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Description archivistique
University of Toronto Poster Collection Série organique
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Correspondence

The correspondents in this series number just under four hundred individuals, of whom sixty-two read and commented on the entire manuscript (these names are listed on page 723 of the 2002 hardcover edition). The correspondents include Professor Friedland’s research assistants, archivists in the University of Toronto Archives, officials and editors at the University of Toronto Press, other editors, writers and independent researchers with an interest in the University’s history, and members of the public that Professor Friedland met in the course of his research and his giving of talks about the history of the University. The majority of the correspondents are academics and administrative personnel at the University of Toronto and elsewhere who were asked for information or offered their expertise. Some of the correspondence is post-publication reaction to the book.

The research assistants (in addition to those listed in Series I), are Sara Burke, David Bronskill, Colin Grey, Graham Rawlinson and Katrina Wyman. Of the staff in the University of Toronto Archives, Harold Averill was seconded part-time to the project to direct the researchers to the appropriate sources in the University Archives, to offer his knowledge of the history of the University and to read the manuscript. Other correspondents from the Archives are Garron Wells (University Archivist), Marnee Gamble (special media archivist) and Loryl MacDonald (administrative records archivist). The University of Toronto Press, the publisher of the book, is represented by Val Cooke, Ani Deyirmenjian, Malgosia Halliop, Bill Harnum, Anne Laughlin,
Melissa Pitts, and Ron Schoeffel. Presidents (past and current) of the University represented are: Robert Birgeneau, Claude Bissell, George Connell, Robert Prichard, and David Strangway. Some of the academics and university administrators forwarded drafts of articles or excerpts from books they were writing, while others commented on the manuscript or portions thereof. Papers or lengthy memoranda and reports are present on a cross-section of activities, disciplines themes and individuals relating to the University including (with the names of the correspondents in brackets). They include the admission of women (Sara Burke), botanical gardens (John Court), chemistry (Susanne McClelland), Connaught Laboratories (George Connell), engineering (Richard White), fees policy (David Stager), gays and lesbians (David Rayside), Jacob Hirschfelder (Sheldon J. Godfrey), Margaret Eaton School (John Byl), history of medicine (Jacalyn Duffin), medicine (David Bronskill), No. 4 General Hospital at Salonika, Greece during World War I (Mary Louise Gaby), philosophy (John Slater), the proposed Wolfe’s University (D. V. Anderson), women (Katrina Wyman), and women in graduate studies (Natalie Zemon Davis).

In addition to letters, the files may contain articles, notes, memoranda, background documents and publications, and the occasional press clipping A few of the files contain historical items, dating back to 1887, that had belonged early graduates and were forwarded by their descendants, Professor Friedland’s correspondents. The detailed comments on the drafts of the book by the correspondents in this series may, for the most part, be found in Series 4.

Personal and family

This series consists of files documenting Professor Friedland’s personal and family activities. It begins with a number of files documenting Friedland’s activities as a student and professor of law at the University of Toronto, his post-retirement professional and other activities. There follow files relating to members of his family, arranged by name, which focus broadly on family affairs and more specifically on personal lives, including professional and social activities, achievements, births, weddings and deaths. These are followed by other files containing correspondence sent home from England, Europe and Israel, and relating to the Friedland residences on Hillsdale Avenue and Belsize Drive.

The files contain correspondence, appointment books, certificates, curriculum vitae, greeting cards, honours, notes, notices, legal documents such as passports and wills, medical reports, programmes, postcards, photographs, and press clippings (including obituaries).

Correspondence

This series consists of correspondence from individuals and organizations throughout most of his academic career. The correspondence covers a wide variety of subjects and issues, and should be consulted along with other series described in this finding aid.
This series is arranged in 2 groups: correspondence arranged alphabetically by name of writer and correspondence by subject. Writers include colleagues such as David Catchpole, J.D.G. Dunn, Charlie Moule, Ben Meyer, Wayne McCready and Prof. Richardson’s brother, Douglas Richardson, professor of fine art at the University of Toronto. Subject files include correspondence with academic associations, journals and publishers, on individuals such as Victor Graham, John Franklin, George Brooke, Douglas Le Pan, among others. Also included is a file “Honors and Honorarium” which supplements personal information in Series 1.

