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Publications

Dr. Hastings’ first documented publications were a book review and a play that are filed with in Series 3 with his University of Toronto Schools material. This series encompasses his writings from the mid-1950s when he was beginning to establish himself professionally. Not all of his writings appear here but included are manuscripts both published and unpublished, some with several drafts. There is also occasional background material, covering correspondence,
some printed versions of manuscripts, reviews and commentary. Not every title is specifically referred to in the following commentary. Files are arranged by title and filed chronologically, except for the first two that consist of letters to the editor and book reviews.

Dr. Hastings’ research and writings broadly focus on issues in the Canadian public health care system – especially delivery, change and reform – along with writings about his
experiences with health care systems in other parts of the world. In 1954 he was hired as a part-time medical officer in the medical department of the Ontario Workmen’s Compensation Board and the following year produced a report on medical administration of that body in conjunction with the Department of Public Health Administration at the University of Toronto. Two analyses of claims, two surveys on the work done by chiropractors and a survey of electrical shock injuries that Dr. Hastings compiled for the Board apparently were not published. He was, however, a joint author of an article on the administrative practices of the Board in relation to the quality of medical care that was accepted by the American Journal of Public Health and published in August 1955.

Dr. Hastings’ visits to India in 1953 and to Japan in 1955 resulted in a number of addresses, both to professionals and to the wider public (see Series 8) and, with reference to Japan, an extensive report and several articles that appeared between 1956 and 1958. The drafts and covering correspondence are in this series; other correspondence and related files are in Series 3, 6 and 8.

In the summer of 1960 Dr. Hastings used a World Health Organization travel fellowship to study medical care, public health and the teaching of medical care in the United Kingdom, Scandinavia, the USSR, India, Ceylon, Singapore, Hong Kong and Japan. While the bulk of his files relating to his trip are found in Series V, his extensive report on his findings is in this series, along with a later article (1961) reflecting on his travels.

The remainder of his writings for the 1960s addresses numerous issues affecting public heath care in Canada, many of which were stressed frequently. They range from the challenges facing medicine generally, change, community health, establishing priorities, prevention, the challenges faced by nurses, and medicare. The last issue was the great debate in medical circles during the last half of the 1960s. Dr. Hastings made his support for the program clear in his writings. His 1962 report, Labour’s plan for a medical care program for Toronto (September 1962), was widely debated and praised. It described by one commentator several years later as “an excellent short review of the theory and experience of group medical practice”, the first such overall study in Canada. Between 1963 and 1965, Dr. Hastings co-authored a special study, Organized community health services, for the Royal Commission on
Health Services, that appeared in 1964 (his policy memo on public health in community health services had been presented to the Commission in January 1963). An article on medicare,
designed for American audiences, appeared in Current History in June 1963 and other articles in Canadian journals appeared after the Commission issued its report.

In July of 1967, Dr. Hastings was an invited participant to an international workshop of medical care experts in Geneva hosted by the International Labour Office. He produced the Canadian section of a monograph on the organization of medical care within the framework of social security that was formally published the following year and translated into French. Two years later he served as a consultant to the World Health Organization/Pan American Health Organization seminar on health administration for executive held in Tobago. His address on the role of the health services administrator was included in the final report, published in 1970.

Dr. Hastings’ first publication of the 1970s was an interim report on his Sault Ste. Marie study (see also Series 5); a related study is his article on pre-paid group practice in that city that appeared in 1973. This was followed the next year by two studies on the impact of social insurance on medical care, one of which was published. The files for his major study on community health centres, dubbed “The Hastings Report” and published in Canadian Welfare in 1972, are found in Series 5.

Between 1971 and 1975 Dr. Hastings headed a research project involving a survey of high level health administrators in Ontario, the results of which were published in 1976 under the title, Ontario Health Administrator Study. In the autumn of 1977 he was a consultant to the Hamilton-Wentworth District Health Council on the Chedoke hospitals and their relation to the district health system; his report was submitted in April 1978. In 1977 and 1978 the Department of Health Administration, with Dr. Hastings as principal investigator, surveyed over 4,000 practising health administrators across Canada. The survey, supported by the Department of National Health and Welfare, was published in 1981. Other articles published in the 1970s included a further analysis of the national health program (1972), a progress report on the community health program in the Faculty of Medicine (1977), and trends and issues in health services (1979).

