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University of Toronto and the Living Room Seminar

The records in this series are divided into two sections. The first consists of a few files relating to Professor Skilling’s appointment to the University of Toronto and his activities as an administrator and professor in the Centre for Russian and East European Studies and as professor emeritus. Included are appointment files (1959, 1979-1994); correspondence, notes, and memoranda on various administrative issues, lecture notes (1968-1973), and correspondence with graduate students and other researchers (1985-2001). The files are grouped by type.

The second section contains correspondence files relating to the seminar variously known as the Living Room Seminar, the Flying Seminar, and the Czech Seminar. This seminar, which Skilling described in his autobiography as “the most exciting and stimulating development in my life” in his last years, was conducted informally in his living room, beginning in 1996. Meetings were held every month or so, initially with graduate students in Toronto working on Czech(oslovak) history and politics, but later
including other interested parties, and usually with a guest-speaker on a Czech subject. The seminar continues to take place and is now known as the Skilling Seminar. The files are arranged chronologically and by author.

Photoprints of the retirement party for the secretary of the Department of Political Science are filed as /009P(18).

Family scrapbooks

This series contains three scrapbooks that were assembled by Gordon Skilling to document the history of his family.

The first, titled ‘Dad Skilling (W. W. Skilling) and his father, John Skilling’, documents the history of the family from 1828 until 1927. It includes poems,
correspondence, photographs, telegrams; birth, baptismal and citizenship certificates, and wills documenting the history of the family from the time William Watt Skilling’s grandfather left Leith in Scotland about 1828, through his move to London and, subsequently, the family’s emigration to Canada in 1907 and eventually to Toronto. It ends with correspondence and documents relating to deaths in 1917 of John Skilling and Gordon’s brother, Donald, killed in action at the age of 19, and subsequent correspondence relating to John’s estate.

The second and third scrapbooks were compiled later in life by Gordon Skilling as a memorial to Donald; they also contain material relating to his brother, William, who was seriously wounded in battle but recovered. The second scrapbook contains photographs of Donald’s childhood and youth, and as a member of the 81st Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force; letters and postcards home while training in England and later from France, along with a diary (1916), a copy of the CEF’s Regimental Songs, 1914-1915, press clippings and memorabilia. There are also some letters from William and, finally, telegrams and letters to family from military authorities on Donald’s death.

The third scrapbook contains letters to Donald from his brother, Will, and his comrades, the nurse, commanding officer and chaplain and official letters concerning his grave, personal affects and estate. There are also letters of sympathy from relatives and friends. There are also a number of photographs, including ones of the temporary marker at his gravesite at Aubigny and later photographs of the permanent marker during taken during a family visit in 1919.

Ephemera and artifacts

  • CA ON00389 F4-14
  • Series
  • [1957 - 1996], predominant 1980 - 1996
  • Part of Henri Nouwen fonds

Series consists of ephemera and artifacts collected by or given to Nouwen throughout his lifetime, including awards and honorary degrees, materials kept in his office and home, promotional materials, artwork, postcards, religious artifacts, and personal artifacts.

Series has been arranged in the following seven sub-series according to their function:
1.14.1. Awards and honourary degrees;
1.14.2. Contents of Nouwen's office;
1.14.3. Promotional material for lectures, workshops and special events;
1.14.4. Collected artwork;
1.14.5. Personal effects;
1.14.6. Postcards, cards and prints;
1.14.7. Religious artifacts.

Graphic material

Consists of graphic material, including photographs of Gill and some taken by him and photographs and postcards of European locations, art and architecture.

Photographs

University of Toronto. Senior Hockey Team. Practice. 1949-1950.
(l. to r.) N.D. Fox, T.C. Turcott, W.R. Moore

Personal and biographical

Series consists of biographical material documenting Prof. Thornton’s career and family. Included are personal documents such as birth and marriage certificates, letters of condolence and Prof. Thornton’s obituary, as well as his CV and bibliography. Also included is extensive family correspondence that covers genealogical research particularly related to military involvement. Portraits of Prof. Thornton and family, as well as one image of his honours class at University College of the West Indies are the additional graphic material that make up the series.

Graphic material

The photographs in this series document the personal and professional life of Professor Friedland. The series beings with eleven files of photographs relating to Professor Friedland and his family, including formal portraits of himself, and informal images of his parents, his wife and children, and other relatives. Other images document events at the Faculty of Law, including informal parties and reunions; honours (including awards and honorary degrees) bestowed upon Friedland and his colleagues in law and university administration; and photographs relating to some of his research projects, including the University of Toronto history project.

Correspondence

The correspondence files in this series are arranged alphabetically by author. They document Professor Friedland’s activities as a friend, as a student advisor and thesis supervisor, as a colleague assisting in honours bestowed on his peers, as an author, and as an authority on legal matters. They also document the increased leisure that came with official retirement.

The correspondence touches on many aspects of Dr. Friedland’s life, both personal and professional. It reveals his enormous network of contacts in legal and academic circles ranging from Lord Denning down to lowly law students. The letters cover a wide range of topics and issues, including some very topical ones such as international terrorism. Dr. Friedland received numerous requests for references from students and colleagues and, because he sat on the manuscript review committee of the University of Toronto Press, he was also asked to evaluate many manuscripts.

