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Archival description
University of Toronto Archives and Records Management Services Series
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Editorial work

This series documents most of Professor Lang’s activities as a member of editorial boards, as an editorial consultant for scholarly journals and as a manuscript reviewer for the University of Toronto Press. There are no files for his work with Interchange: A Journal of Educational Studies and the Ontario Journal of Higher Education or for his work as a manuscript reviewer for the University of Toronto Press after 1999.

Books and edited books

During his career, Prof. Richardson published 13 books as author, co-author or as editor. Seven of these works are contained in this series. His first book, Volume 10 of the Society for New Testament Studies (SNTS), was based on his PhD thesis. He changed the title to Israel in the Apostolic Church and it was published by the Cambridge University Press in 1969. Described as “lucidly written, closely argued and most scholarly work”, it was reprinted in paperback 36 years later by Cambridge University Press. In 1984 with John Parry he produced a small pamphlet on University College entitled The great good place: exploring University College.

Another edited book, Law in religious communities in the Roman period: the debate over Torah and Nomos in post-biblical Judaism and early Christianity, appeared in 1991. This book was based on the seminar “Torah and Nomos in Judaism and Christianity” sponsored by the Canadian Society of Biblical Studies over the previous six years. Five years later Herod, Friend of Romans and King of Jews was completed and published by the University of South Carolina Press. This work was reprinted in 1999 by Fortress Press and in Edinburgh by T & T Clark. It became a selection for the History Book Club and the Book of the Month Club.

From 1994 to 1998 he worked with co-editor Karl Donfried on the book Judaism and Christianity in First-Century Rome which was published by Eerdmans in 1998. The papers in this book were revised versions of papers delivered at the “Seminar on NT Texts in their cultural environment” of the Studiorum Novi Testamenti Societas (SNTS) between 1990 and 1994. Prof. Richardson contributed one of the papers "Augustan-era synagogues in Rome" in this volume, copy of which will be found in Series 10 Articles .

In City and Sanctuary: religion and architecture in the Roman Near East (2002), Prof. Richardson “examines the urban design of five cities in the Near East – Palmyra, Petra, Gerasa, Caesarea Maritima and Jerusalem – including cult centres, temples and buildings for mystery religions.” The content of this book is based on a series of John Albert Hall lectures given by Prof. Richardson in 2001.

Building Jewish in the Roman East published in 2004 continues the theme of the relationship between religion and architecture. This book consists in large part of chapters containing revised versions of articles previously published in scholarly journals and collections of essays.

Prof. Richardson’s last book in this series was co-authored with his brother, Douglas Richardson, retired professor of fine art. Canadian Churches, an architectural history is an extensively illustrated book published by Firefly in 2007. This book was described as a “tribute to the religious underpinnings of the nation and to the care with which so many of these houses of worship.. have been preserved”.

Grant files

Series documents successful grants received by Warkentin mainly to undertake research during her sabbaticals. Includes correspondence, applications, reviews and progress reports. There is one file on the Guggenheim Foundation which was a failed application.

Addresses, refereed reports and working papers

This series consists of papers prepared for presentation at conferences, workshops and other invited talks, reports prepared as a referee for scholarly journals, and working papers published on University of Toronto Department of Economics web site since 1998. The numbers attached to the working papers are from Professor Munro’s 2009 curriculum vitae [see B2014-0035/001(02)] and elsewhere. By the time of his death, he had completed 55 of them for the Departmental website.

Also by May 2009, Professor Munro had given papers at 81 scholarly conferences and invited lectures. He organized three of these conferences. Many of the conference and workshop papers are early versions of later published works (See Series 9). Refereed reports are for such scholarly journals as Journal of Economic History, Explorations in Economic History, Economic History Review (see also Series 5: Other activities), Medieval Studies, American Historical Review and university presses such as the University of Nebraska and Oxford University Press. Files may contain various versions of the typescript report or paper, the final version, along with associated correspondence.

Thelma Cardwell

Series documents the professional life of Thelma Cardwell (1920-2001), occupational therapist, professor and former Director at the University of Toronto’s Department of Occupational Therapy. Material covers Prof. Cardwell’s education, development of her academic career, activity in professional organizations such as the Canadian Association of Occupational Therapy and the World Federation of Occupational Therapists, and awards received. Records include curricula vitae, tenure application, correspondence, diplomas, and text of a eulogy given by Prof. Friedland.