In 1985 Dr. Hastings’ article, ‘The Canadian health care system – evolution, current status and issues’, appeared in Introduction to nursing management: A Canadian perspective. In it he summarized his thinking over many years. At the time he was also researching issues relating to primary health care at the international level. He was a consultant for the design of and Canadian study principal investigator for the WHO, Regional Office of Europe, Study on patterns of community participation in primary health care that appeared in 1986 and a consultant to the Centre for Public Health Research in Mexico City, the results of which were
published in November that year. 1986 and 1987 also saw the publication of articles on ambulatory care (Dr.Hastings had served for many years as a consultant on this issue to Mount
Sinai Hospital) and community involvement in health, and “The Ontario health system – an overview”, a chapter in Le system de santé de l/Ontario: enseignments pour le Quebec (1987).

A working paper for the Department of National Health and Welfare, Public involvement in health promotion and disease prevention, a comprehensive literature review and analysis, appeared in January 1988. It was co-authored with David Zakus, with whom he produced an unpublished report the next year on community involvement in decision making in health related matters. In the 1990s he continued to write articles and studies. These include his contribution on health services issues to a WHO/CINDI workshop in Toronto in 1990, and another co-authored monograph, Managed care in Canada: the Toronto Hospital’s proposed comprehensive health organization (1991). Further articles and reports on various aspects of health care in Canada appeared between 1991 and 1994.

Addresses and interviews

Dr. Hastings was much in demand as a public speaker throughout his career. In the early 1960s, for example, he often gave more than one a week and by the late 1990s he himself estimated that he had given well over 1,000 addresses. While the majority were delivered at academic and professional gatherings, he also made time to speak at community events, including graduation exercises.

This series contains lists of addresses, correspondence, notes, drafts of addresses, and, often, press coverage. The arrangement is chronological, with correspondence for which accompanying addresses have not survived being arranged in separate files. There is a substantial file of this type for 1963. Interviews are filed at the end of the addresses.

The earliest extant address is his first professional foray on the international scene, at the American Public Health Association conference in October 1954. The theme was administrative practice in relation to the quality of medical care provided under the Ontario Workmen’s Compensation Board. This address and subsequent ones follow the major themes laid out in the earlier series, especially Series 7. Those that were published are filed, for the most part, in Series 7. Some of the addresses are indicated in Appendix 2, which includes entries up to 1994.

After his retirement, Dr. Hastings’ addresses continued to focus primarily on public and community health issues. One, in 1994, was given on the occasion of the tenth anniversary of the Charles Hastings Co-operative, named after his great-uncle, Toronto’s innovative and pioneering medical officer of health. On another occasion, he spoke about the future of community health centres to the International Conference on Community Health Centres in Montreal (December 1995).

While President of the Canadian Public Health Association in 1996-1997, he travelled widely and was much in demand as a speaker. Four venues included a reception in his honour in Winnipeg, the second National Conference on Communicable Disease Control in Toronto, the World Health Organization’s Intersectional Action for Health conference in Halifax, and the annual general meeting of the Northwest Territories branch of the CPHA in Yellowknife. In 1999, after many years of long distance communication, he flew to Manitoba to address the Hamiota District Health Centre Foundation, and in November was a keynote speaker at the 50th annual conference of the Ontario Public Health Association.

In June 2000, at the annual meeting of the Association of Ontario Health Centres, Dr. Hastings reflected on a turning point in his career in his address, “The Hastings Report – then and now”. This is followed by an address delivered at the opening in October 2001 of the Institute of Population and Health, one of four Toronto-based Institutes of Health Research.

The series concludes with three interviews, one on CBC’s radio and television “Citizen’s Forum” in 1960, a ‘telepole’ on CFTO TV in 1962, and an interview with Jan Brown in February 1997.

University of Toronto. Department of History of Art/Graduate Department of Art

This accession from the Department of History of Art/Graduate Department of Art contains annual budget and contract information, funds and donation reports, graduate program correspondence, OCGS appraisals, Chair's correspondence (Peter Brieger), lecture series material, and retired faculty HR/personnel files.

Reviews

This series documents Conacher’s role as an external assessor and reviewer. At times it is other historians he has been asked to assess for promotion or act as external reviewer of a Ph.D. candidate. At other times it is a review at the institutional level, as in the case of his role in reviewing the Dalhousie Graduate History Department (1977) and the University of Western Ontario, Graduate Department of History (1986). There are also files relating to Conacher acting as referee for articles most of which are filed in four chronological files covering his entire career (1947-1991). These files contain correspondence with publisher as well as drafts of published reviews.