Some of the files contain commentary on legal issues on which Dr. Friedland was working. They may also hold drafts of articles forwarded by colleagues for commentary or presented a complementary copies [published copies have been removed, though the appropriate references have been retained], letters of congratulation and of reference. There is also correspondence regarding and programmes of conferences, and correspondence re and programmes for installation ceremonies. There are numerous invitations to dinners and other events and tributes on the deaths of friends and colleagues and notes on any of the above. Also present are greeting cards and several photographs.

Personal and family

This series consists of files documenting Professor Friedland’s personal and family activities. It begins with a number of files documenting Friedland’s activities as a student and professor of law at the University of Toronto, his post-retirement professional and other activities. There follow files relating to members of his family, arranged by name, which focus broadly on family affairs and more specifically on personal lives, including professional and social activities, achievements, births, weddings and deaths. These are followed by other files containing correspondence sent home from England, Europe and Israel, and relating to the Friedland residences on Hillsdale Avenue and Belsize Drive.

The files contain correspondence, appointment books, certificates, curriculum vitae, greeting cards, honours, notes, notices, legal documents such as passports and wills, medical reports, programmes, postcards, photographs, and press clippings (including obituaries).

Honours

The files in this series contain correspondence, addresses, certificates, programmes, and a photoprint relating to honours bestowed in Professor Friedland.

The honours described herein are: Queen’s Council (Canada), 1976; James Marshall Tory Dean’s Chair, Faculty of Law, University of Toronto, 1996; an LLD degree from Cambridge University (2000); and an honorary degree from the University of Toronto (2001).

Publication matters

Professor Friedland notes in his “Introduction” that this series “describes the process of publication and includes such issues as selecting pictures, working out the website for the notes, choosing a cover, plans for promotion of the book, preparing the index, and other matters connected with the publication of the book.”

Sub-series 5.3 is the largest by far and contains the correspondence and related files documenting the selection process for photographs. Sub-series 5.1 contains correspondence, documents, and memoranda relating to publication matters generally, readers’ reports, cover design, book orders, and events leading up to and the book launch itself. Sub-series 5.2, “endmatters”, is devoted primarily to issues relating to the bibliography and the index. Sub-series 5.4, “webnotes”, documents the issues and problems associated with putting all the footnotes on the Internet, the first time this was attempted by the publisher, the University of Toronto Press. Other files relating to webnotes may be found in Series 3, Sub-series 5.

Correspondence

The correspondents in this series number just under four hundred individuals, of whom sixty-two read and commented on the entire manuscript (these names are listed on page 723 of the 2002 hardcover edition). The correspondents include Professor Friedland’s research assistants, archivists in the University of Toronto Archives, officials and editors at the University of Toronto Press, other editors, writers and independent researchers with an interest in the University’s history, and members of the public that Professor Friedland met in the course of his research and his giving of talks about the history of the University. The majority of the correspondents are academics and administrative personnel at the University of Toronto and elsewhere who were asked for information or offered their expertise. Some of the correspondence is post-publication reaction to the book.

The research assistants (in addition to those listed in Series I), are Sara Burke, David Bronskill, Colin Grey, Graham Rawlinson and Katrina Wyman. Of the staff in the University of Toronto Archives, Harold Averill was seconded part-time to the project to direct the researchers to the appropriate sources in the University Archives, to offer his knowledge of the history of the University and to read the manuscript. Other correspondents from the Archives are Garron Wells (University Archivist), Marnee Gamble (special media archivist) and Loryl MacDonald (administrative records archivist). The University of Toronto Press, the publisher of the book, is represented by Val Cooke, Ani Deyirmenjian, Malgosia Halliop, Bill Harnum, Anne Laughlin,
Melissa Pitts, and Ron Schoeffel. Presidents (past and current) of the University represented are: Robert Birgeneau, Claude Bissell, George Connell, Robert Prichard, and David Strangway. Some of the academics and university administrators forwarded drafts of articles or excerpts from books they were writing, while others commented on the manuscript or portions thereof. Papers or lengthy memoranda and reports are present on a cross-section of activities, disciplines themes and individuals relating to the University including (with the names of the correspondents in brackets). They include the admission of women (Sara Burke), botanical gardens (John Court), chemistry (Susanne McClelland), Connaught Laboratories (George Connell), engineering (Richard White), fees policy (David Stager), gays and lesbians (David Rayside), Jacob Hirschfelder (Sheldon J. Godfrey), Margaret Eaton School (John Byl), history of medicine (Jacalyn Duffin), medicine (David Bronskill), No. 4 General Hospital at Salonika, Greece during World War I (Mary Louise Gaby), philosophy (John Slater), the proposed Wolfe’s University (D. V. Anderson), women (Katrina Wyman), and women in graduate studies (Natalie Zemon Davis).

In addition to letters, the files may contain articles, notes, memoranda, background documents and publications, and the occasional press clipping A few of the files contain historical items, dating back to 1887, that had belonged early graduates and were forwarded by their descendants, Professor Friedland’s correspondents. The detailed comments on the drafts of the book by the correspondents in this series may, for the most part, be found in Series 4.

Law school activities

The records in this series document Professor Friedland’s activities as a student, professor of law, and as an administrator in his capacity as dean of the Faculty of Law at the University of Toronto.

Personal

These boxes contain personal materials relating to my early years, my undergraduate years, various correspondence from and to family members and others, materials relating to the immediate family, files involving homes and other property that we owned, my income tax returns, other financial matters, and assorted other files.