Book reviews (G.M. Craig)

Gerald M. Craig donated a number of books to the University of Toronto Library which contained a variety of inserts. These have been removed and listed below, along with the name of the book in which they were found.

Professional Associations and Societies

This series reflects Professor Roots’ involvement in professional associations and societies. Material included in this series is correspondence, organizational documents (constitutions, financial records, etc.), newsletters, meeting minutes, financial statements, membership applications, and notes. Nearly half of the material consists of Dr. Roots’ involvement with the Young Naturalist Foundation.

Administration

This series reflects Professor Roots’ involvement with academic administration and academic committees within the Zoology Department as well as the larger University of Toronto. This series includes notes, correspondence, reports and documents related Roots’ role as chair of the zoology department, promotions Roots was involved in, the organization of symposiums and retreats, departmental reviews, budgeting, staffing and re-organizing the zoology department, and handling cases of academic misconduct.

Academic activity and teaching

Series consists of administrative and personal records generated by Dr. Galloway. Series includes records of his teaching activity at McGill University and the University of Toronto, research leave proposals, academic exchanges, and funding requests.

Graphic material

This series consists of photographs related to Rodney Bobiwash's professional and personal activities. The majority of the photographs are professional in nature and document Bobiwash's participation in conferences and seminars around the world. Many of the photographs are from the late 1990s and early 2000s when Bobiwash was working for the Center for World Indigenous Studies. Many photographs in series 10 are related to other series in the accession; see the notes section in series 1-9 for related photographs. The photographs are arranged in alphabetical order, except for box /004P, which is arranged chronologically.

Research

The files in this series consist of an album of reproductions of drawings of archaeological excavations and surveys carried out by Professor Shaw between 1963 and 1966, especially at Zakros, Kenchreai, Gordion, and Corinth. Some of these were reproduced in his articles and used in talks at conferences. There are also files of correspondence, notes, background material and photographs relating to research relating to the Phoenicians in the eastern Mediterranean, especially in Sicily, Sardinia and Greece, including Crete and Messara. Files from Accession B2011-0007 contain staff lists and excavation schedules for Kommos excavations.

The descriptions of the folders and the volume of drawings are those provided by Professor Shaw.

Addresses

The addresses in this series are ones that are not integrated into the files of material submitted for publication, principally as proceedings of conferences (see Series 5), or into the files on courses Professor Shaw taught at the University of Toronto (see Series 4). The files contain any combination of correspondence, notes, drafts of the addresses and photographs.

Book files

This is a small series containing correspondence and manuscripts relating to various versions of Etkin’s book on flight dynamics. Most records relate to his first book published in 1959 entitled Dynamics of Flight - Stability and Control and his 2nd version Dynamics of Flight published in 1972. In between, Etkin did publish Dynamics of Atmospheric Flight and some correspondence and reviews relate to this as well.

Grants

Files in this series document much of the same research areas documented in Series 3 but relate to those specific projects funded by granting bodies, mainly by the Canadian and American governments. Much of the early research conducted at the Institute of Aerospace Studies by Etkin and his colleagues was funded by Canada’s Defence Research Board, the U.S. Air Force’s Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR), and National Research Council of Canada (NRC) and later by NASA and the Natural Science and Engineering Research Council .

Other government agencies supported research for specific purposes relating to their operation. For example, there are files on air curtain projects for Toronto City Hall, Ontario Hydro and the Ontario Science Centre, a file on noise research for the Toronto Transit Commission, and one file on the aerodynamic stability of helicopters for the Hydro-Electric Power Commission.

Files contain papers, reports, proposals, budgets, contracts and correspondence. They are arranged alphabetically by the name of the granting agency or the subject matter of the research undertaken.

