship at Nanjing Institute of Technology/South East University in Nanjing, China in 1987 and 1988, the files for which are found in Series 4.

This series begins with general files on the Sacri Monti research project, including corres-pondence and grant applications, literature, maps, general research material, photographs, posters, and some tracings. There are also files for each year that Urban was in Italy, arranged chronologically. They document his itinerary and contain correspondence, a sampling of programs and brochures, programs for the Biennale of Venice (1985), and one journal (1986).

The series ends with files on exhibitions and performances of interest, along with a selection of slides, photoprints, postcards and posters. There is a folder of cards, notices and programs for a number of exhibitions and performances, primarily Canadian (1978-1992), followed by cards and catalogues for particular exhibits: Christo (1979-1982), Creative Time (including Butler’s lives of the saints), Garry Neil Kennedy, Miami University Art Museum, The New Yorker, and Andy Warhol/Jamie Wyeth. The slides are of ‘design elements’, raves in Toronto, the Toronto Sculpture Garden, and ‘Women study’. The photoprints are of streetscapes in Toronto, taken in the early 1980s. There are ‘Special postcards’ [design elements] collected by Urban, postcards of photographs taken by the British photographer, Frank Sutcliffe, ‘Die einrichtungen der Akaademie der Kűnste der DDR’ (1979), and ‘The theatre of architecture’ by Susan Speigel (Toronto, 1986).

Manuscripts and publications

Professor Urban’s writings focus on the relationship between art and architectural design. Six of his publications are present in this series. Some of those that appeared before 1986 and all published afterward are absent. His earliest writing are based on his involvement with Networks Limited in Halifax, then on collaboration with New York City artist Brian Boigon, and finally on his research in Italy in the 1980s.

Manuscripts and publications

The manuscripts and publications in this series form a small representation of Principal Wallace’s literary output, but they do provide a sense of the breadth of his interests and the activities to which he devoted himself after his retirement in 1944.

University of Toronto

This series contains items ranging from University College class reunions to the University of Toronto Overseas Training Company’s “Record of Service” book that Malcolm Wallace compiled while second-in-command of the Company during World War I. There are also files on retirements (William John Alexander), College fees and scholarships, articles about Toronto and U of T history, and Wallace’s copies of publications about King’s College, the University of Toronto Act, the Victoria Club’s curling manual.

Manuscripts & publications

This series documents the writing activities of Professor York in terms of publication of papers in scholarly journals. Files contain correspondence, and notes, as well as drafts of articles and unpublished manuscripts. The arrangement is chronological.

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