Showing 2831 results

Archival description
Series
Print preview View:

Correspondence

This series contains a mix of personal and professional correspondence, both incoming and outgoing spanning five decades. The early correspondence (1947-1968) richly documents Gotlieb’s early role in the development of computer science at the University of Toronto, first within the Department of Physics and later the Computation Centre and its successor bodies the Institute of Computer Science and the Department of Computer Science. There are two files marked “historical” that contain correspondence that Gotlieb selected as significant to the history of computing. Most of these early files are marked “personal” but are really professional in nature. This “personal” correspondence mainly deals with appointments, recommendations, advice, visits, lectures and thanks from a wide range of colleagues and former students.

Later correspondence (ca. 1968-1995) was arranged more of less by either activity or organization. Therefore, general correspondence files relating to Gotlieb’s publishing activities, conferences, trips and lectures are grouped together and are followed by files containing correspondence with other universities: Canadian, US and international. These document the breadth of Gotlieb’s contacts and relationships with colleagues all over the world. Files marked University of Toronto document Gotlieb’s activities on campus with respect to some committees, special lectures, planning roles, cross appointments etc.. but only in a very cursory way. There are also a series of files relating to government bodies that mainly document his advisory roles. Finally, there is one box of printed e-mail that can cover any of the above mentioned categories and more. They date from June 1989 to June 1993 and are arranged chronologically.

Also included in this series are three files of Letters of Recommendation, dating from 1983-2001. Some of this correspondence relates to the Student Files found in Series X. Gotlieb was often asked for recommendations for former students long after they graduated.

Professional associations and committees

This series contains correspondence, reports, memos, notes, minutes of meetings relating to Gotlieb's participation in several professional associations and committees external to the University of Toronto. Of some interest for researchers of early computing are the printed proceedings of the Computation Seminar in 1949 and the Scientific Computation Forum in 1950 hosted by IBM. A group photograph taken at the first meeting is part of this series and has been filed at /001P(30). Other early records document the 1968 Congress of the International Federation of Information Processing in Edinburgh that Gotlieb helped organize. A 2001 history of IFIP is also included in this series, a chapter of which deals specifically with Gotlieb’s contribution to the international body. There is also documentation relating to the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Computer History Project. Gotlieb was interviewed for this project and the 1971 transcript describes early computing at the University of Toronto from 1949 to 1961.

The greatest extent of records in this series documents Gotlieb’s active participation in the Association of Computing Machines – more commonly known as ACM. Included is some early correspondence (1960-1965) as well as correspondence while Editor-in-Chief of two publications Communications and The Journal of ACM. There are three boxes of files documenting his influential position as Chair of the ACM Awards Committee, a position he held from 1988-1993 and from 1998 to the present.

Conferences, talks and seminars

This series includes files relating to participation at conferences, seminars and special lectures. The files most often contain a copy of the paper or talk given at the event as well as related correspondence, information about the event such as conference programs, meeting outlines and notes. Some of these papers were subsequently published, usually in the journal for the sponsoring organization. Other records relating to the publishing of papers can be found in Series 6. Researchers should note that many of these papers relate to how computers have affected society and are therefore a rich resource for studying the larger social impact of computers.

Editing

This series documents Gotlieb's activities on editorial advisory boards, as a referee, consultant and/or editor. It includes documentation on several publications, including the Annals of the History of Computing, the Journal of Computing and Society, Utilitas Mathematicas as well as several encyclopedias. There is also one general file relating to a variety of editorial projects. Not included in this series, are the papers related to his role in editing the publications of ACM. These records can be found in Series IV.

The files may contain correspondence, referee reports, submissions of papers, biographies of contributors, minutes and meeting agenda.

Research

This series documents Gotlieb's early research, mainly in the use of computers to develop timetables. Gotlieb's interest in this area of computer application evolved from a very practical need to revamp the Arts and Science Timetable in early 1960s, a task he was assigned as a young professor. Through the 1960s, he gave many papers on the subject and his expertise was recognized internationally. However, overtime, his interests led elsewhere and his time table research was passed on to another generation of computer scientists. He is recognized internationally for laying the groundwork in this area of computer applications. There are eight files on this research containing correspondence, reports, notes and related papers.

There is also one file relating to early research on computers and music. This master’s thesis research by student Jim Gabura had as its goal to successfully develop software that could recognize music by specific composers. The file contains original research, papers, correspondence, research reports and other related material. There is also the original cassette of taped music used in the research titled as "Appendix 6 -- Recordings" (For access see /002S). This research was being done in the early 1960s.

In the early 1980s, Gotlieb participated in the Bell Canada VISTA project, a videotex system that allowed users to access computer stored information on a modified television screen. This was more or less an early attempt at a communication system like the Internet. Included is correspondence, the original agreement, notes and publications documenting the experiment. There are also slides showing what the screens of information looked like. (For access see /001P(38)-(39).

There is one other graduate project documented in this series. This is the research by student Darrell Parsons (Ph.D. 1990) looking into the use of computers as it relates to productivity in banking. This thesis research was eventually published in the Journal of Productivity Analysis as “Productivity and Computers in Canadian Banking”, by Darrell Parsons, Calvin C. Gotlieb and Michael Denny, 1993. A copy of the paper, along with correspondence, research outlines and proposals can be found in the last file of this series.