Research projects

This series documents many of Professor Helleiner's research projects that were done early in his career and, for later projects, mostly outside of his work with WIDER and G24. Most of these led to publications, the details of which may be found in Series 10: Manuscripts and publications. Included are sabbatical leave fellowships. The series begins with grant applications, followed by files on research topics, concluding with Professor Helleiner's

Teaching materials

This series contains lecture notes, and other teaching materials on various topics of economic history delivered to students during his graduate studies days at Yale and through his years as professor of economic history at the University of Toronto. Files contain typescript texts of lectures, rough notes, bibliographies, course outlines, and clippings. This series demonstrates the breadth of knowledge required to deliver lectures covering the medieval period to recent economic events.

Publications

This series includes copies of “The Iron Ring”, a private publication for the Camp Wardens, printed as a kind of historical primer and general information circular. There is also a clipping file of publicity concerning the Ritual, correspondence regarding the various publications, and a printed musical score for a composition by Alice Roger Collins, to the text of the poem “The Sons of Martha” by Rudyard Kipling, dedicated to the “engineering profession”.
Accession B1995-0040 includes additional publicity clippings, more recent editions of “The Iron Ring”, a Manual of Camp Procedures and mark ups for a collection of Kipling poems. Accession B2009-0029 includes a copy of the reprinted Twenty Poems by Rudyard Kipling, issue no.8 of “The Iron Ring”, The Manual of Camp Procedure (1988), various articles and publicity concerning the Canadian postage stamp honouring the 75th anniversary of the creation of the Ritual, issued in April 2000.

Manuscripts and publications

Dr. Safarian's doctoral thesis on the Canadian economy in the Great Depression was his first major publication. It was published in 1958, two years after its completion. Articles and books began to appear earlier, in 1952, and he has maintained an impressive publication record since then. His writings have concentrated on the relationship of the Canadian economy to those of other countries, primarily through analyses of theories of foreign investment and ownership, and multinational enterprise. He has written or co-authored eleven books, contributed chapters to a dozen books, and has had over fifty papers published in academic and other journals.

Most of the files in this series contain drafts of his writings, with covering correspondence and reviews.  A selection of research material for his latest book, Multinational Enterprise and Public Policy (1993), has been preserved.

Biographical materials

This small series consists of two files containing Dr. Fox's curriculum vitae and a single file relating to his University of Toronto grades, notification of Ph.D conferral from the University of London and miscellaneous academic related materials. It provides a valuable guide to Dr. Fox's professional activities and accomplishments. Also included are three portraits of Dr. Fox taken at various times throughout his career (1964-1984) and a cassette tape sound recording of his retirement dinner tribute, 26 March 1986.

Research materials

This series contains files relating to the production of Prof. Harney’s proposed book on “Italians in Canada”. It includes transcripts of interviews and other biographical information on identifiable individuals, notes, and some drafts documenting Italian Canadians in provinces across the country. It should be noted that some of the transcripts may be copies of records held at the Multicultural History Society of Ontario.

Broadcasting and film

Prof. Hume and Prof. Donald Ivey of the Department of Physics were pioneers in educational television, having developed their first 12 part program “Focus on Physics” in 1958. This was co-sponsored by CBC and the University of Toronto. The success of this series was followed up the next year by “Two for Physics”. Both series eventually aired on the National Educational Television (N.E.T.) in the United States. Other programs that followed include:

1960 – 15 short programs on Physics for children produced by CBC in cooperation with N.E.T. for joint use in Canada and United States

1962 – “The Ideas of Physics” – 4 programmes
1963 – “The Nature of Physics” – 5 programmes
1966 – “The Constant of Physics” – 4 programmes
All of these were for in-school broadcasts to Canadian high schools produced by CBC with the National Advisory Council on School Broadcasts

1960-1965 – 18 programmes for “The Nature of Things”, produced by CBC.
The program “The Nature of Things” is still today a staple of Canadian educational television. Hume and Ivey helped lay the foundation for such a successful broadcast run.

By 1960, their success in educational television spilled over into film where they were commissioned by the Physical Science Study Committee (PSSC) in the United States to do four films: “Frames of Reference”, “Periodic Motion”, “Universal Gravitation” and “Random Events”. All of these were created for distribution in high schools. In 1962, “Frames of Reference” won Edison Foundation award for the best science film and “Random Events” received a silver medal from the Scientific Institute in Rome.

This series contains a fairly complete set of scripts for all the titles noted above. Moreover, there is a 16 mm release print for each of the four films and one sound recording of one program from “The Constant of Physics” series. There are also still images from “Frame of Reference” and a file on the Edison Award.