Teaching files

This series contains mainly course outlines and lecture notes for the various courses taught by Etkin at the Institute of Aerospace studies, some of which were developed by Etkin and were the first such courses to be formally taught in Canada. A few of the courses documented include Applied Aerodynamics, Dynamics of Atmospheric Flight, Numerical Methods, Fluid Mechanics, Stability and Control, Wing Theory and Social Impact of Technology.

Lecture notes

Most are titled and dated and include pencilled dates of revision on the title pages. Where loose holograph sheets were found, they were placed, in the original order, in small neutral paper folders. The bulk of the material was prepared between 1936 and 1939. The series was not completely organized, but the lectures seem to have been grouped by course.

The lecture notes consist of holograph outlines of lectures of half sheets of paper interspersed with holograph and typewritten sheets of the actual text of the presentation.

Lecture notes filed in black file boxes

Except for their organization in to file boxes, this material is of the same type as that in Series 2. The titles of the file boxes are as follows:

Romantic Poetry
Arnold II [note there is no Arnold I]
English Novel I
English Novel II
Browning
Browning II
Nineteenth Century Minor Prose
Carlyle
Seventeenth Century

University of Toronto. Department of Surgery

This series partially documents Morley’s professional activities as a neurosurgeon, clinical professor and administrator at the Toronto General Hospital, affiliated with the University of Toronto Department of Surgery. Correspondence with fellow colleagues, minutes of meetings, committee reports and press clippings document various Toronto General Hospital committee including the Staff Association that Morley addressed at its inaugural meeting in 1963. There is also documentation surgeons Kenneth Livingston, Gordon Murray and W.S. Keith as well as information on the McKenzie Fund at the Toronto General Hospital.

Subject and conference files

The files in this series contain correspondence, notes, and manuscripts relating to his activities as author, teacher, and consultant to government agencies and participant in academic conferences relating to economic policy analysis and telecommunications. Included in this series are records relating to his activities with the U.S. National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc. (1965-1977) including his period as the University of Toronto’s representative on the Board of Directors.

University of Toronto

This series contains mainly files documenting Prof. Wilson’s activities as teacher, administrator and consultant in the Department of Political Economy, the Institute for the Quantitative Analysis of Social and Economic Policy, later known as the Institute for Policy Analysis. These files contain correspondence, notes, minutes of meetings, reports, etc. In particular are files relating to Econometric Forecasting Programme (1973-1976), Industrial Organization program (1970-1978), and the Policy and Economic Analysis Programme (PEAP) (1978-1983).

In addition are files relating to his activities on University committees such as Presidential Advisory Committee on Disciplinary Procedures (1969-70), and Special Committee on Frozen Policies (1988-1989).

Course notes and related material

While an undergraduate at the University of Toronto, Ireton was registered in the four-year BA Honours programme, Honours Mathematics and Physics. He defended his PhD thesis in 1934.

Professional correspondence

Throughout his long career, Dr. Farrar had contact with the world’s leading physicians and psychiatrists. The records in this series document these professional connections. Records include letters from Sir William Osler , Sir David Henderson and Franz Nissl. Also included is correspondence from Dr. Farrar’s colleagues on the American Journal of Psychiatry such as Edward Brush, G. Alder Blumer, Henry M. Hurd and Charles Macfie Campbell. Canadian correspondents include Dr. C. K. Clark, Clarence Hincks, and Robert Noble.

Heidelberg

Between October 1902 and May 1904, Dr. Farrar took leave from Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital for post graduate medical training in Europe. Although he traveled widely, attending lectures and meeting scientists in Munich, Paris and London, Dr. Farrar spent most of his time at Emil Kraepelin’s psychiatric clinic in Heidelberg. There, Dr. Kraepelin had revolutionized modern psychiatric diagnosis. Kraepelin, along with his Heidelberg colleagues, Franz Nissl and Aloys Alzheimer, rejected the nineteenth century practice of reducing mental illness to brain disease. Instead, the Heidelberg School emphasized careful description and clear understanding of individual symptoms in psychiatric diagnosis. When Dr. Farrar returned from Heidleberg in 1904, he had received thorough training in Kraepelin’s psychological approach. He also returned mindful of the Heidelberg School’s emphasis upon brain histopathology, neurohistology, and neuropathology.