Ceremonies and obligation lists

This series includes copies of addresses and poems used in homilies during the Ritual, obligation booklets, obligation lists for special ceremonies, statistics on obligated engineers and collected correspondence concerning the preparations for the inaugural ceremonies. Several files also include information on special ceremonies for older candidates and proposed special ceremonies that did not occur.

Material from accession B1995-0040 (1959-1989) also includes a copy of the ceremony book for Camp Wardens, application forms and considerable material concerning the manufacture and distribution of iron rings, as well as preparations made for campus ceremonies. Material from Accession B2009-0029 includes six files (06-11) containing updated ceremony booklets and guidelines, a certificate for the nomination of an Honorary Camp Warden, several speeches and a candidate list. Files are arranged chronologically. White prints, several photographs and two obligation sheets have been removed for separate storage.

Expansion of the ritual

The series contains primarily correspondence with Camps Two through Nine, much of it dealing with the matter of verifying candidate credentials from different jurisdictions. There is also some correspondence of a social nature related to the establishment of authorities and Camp Wardens in new jurisdictions. The system of record keeping by Camp appears to have stopped in 1954, after which correspondence pertaining to the Camps may be found in the individual correspondence files in series 5. Arrangement is by Camp number, followed by the records pertaining to discussions of expanding the Ritual to the United Kingdom, India and the United States.

Camp Ten records pertain to a proposed camp in Ottawa, which was never established. Camp Ten, when it was established, became the camp for the Université Laval in Québec City in 1956. Camp Twelve was established by Carleton University in Ottawa in 1958. The B1995-0040 accession includes one file of material, from 1978-1987, related to the expansion of the “Links” programme of the Order of the Engineer organization, based in the United States. The records for Camp Five contain an example of an early iron ring.

National Research Council

Series contains is composed of records dating from McKay’s time at the National Research Council. During the Second World War, the organization was mobilized to support the Allied war effort. As a result, most of the series’ records relate to military research and development. Canadian Army Operational Research Group (C.A.O.R.G.) reports compose approximately half the files that make up the series. These reports cover subjects ranging from blast measurements for anti-tank mine clearance to the number and distribution of Japanese paper balloons in North America. There are also two summary reports on Japanese balloon incidents.
The remainder of the textual and graphic records are made up of committee minutes, general Department of Defence documents, and a short paper on Canada’s part in the development of the radio proximity fuse, which McKay contributed to as assistant to project leader Professor Arnold Pitt.

Also included in this series are the remains of a Japanese paper balloon. Paper balloons, also known as balloon bombs, were a by-product of an atmospheric experiment by Axis scientists, which discovered a powerful air current traveling across the Pacific at about 30,000 feet [1]. Taking advantage of this knowledge, the Japanese military developed what may well have been the first intercontinental weapon in the form of explosive devices attached to paper balloons. These balloons were released in Japan and carried along the Pacific by a jet stream, ultimately finding their way to North America’s West Coast. Although the Japanese are thought to have released as many as 9,000 paper balloons, only 1,000 or so are thought to have reached North America, resulting in a total of six casualties [2].

NOTES

  1. Johnna Rizzo, “Japan’s secret WWII weapon: Balloon bombs,” National Geographic, 27 May 2013.
  2. Ibid.

Manuscripts and publications

Series contains manuscripts and publications that McKay either wrote or kept in his files. Although the majority of pieces address scientific matters, the series also includes a Junior Prize Essay (“Fathers Versus Sons”) that McKay wrote while still in high school. A number of pieces, including the aforementioned “Fathers Versus Sons,” are to be found in journals or magazines, which have been included in the fonds both so as to preserve context and because many of them are no longer in print. It is worth noting that four of the articles in the series were coauthored, rather than sole-authored, by McKay. These are: “The Decay of Nitrogen Afterglow,”
“”The Decay of the Populations of Metastable Atoms and Ions from the Same D-C. Discharge in Neon,” “Effect of Previous History on Switching Rate in Ferrites,” and “The Hall Effect and Resistivity in Tellurium.” The series also includes McKay’s PhD dissertation, The Measurement of the Dialectric Constant of Electrolytes, and the high school physics textbook he co-authored with D.G. Ivey and which his sister, Marjorie, illustrated.

Correspondence

This series contains a mixture of personal and professional correspondence with friends, colleagues, government departments, publishers and non-governmental organizations relating to all aspects of Metta Spencer's career. The correspondence, in the form of letters, faxes and e-mail, document her network of friendships especially throughout the international peace community as well with other North American sociologists.

Addresses and speeches

This series contains addresses and speeches presented mainly at peace conferences, meetings and professional sociology associations. Most of them relate to the peace movement, advocacy and disarmament. There is also Spencer's speech on accepting the Jus Prize in Human Rights. Again these papers represent only a small fraction of addresses given throughout Spencer's career. Arrangement is chronological for specific titles with general speeches filed at the end.

University of Toronto Administration

Although Prof. Spencer held many administrative positions within the Department of Sociology, including several terms as associate chair for Erindale, this series mainly documents her successful efforts to establish and co-ordinate an interdisciplinary Peace and Conflict Studies Programme at Erindale College. Included are the early proposals and background documentation, minutes of meeting, reports, course and program descriptions and correspondence.