For a good overview, researchers should begin by consulting reports written by Hume and Ivey for most of the television series. They detail the development of each theme. In addition, there is correspondence and contracts with CBC, correspondence with Educational Services Incorporated and the PSSC as well as program guides, clippings, published reviews, correspondence from viewers, and one 1962 audience response report for a “Nature of Things” programme.

Other presentations and informal lectures

This series contains files documenting Prof. Richardson’s presentations generally outside the community of scholars associated with pure academic religious studies. As a recognized expert and scholar in his field, Prof. Richardson was frequently invited to speak to groups both inside and outside the University, in informal settings. Files in this series may contain manuscripts, notes, correspondence, programmes and other documents prepared for presentations to church groups like Temple Emanu-El and the Yorkminster Park Baptist Church, members of the general public, students, faculty, associations and others interested in historical or current topics relating to religion. Unlike Series 9 and 10, this series contains works not usually submitted for publication or other scholarly distribution. In addition, one will find some of his earliest presentations, mainly in the form of sermons, delivered while a student in divinity and campus minister at Knox College in the University of Toronto (see /034(01)-(06)).

Teaching

This series contains files relating to the teaching of a course at Trinity College - INX 199Y Science and Social Choice and includes choices of course material and assignments which were published in a handbook for the course edited by Hull. No other records relating to Hull's teaching either at Trinity or within the Department of Computer Science are known to exist.

Addresses and interviews

Dr. Hastings was much in demand as a public speaker throughout his career. In the early 1960s, for example, he often gave more than one a week and by the late 1990s he himself estimated that he had given well over 1,000 addresses. While the majority were delivered at academic and professional gatherings, he also made time to speak at community events, including graduation exercises.

This series contains lists of addresses, correspondence, notes, drafts of addresses, and, often, press coverage. The arrangement is chronological, with correspondence for which accompanying addresses have not survived being arranged in separate files. There is a substantial file of this type for 1963. Interviews are filed at the end of the addresses.

The earliest extant address is his first professional foray on the international scene, at the American Public Health Association conference in October 1954. The theme was administrative practice in relation to the quality of medical care provided under the Ontario Workmen’s Compensation Board. This address and subsequent ones follow the major themes laid out in the earlier series, especially Series 7. Those that were published are filed, for the most part, in Series 7. Some of the addresses are indicated in Appendix 2, which includes entries up to 1994.

After his retirement, Dr. Hastings’ addresses continued to focus primarily on public and community health issues. One, in 1994, was given on the occasion of the tenth anniversary of the Charles Hastings Co-operative, named after his great-uncle, Toronto’s innovative and pioneering medical officer of health. On another occasion, he spoke about the future of community health centres to the International Conference on Community Health Centres in Montreal (December 1995).

While President of the Canadian Public Health Association in 1996-1997, he travelled widely and was much in demand as a speaker. Four venues included a reception in his honour in Winnipeg, the second National Conference on Communicable Disease Control in Toronto, the World Health Organization’s Intersectional Action for Health conference in Halifax, and the annual general meeting of the Northwest Territories branch of the CPHA in Yellowknife. In 1999, after many years of long distance communication, he flew to Manitoba to address the Hamiota District Health Centre Foundation, and in November was a keynote speaker at the 50th annual conference of the Ontario Public Health Association.

In June 2000, at the annual meeting of the Association of Ontario Health Centres, Dr. Hastings reflected on a turning point in his career in his address, “The Hastings Report – then and now”. This is followed by an address delivered at the opening in October 2001 of the Institute of Population and Health, one of four Toronto-based Institutes of Health Research.

The series concludes with three interviews, one on CBC’s radio and television “Citizen’s Forum” in 1960, a ‘telepole’ on CFTO TV in 1962, and an interview with Jan Brown in February 1997.

Manuscripts and publications

There are only a few files in this series, consisting of some book reviews, and drafts and offprints of articles that appeared between 1968 and the early 1970s. The arrangement of the files is chronological.

Hospital Employment

This series is comprised of most of MacIntosh’s records dealing with his employment and involvement at several hospitals, including Sunnybrook Hospital, Toronto General Hospital, Mount Sinai Hospital, and The Riverdale Hospital. The series also contains material MacIntosh accumulated while serving on hospital boards and committees, as well as employment information detailing MacIntosh’s work with the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Medicine, and information on work MacIntosh completed for the Worker’s Compensation Board.