University of Toronto

Throughout his career, Prof. Conacher was active on various University administrative committees. In some cases, he was a member of the committee, in other cases he corresponded with committee members or wrote memos on behalf of both the Dept. of History and/or the Faculty Association. There are files for the following committees on which he served: Plateau committee, sub-committee on staff (1955-56), Policy and Planning committee (1961), Presidential Committee on Appointments (1964-1965), Presidential Advisory Committee on Academic Appointments and Tenure also known as the Haist Committee (1968-1971), Presidential Search Committee (1971). There are also several files on the Faculty of Arts General Committee (1970-74) as well as one file relating to a proposed restructuring of the Faculty of Arts (1976)

There are also several files on University structure including records relating to the Duff Berdalh Report (1963), general memos and correspondence (1965-69),the Committee of Concerned Faculty (1971), the Dumphy Committee for Participation of Faculty in Governance (1976), the Ad Hoc Committee on Academic Freedom (1977), the Budget Advisory Committee (1978-79), the Governing Council, Academic Affairs Committee (1980), and the Decanal Promotion Committee (1981),

He made submissions to Committee on Graduate Studies (1964-65), Placement Services 1967, MacPherson Committee (1967), Robarts Library fundraising letter (1973), review of Scarborough College (1970), the PACE Committee (1971), Library Advisory Committee (1981). There is documentation on a meeting organized by Conacher with Minister of Finance Donald Macdonald relating to university and research funding and his part in proposing an Emeritus College Retirement Complex (1983-1986).

Non-Professional activities

Correspondence, memos, reports, minutes of meetings document Prof. Conacher’s involvement in non-professional associations. Several files relate to his life as a Roman Catholic, including files on the Committee on Higher Education for Catholics (1960-61), Parish Council for Our Lady of Perpetual Help Church 1967-68 and several files relating to his long-time work in the St. Vincent de Paul Society. During the 1950s and 1960s, Prof. Conacher belonged to the Atlantic Treaty Organization. Files contain correspondence with Edgar McInnis, president of the Canadian Institute of International Affairs and with Ronald Ritchie, chairman of the Canadian Atlantic Coordinating Committee Ronald Ritchie. Finally there is one file for an anti-nuclear organization called Third Track for Peace (1984) that included many from the University of Toronto community.

Thesis

Copy of James Conacher's doctoral thesis from Harvard University, entitled "Canadian participation in the Sicilian campaign, 1943: the role of the 1st Canadian Infantry Division."

Correspondence

This series contains, in addition to letters, a wide range of material associated with the ongoing production of the Atlas: notes, memoranda, reports, brochures, partial drafts of the manuscript, photoprints and maps. The arrangement is generally chronological, except where otherwise noted.

Manuscripts and publications

Professor Dean, in collaboration with his colleagues on the Atlas project, began speaking and writing about it almost as soon as it began. These addresses and articles helped maintain scholarly interest in the project as it proceeded and also created a wider public awareness. Both are reflected in the reviews that the Atlas received, and the articles that were written about it, particularly after the Leipzig prize was awarded.

Stuart Grenville Hennessey fonds

  • UTA 1371
  • Fonds
  • 1920-1985

Personal records of Dr. Hennessey documenting his academic activities as professor in Dept. of Political Economy, especially with Extension and Professional Association education. Includes correspondence (1949-1985), lecture notes and course outlines (1933-1983); student assignments, student marks, essays and examinations (printed) (1924-1983); subject files; photographs.

Hennessey, Stuart Grenville

Marion Walker fonds

  • UTA 1930
  • Fonds
  • [1920?]-1998

This accession consists of the personal records of Marion Dorothy Walker. The records document Ms. Walker’s activities as a production assistant for Hart House Theatre, as a professor in the University of Toronto Department of Fine Art and as a creative writer. Types of records include: personal correspondence, manuscripts, theatre programmes, playbills, lecture notes, research notes, scrapbooks, costume designs, stage designs, photographs and slides. This accession is arranged in the following 5 series:

Series 1: Early Biographical Information
Series 2: Personal Correspondence
Series 3: Hart House Theatre
Series 4: Department of Fine Art
Series 5: Fiction

Walker, Marion Dorothy

Personal correspondence

This series consists of chronologically arranged, incoming personal correspondence, documenting Ms. Walker’s personal life from 1936 to 1998. Correspondents include family, friends, Hart House Theatre colleagues, sorority sisters and fine art students. Major correspondents are: Burgon Bickersteth, Pat Carson, Norman Endicott, Robert Gill and James Reaney. The letters, mostly written in the 1950’s, document Ms. Walker’s friendships, romances, interest in theatre, and travels throughout Europe.