Books

This series consists of two sets of files. The first set relates to Prof. Nelson’s only published book Land and Power: Britain and Allied Policy on Germany’s Frontiers 1916-1919 (University of Toronto Press and Routledge, Keagan Paul, London, 1963). Included is a full typescript with revisions, as well as some earlier drafts. Some drafts are also interfiled with notes found in Series 6 Research Notes. This series also contains some correspondence with the publishers and a signed publication agreement. There is additional correspondence relating to permissions for use of materials. Finally there is a file of collected reviews of the book and informal comments. In 1963, this book shared the George Lewis Beer Prize given by the American Historical Society for ‘outstanding work in the field of European international history since 1895’.

A second set of files relates to research Prof. Nelson undertook late in his career. It was a book on the trial and conviction of a British citizen, Miss Malecka, in 1912 in Russia on a charge of sedition. While one file of notes is dated 1983, records generally indicate that Prof. Nelson began researching the case in earnest in the early 1990s. He was studying it in reference to the question of ‘nationality’ and what it could reveal about Anglo Russian relations prior to WWI. Entitled simply Malecka Case, typescripts begin in 1993 and go through various drafts up to 2004. There is no evidence in the records that Prof. Nelson had sought out a publisher and it is clear the book was never published. These drafts, revisions, outlines and notes have been arranged chronologically.

Associations and committees

This series consists of files for committee and clubs in which Prof. Nelson was an active member. Files relating to his days as a student show his involvement in the Modern History Club (1938) and the Historical Club (1939-40) at the University of Toronto. In the latter club, he held the position of secretary then president. From those early years, there is also a file documenting his work in the Eglinton Jr. Conservative Club (1939-1943). Files contain memorabilia, notes, minutes, membership lists and correspondence.

Later in his career, there are more professional types committees outside of the framework of the University of Toronto including the Atlantic Treaty Organization (1960-1964), a provincial body called the Ontario Curriculum Institute (1962-1964), as well as the Canada Council Academic Advisory Panel (1975). For all of these later committees, files contain original correspondence, agenda and minutes as well as reports and notes.

Biographical

This series gives a good overview of Prof. Moggridge’s career. Correspondence and personnel documents discuss appointments, applications, leaves and promotions. There are also several files relating to awards and fellowships as well as research grant applications. Finally, there is a copy of an unpublished autobiography with related notes.

Papers and talks

This series further documents Prof. Moggridge academic publishing and output. Included are non refereed articles and papers, as well as unpublished works such as talks, seminars, and papers presented at conferences. Files contain at least one draft of article or paper and possibly some related notes and/or correspondence. They are arranged chronologically.

Editing

In addition to his original writings, Prof. Moggridge’s international contribution to the field in economic history is also supplemented with his editing projects and in particular the Collected Writings of the John Maynard Keynes with the Royal Economic Society. Prof. Moggridge was managing editor for twenty-four of the thirty volume series. Files contain extensive correspondence, notes and minutes of meetings that detail the projects from their inception to their distribution. Some the key economists with which Prof. Moggridge’s worked include Cambridge economists Lord Richard Kahn and Sir Austin Robinson, Don Patinkin of Hebrew University of Jerusalem, polish-born English economist Tadeusz Rabczynski. There is also extensive correspondence with publishers Macmillan and Cambridge University Press.

This series also documents other editorial projects and positions including: the editing of the J.E. Meade diaries and Lionel Robbins diaries with fellow University of Toronto economist Susan Howson; History of Economics Society (HES) proceedings from 1988 conference entitled Perspective in the History of Economic Thought; his role as managing editor for the HES journal Studies in the History of Economic Thought; as well as his work the Editorial Board and as Review Editor for the journal History of Political and Economy (HOPE).

Referee reviews and comments

This series provides extensive documentation of Prof. Moggridge’s role as a peer reviewer or referee for many publications, research projects and grant applications. Correspondence, referee reports, notes and applications are found throughout these files often titled “Comments on others”. Records are filed chronologically.

Research projects

This series contains files relating to specific research projects in the Departments of Physics and Medicine in which Prof. McNeill was an active participant. Most of the files relate directly to the building and use of a "low background" room, called the Steel Room used to measure low level radiation in humans. He was instrumental in having it built at the university and for providing administrative support for its research use. Included is correspondence, memoranda, research data, grant files, measurements and progress reports. There are also minutes, correspondence and reports of the President's Committee on Background Radiation from which came the impetus for such a laboratory. Experiments and readings conducted in the Steel Room were some of the earliest examples of research in the field of nuclear medicine undertaken at the University of Toronto.

Later research files relate to his research on radon levels, his work developing and patenting a land mine detention device and his personal interest in Stonehenge.

Teaching files

This series consists of lecture notes for courses taught in nuclear physics at the University of Glasgow where he lectured from 1952-1957 and for courses taught at the University of Toronto including:

  • Application of Physics in Medicine
  • Physics Questions for Life Sciences
  • Physics 138 – Nuclear section
  • Physics 238 – Biological Effects of Nuclear Radiation, Heat Engines and Physical Optics

Some files also contain notes on class experiments and assignments as well as some examination questions.

Education records

Includes mainly lecture notes from courses taken while attending Oxford for his B.A. and M.A.. Also includes notes and a copy of his Ph.D. Thesis (1950) and a speech given to the Oxford University Physical Society in 1948.