Bible Project

Series consists of records relating to the Bible project of Peter Brieger and Jürgen Paul. The original idea of the project was to compile a complete collection of photographs of French and English illustrated Bibles produced between the end of the eleventh century and around the year 1270, with a focus on the iconography of their illustrations. The project likely began in the late 1950s. In 1965, Dr. Brieger met Dr. Jürgen Paul, who moved to Toronto, from Germany, in 1967 to help Dr. Brieger finish the book.

Dr. Paul helped define the focus of the book, from a multi-volume corpus of all illustrations, to a study of “questions of iconography, the variety and development in the choice of subjects for illustrating the biblical books, and to concentrate on the Old Testament. It was to be demonstrated how over the period of the two centuries changes in subjects of illustration selected were influenced by changes in Christian theological exegesis of the Old Testament.” [1] The pair worked together in an office in Sydney Smith Hall during the winter and spring of 1967/68.

The pair later organized trips to several repositories to examine manuscripts. As Dr. Paul writes, “I had already realized that the material of French and English illustrated Bible manuscripts was still incomplete. Therefore, during the summer of 1968 we, together with Mrs. Brieger, spent several weeks in England checking the college libraries in Oxford and Cambridge. It turned out that in both universities large numbers of most interesting Bible manuscripts existed that were not even registered. No catalogues existed. After the stay in England we went by car through France checking the manuscript collections in Paris and provincial libraries between Avranches and Dijon. After that, we went to Italy checking the manuscripts in the Vatican library and in Laurenziana in Florence.”

When Dr. Brieger’s health began to fail, Dr. Paul continued the project, to a lesser degree, with Ann Hilty. The project was never published.


[1] From an account written by Dr. Paul. The full account can be found in the case file for B2016-0007.

University of Toronto Administration

Although Prof. Spencer held many administrative positions within the Department of Sociology, including several terms as associate chair for Erindale, this series mainly documents her successful efforts to establish and co-ordinate an interdisciplinary Peace and Conflict Studies Programme at Erindale College. Included are the early proposals and background documentation, minutes of meeting, reports, course and program descriptions and correspondence.

Student files

This series includes general files on students, as well as files on individual students kept by Prof. Lemon which document their progress (mainly graduate students) as well as his assessment of them. Files contain correspondence, evaluations, theses proposals and theses, essays, comprehensive oral exams, notes and some letters of reference.

Correspondence

This series contains correspondence from 1898-1950. Baillie was a professor of Marine Biology at the UofT. The correspondence in this series is mainly with family and friends while Baillie was stations in England during WWI, but also contains pre-war correspondence from Baillie to his parents, written while he was assigned to a marine biological station at St. Andrews, New Brunswick. There is also correspondence between Baillie and his son, while his son served overseas in WWII.

Academic Lectures

Series consists of lectures delivered by McIlwraith while teaching at Cambridge University and the University of Toronto. Lectures cover a range of topics within anthropology and are directed to first-year students, third-year medical students, as well as including some graduate-level seminars.

Research files

Over the years, Professor Skilling assembled a large number of research files which contained a great variety of material, including notes, correspondence, press clippings (especially from Czechoslovak, other Eastern European newspapers, and Canadian newspapers written in Czech), photocopies of articles, pamphlets, and books.

A selection of these research files has been retained in this series; the material not kept was turned over to members of the Skilling Seminar for their use. The files are grouped into several subject areas, following Professor Skilling’s arrangement and, for the most part, his file descriptions. The emphasis in selection was on original notes, heavily annotated items, correspondence, memoranda, drafts of papers and addresses, and material from conferences and seminars.

The first research area is on Czechoslovakia generally (1966-2000), with its files on the country’s political culture and political reform, political activists, and conferences [box 031]. The latter include the International Political Science Association roundtable in Zagreb in 1985, ‘Ten years after’ conference in Prague (1999), and the Forum 2000 conference in the same city. There is also material on the breakup of Czechoslovakia. Accompanying these files are two boxes [036, 037] of index card notes – one on Czech politics and one a bibliography of Czech politics.

The second category of files [boxes 033-034] consists of material gathered by Professor Skilling for his numerous writings about Tomas Masaryk, including his T. G. Masaryk: Against the current, published in English and Czech in 1994. The first part consists primarily of general writings about Masaryk, along with accompanying notes, correspondence, etc. The arrangement in the latter portion is by subject areas, of which the principal ones are: ‘the Slovak questions’, ‘the Jewish question’, ‘religion’, ‘the women’s question’ and ‘foreign policy’. Accompanying these files is a index card box of entries on Masaryk generally, on his writings, on works about him and on searches to be carried out [box 038, 038a and 038b].