Hart House Theatre

Marion Walker was Production Assistant at Hart House Theatre from 1946 to 1957. Under the directorship of Robert Gill, she designed sets and costumes for each of the Theatre’s annual four plays. Her first production was St. Joan, starring Charmian King. Other early performers who worked with Ms. Walker at Hart House Theatre included Kate Reid, Donald Sutherland, and William Hutt.

The records in this series pertain to Ms. Walker’s involvement with Hart House Theatre. Textual records include scripts 1946, annotated Hart House Theatre programmes 1946 – 1957, and obituaries for Robert Gill, 1974.

Series also includes approximately 100 photographs of various productions for which Ms. Walker designed costumes and sets. The photographs depict various scenes, actors and set designs. Productions represented are: Romeo and Juliet, 1947; Julius Caesar, 1948; the Seagull, 1948; The Skin of Our Teeth, 1948, The Doctor’s Dilemma, 1948; Crime and Punishment, 1949; Othello, 1949; Fortune My Foe, 1950; The Guardsman, 1950; Captain Brassbound’s Conversion, 1950; Medea, 1950; Henry IV, 1950; Marco Millions, 1950; Richard II, 1951; Pygmalion, 1951; The Madwoman of Chaillot, 1951; The Admirable Crichton, 1952; The Winslow Boy, 1952; Macbeth, 1952; The Wild Duck, 1953; The School for Wives, 1956; and The Innocent, 1957.

Series also contains 8 sketchbooks of costume designs for the following Hart House productions: The Internal Machine, 1946; Othello, 1949; Medea, 1950; Richard II, 1951; School for Wives, 1956; Hamlet, [n.d.]; and King Lear, [n.d.].

Personal/Family

Consists of family biographical information on the Rhodes ancestry, submissions to American and Canadian Who’s Who volumes

Correspondence

This series contains general correspondence files arranged chronologically, and separate individual files arranged alphabetically by correspondent. General files include correspondence relating to his early education at the University of Edinburgh, appointments in Scotland and England, and appointment to the School of Hygiene, University of Toronto. Individual correspondents include, among others, faculty members at the University of Toronto such as Dr. Morris Goldner, Dr. John Hastings, Prof. Hannah Farkas-Himsley, Dr. W. Harding le Riche, former students, professional associates and personal friends.

Church of St. Leonard, Toronto

Dr. Rhodes was Vestry Clerk for Church of St. Leonard (Anglican Church of Canada) for ten years (1980 to 1990). His wife, Harriet, was a member of the Outreach Committee. The series consists of annual reports, budgets, minutes of meetings and some correspondence with the Reverend J. Taylor Pryce.

Laboratory Services Branch, Ministry of Health

This series documents Dr. Rhodes employment with the Ontario Ministry of Health as Associate Medical Director and later Medical Director of the Laboratory Services Branch, including appointment negotiations in 1969 to his retirement in 1977. Dr. Rhodes joined the Laboratory Services Branch following his resignation as Director of the School of Hygiene in 1970.
Files consistent of general correspondence and subject files relating to Autoclaving, Disinfectants in the TB Laboratory, Report of the Technical Advisory Committee on Laboratory Safety, Immunization and surveillance and Task force on care and transportation of communicable disease cases.

Ministry of Natural Resources. Rabies Advisory Committee

In 1979 Dr. Rhodes accepted an appointment as Chairman of the Rabies Advisory Committee within the Ministry of Natural Resources. This series documents some of the activities of this committee focusing primarily on immunization against rabies nationally and internationally. Included are general correspondence relating mainly to his appointment and reappointment to this committee and his retirement, and subject files relating to the World Health Organization conference in Essen, Germany, oral immunization of wildlife, safety standards and a seminar in Maple, Ontario on “Public, Intra- and Inter-Agency Relations in Rabies Control programs: a review”

Talks and addresses

This series contains copies of talks and addresses by Prof. French at professional meetings, symposia, and conferences. They are arranged chronologically and cover such research topics as upper atmospheric mass spectroscopy, the Trace Atmospheric Gas Analyser (TAGA), satellite aerodynamics, molecular beams and ion clustering. Not all talks were scientific in nature. Prof. French was often asked to speak about the role of engineering in space exploration and the relationship between university engineering research and industry as well as the commercialization of scientific applications. Historical talks include a paper on Canadian post-war aerospace development, a 1968 talk on Canadian development in space research, as well as papers telling the story of key scientific innovation such as the story on how TAGA and SCIEX came about and the role of the University of Toronto Innovation Foundation.

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