Administrative files (University of Toronto)

Dr. Glass held several administrative positions in the Institute for Aerospace Studies. From 1961-1966 he was its chairman and from 1968 to 1974 it’s assistant director of education. Most of the records from both of these positions have remained in the respective administrative jurisdictions.

The files in this series include Dr. Glass' "activity reports" (1975-1993), minutes of the Institute's council meetings (1975-1977) and its advisory committee (1976); proposals for buildings, teaching assignments, and post-doctoral fellowships; correspondence concerning visiting professors and exchange students from the Soviet Union (1962-1988) and China (1981-1982), and correspondence about Pathways to Excellence, the history of UTIAS (1976).

Teaching files and lecture notes

Dr. Glass' teaching career began in the autumn of 1950 when he was appointed a research associate in the then Institute of Aerophysics. His earliest surviving lectures are on boundary layer theory, but he became best known for his fourth year course in gasdynamics (ASE 1048, AER 410S), and his graduate courses: non-stationary gasdynamics and wave interactions (1009); shock waves in continuous media, a reading course (1014); gas flows at high temperature (1302, 1402); hypersonic gasdynamics (2003); and his gasdynamics seminar (2045X). While his career was spent at Institute, he also taught elsewhere, especially during sabbatical leave, and was in much demand as a visiting lecturer.

This series consists largely of lecture notes, mostly by Dr. Glass but including some by other specialists in areas such as boundary layer and wing theory. Included are assignments, problem sets, examination questions, course evaluations by students, and a single file on the Institute's Gasdynamics Group (1975-1984).

This series begins with the surviving lecture files from the year (1957-1958) Dr. Glass taught at the Imperial College of Science and Technology in London while on sabbatical. Next are his teacher and course evaluations at the University of Toronto (1969-1980); general examination files (1955-1967); and lecture notes, problems sets and examinations, grouped by course and arranged, as far as possible, chronologically within each course. The principal courses are: advanced mechanics, aerodynamic measurements, boundary layer theory, dynamics of space flight, wing theory, gasdynamics, and shock waves. The files begin in 1950 and end in 1984, the year of Dr. Glass' retirement.

Addresses and public lectures

Dr. Glass was much sought after as a public lecturer and gave freely of his time. Most of the addresses relate to his professional work, but he also took time to share his private passions, especially the utilization of geothermal energy and his research on the Jews in China. The last arose from his invitations to visit China in 1980 and 1985, where he was awarded an honorary professorship from the prestigious Nanjing Aeronautical Institute.

The files contain drafts of addresses, covering correspondence, notes, programs, press coverage, photoprints and slides.

Trips

As Dr. Glass's reputation as a scientist grew, he began to receive invitations to make special trips abroad. In 1961 he was invited by the Academy of Sciences in the USSR to give a series of lectures on high-temperature gas flows and shock wave phenomena. In 1965 the Polish Academy of Sciences invited him to attend the 7th Fluid Dynamics Symposium at Jurata; afterwards he attended the 7th International Congress on High-Speed Photography and Cinematography in Zurich. In 1980, on the invitation of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, he spent four weeks lecturing in China and a further two weeks in Japan as a part of the Speakers' Program sponsored by the Department of External Affairs. In May of 1985 he returned to China on a lecture tour and was awarded an "honorary professorship" by the Nanjing Aeronautical Institute, the first foreigner to receive one. He returned via Japan.

The files in this series document all of these trips. Most include background files, correspondence, programs, drafts of addresses and lectures, notes and press clippings. For the trip to the USSR in 1961, there is only a report prepared by Dr. Glass on his return; he also wrote one for the 1985 trip to China, for which there are also diaries and notebooks. The arrangement is chronological.

Course materials and notebooks

This series contains one file of course materials such as outlines, reading lists, lecture schedules for courses Acland taught at various institutions. Courses for the University of Toronto School of Architecture include 2.23 The European Tradition of Framed Building, 2.24 Mediterranean Tradition, 2.26 The House, 2.27 Residential Patterns 222 and 322 History of Architecture.

Acland’s notebooks, which he most certainly used for lectures, document the subject matter of the courses and the way in which Acland organized his lectures. There are eight in total, illustrated with his original sketches.

Co-operative Housing Case Study: meeting minutes & transcripts

This series consists of meeting minutes, agendas, notices and notes by both Breslauer and Andrews for meetings of the Co-op Habitat Association of Toronto (CHAT) Board of Directors and staff, as well as the Ashworth Square Co-operative Board of Directors, staff and general membership covering the period from 5 October 1971 to 2 January 1974. It also consists of paper transcripts of meetings from 12 January 1972 CHAT staff meeting to the 18 September 1973 ASC Board of Directors meeting.

Student activities

Personal correspondence with friends and University officials, brochures, flyers, pamphlets, and reports relating to courses in Caribbean studies created and collected during Mr. Pieters undergraduate years (B.A. Political Science, 1993) at New College. Also included is a file on New College Alumni Association containing copies of reports, etc relating to the provostial review of the college, 1996. This series also includes photos documenting his activities as a student including social events, meetings, dinners and his graduation.

Future Teachers Club

The Future Teachers Club is an initiative of the Faculty of Education to encourage African/Canadian students in elementary and secondary schools to consider teaching as a career. The objective is to increase the number of African/Canadian teachers in the classrooms to a level which is reasonably representative of African/Canadians in relation to European/Canadians, Asian/Canadians and Aboriginal/Canadians in the provincial population.