The final category [box 035] relates to Vaclav Havel. In it is correspondence between him and Professor Skilling and copies of letters to Vilem Precan, along with files of interviews, addresses, and honours bestowed; Havel’s visits abroad (including the University of Toronto in 1990); his writings (with notes by Skilling), and material documenting his involvement with Charter 77.

Oversized material has been removed from /034(10) and (12) to /003(04), and from box 034(27) to box 003(05).

A poster has been removed from /035(23) to folder .(02).

Photoprints have been removed from /032(04) and (05) to box 009P(12).

Administrative files: "Dead files"

This series contains files relating to studies and other activities for mainly government agencies of the Ontario provincial government, and the Canadian federal government as well as the National Institutes of Health in the United States. Canadian government bodies include the Department of National Defence, Department of National Health, and the National Cancer Institute of Canada, to name a few. For Ontario, files concern the Ontario Cancer Institute/Princess Margaret Hospital, and the Ontario Council of Health.

Professional activities (other)

This series documents professional activities other than those described in the two previous series. Included is material on consulting and special projects, boards of governors of educational institutions that Professor Lang sat on, and his association with a number of other educational agencies and groups in Canada and elsewhere. Of the last, the most documentation is on the Ontario Council on University Affairs, the Premier’s Council for Economic Renewal, and the Sweden/Ontario Bilateral Exchange Seminar for Senior Academic Administrators (1982-1983). The arrangement in this section is by name of organization or event.

The files may contain any combination of correspondence, memoranda, minutes of meetings, notes, and reports.

Files from B2018-0001 include further records documenting Lang’s active involvement with the Board of Trustees of the Toronto School of Theology (2008 - ; Chair, Institutional Evaluations Committee, 2014-2017) and the Board of Governors of Saint Augustine’s Seminary. His work as Chair of the Strategic Asset Study Committee (2011-2014) for the Archdiocese of Toronto is also documented.

Manuscripts and publications

Professor Urban’s writings focus on the relationship between art and architectural design. Six of his publications are present in this series. Some of those that appeared before 1986 and all published afterward are absent. His earliest writing are based on his involvement with Networks Limited in Halifax, then on collaboration with New York City artist Brian Boigon, and finally on his research in Italy in the 1980s.

Bank of England

The series consists of a book with typed notes of conversations, and both personal and business related incoming and outgoing correspondence written between 1935 and 1939, when Mr. Jackson was advisor to the Governors of the Bank of England. The series mainly consists of outgoing correspondence written by Mr. Jackson to family, friends, acquaintances, students, colleagues and committee members living within the United Kingdom, Canada, the United States, Jerusalem and Italy. Arranged chronologically, the correspondence deals with: the termination of Mr. Jackson’s teaching position at the University of Toronto; his position at the Bank of England; the activities, events and accomplishments of his family; his book An Economists confession of faith (1935); Mr. Jackson’s opinions and views of England at the time; the economic condition of Canada and England during the late 1930s; reflections on his work at the University of Toronto; the employment situation of his students, friends and acquaintances; and the development of the Economics department at the University of Toronto.

Accompanying the correspondence are two indexes (1937 and 1938), possibly created by Mr. Jackson’s secretary at the Bank of England. The indexes list the name of the person who sent the letter (in alphabetical order) with a number that was placed on the letter at the time it was received.

Mixed into the correspondence are articles, newspaper clippings, off-prints and speeches written by academics and consultants on various economic and financial issues within Canada and England. Sent to Mr. Jackson from family, friends, acquaintances, students and colleagues, the articles, newspaper clippings, off-prints and speeches are also arranged chronologically.

Advisory Committee on Science and Medicine of the Canadian Corporation for the 1967 World Exposition

Includes mainly copies of minutes, reports, agendas and correspondence of the Advisory Committee on Science and Medicine - EXPO, of which Dr. Hogg was an active member. There are also copies of speeches given by EXPO officials. Much of the papers relate to the development of "Themes" including storylines and exhibit designs.

Interfiled with copies of minutes and reports, is some original correspondence between Hogg and members of the committee which documents, to some degree, her particular role in the committee. The most extensive original material relates to her role as chairman of one of the lectures given as part of the Noranda Lecture Series. Included is correspondence, drafts for her introductory note, and progress reports of the series. The lecture series itself, sponsored by Noranda Mines, featured a host of international scientists, including Nobel Prize Laureates and was attended by specially invited audiences during EXPO '67.