The records in this series pertain to Dr. Farrar’s personal and professional activities in Heidelberg. Records consist of a personal diary, research notes and patient observations. Also included is personal correspondence from various Heidelberg colleagues such as Franz Nissl, Emil Kraepelin, Albert Deveaux, and Charles Macfie Campbell. Photographs include mainly snapshots taken by Farrar of the German towns and countryside, of his colleagues at Heidelberg, and of the university and his personal study.

In addition, this series also contains glass slides, printing plates, a gravity measuring device, and a knife for preparing brain tissues for slides. During his Heidelberg studies, Dr. Farrar, along with Franz Nissl and Aloys Alzheimer, became occupied with the microscopic study of brain disease. Dr. Farrar prepared these slides under Dr. Nissl’s supervision.

For photographs, see Box /003P (09).

Department of Soldier’s Civil Re-establishment

This series documents Dr. Farrar’s work with the Canadian Federal Department of Soldier’s Civil Re-establishment. In 1916, Dr. Farrar joined the Canadian army. Initially posted to a hospital unit in Kingston, Ontario, he was transferred to Ottawa for duty in the Military Hospitals Commission. Dr. Farrar would eventually become Chief Psychiatrist in the Federal Department of Soldier’s Civil Re-establishment. In this capacity, he treated invalided soldiers suffering from psychiatric illnesses including shell shock. Though primarily based in Ottawa during the war, Dr. Farrar also worked out of the military hospital in Cobourg, Ontario, a photograph of which can be found in /003P(11). Records in this series consist of professional correspondence, reports, patient files, plans for a military hospital. There are also lantern slides depicting hospitals and asylums throughout North America in the early 1900s. It is believed that Dr. Farrar may have collected and used these images in his capacity as Chief Psychiatrist to put forth a proposal for a new military hospital.

Toronto Psychiatric Hospital and University of Toronto Department of Psychiatry

In 1926, Dr. C.K. Clark recruited Dr. Farrar as medical director of the newly built Toronto Psychiatric Hospital and as head of the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Toronto. Dr. Farrar remained in these positions until his retirement in 1947. Between 1926 and 1947, Canadian psychiatry became a major center in international scientific circles. Indeed, under Dr. Farrar’s tenure, the Toronto Psychiatric Hospital became a university teaching hospital and developed a clinical service for teaching and research. Further, in 1932, Dr. Farrar initiated the first Canadian postgraduate program for physicians in psychiatry. The program was broadly based and was accepted by the University as leading to a Diploma in Psychiatry.

Records in this series document Dr. Farrar’s career at the Toronto Psychiatric Hospital and the University of Toronto Department of Psychiatry. This series has been divided into three sub-series to reflect the administrative, clinical, and teaching activities of Dr. Farrar’s joint appointment.

Sound recordings and Videos

Series consist of sounds recordings of Dr. Rakoff speaking at conferences, on radio programs, and at university lectures. They include addresses, interviews, talks and discussions regarding various topics related to mental illness, primarily psychiatry. Videos include a filmed interview with Dr. Rakoff and a documentary on adolescence.

Education

This series documents Professor Sim’s university education, beginning with examination results at Wah Yan College, the English-system school run by the Jesuits in Hong Kong, where he spent two years improving his English before entering the University of Hong Kong in 1938. His notes at the latter, for Engineering courses in algebra, applied and pure mathematics and physics, survived the vicissitudes of war, but those for Medicine, to which he switched in the fall of 1940, did not. The files for Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy courses at the University of Washington (1946-1949) include course notes for only two courses (in French), some essays on his experiences during World War II and his coming to the United States, short essays on scientists, his BScPhm thesis, and a file on the 50th anniversary (1999) reunion of his class. Also present are copies of his Masters and Doctoral theses, a notebook on extractions and assays, a spoof on a technical paper, and an essay on his impressions of America. There are also files documenting his state pharmacist licence, which he obtained in 1951 and maintained until 1980, and on the course in pharmacognosy he taught while finishing his thesis and about which he later wrote.