This series consists of correspondence, reports, minutes of meetings, survey forms and results, brochures, and flyers collected by Mr Pieters as an active participant in this club while a student at the Faculty of Education. Also included are records relating to "Promoting equity for the teachers of tomorrow" (PETT), a program "undertaken to encourage students from African Canadian and Portuguese communities to consider teaching as a career. There is also a photo album showing Pieters practice teaching at a local school.

Students' Administrative Council

This series consists of two files relating to Mr. Pieters participation in the March, 1994 presidential election campaign of SAC. Mr. Pieters acted as campaign manager for presidential candidate, Andrea Madho, but withdrew his support when he could no longer support the methods being used in the campaign. Included are correspondence, notes, election materials, and articles. Also included is an unsigned and undated typescript of "Beyond Ambition: 14 days in March. The scandalous road to win the 1994 University of Toronto Students' Administrative Council Election".

Correspondence

Correspondence is mainly with colleagues regarding on-going research and results. Included is some correspondence with Dr. Ken Fisher, Dr. Scott's associate.

Manuscript files

Manuscript files document the research and publishing activities of both Dr. Scott and Dr. Fisher. Apart from drafts of articles many files also contain notes, points of discussion, some original data and data analysis, correspondence regarding publication and referee comments, and results of research not published.

They are identified by the research topic (which usually corresponded to one or two articles) and, since the material is largely undated, files have been dated ca. the date of the published article. It should be noted that much of the contents of the file however will have been created before this date.

Student papers

This series includes course notes in Physics and Biology taken as an undergraduate student in biology at the University of Toronto as well as graduate course notes, drawings, early draft and final submission of her Masters thesis.

Professional correspondence

This series is comprised of professional correspondence, incoming and outgoing, between William and his colleagues and/or students. Correspondence is usually filed by the person's name but some files reflect the type of correspondence ie. recommendations, references, applications. The correspondence relates mainly to research endeavours being undertaken with colleagues or students, meetings or symposiums in which Williams was participating, visits from international colleagues, recommendations of students for post-graduate scholarships or employment positions and applications from students wanting to study under Williams.

Laboratory notebooks

Includes four laboratory notebooks: two belonging to Williams and two belonging to individual students. They document how Williams organized his laboratory work and how he supervised his students' work.

Professional Correspondence

Correspondence and related attachments document Zimmerman's professional relationships especially with co-authors of published articles, research partners and former Ph.D. students.

Publications

Records in this series document Zimmerman' s publishing activities relating to refereed articles, chapters in books, books edited and papers presented at symposia, and subsequently published in proceedings and journals. Files contain draft manuscripts, submitted final drafts, some research notes, as well as correspondence among the authors, with publishers and comments from reviewers. They are arranged chronologically. Files are titled most often with the name of the authors and sometimes the "running title". A cross-reference number [ in brackets ] refers to its corresponding bibliographic reference in Zimmerman's c.v. found in the file list

Seminars and Talks

This series documents attendance and participation at professional conferences, meetings and symposia. Files contain correspondence relating to attendance and the delivery of papers, as well as manuscripts of seminars and talks. They also contain general information regarding meetings including conference programs, list of participants, minutes and proceedings. Includes associations and symposia such as: the International Cell Cycle Congress, Canadian Federation of Biological Sciences, the American Society of Cell Biology and the International Congress of Physiological Sciences.

This series also includes notes and draft manuscripts for workshops and invited lectures especially relating to Zimmerman's research on narcotics and particularly marijuana in the 1970s. All files are titled most often by the institution or group hosting the seminar and are arranged chronologically.

Graphic material

This series includes photographs and technical drawings of pressure equipment used by Zimmerman in early high pressure research.

Correspondence

This series consists of incoming and outgoing correspondence arranged chronologically. Included is some personal correspondence but most is professional correspondence with colleagues on varied academic and administrative topics including exhibits, issues on teaching architecture, research and design philosophy. Also included is administrative correspondence within the Faculty.

Exhibition files

Files relating to the mounting of exhibits by faculty and students, most notably Connaitre/Reconnaitre Le Corbusier exhibit in 1987 and Restatements and Realizations: Built work of graduates of the School since 1893, put together by van Ginkel as part of the Centenary Celebrations.

The general administrative files around borrowing, lending and mounting exhibits are filed at the beginning of this series, followed by the specific administrative files on the above mentioned exhibits. Finally, files relating to exhibits borrowed and mounted at the Faculty's gallery are arranged in chronological order.

This series contains photographs, negatives and slides documenting the mounting of exhibits in the Faculty of Architecture including the 1983 exhibit on Le Corbusier and the school's centenary exhibit "Restatement and Realizations: Built work of graduates of the School since 1893". All photographs, slides and negatives have been removed, placed in their own files and boxed separately. In such cases, a SEPARATION NOTICE has been inserted to indicate the existence of graphic materials.

Correspondence

This series includes some professional correspondence but much of it consists of letters to and from Dr. Hastings’ parents, his grandmother, his aunts, Bessie Ferguson, Betty Graham and Louise Hastings, and other relatives and friends met over a lifetime of public service and devotion to his church. The last influenced many of his interests outside his academic and administrative work at University of Toronto, and is reflected in thirty years of correspondence arising from visits to India and Japan beginning in the early 1950s.