There is relatively little material relating to my early years, including my high school years (files 3 and 4). I saved very little of that material. Similarly there is very little with respect to my University undergraduate years (files 5-16). There are no files relating to courses in Commerce and Finance (file 7). There are a few scattered things involving the university fraternity, the University College Literary and Athletic Society (UC “Lit”), U of T athletics, Hart House, and the Historical Club (files 6-13). A few postcards and letters and newspapers relate to the World University Service (WUS) trip to West Africa in the summer of 1955 and the many trips thumbing through the states while an undergraduate and law student (files 14 and 15). Material relating to my time at law school is contained in the “Law School” sub-series in Series 4.

I have included correspondence and other documents involving our children and the immediate family (files 17-27) and letters received from Judy’s and my folks while we were in Israel (files 28-30). Letters relating to our times in Cambridge are found in the boxes on Double Jeopardy and Law Reform (Series 5).

There are files relating to the purchase and sale of 169 Hillsdale, our first house, and the purchase and rentals while away of 77 Belsize Drive, our second house (files 31-38). There is also a file on the purchase and sale of property in Barrie, Ontario (file 39). I have not included at this time the material that I have on the purchase from Dean WPM Kennedy’s son, Frere, in 1983 of the Kennedy property in Kearney, Ontario, where our summer place is.

I have included a file relating to the estates of Ben and Sarah Garfield, Judy’s uncle and aunt, of which I was an executor (file 48). There are also other financial matters in the files, particularly my income tax returns for the years 1963-1992 (files 50 and 52-57).

Other miscellaneous files include records of the Public Lending Rights scheme (file 41), a Cambridge Boat Race Dinner speech that I gave in 1990 (file 42), some correspondence with Jewish groups (file 43), and various who’s who entries (file 40).

Photographs

Photographs document Frances Dale’s activities specifically at the University of Toronto, at the Ontario College of Education, her numerous trips abroad during the 1930s and her participation in several physical education schools. This series also contains one formal portrait of Frances Dale taken in 1968 as well as photographs of her sister Margaret and family.

Group portraits of various baseball and basketball teams document Dale’s involvement in athletics while a student at University College from 1927-1930. Other portraits show her as a member of the Classical Society, 3T0 Executive and the Queen’s Hall House Committee. Snapshots taken by Dale give informal views of residents of Queen’s Hall in 1927. There are a few photographs of physical education training at OCE and one panoramic portrait of staff and students for her graduating class 1930-31, as well as a similar panoramic of a 1946 guidance course.

Dale took numerous photographs of her trips to Europe in 1934, 1936, 1938, 1939 and 1940. There is also a scrapbook of her trip to England in 1934. Snapshots document her time at the English Scandinavian Summer School in Sturry, England in 1934 and 1936, her time at Andersskolen, Denmark in 1936, to Europe on the S.S.Normandie in 1938, at the Liverpool Physical Training College in 1939-40 and her participation at the Lingiad in Stockholm in July 1939. Most of the snapshots are identified on the reverse side. Notes usually mention the date, event and identify individuals in the photograph. Some photographs have related negatives. There are also two group photographs documenting her participation in the Canadian Girls in Training Camps in 1946 and 1952.

Dale/Ryckman family

This series contains an assortment of documents relating to the Dale and Ryckman families. It includes the diary of Margaret Dale of her trip to Europe in 1930 (see Series 1 above for correspondence), Fredericka Dale’s diary of her trip with her daughter, Frances , to Europe in 1934 (for Frances’ account see Sous Fonds 3, Series 1, marriage certificate for William Dale and Fredericka Ryckman, education diplomas and other memorabilia of Frederika Ryckman, testimonials for her sister Louise Ryckman, Victoria University Senate resolution on the death of her father, Rev. E. B. Ryckman in 1916 and correspondence between the Dale children for three years, 1923, 1924 and 1927. There are four portraits included in this series: one of Fredericka Ryckman Dale (1902), two of her father Rev. Dr. Edward B. Ryckman and one of her mother Emmaline Baird Ryckman (ca. 188-).

Photographs

Images consist mainly of portraits of William Dale including one from 1873 when he received his M.A. and several copies of an engraving done in 1920, one year before his death. There is also one group portrait of the General Committee of the University College, Literary and Scientific Society, 1868-1869.

Editorial cartoons

Series consists of Canadian editorial cartoons collected by Hershell Ezrin. Illustrators include Brian Gable, Andy Donato, and Patrick Corrigan. They cover various Ontario and federal political events such as 1995 referendum and former government aide Ms. Durcos’ comments regard President George Bush.

Photographs

Series contains photographs documenting both the personal and professional life of Hershell Ezrin. Included are family photographs covering Ezrin’s childhood, young adulthood, and images of his own family in the 1990’s. Also included are images from Ezrin’s time in government, including some from the constitutional negotiations of 1981.

Photographs

This series contains photographs documenting some of Peter Russell’s activities while participating mainly in academic and professional functions. Most are informal colour snapshots taken while at academic conferences and meetings, as well as in social situations with colleagues and students. Activities documented include trips to China, his class of students for POL 299Y, CBA meeting in Yellowknife and receiving awards and honorary degrees from University of Calgary and University of Toronto. Most photographs were either taken by or with Prof. Russell’s camera or sent to him by friends and colleagues. A small album of 17 photographs compiled by Prof. Russell documents his activities primarily in the 1980’s.