Included in this series is a photo album of Professor Sim’s years at the University of Washington and a number of files of loose photos for the years 1947-1955 of him in his residences, his lab, with friends and colleagues and on vacation.

Photographs

Photographs document Prof. Stephen K. Sim ,first Chinese professor in the Faculty of Pharmacy at the University of Toronto. Includes photos taken at conferences, with professional group such as the American Society of Pharmacognosy (1964-1965) and the Canadian Pharmaceutical Society (1958), Prof. Sim at UBC in the and the University of Washington 1950s, informal snapshots of colleagues as well as many documenting the Sims family. There is also one oversize portrait of the 1961 Undergraduate Pharmaceutical Society Executive at the University of Toronto.

Personal and general correspondence

This series contains general correspondence, curriculum vitae, letters of reference for clerical and professional staff broadly documenting his activities as teacher, administrator and author, as well as other professional activities. Correspondence files for example, relate to the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons, Providence Villa, and the University of Toronto Department of Medicine.

Grant applications

While the bulk of funding for the Lipid Research Project came from the US National Institutes of Health (see A2002-0009), funding for additional studies was sought from Canadian sources, mainly the OHF (the Ontario Heart Foundation and now the Ontario Heart and Stroke Foundation) and the national organization, Canadian Heart Foundation (now the Canadian Heart and Stroke Foundation).

Files in this series contain copies of grant applications, correspondence, and curriculum vitae for researchers and fellowship/scholarships applications for research associates involved in these studies. Studies include “Continuing Development of Nutrition Counseling Service for Patients with Hyperlipoproteinemia” and the “Study of Effect of Sugar in Practical Controlled Fat Diets on Serum Lipids in Hyperlipoproteinemia Patients”. Also included are files relating to the GXT (Graded Exercise Test) and ECG (Electrocardiogram) Labs for the purposes of the Prevalence and Coronary Prevention Trial subjects. This series also contains records relating to the first discovery of patients with APO (Apolipoprotein) CII Deficiency.

In addition to receiving funding from the OHF, Dr. Little and his team applied for funds from Health and Welfare Canada and the US Department of Health, and the National Institutes of Health, Atkinson Foundation, J.P. Bichell Foundation, Connaught Labs, Medical Research Council of Canada and St. Michael’s Hospital Research Society.

Lecture notes

Dr. Ostry began the academic portion of her career at McGill University in 1948 with a graduate assistant-ship. In 1951 she was appointed as a sessional lecturer in the Department of Economics and Political Science and held the position of lecturer from 1953 to 1955. She was also a lecturer at Sir George Williams University from 1948 to 1950 and from 1951 to 1954. She rejoined McGill University as an assistant professor in 1958 and during the academic year 1958-1959 was also a visiting lecturer at Carleton University. In 1962 she accepted the position of associate professor in economics at the Université de Montréal.

The lecture notes in this series are arranged by courses within the appropriate academic institution, where this is known. A file may also contain material about similar courses taught in other institutions. The material relating to a particular course is filed chronologically where possible. A file may contain lecture notes and related material such as course outlines, reading lists, memoranda, lists of students, term papers and, occasionally, correspondence.

University of Toronto. Administration

Consists of correspondence, reports, minutes, and research notes which reflect the academic and administrative appointments held by Robin Harris and his involvement in the activities of the Joint University and Toronto Board of Education (1960-1961), the Committee of Presidents, the Committee on Research and Planning (1970-71), the Presidential Advisory Committee on Policy and Planning (1958-1961) the Presidential Advisory Committee on Archives (1970-71), the Library Oral History Project (1973-1987), and the Off-campus colleges committee (1963), and the Committee of the Teaching Staff (1975-1976). Also includes records relating to the Presidential Advisory Committee on the status and future of Scarborough College (1970-1971) originally owned by Prof. E. F. Sheffield, and records of the Curriculum Review and Planning Project for the Faculty of Social Work (1977).