Student Notebooks

These are Prof. Lee’s notebooks from when he was a student. Many of his instructors are well known in the field of anthropology or worked with Lee during his career. For some of them, their records are also held by the University of Toronto. Instructors include: Ronald Cohen, Dr. C. D. Ellis, J.N. Emerson, Dr. Nathan Keyfitz, Dr. Thomas F. MacIlwraith, Cranford Pratt, Dr. James W. Vanstone, Dr. Fred W. Voget.

Footnote source binders

In his “Introduction” , Professor Friedland wrote that “in order to keep track of the vast quantities of [research] material we were producing, we devised a system of making copies of the relevant pages of material cited in the notes. We therefore rarely spent time looking for material we had already cited. There was a binder for each chapter, with various ways of accessing the material. Future researchers may find the material contained in this series, Series 8, helpful in their own research.”

Each “binder” (the binders themselves were removed and the pages were tied together with library ribbon) consisted largely of photocopied material from published sources and archival records, along with some research reports, material downloaded from websites, and other ‘original’ material. Beginning in 1999, Charles Levi went through these binders, tidying up the material, checking and clarifying the bibliographic reference points, retaining the pages and leaves from which citations were made, and circling the appropriate passages in red ink.

The series consists of three sub-series, the first (by far the largest), being the sources for each footnote in each of the forty-two chapters. The last two sub-series, ‘additional binder material’ and ‘further supplemental material, 19th century’, contain what their titles convey. The arrangement was (and is) by chapter, originally with footnote numbers on yellow post-it notes firmly taped in place.

For each chapter, all the post-its have been removed (as they have largely been through the other series) and the numbers transferred to the documents themselves. Material that was not photocopied has been retained in its entirely. With the photocopied material, the bibliographic reference points only have been retained and entered on the title page or as appropriate. There are numerous entries from periodicals in the University Archives, especially the University of Toronto Bulletin, the University of Toronto Monthly, the Varsity Graduate and its successors. Here, only the first one or two photocopies from each title have been retained; the other issues referred to were listed, with the relevant pagination and commentary.

Mothercraft –OISE project

In 1968, Dr. Fowler headed up a research team in a joint Canadian Mothercraft Society (CMS) – OISE study to determine the effects of quality child care on disadvantaged children. This two-year joint study formed the basis upon which the Early Childhood Education (ECE) curriculum was written. In particular it involved the development of a model infant day care centre for disadvantaged children from four months to two and one half years of age. It also included a follow up study conducted by Dr. Fowler in 1973-1974.

This series documents this joint study with Mothercraft in general and Dr.Fowler’s role in particular. It includes minutes of meetings of the Board of Mothercraft, and the OISE research staff, correspondence with Mothercraft officials, OISE faculty and staff, municipal, federal and provincial governments, private foundations (like the Atkinson Foundation, Laidlaw Foundation), research proposals, budget and publicity files, papers and progress reports. Also included is the film script for “Joint OISE-Mothercraft Infant Demonstration Program” with text of Dr. Fowler’s commentary (1973).

This series also includes film elements including original negative, sound track and release print to the OISE produced film A Demonstration Program on Infant Care and Education in which Dr. Fowler describes the OISE Infant care and education program and Mothercraft Society with emphasis on learning through play.

Reports

Consists of two reports on the provincial education system, and a report of the Principal of Innis College.

Research and research contract files

Dr. Glass kept a number of research files, which he arranged by subject, but most relate to research contracts with Canadian and American government agencies.

The general research files include lab books from the early 1950s, and correspondence, research proposals, notes, research data, and photoprints from 1950 to 1981. Dr. Glass provided titles such as "spherical shock tubes", "spherical explosions", and "sonic boom", the material on the last topic, in particular, being related to the research projects mentioned below. Dr. Glass also maintained files on the following granting agencies: the Canada Council, the National Research Council, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council, and the Connaught Research Fund at the University of Toronto.

The greatest volume of material in this series relates to research projects funded by government agencies. They are arranged by the name of the agency and by the contract(s) for each. The Canadian contracts were with AECL, Transport Canada, the Defence Research Establishment (Sheffield, Alberta), and Pratt and Whitney Canada. American contracts were with the Defence Nuclear Agency, NASA, and the research offices of the Air Force, Army and Navy. There are three research proposals, for which funding apparently was not granted, in this series, and two review reports for research projects by others.