While most of the correspondence is filed chronologically, the first files contain exchanges of letters with the Drever family (especially Michael Drever), the politician Eugene Forsey, and the relatives mentioned above. Dr. Hastings met the Drevers from Montevideo, Uruguay, in 1959, when he went on a tour of Latin America to observe preventive medicine and public health teaching. He was to return to Uruguay at the end of 1964 as a member of the World Health Organization/Pan American Health Organization program on health planning in Latin America that also entailed visits to Chile and Argentina (he had a regular correspondent from Santiago after that date).

Dr. Hastings first went to India in 1953 as the University of Toronto’s representative to the World University Service International Seminar (the files for which are in Series 5). While there he first visited the Christian Medical College and Hospital in Vellore, near Madras, that received support from the Canadian Council of Churches through its Vellore/Ludhiana Committee, of which he was a member from 1962 to 1975 and to which he was an advisor from 1975 to 1981. Over the years Dr. Hasting was to provide financial support to many young people he met in India, helping some with their education overseas and others to immigrate to Canada. In 1955 he had the opportunity to go abroad again, this time as a faculty member of the WUS International Seminar, Japan, followed by a month for studying medical education and medical care in that country. He wrote a widely praised report on his return, and kept up a voluminous correspondence with many of the people he had met. In later years Dr. Hastings came to regard these two visits as seminal events in his life.

The first files of chronological correspondence is primarily with his parents, consisting largely of letters sent and received while at Camp Kagawong on Balsam Lake near Fenelon Falls, Ontario where Hastings was to spend many summers from about 1937 and where he was sometime counsellor and a director. (Correspondence from his vacation trips to Quebec in 1943 and 1946 is filed in Series 1). From 1953 and his visit to India, the chronological arrangement is divided in each year into the following categories: general, parents (later ‘mother’, India and (from 1955) Japan.

The volume of correspondence tails off in the mid-1970s; one file covers the years 1986-1997.

Other activities

The records in this series underscore the impact of an upbringing where the tenets of Christianity, public service, and duty were emphasized. They begin with thirty years (1937-1969) of files on Camp Kagawong, a privately owned boy’s camp on Balsam Lake, where Dr. Hastings spent his summers as a young boy enjoying the outdoors. The leadership qualities he displayed led to his becoming a camp counsellor (1944-1945) and, from 1946-1950, director of the Bantam Section and instructor in nature, first aid, swimming and games. During those years he dramatized three folk tales for presentation. At the weekly chapel services, he often delivered homilies or ‘sermonettes’, a practice he continued throughout his association with the camp that closed in 1975. Dr. Hastings’ activities at Camp Kagawong are well documented through notes, certificates, correspondence (much of which is in Series 3) scripts for theatrical presentations, chapel service programs and sermonettes, and some of the annual camp catalogues, photographs and artifacts. The arrangement of the files is largely chronological.

The material on Camp Kagawong is followed by files on Canadian Council of Churches and its Vellore/Ludhiana Committee, of which Dr. Hastings was a member from 1962-1975 and to which he was an advisor from 1975 to 1981. These are followed by files on the Christian Medical College in Vellore, India, including extensive ones documenting the work of the international review team that visited Vellore in 1979 and produced a report on its findings in 1980.

Next are files on the coronation of Queen Elizabeth in 1953; the Developing Countries Farm Radio Network, of which Dr. Hastings was a member of the board; Emmanuel College, where he was a University representative on its council and a member of its curriculum committee; the King’s College Fund which in 1985 organized a Canadian study tour of health services in Britain; and on Pickering College in Newmarket, Ontario. A member of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada, Dr. Hastings was active in its youth clubs in the 1940s. He attended the 1948 convention at which George Drew was selected leader and took part in the federal election the following year.

Dr. Hastings’ place of worship for many years was St. Andrew’s United Church at 117 Bloor Street East in Toronto. He played a very active role in its affairs, serving on its board, many of its committees, was a member of its Men’s Club and, on occasion, delivered the sermon of the week. The files cover the years from 1952 to 1973, when St. Andrew’s and the Yonge Street United Church amalgamated and include correspondence, notices of services, minutes of meetings, reports, and drafts of three sermons.

This series ends with a number of files on Dr. Hastings’ involvement in several activities of the United Church of Canada, centring around his being a member of its task force on health services (1985-1987) and its Division of Mission in Canada’s health task group (1991-1994). Included are correspondence, minutes, memoranda, notes, drafts of reports, and a video, “Taking the pulse of Canadian health care” that grew out of the work of the health task group.

Publications

Dr. Hastings’ first documented publications were a book review and a play that are filed with in Series 3 with his University of Toronto Schools material. This series encompasses his writings from the mid-1950s when he was beginning to establish himself professionally. Not all of his writings appear here but included are manuscripts both published and unpublished, some with several drafts. There is also occasional background material, covering correspondence,
some printed versions of manuscripts, reviews and commentary. Not every title is specifically referred to in the following commentary. Files are arranged by title and filed chronologically, except for the first two that consist of letters to the editor and book reviews.