The idea of writing a new university history focusing on higher education was a brainchild of Professor Harris and was set in motion through efforts of members of the Sesquicentennial History Project and its advisory committee. The finished product, a university history book, was to be published during the university's 150th year in 1977. As University Historian, his role is documented in the correspondence and minutes of this committee, as well as reports, proposals, drafts and outlines of an unfinished manuscript.

Education and teaching files

This series contains annotated student handbooks, programmes for football and hockey games, and an issue of the Undergrad, all from Brian Land’s undergraduate years; course notes for an MLS college universities library administration course taught largely by Margaret Cockshutt in 1955-1956; a file Land compiled while chairing the constitution revision committee of the Alumni of the Library School (1954-1959); and lecture notes for two courses he gave in the Library School, Ontario College of Education (1961-1963); and correspondence relating to his appointment as its director (1964). There is a final file relating to his Labour Gazette indexing project for the federal Department of Labour (1956-1958).

Dr. Land kept only selected lecture notes. For others, see Series IV of B1993-0026.

1962 election, Eglinton constituency

Brian Land enrolled in the School of Graduate Studies in the fall of 1960 as a political science student. The opportunity for a thesis topic arose in the spring of 1962 as a federal election loomed. He chose to conduct a study of the campaign in the Eglinton constituency in Toronto, partly because he was a resident and because he had a personal acquaintance with a number of the principals involved.

Land offered his services to Donald Fleming, the long-standing Progressive Conservative member from the Toronto riding of Eglinton, and Minister of Finance in John Diefenbaker’s government. It was the first and only time that Land worked for a Conservative candidate. His notebook records that his first meeting was on May 10
and, over the next five weeks, he immersed himself in the strategy sessions, meetings, and envelope stuffing sessions and other activities of electioneering. He attended meetings of the Liberal candidate, Mitchell Sharp, as well as those of Mr. Fleming, and collected campaign literature from all parties.

This series contains background material to the constituency, Land’s notebook, correspondence, notes, membership and voter lists, poll revisions, maps, election results by poll, addresses, campaign literature and buttons, and press coverage. The bulk of the material relates to the Fleming campaign.

The records are grouped by function.

Davenport-Dovercourt Liberal Association

Brian Land’s involvement in party politics was primarily in the Liberal party at the federal level. He was a member of the executive of the Davenport-Dovercourt Liberal Association, for which, in 1965, he carried out a study of the Davenport voting record by conducting a poll analysis for the years 1952-1963. In February of 1968 he was elected as a delegate to the forthcoming Liberal leadership convention that chose Pierre Elliott Trudeau to succeed Lester Pearson as Prime Minister.

This series contains files consisting of: the constitution, lists of executive officers, minutes, correspondence and press clippings documenting the activities of the Davenport-Dovercourt Liberal Association from 1965-1968; the questionnaire, notes, correspondence, maps and report relating to the Davenport voting record; local press coverage, poll results and capitulation sheets for Eglinton riding in 1963 when Mitchell Sharp was elected for the first time (in oversized folders); campaign literature and press clippings relating to Walter Gordon’s successful re-election in 1965; and credentials (including buttons and decals) for and press clippings about the Association’s delegates to the 1968 convention.

Talks

This series consists of one file only on talks given on the University of Toronto Library to Paul Fox’s class in political science (1a and 1b) when Prof. Land was Assistant Librarian.

Professional and scientific organizations

Of the professional and scientific associations listed in the biographical sketch on Professor Sim, only the Canadian Pharmaceutical Association and the American Society of Pharmacognosy are included in this series. There are also slim files on the Association of Deans of Pharmacy of Canada, the Association of Faculties of Pharmacy of Canada, and the Pharmacy Examining Board of Canada. Accompanying the textual records are photographs of meetings American Society of Pharmacognosy and the Canadian Pharmaceutical Association.