Articles, reviews, published addresses and referee comments

This series contains records documenting Prof. Russell’s extensive production of both published and unpublished works including articles, papers, reviews, informal talks and addresses. Published articles were produced primarily for scholarly journals and document his specialized knowledge on Canada’s Supreme Court, the Charter of Rights and Canadian constitution, aboriginal rights both in Canada and Australia, commentaries for national media such as the Toronto Star and Globe and Mail, and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.

Talks and addresses from accession B2005-0001 include his speeches on receiving honorary degrees at University of Guelph (1998) and University of Toronto (2001) as well as invited talks to private business such as the Canadian Club, Royal Trust, Toronto Club, as well as universities and other academic institutions in Canada and abroad.

Also included are his commentaries as referee for various manuscripts submitted by other writers for publication. Files contain predominantly drafts of manuscripts, notes, and correspondence, as well as photocopies of related materials.

Correspondence

This series contains professional and personal correspondence covering the years 1952-1990. Topics covered include administrative matters in the Department of Slavic Studies, issues relating more widely to slavic studies, and Professor Luckyj's writings, including correspondence with publishers. Interspersed with this correspondence are drafts of book reviews, articles, and memorials; notes, press clippings, and photoprints. Many of the letters are written in Ukrainian, and there are a few also in Russian and French.

Graphic material

Photographs of Gordon Patterson, director of the Institute of Aerospace Studies from 1949-1974; early images of building, equipment and staff of the Institute including a composite of the 1st graduating Ph.D. class in 1950.

Photoprints

Three black and white prints of Hartle standing in front of the sign for the Institute of Policy Analysis.

Research and writings

The records in this series pertain to J. M. S. Careless’ research and publishing activities. His research interests are broad, spanning political, urban, ethnic and intellectual history. His most seminal works, however, have concerned George Brown, the metropolitan model of national development, and urban history. Dr. Careless’ books include: Canada, A Story of Challenge (1953); Brown of the Globe (2 volumes 1959, 1963); Union of the Canadas (1967); Colonists and Canadians (1971); Rise of Cities in Canada (1978); Pre-Confederation Premiers (1980); Toronto to 1918 (1984); Frontier and Metropolis (1989); Careless at Work (1990); and ONTARIO: A Celebration of Our Heritage (1991). In addition, Dr. Careless has contributed hundreds of articles and reviews to various professional journals.

This series contains research notes, manuscripts, and correspondence related to these publications. Most of the records in this series have been arranged chronologically according to year rather than publication. Series also contains research notes for an uncompleted study of Canadian urban development. Also included are records concerning Brown of the Globe such as research notes, card files, and correspondence. Further, there are some original George Brown records such as personal letters to his wife, Anne Brown; political correspondence with Alexander Mackenzie and Lord Monk; and Reform Party political posters.

Also included are original artwork for the cover of Brown of the Globe, original photographs of George Brown and his family, as well as copies and original photographs for Toronto to 1918.

Series also includes all records in accession B2001-0020: Typescripts for various publications written by J.M.S. Careless including 'Canadian Heritage', 'Ontario Frontier and Metropolis', 'Toronto to 1918', and 'Brown of the Globe'.

Manuscripts and publications

Ms Winearls has published widely on maps and map librarianship, beginning in 1967. This series consists of book reviews, articles, directories, exhibition catalogues, and chapters in books. A file in this series may contain draft of a manuscript, along with notes, covering correspondence, and reviews. The arrangement is chronological by date of publication.

Very few of Ms Winearls publications are missing from this series. The files relating to the writing of her major bibliographic work, Mapping Upper Canada, 1780-1867, are in Series 9. Files relating to Editing Early and Historical Atlases are found with the Conference on Editorial Problems files in Series 4.

A poster advertising the book, Ontario’s History in Maps (1984), which contains a cartobibliographic essay by Ms Winearls, “Sources for early maps in Ontario,” has been removed from B1998-0013/002(21) to /002(29).

Research files – Other projects

The principal research project in this series is described by Ms Winearls as “The mapping of western North America in the 19th century with particular reference to the De Fonte fantasy and the earlier ‘Sea of the West’ fantasy”. (The maps showed purported water routes between the west coast
and the Northwest Passage or the central North American plains.) This project was begun in the early 1990s but not completed as planned and led to an article on one particular map, “Thomas Jefferys Map of Canada and the mapping of the western part of North America, 1750-1768’, that appeared in 1996. The second research project is on carto-bibliographic analysis and methodology re 18th century printed maps of North America [1].

The series begins with map bibliography & notes, consisting of preliminary bibliographic entries for Mer de l’Ouest/Riviere Longue de l’Ouest, and an early draft of a bibliography of maps relating to the De Fonte fantasy, followed by files of maps arranged by area: World, Arctic, Western hemisphere, North America, and Canada. There are also source files with notes, correspondence, and copies of documents, maps and other source material, covering De Fonte, early Canadian maps, and archival sources in British Columbia, the United States and Europe. Much of the photocopied material that has been retained is annotated. These files are followed by research notes and correspondence on Northwest-De Fonte and biographical sources, and on related maps, along with requests for microform and maps. Included are reproductive copies of maps and other copies.

The files for the research project on carto-bibliographic analysis and methodology re 18th century printed maps of North America include sample entries, copies of maps and published bibliographies and sources (largely annotated), along with bibliographical analyses and North American maps sources for analysis. Some oversized maps are included.

The series ends with Ms Winearls’ research on book illustration in Canada for the History of the Book in Canada project. Three volumes were planned under the general editorship of Patricia Lockhart Fleming and Yvan Lamonde, and they appeared between 2004 and 2007. Ms Winearls’ contribution was to the first volume. The files contain correspondence, contracts, notes, and source material. Drafts of the manuscript are in Series 8.