Dr. Hastings’ research and writings broadly focus on issues in the Canadian public health care system – especially delivery, change and reform – along with writings about his
experiences with health care systems in other parts of the world. In 1954 he was hired as a part-time medical officer in the medical department of the Ontario Workmen’s Compensation Board and the following year produced a report on medical administration of that body in conjunction with the Department of Public Health Administration at the University of Toronto. Two analyses of claims, two surveys on the work done by chiropractors and a survey of electrical shock injuries that Dr. Hastings compiled for the Board apparently were not published. He was, however, a joint author of an article on the administrative practices of the Board in relation to the quality of medical care that was accepted by the American Journal of Public Health and published in August 1955.

Dr. Hastings’ visits to India in 1953 and to Japan in 1955 resulted in a number of addresses, both to professionals and to the wider public (see Series 8) and, with reference to Japan, an extensive report and several articles that appeared between 1956 and 1958. The drafts and covering correspondence are in this series; other correspondence and related files are in Series 3, 6 and 8.

In the summer of 1960 Dr. Hastings used a World Health Organization travel fellowship to study medical care, public health and the teaching of medical care in the United Kingdom, Scandinavia, the USSR, India, Ceylon, Singapore, Hong Kong and Japan. While the bulk of his files relating to his trip are found in Series V, his extensive report on his findings is in this series, along with a later article (1961) reflecting on his travels.

The remainder of his writings for the 1960s addresses numerous issues affecting public heath care in Canada, many of which were stressed frequently. They range from the challenges facing medicine generally, change, community health, establishing priorities, prevention, the challenges faced by nurses, and medicare. The last issue was the great debate in medical circles during the last half of the 1960s. Dr. Hastings made his support for the program clear in his writings. His 1962 report, Labour’s plan for a medical care program for Toronto (September 1962), was widely debated and praised. It described by one commentator several years later as “an excellent short review of the theory and experience of group medical practice”, the first such overall study in Canada. Between 1963 and 1965, Dr. Hastings co-authored a special study, Organized community health services, for the Royal Commission on
Health Services, that appeared in 1964 (his policy memo on public health in community health services had been presented to the Commission in January 1963). An article on medicare,
designed for American audiences, appeared in Current History in June 1963 and other articles in Canadian journals appeared after the Commission issued its report.

In July of 1967, Dr. Hastings was an invited participant to an international workshop of medical care experts in Geneva hosted by the International Labour Office. He produced the Canadian section of a monograph on the organization of medical care within the framework of social security that was formally published the following year and translated into French. Two years later he served as a consultant to the World Health Organization/Pan American Health Organization seminar on health administration for executive held in Tobago. His address on the role of the health services administrator was included in the final report, published in 1970.

Dr. Hastings’ first publication of the 1970s was an interim report on his Sault Ste. Marie study (see also Series 5); a related study is his article on pre-paid group practice in that city that appeared in 1973. This was followed the next year by two studies on the impact of social insurance on medical care, one of which was published. The files for his major study on community health centres, dubbed “The Hastings Report” and published in Canadian Welfare in 1972, are found in Series 5.

Between 1971 and 1975 Dr. Hastings headed a research project involving a survey of high level health administrators in Ontario, the results of which were published in 1976 under the title, Ontario Health Administrator Study. In the autumn of 1977 he was a consultant to the Hamilton-Wentworth District Health Council on the Chedoke hospitals and their relation to the district health system; his report was submitted in April 1978. In 1977 and 1978 the Department of Health Administration, with Dr. Hastings as principal investigator, surveyed over 4,000 practising health administrators across Canada. The survey, supported by the Department of National Health and Welfare, was published in 1981. Other articles published in the 1970s included a further analysis of the national health program (1972), a progress report on the community health program in the Faculty of Medicine (1977), and trends and issues in health services (1979).

In 1985 Dr. Hastings’ article, ‘The Canadian health care system – evolution, current status and issues’, appeared in Introduction to nursing management: A Canadian perspective. In it he summarized his thinking over many years. At the time he was also researching issues relating to primary health care at the international level. He was a consultant for the design of and Canadian study principal investigator for the WHO, Regional Office of Europe, Study on patterns of community participation in primary health care that appeared in 1986 and a consultant to the Centre for Public Health Research in Mexico City, the results of which were
published in November that year. 1986 and 1987 also saw the publication of articles on ambulatory care (Dr.Hastings had served for many years as a consultant on this issue to Mount
Sinai Hospital) and community involvement in health, and “The Ontario health system – an overview”, a chapter in Le system de santé de l/Ontario: enseignments pour le Quebec (1987).

A working paper for the Department of National Health and Welfare, Public involvement in health promotion and disease prevention, a comprehensive literature review and analysis, appeared in January 1988. It was co-authored with David Zakus, with whom he produced an unpublished report the next year on community involvement in decision making in health related matters. In the 1990s he continued to write articles and studies. These include his contribution on health services issues to a WHO/CINDI workshop in Toronto in 1990, and another co-authored monograph, Managed care in Canada: the Toronto Hospital’s proposed comprehensive health organization (1991). Further articles and reports on various aspects of health care in Canada appeared between 1991 and 1994.

Addresses and interviews

Dr. Hastings was much in demand as a public speaker throughout his career. In the early 1960s, for example, he often gave more than one a week and by the late 1990s he himself estimated that he had given well over 1,000 addresses. While the majority were delivered at academic and professional gatherings, he also made time to speak at community events, including graduation exercises.

This series contains lists of addresses, correspondence, notes, drafts of addresses, and, often, press coverage. The arrangement is chronological, with correspondence for which accompanying addresses have not survived being arranged in separate files. There is a substantial file of this type for 1963. Interviews are filed at the end of the addresses.