Department of Veterans Affairs Project: Atherosclerosis Study

In 1952, the Canadian Department of Veterans Affairs authorized a research project to study coronary atherosclerosis, a leading cause of death among veterans [1]. This ten-year study was one of the first to look into the link of blood lipids to heart disease. It was centred at Cardiology Clinic of Sunnybrook Hospital, a teaching hospital of the University of Toronto. The Director of the Cardiology Clinic, Dr. H. E. Rykert appointed doctors J. A. Little and H. M. Shanoff to design and conduct the Atherosclerosis Project. Additional funding was also received from the Ontario Heart Foundation (OHF). A lipid laboratory for determining serum free and ester cholesterol and phospholipids with high accuracy was established at Sunnybrook Hospital. Lipoproteins were determined at the Ultracentrifuge Laboratory at McGill University. “The purpose of the project …was to study a carefully selected group of [male] veterans with proven coronary heart disease. It was proposed to follow these patients over a ten-year period and attempt to correlate the serum lipid factors with the course of their disease. A control group of male veterans without clinical manifestations of atherosclerosis [were] studied in comparison” [2]. Seventy-seven male veterans with proven coronary atherosclerosis and a control group of approximately 25 male veterans were studied. Patients ranged in age from 30 to 83. By the end of the ten-year period the group had been reduced to less than 50% of the original number due to deaths.

There were approximately 25 subjects in each decade from the fourth to eighth. These studies showed that patients with coronary heart disease have higher average serum lipid levels than ‘normal’ subjects especially in the younger decades. During the follow up period after myocardial infarction there appeared to be no relationship between survival and concentrations of total serum cholesterol and …lipoproteins” [3].

While the project ran from 1952 to 1962, articles and correspondence continued to be generated by Dr. Little and his colleagues as interest in the project continued well into the 1970s.

NOTES

  1. Other hospitals running projects were Queen Mary Hospital, Montreal, Westminster Hospital, London, Ont., Shaugnessey Hospital, Vancouver and Camp Hill Hospital, Halifax. However the Project at Sunnybrook did not have any interaction with these. (Dr. J.A. Little to Garron Wells, March 2003.)
    1. B2001-0040/018(22) “Serum lipids in carefully selected ‘atherosclerosis’ and ‘normal’ males” Paper given in Chicago, October 1954. J. A. Little, H.M. Shanoff, R.W. Van der Flier and H.E. Rykert.
  2. Ibid., Eighth Annual Report of the Atherosclerosis project 41-52. By Alick Little, Henry M. Schanoff, November 1960, p. 1

Teaching

Series 4 documents Rodney Bobiwash's teaching career at Trent University and at the University of Toronto. The series consists of course notes, lectures, syllabi, presentations and outlines for various Native Studies and Aboriginal Studies courses Bobiwash taught in the 1980s and 1990s. Bobiwash began lecturing at the University of Manitoba before moving on to Trent University and the University of Toronto. The records demonstrate Bobiwash's instructional style, which was both intellectual and practical, where students are encouraged to actively engage with the material being presented. The records also provide a good overview of the issues and challenges facing First Nations peoples in the eighties and nineties. The files are arranged chronologically. For photos from ABS320 see Series 10

Subject files

This series consists of A-Z subject files that are primarily related to Rodney Bobiwash's professional activities as a First Nations and Anti-Racist activist. The series documents the far-right political movement that took place in Toronto, and throughout Canada, in the early and mid-1990s. The series includes profiles of far-right racist agitators, white supremacist newsletters and propaganda such as the Heritage Front's Up Front, documentation of the KKK in Canada, and documents related to the anti-racist resistance mounted by Bobiwash and other activists. The series is arranged alphabetically by subject, with records dating from 1980 through to 1997. Photos of Aryan Fest 1992 can be found in Series 10, Boxes /001P and /004P. Series 1 provides a comprehensive overview of the far-right movement in Toronto, and in Canada, during the 1990s, and an understanding of the role Rodney Bobiwash and other First Nations/anti-racist activists played in combating right-wing hate groups.

Research projects

Dr. Wilson applied widely for research grants for his research projects, including the writing of his autobiography and his projects on the Arctic.