B2016-0009 contains research Ms Winearls did on Canadian bird artist J. Fenwick Lansdowne from 2000-2013. Included are original photographs of the artist, interviews, notes, compiled bibliography and exhibition list. There is also collected photocopies of ephemera relating to the artist, reviews of his works and exhibition catalogues. Finally, Winearls collected copies of correspondence and contracts between Lansdowne and his agent Bud Feheley (restricted to 2026).

NOTES

[1] The descriptive portion of this series is drawn largely from notes provided by Ms Winearls in a container list she provided to the compiler of this inventory.

Conferences and exhibitions

This series documents the conferences on map librarianship in which Ms Winearls participated, exhibitions she prepared, and publications arising from them. It begins with several files containing correspondence and research notes on cartography and the early lithography of maps in Canada that Ms Winearls compiled between 1973 and 1998, and many of her applications to attend the conferences. Then follow the conferences and exhibits, the arrangement for which is generally alphabetical, beginning with the Association of Canadian Map Librarians 1993 workshop on the cataloguing rare maps.

Next is a file on the formative years (1975-1978) of the Canadian Cartographic Association and its History of Cartography Interest Group. This group drew on the formation three years earlier of a working group on the history of cartography within the International Cartographic Association. Ms Winerals was the co-ordinator of the cartobibliography section of the ICA, which organized the 11th International Conference on the History of Cartography in Ottawa in 1985. The files on this conference contain correspondence, notes, programs, and the papers presented by some of the participants. Also included are files on the Working Group on Cartobibliography’s proposal to

publish as a manual Coolie Verner’s manuscript on carto-bibliography. There also files on the ICHC conferences in 1987, 1989, and 1991. This part of the series ends with a file from 1992 for a project on cataloguing maps. All of these files are in B1998-0012, boxes 012 and 013, files 01-04.

In 1984, in conjunction with the sesquicentennial celebrations of the City of Toronto, Ms Winerals was invited to be a guest curator for an exhibit at the Canadiana Gallery of the Royal Ontario Museum, “Mapping Toronto’s first century, 1787-1884.” The files [B1998-0013/013(05) – (13), /014(01) – (02)], trace the development of the exhibition and include drafts of the catalogue and photographs. There is also a diary [B1996-0021/003(05)] that she kept while planning the exhibition.

Ms Winearls began attending meeting of the Conference on Editorial Problems in 1991 as convenor of its 29th annual conference in 1993 that coincided with the publication of The Historical Atlas of Canada. The title of the conference was “Editing early and historical atlases”. In conjunction with the conference she mounted an exhibition, “The atlas as a book”, in the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library. She also edited a volume of selected conference papers that was published by the University of Toronto Press in 1995. Most of the files are in B1998-0013 but there is one in B2007-0015.

The Conference files contain minutes, correspondence, grant applications, editing notes, drafts of the papers published, and reviews. The exhibition files contain background notes, research files for each exhibition case, collations, and drafts of the catalogue.

Finally, Ms Winearls curated an exhibit in the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library called “Art on the Wing” in 1999. Records includes notes on cases, drafts and final copy of the catalogue as well her lecture. The Conference files contain minutes, correspondence, grant applications, editing notes, drafts of the papers published, and reviews. The exhibition files contain background notes, research files for each exhibition case, collations, and drafts of the catalog.

Biographical and personal

This series contains files with Joan Winearls' curriculum vitae and other information on professional activities, followed by several files of professional correspondence, including commentary on specific manuscripts. There are also files on her employment at the University of Toronto and her applications for research leave, on the Historical Atlas of Canada project, and relating to her consultative position with the Legislative Library of Ontario in 1983. The series concludes with several files on honours and awards bestowed on her.

Hart House Theatre

Marion Walker was Production Assistant at Hart House Theatre from 1946 to 1957. Under the directorship of Robert Gill, she designed sets and costumes for each of the Theatre’s annual four plays. Her first production was St. Joan, starring Charmian King. Other early performers who worked with Ms. Walker at Hart House Theatre included Kate Reid, Donald Sutherland, and William Hutt.

The records in this series pertain to Ms. Walker’s involvement with Hart House Theatre. Textual records include scripts 1946, annotated Hart House Theatre programmes 1946 – 1957, and obituaries for Robert Gill, 1974.

Series also includes approximately 100 photographs of various productions for which Ms. Walker designed costumes and sets. The photographs depict various scenes, actors and set designs. Productions represented are: Romeo and Juliet, 1947; Julius Caesar, 1948; the Seagull, 1948; The Skin of Our Teeth, 1948, The Doctor’s Dilemma, 1948; Crime and Punishment, 1949; Othello, 1949; Fortune My Foe, 1950; The Guardsman, 1950; Captain Brassbound’s Conversion, 1950; Medea, 1950; Henry IV, 1950; Marco Millions, 1950; Richard II, 1951; Pygmalion, 1951; The Madwoman of Chaillot, 1951; The Admirable Crichton, 1952; The Winslow Boy, 1952; Macbeth, 1952; The Wild Duck, 1953; The School for Wives, 1956; and The Innocent, 1957.

Series also contains 8 sketchbooks of costume designs for the following Hart House productions: The Internal Machine, 1946; Othello, 1949; Medea, 1950; Richard II, 1951; School for Wives, 1956; Hamlet, [n.d.]; and King Lear, [n.d.].