Urban Studies Programme at Erindale College

This series consists of files pertaining to the development of an Urban Studies Programme at Erindale College. In particular, there are files relating to the curriculum for two courses: one addressing Urban Canada, and the other entitled ‘Concepts, Methods and Values in Urban Planning’. In addition there are files pertaining to the Urban Studies & Community Living programme at Innis College.

Diplomas and honours

This series includes Williams' university diplomas from the University of Western Ontario (B.A. and M.Sc.) and McGill University (Ph.D.) as well as awards such as Fellow of the Plastics Institute, Fellow of the Royal Institute of Chemistry and Professor Emeritus of the University of Toronto.

Teaching files

This series documents the courses taught by Prof. Nelson in the Department of History. Documents include course outlines, seminar topics, essay topics, exam questions, lecture schedules, reading lists and marks and comments on student work.

The main courses that Prof. Nelson taught were:

Hist 1620 The First World War: Origins, Course, Consequence
Hist 344 International Relations
Hist 443 Peacemakers and Peacemaking: The Quest for Peace 1814, 1919, 1945.

Benson Family

This series contains assorted files relating to the Benson family in general and Dr. Benson’s parents in particular. Included are records relating to the family property in Port Hope, estate papers for her father Judge Thomas Benson, correspondence between Judge Benson and his second wife, Laura Fuller Benson (Clara Benson’s mother), account records for the management of the house and property in Port Hope.

B2010-0008 contains mainly family papers. Included are records relating to Clara Benson’s sister Emily C. Morris, including estate correspondence. Other members of the Morris family for which there are records: William Morris and Alexander Morris. Correspondence, wills, clippings and memorabilia also document Benson family members, particularly Thomas Bengley Benson, son of Thomas Moore Benson and Laura Fuller. Many of the records relate to his work as a naval architect and yacht broker as well as his estate of which Clara Benson was executor. Finally there are drawings and some financial records relating to the family home in Port Hope – Terralta.

Slides

Series consists of paper copies of slides used by Dr. Mustard in his various presentations. These printouts were kept in binders, organized by year, with each slide assigned a particular number. These binders were presumably used as a reference for assembling a slide show for various presentations. For the years 1996-1999, the slides are digital files only.

Series also consists of digital Power Point Presentation (.ppt) versions of these files, 1989-2005.

Professional associations

This series relates to Prof. French’s involvement with various professional associations and funding bodies for a ten year period through the 1980s. Included are files on the National Research Council, the Royal Society, the Science Council of Canada, the Canadian Society for Chemistry as well as several others. Correspondence, memos, agenda, papers and notes usually document his role as an advisor, reviewer or participant at a conference or meeting. There is also a file on the Bell Canada Forum Award that Prof. French received in recognition for excellence in business-university research collaboration. Files are arranged chronologically.

Teaching materials

This series provides only a small sample of what must have been a large body of materials relating to the teaching of Canadian and American history at the University of Toronto. These six files consist of lecture notes for HIST 271, 379Y, 472Y, and 731. Also included are lecture notes for American History seminar at York University (1989).

Research materials

This series consists of original data, correspondence, and notes compiled for research on moose during Dr. Pimlott's employment with the Newfoundland government and in preparation for his doctoral thesis at the University of Wisconsin (1951-1960). Also included is a draft of a paper by D.A. Chant, Professor of Zoology, University of Toronto, entitled "Biological and ethical considerations related to the question of growth" (Oct. 1974).

University of Toronto Administration

Records in this series document Etkin’s role on various University committees and his leadership as Dean of the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering (FASE). Included are files on the FASE Special Committee on Curriculum, the Masters of Applied Science Committee, and the Presidential Advisory Pension Review Committee. As Dean, he was involved in the reconstruction of Sandford Fleming after the fire and there is a file on his involvement on the CUG and in the 1973 Library Sit-In. In later years, he sat on Innis College Council and was involved in running the AMIK Program in Engineering, a recruiting and mentoring program for aboriginal students.

Files contain correspondence, reports, minutes of meetings and notes. They are arranged by committee chronologically.

History of the ritual

Although a large range of material is covered in this series, most of the documents within it were created circa 1950. Those documents from earlier are often pulled together for the purposes of Brickett’s “Summary of Information” concerning the Ritual of the Calling of an Engineer, which was completed in 1952. Series 8 also includes copies of the history prepared by the Corporation of the Seven Wardens, printed in 1950, to which Haultain objected on the basis of its perceived inaccuracies. There are copious notes in this series regarding his objections. The series also includes peripheral material related to Brickett’s history, such as copies of the detailed indices (see B1982-0023/017(09)) she prepared for her rearrangement of the Kipling Ritual documents. The series also includes numerous copies of arranged early correspondence, which assemble together the multiple threads of communication between the early creators of the Kipling Ritual. Accession B2009-0029 contains a single file of a remembrance essay by Robert J. Marshall concerning his early involvement with the Iron Ring ceremony.