Groups

Series consists of Prof. Ng’s files on organizations for immigrant women and garment workers in which she participated. These include the following:

  • Apparel Textile Action Committee (ATAC) (1989-1995): Records document the work of ATAC’s Joint Adjustment Committee, which was set up between the International Ladies Garment Workers Union and the Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers Union under the Industrial Adjustment Service Program of Canada Employment and Immigration Commission. Prof. Ng was appointed Chairperson in 1991. The group aided workers affected by closures, downsizings and/or bankruptcies in the textile industry by providing counselling, retraining, and help finding a new job. Files include program reports, correspondence, minutes, funding requests, member lists, brochures and press releases. There is also a report from ATAC’s ESL-career decision making program.

  • CERIS (The Joint Centre of Excellence for Research on Immigration and Settlement (1997-2008): Files include administrative records, newsletters, research overviews, and the proceedings of the Fourth National Metropolis Conference in 2000.

  • The Canadian Research Institute for the Advancement of Women (CRIAW) (1986-2010): Files include financial statements, reports, strategic planning, project files, research and articles, and conference records.

  • The International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union (ILGWU) (1992-1994): Files include conference records, reports, research interviews and other records.

  • INTERCEDE (International Coalition to End Domestics’ Exploitation) (1980-2001): This coalition provided services, assistance, and education to domestic workers, advocated for improvements in the living and working conditions of domestic workers and participated in public awareness campaigns. The group also lobbied provincial and federal governments for legislative changes for domestic workers, presented briefs to the Ontario government and the federal government’s Task Force on Immigration Practices and Procedures, organized rallies, and generally advocated on behalf of the needs of domestic workers. Files include research and reports, press clippings, newsletters, correspondence, minutes, orientation kit and briefs and responses to government reports.

  • Inter Pares (1999-2004): The single file on Inter Pares includes published ephemera such as bulletins and pamphlets.

  • The Jade Garden Adjustment Committee (1988-2005): This committee was struck in order to provide support for workers displaced by the closing of the Jade Garden Restaurant. Files include reports, contracts, interviews and surveys, correspondence, minutes, financial records, and background material on Chinese immigrants in Toronto. One report, to the Office of Labour Adjustment and Ontario Training and Adjustment Board, gives a good overview of the case: “When restaurant workers and adjustment services meet: the Jade Garden Restaurant Workers’ Experience” by Roxana Ng (B2014-0005/004(02))

  • The National Organization of Immigrant and Visible Minority Women of Canada (NOICMWC) (1986-1992): Files include conference records, meeting minutes, the constitution, newsletters, outreach materials, reports, correspondence, conference material, and other records.

  • UNITE (the Union of Needletrades, Industrial and Textile Employees) (1995-2001): Files include outreach materials, newsletters, memos, minutes from the Toronto Project Team, project records, press releases and clippings, publications, reports, and other records.

  • Women Working with Immigrant Women (WWIW) (1979-1992): Files include annual reports, minutes, the constitution, newsletters, project files and other records, especially for the WWIW in New Brunswick.

The series also begins with files on various groups for which there are only a few records, and in which Prof. Ng was less actively involved.

Homeworkers Association

  • UTA 1607-13
  • Série organique
  • 1985-2009 (predominant 1995-2007)
  • Fait partie de Roxana Ng fonds

Series consists of records relating to the Homeworkers Association (HWA), which was initiated as part of the Chinese Canadian National Council Toronto Chapter (CCNCTC). The group was comprised of and advocated for homeworkers – particularly garment workers – in Toronto. It provided training, advocacy, social activities and other support. The group incorporated, independently of the CCNCTC, in 2007.

The series provides fairly thorough documentation of the group and includes annual reports, minutes, workshop statistics, grant records, brochures and other outreach material, news clippings, membership records, and records documenting the group’s relationship with the CCNCTC.

There is significant documentation of HWA projects and events, including a health and safety outreach project, a fashion show, a photo exhibit, a training and mentoring project with low-waged women, and a wear fair employment project.

In addition the series includes photographs of events, workshops, rallies, and members; scrapbooks; and the contents of a public display used for public education and promotion of the group.

Memos

This series is one file of memos mainly written by Prof. Prentice dealing with issues within the Department of History and Philosophy at the Ontario Institute of Studies in Education. Memos document Prentice’s views on staffing, research direction, and courses being offered.

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