Correspondence

The letters at the beginning of this series (in accession B2013-0005) consist of Spencer’s letters home while on military training and active duty (1941-1946), beginning with letters sent from Canada (June 1941 – March 1943) and then from overseas (June 1943 – July 1946). Spencer began numbering his letters home on 28 February 1943 when he was about to be stationed at Camp Debert, Nova Scotia. Between then and 23 March 1945 he wrote at least 312 letters home; then started, but did not maintain, a new numbering system.

These are followed by various family letters, including some sent by Spencer (1943-1947), letters to and from third parties, letters to and from his parents between 1946 and 1950, and letters (1946-1948) between Robert and Ruth Church whom he married on 22 June 1948. Bob’s letters to Ruth were always mailed to the Office of the High Commissioner at Canada House where she worked. The family correspondence, which included some from Robert’s parents (his father, Charles Allan, died on 2 August 1972), his brothers (Colin and Wilson), and later his and Ruth’s children (Charles, Valerie, and Katherine) continues until 2010. From the mid-1990s, there are no letters from Ruth.

The arrangement in this section of correspondence is grouped by correspondents but is largely chronological. Fax paper has been photocopied and the original faxes have been destroyed.

The correspondence in accession B2010-0024 relates mostly to professional, not family, matters. It includes Professor Spencer’s ongoing correspondence and dealings with various government departments, embassies, consulates, international, national and local organizations other than the COTC and Atlantik-Brücke. For more information, also see Series 9, which includes information on Spencer’s extensive roster of speaking engagements, and Series 11, which documents his attendance at various conferences, seminars, roundtables and panel discussions. The arrangement for this section is alphabetical by organization.

Included with the letters are numerous postcards and a few photoprints.

Education

Robert Spencer received his elementary, high school, and undergraduate education in Montreal, at Kensington School, the High School of Montreal, and McGill University respectively. The files relating to these stages of Professor Spencer’s education contain correspondence, report cards and certificates, term papers, programmes for student dinners and graduation ceremonies, short stories, student newspapers and yearbooks, flyers and other material relating to student organizations, and social activities.
The basic arrangement is by the institutions that Professor Spencer attended, with some files on teacher training during and after his undergraduate years at McGill.

Professor Spencer was on military service in Europe from 1942 to 1946. Once back in Canada, he decided to undertake post-graduate work in history. C.P. Stacey, Director of the Historical Section of the General Staff at Canadian Military Headquarters in London, England, for which Spencer had been working since the beginning of 1946 under the direction of Eric Harrison, could not find funds to assist him. Harrison, who in civil life was a professor of history at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario, supported Spencer’s applications for scholarships; he was successful in getting the James C. Cumming Fellowship from Trinity College in the University of Toronto. From 1946 to 1950, he also received ‘university training” funds from the Department of Veterans Affairs. Spencer spent a year (1946-1947) at the U of T, studying under Professors Ralph Flenley and G.P. de T. Glazebrook and reading widely. His MA thesis, “History of the Fifteenth Canadian Field Regiment, Royal Canadian Artillery, 1941-1945”, was essentially the study he had written while with the Canadian Forces in the Netherlands in 1945; 1,000 copies of which had been printed by Elsevier in Amsterdam.

Following his graduation from the University of Toronto, Spencer applied to study modern history at Oxford University and was accepted by St. John’s College. He received funding from McGill University (Moyse Travelling Fellowship worth $350), the Imperial Order of the Daughters of the Empire (Overseas Scholarship, $800), and part (₤30) of a scholarship from the British Council. In September, 1947 he sailed on the Queen Mary to Southampton. He studied under W. Norton Medlicott and A.J.P. Taylor, receiving his B.Litt in 1950. He was then accepted to do a Doctor of Philosophy.

The files relating to his graduate studies contain correspondence, official documents, essays, programmes, flyers, press clippings, booklets relating to Oxford, St. John’s College, and the Bodleian Library, greeting cards and other souvenirs of his time at Oxford.

Canada. Canadian Officers' Training Corps, University of Toronto Contingent

This series consists of the financial and administrative records of the Board of Trustees, including photographs of special events. It also includes documentation of a project to publish the history of the COTC that was never completed. Spencer subsequently wrote his own history of the COTC, the notes and correspondence of which are included under Series 10: Publications.

Personal and biographical

This series contains material relating to Professor Spencer’s birth, childhood and later birthdays; childhood stories, plays, and poems; reunions and other post-graduate activities at McGill University and the University of Oxford; honours received; and files relating to the residences that he had owned. Also present are copies of his curriculum vitae, security documents regarding the Department of External Affairs, and material reflecting his long association with the Canadian military in the form of Remembrance Day ceremonies and VE-Day and other celebrations related to World War II.

Travel

This series documents Professor Spencer’s travels, both for pleasure and for academic and other professional purposes. The first of his trips documented here is to New York City in 1946; the last is to Europe in 2011.

The files contain an assortment of flight information, correspondence, itineraries, invitations, notes, postcards, diaries and reports (indicated below where they exist), programmes for a wide variety of events, menus, tickets, passenger lists, booklets, maps, photographs, press clippings, and other memorabilia. The arrangement is chronological by trip. Beginning in April, 1977 and continuing while he was director until his retirement in 1986, a lot of Professor Spencer’s travel was done as an extension of the work of the Centre for International Studies. For the first of these trips, he wrote a detailed report of his activities. The often extensive correspondence in these files ranges from that with Canadian government, consular, and military officials to military officials at NATO and elsewhere in Europe and England, to academic and government personnel in Western Europe. Included are files on Professor Spencer’s involvement with the Atlantic Council of Canada, the Committee on Atlantic Studies, and the Canadian Studies Association.