The earliest extant address is his first professional foray on the international scene, at the American Public Health Association conference in October 1954. The theme was administrative practice in relation to the quality of medical care provided under the Ontario Workmen’s Compensation Board. This address and subsequent ones follow the major themes laid out in the earlier series, especially Series 7. Those that were published are filed, for the most part, in Series 7. Some of the addresses are indicated in Appendix 2, which includes entries up to 1994.

After his retirement, Dr. Hastings’ addresses continued to focus primarily on public and community health issues. One, in 1994, was given on the occasion of the tenth anniversary of the Charles Hastings Co-operative, named after his great-uncle, Toronto’s innovative and pioneering medical officer of health. On another occasion, he spoke about the future of community health centres to the International Conference on Community Health Centres in Montreal (December 1995).

While President of the Canadian Public Health Association in 1996-1997, he travelled widely and was much in demand as a speaker. Four venues included a reception in his honour in Winnipeg, the second National Conference on Communicable Disease Control in Toronto, the World Health Organization’s Intersectional Action for Health conference in Halifax, and the annual general meeting of the Northwest Territories branch of the CPHA in Yellowknife. In 1999, after many years of long distance communication, he flew to Manitoba to address the Hamiota District Health Centre Foundation, and in November was a keynote speaker at the 50th annual conference of the Ontario Public Health Association.

In June 2000, at the annual meeting of the Association of Ontario Health Centres, Dr. Hastings reflected on a turning point in his career in his address, “The Hastings Report – then and now”. This is followed by an address delivered at the opening in October 2001 of the Institute of Population and Health, one of four Toronto-based Institutes of Health Research.

The series concludes with three interviews, one on CBC’s radio and television “Citizen’s Forum” in 1960, a ‘telepole’ on CFTO TV in 1962, and an interview with Jan Brown in February 1997.

Reviews

This series documents Conacher’s role as an external assessor and reviewer. At times it is other historians he has been asked to assess for promotion or act as external reviewer of a Ph.D. candidate. At other times it is a review at the institutional level, as in the case of his role in reviewing the Dalhousie Graduate History Department (1977) and the University of Western Ontario, Graduate Department of History (1986). There are also files relating to Conacher acting as referee for articles most of which are filed in four chronological files covering his entire career (1947-1991). These files contain correspondence with publisher as well as drafts of published reviews.

University of Toronto

Throughout his career, Prof. Conacher was active on various University administrative committees. In some cases, he was a member of the committee, in other cases he corresponded with committee members or wrote memos on behalf of both the Dept. of History and/or the Faculty Association. There are files for the following committees on which he served: Plateau committee, sub-committee on staff (1955-56), Policy and Planning committee (1961), Presidential Committee on Appointments (1964-1965), Presidential Advisory Committee on Academic Appointments and Tenure also known as the Haist Committee (1968-1971), Presidential Search Committee (1971). There are also several files on the Faculty of Arts General Committee (1970-74) as well as one file relating to a proposed restructuring of the Faculty of Arts (1976)

There are also several files on University structure including records relating to the Duff Berdalh Report (1963), general memos and correspondence (1965-69),the Committee of Concerned Faculty (1971), the Dumphy Committee for Participation of Faculty in Governance (1976), the Ad Hoc Committee on Academic Freedom (1977), the Budget Advisory Committee (1978-79), the Governing Council, Academic Affairs Committee (1980), and the Decanal Promotion Committee (1981),

He made submissions to Committee on Graduate Studies (1964-65), Placement Services 1967, MacPherson Committee (1967), Robarts Library fundraising letter (1973), review of Scarborough College (1970), the PACE Committee (1971), Library Advisory Committee (1981). There is documentation on a meeting organized by Conacher with Minister of Finance Donald Macdonald relating to university and research funding and his part in proposing an Emeritus College Retirement Complex (1983-1986).

Non-Professional activities

Correspondence, memos, reports, minutes of meetings document Prof. Conacher’s involvement in non-professional associations. Several files relate to his life as a Roman Catholic, including files on the Committee on Higher Education for Catholics (1960-61), Parish Council for Our Lady of Perpetual Help Church 1967-68 and several files relating to his long-time work in the St. Vincent de Paul Society. During the 1950s and 1960s, Prof. Conacher belonged to the Atlantic Treaty Organization. Files contain correspondence with Edgar McInnis, president of the Canadian Institute of International Affairs and with Ronald Ritchie, chairman of the Canadian Atlantic Coordinating Committee Ronald Ritchie. Finally there is one file for an anti-nuclear organization called Third Track for Peace (1984) that included many from the University of Toronto community.

Thesis

Copy of James Conacher's doctoral thesis from Harvard University, entitled "Canadian participation in the Sicilian campaign, 1943: the role of the 1st Canadian Infantry Division."

Swim meets, results, rankings and guides

This series consists of Thierry’s handwritten and typed results for various swim meets. The competitions covered in this series include the Summer Olympics, World Championships, European Championships, Pan American Games, Pan Pacific Games, the Commonwealth Games, numerous Canadian university meets, age-group meets and provincial competitions. The series also includes files on national swim records from around the world, swimmer profiles, statistics and biographies, and world rankings – many of which have been compiled by Thierry.

Results 51 to 100 of 2831