Research: Laboratory Reports

Associated with the research files are nine boxes of laboratory notebooks with the results of experiments conducted between 1925 and 1964. The arrangement is chronological, and by notebook number where more than one is used in a project.

The earliest results, from 1925 to 1942 [boxes 027 to 029], relate largely to scarlet fever antitoxin research, though there are also some for vaccine research beginning in 1935. From 1942 to 1948 [boxes 030 and 031] the notebooks contain data for experiments on penicillin absorption, on Griffith cultures, on streptomycin, and the effectiveness of penicillin in the treatment of gonorrhoea.

The remaining notebooks in box 031 and the first one in box 032 (1948 to 1953) contain data collected for the experiments on the new strains of micro-organisms, on gram-negative cocci experiments. There follows five notebooks of data from experiments carried out between December, 1950 and December, 1952 on antibiotic strains of fungi, including strains isolated from samples of Arctic soil, and possibly on other projects as well.

The first notebook in box 033 contains data from experiments conducted in the first four months of 1953 that are not identified. There follow, in boxes 033 and 034, eleven notebooks of data from experiments conducted between May, 1953 and March, 1958 that are from Dr. Fraser's experiments on methods for the electrophoresis on paper of viruses and a strain of bacteriophage. These notebooks are related to six more containing data on phage experiments, beginning with the last file in box 034. They cover the period October, 1952 to September, 1957. This may be the data, which led to the development of simple synthetic media for the propagation of phage on a non-pathogenic mycobacterium.

The last two laboratory notebooks in this series contain later data (April, 1958-January, 1959) on phage experiments, and swabs from Public Health Nursing students taken between 22 January and 3 December, 1964.

Referees

Professor Helleiner was frequently asked to review grant applications submitted to agencies as varied as the Canada Council, the Ford Foundation, and the Swedish Agency for Research Co-operation. He was also often asked to review manuscripts submitted to journals, book publishers, and government agencies. His colleagues also knew that he would provide careful commentary on drafts of articles, chapters of books, and reports they were writing.
This series documents these activities, and the files are grouped by the categories mentioned.
Additional information may also be found in other series, especially 2, 5, 6, and 7.

The files contain correspondence, grant applications, and drafts of manuscripts.

Papers, Articles and Reviews

The records in this series from B2008-0023 document many articles and papers published by Rayside from 1977 to 2002. The topics range from his early interest and research on federalism and small towns to his extensive research on gay rights and gender equality for which he is now so well known. Arranged chronologically, most files contain correspondence and draft typescripts and some also contain research notes and reader’s comments. There are also some interview transcripts and notes for Prof. Rayside’s article “Gay Rights and Family Values: The Passage of Bill 7 in Ontario” (1987) as well as for a series of articles written in the early 1990s on AIDS in Canada with Evert Lindquist. Most published reviews written by Rayside from 1979 to 1994 are amassed in one folder. Note that many records in this series are electronic. Also included are cassette recordings of some of his talks and public appearances.

Records from B2013-0015 document Rayside’s published peer-reviewed articles, chapters in books, encyclopedia entries, magazine and newspaper articles and reviews. Topics for these records focus mainly on gay rights and gender equity. Sub-topics include marriage, parenting and workplace safety.

Records from B2017-0024 includes assessments done by Rayside for refereed papers 2013-2017. There are also drafts for papers Employment Equity written with Gerry Hunt and The Inadequate Recognition of Sexual Diversity published in in the Journal of Canadian Studies. Records also document his contributions to two books Queering Ontario (UBC Press, 2012 ?)and After Marriage Equality: the Future of LGBT Rights (NYU Press 2015) Finally there are two files relating to his contribution to Who’s Who in Gay and Lesbian History (Sidney’s Biographies), 1999-2006.

Helen Primrose LeVesconte

Series consists of records documenting the professional life of Helen Primrose LeVesconte (1896-1982), occupational therapist and former director of the occupational therapy program the University of Toronto. Material consists primarily of a typescript of an unpublished book on the history of occupational therapy in Canada. Additional material includes correspondence between Professor H.E.T. Haultain and professional associations, and a file on the LeVesconte Award given by the Canadian Occupational Therapy Foundation.

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