Some of the folders in this series contain correspondence, postcards, reports, and other items that are well outside the dates of the activities being described.

The photoprints, postcards, and artifacts (pin buttons) have been retained in the relevant files. Files containing receipts only (such as transportation, car rentals, luggage, and accommodation) were not kept and the retention of such material in other files is selective. Fax paper, where present, has been photocopied and the original faxes, most of which had deteriorated badly, have been destroyed.

Additional information about some of these trips can be found in Series 7: Correspondence.

Manuscripts

Series consists of draft manuscripts and typescripts of more than 150 books and articles, forewords and introductions, sermons, and talks by Henri Nouwen. The date range of the materials is from 1956 to 1996. The series contains drafts of 49 of his articles and drafts of 41 books (Nouwen published over 300 articles and 39 books in his lifetime). In addition to handwritten drafts or typescripts some files may also include loose notes (usually background reading notes), galley and print proofs, administrative papers, correspondence regarding the materials, and photographs and artwork used in the process of publication.

The materials in the Series reflect Nouwen’s general writing process: for the most part he hand-wrote his works on foolscap or in hard-back journals, often he created reading notes pertaining to the subject he was writing on, drafts were typed by an administrative assistant and then circulated to friends and other readers for comment. He saved all of the drafts, often incorporating the notes made by himself and other readers, in order to create one final work.

Common themes present in the drafts include: spirituality, love, God, psychology, theology, relationships, prayer, ministry, and Christian life. Nouwen often reflected on his own spiritual journey and experiences in his works in journal form. This writing was often deeply personal and it is for this reason that some of the manuscripts and drafts are restricted from use, including Man at the Watershed, A Spiritual Journey, Taken, Blessed, Broken, Given (parts of which were published in Life of the Beloved), The Inner Voice of Love, Adam, and Sabbatical Journey.

With exception of the sermons, most material has been published. Eight transcripts have been identified as unpublished, including a book on Anton T. Boisen based on Nouwen’s doctoral thesis, a draft of a work about Nouwen’s friend Richard Alan White, and notes for a book Nouwen began in 1991 regarding the trapeze and the spiritual life as well as some of the restricted material listed above. See file descriptions for more information on each work.

The series has been arranged into two sub-series:

    1. Books and articles
    1. Talks and sermons

Each of these sub-series has sub-sub-series, files, and items. They have been arranged chronologically.

Teaching materials

  • CA ON00389 F4-7
  • Series
  • 1966 - 1985, 1994; predominant 1971 - 1981
  • Part of Henri Nouwen fonds

Series consists of materials created by Nouwen for use in his capacity as a professor and instructor. These materials include notes for lectures, reading notes, class lists, handouts for students, class schedules, course evaluations, audio recordings of lectures, and records related to the administration of courses.

Series has been divided into two sub-series:

1.7.1. Course handouts, lecture, reading and students notes (1966 - 1994, predominant 1972 - 1981). This sub-series also includes 14 audio recordings of Nouwen's lectures and 357 art slides which he used in his lectures on Van Gogh.
1.7.2. Administrative records (1966 - 1994, predominant 1983-1985)

Further details can be found on the sub-series description level.

Bible Project

Series consists of records relating to the Bible project of Peter Brieger and Jürgen Paul. The original idea of the project was to compile a complete collection of photographs of French and English illustrated Bibles produced between the end of the eleventh century and around the year 1270, with a focus on the iconography of their illustrations. The project likely began in the late 1950s. In 1965, Dr. Brieger met Dr. Jürgen Paul, who moved to Toronto, from Germany, in 1967 to help Dr. Brieger finish the book.

Dr. Paul helped define the focus of the book, from a multi-volume corpus of all illustrations, to a study of “questions of iconography, the variety and development in the choice of subjects for illustrating the biblical books, and to concentrate on the Old Testament. It was to be demonstrated how over the period of the two centuries changes in subjects of illustration selected were influenced by changes in Christian theological exegesis of the Old Testament.” [1] The pair worked together in an office in Sydney Smith Hall during the winter and spring of 1967/68.

The pair later organized trips to several repositories to examine manuscripts. As Dr. Paul writes, “I had already realized that the material of French and English illustrated Bible manuscripts was still incomplete. Therefore, during the summer of 1968 we, together with Mrs. Brieger, spent several weeks in England checking the college libraries in Oxford and Cambridge. It turned out that in both universities large numbers of most interesting Bible manuscripts existed that were not even registered. No catalogues existed. After the stay in England we went by car through France checking the manuscript collections in Paris and provincial libraries between Avranches and Dijon. After that, we went to Italy checking the manuscripts in the Vatican library and in Laurenziana in Florence.”

When Dr. Brieger’s health began to fail, Dr. Paul continued the project, to a lesser degree, with Ann Hilty. The project was never published.


[1] From an account written by Dr. Paul. The full account can be found in the case file for B2016-0007.

Photographs

Series consists of colour and black and white photographs (including negatives) accumulated by Nouwen, and colour slides taken by him and others. Photographs not taken by Nouwen were gathered mainly from friends and acquaintances through correspondence, over a period of approximately 30 years. The photographs were stored by Nouwen and his administrative assistant(s) in files, or displayed on one of several large bulletin boards Nouwen used in his office and photograph albums compiled. Some photographs that arrived with correspondence were kept in the General Files series with their letter of origin, while others which were not clearly attached to a letter were separated and added to this series.

Subject matter depicted in the photographs include professional portraits of Nouwen; Nouwen in both his professional and private capacities at: the Yale and Harvard Divinity Schools, and at L'Arche Daybreak (leading church services, at birthdays and Christmas celebrations), religious events (baptisms, first communions, ordinations and weddings); as well as his travels to Peru and Bolivia, the United States, France, and other countries; and with his family in the Netherlands both as a child and as an adult. Photographs also depict Nouwen's friends, their families, and L'Arche Daybreak assistants and core members. In addition, a large number of photographs in this series (approximately one fifth), document Nouwen's time spent in Germany with a flying trapeze troupe, The Flying Rodleighs.

Slides were taken by Nouwen of Martin Luther King, Jr’s civil rights march from Selma to Montgomery, AL, in March 1965; of the University of Notre Dame; vacations, including a trip to Greece; and of Nouwen with Rodleigh Stevens of The Flying Rodleighs in 1995.

This series is arranged in three sub-series:

1.15.1. Photographs Accumulated by Henri Nouwen
1.15.2. Early Personal Photographs
1.15.3. Photograph Albums

The series include both file- and item-level descriptions. Photographs and slides are arranged in chronological order where possible.

Slides and pictures

Box 002P: Canadian History Slide collection: 12 double-trays of slides containing 1,216 black-and-white and colour illustrations relating to the widest possible number of subjects in Canadian history. Printed list of the contents. [includes double tray of slides (#501-600) removed from box 012 – note by Harold Averill].

Box 003P: Smallpox slide collection: Two double-trays containing 93 slides of illustrations relating to the Montreal smallpox epidemic of 1885; compiled to illustrate Plague: A Story of Smallpox in Montreal. Printed list of slides. (Some, but not all of these slides were made from prints in the folder in Box 24)

Prints, negatives, relating to themes in Canadian business history – and general history. 3 folders, approx 300 pictures. Most of these were accumulated as possible illustrations for Northern Enterprise: Five Centuries of Canadian Business; most came from collections I had access to as described above. Some of the best of the prints were made into slides, as above; but not all.

Accession B1989-0046

Consists of biographical files, mementoes, addresses, manuscripts and publications (1950-1988), curricula and lecture notes in epidemiology (1960's to 1976), lecture notes in public health sanitation, international health, and School of Hygiene documenting Prof. le Riche's career in epidemiology in the School of Hygiene and its successor departments. Includes photoprints.

Photographs

Photographs document the personal and professional life of Dr. W. Harding le Riche including his time as an epidemiologist in South Africa and in Canada at the University of Toronto. There are early images of le Riche and Grant ancestors, as well as the le Riche family in Pretoria. There are some early photos of the skeleton dig at the Sterkfontein caves in 1936. Portraits and snapshots cover Le Riche’s time as a student at University of Witwatersrand and at Harvard University. Many snapshots document his arrival in Canada and his family’s early years in their adopted country.

Photographs, both amateur and professional document his professional life including attending conferences making speeches and receiving awards. Events at the University are also documented including celebrations around the 50th anniversary of the discovery of insulin in 1971 and general photos of the students and faculty of the School of Hygiene (1960-70s).

Finally, le Riche had a collection of portraits of well know scientists in the public health field who would most likely have been his peers or pioneers in this field of medicine.

Addresses, manuscripts and publications

At convocations, seminars and conferences, Professor Harris spoke on topics relating to university affairs and the study of higher education. This series contains original and copies of his addresses, lectures, notes, and papers that he presented at academic events as well as undated typescripts, correspondence, manuscripts. His research material for the Graduate Studies Lecture Series contain information relating to prominent academic staff, namely, J.C. McLennan, J.P. MacMurrich, A.B. Macallum, Andrew Hunter, Harold Innis, George Sidney Brett and Andrew Gordon.

Articles and reviews written by Professor Harris, programmes of events he attended, and sample invitation cards issued by him as Principal of Innis College form part of a scrapbook, which also has an original photo of Professor Harris with unidentified group.

Lectures

This series consists of lecture files used by Harris for teaching mainly undergraduate English courses. There is a file for Course 316 on Higher Education taught in the mid 1960s. Among the files on a course of History and theory of English Studies (1984) is a manuscript of paper entitled “The role of English in general education 1890-1950” written by Harris while as a Ph.D. student in 1951 at the University of Michigan.(B2002-0003/002(09) Files contain hand written and typed notes, some outlines to lectures, clippings and essays related to the lecture topic. These files more than likely began as notes Harris took while a student of English at the University of Toronto during the 1940s and formed the basis of his early lectures. Overtime Harris added to the files and they clearly became his teaching lectures.
Lectures relating to period literature are filed first (19th century poetry, 20th century prose), followed by types of literature (i.e. poetry, tragedies, the novel, the theatre) and finally followed by files on individual authors arranged alphabetically.

Of a more ambiguous nature are files on philosophy, which may or may not have been used for teaching. They are filed after the English Literature files and are followed by the one file on a course in Higher Education mentioned above.

Also includes slides used to illustrate a lecture on the past deans of the School of Graduate Studies, given at the University of Toronto on November 18, 1986; copy of text in case file.

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