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Electric Reduction Company of Canada Ltd.

From de Havilland, Dr. Solandt moved on to the position of Vice-Chair of the Electric Reduction Company of Canada (later ERCO), a subsidiary of Allbright & Wilson Ltd. of England, which he held from 1965 until 31 December, 1970.

This series contains correspondence, press clippings, articles, minutes, memoranda, reports, and photoprints.

Wilderness Research Foundation

During the late 1980s the future of the Quetico-Superior Wilderness Research Center at Mukluk Bay, Minnesota was very much in question. The Wilderness Research Foundation, which sponsored it, was assessing its future at a time when its founder was withdrawing from active participation prior to his death in December, 1988. Dr. Solandt was initially a member of the Advisory Committee to the Board of the Foundation and later a member of the Board. He pressed for the continuation of wilderness research at Mukluk Bay and left the Board in 1991 only when he felt that this would be achieved.

The correspondence, minutes, memoranda and reports written by Dr. Solandt and others, along with articles and institutional reports, clearly document the relationship between the Foundation and the Center, the work done by the latter, the problems it faced, and the policies that were developed in an attempt to save it.

Canada/Newfoundland Royal Commission on the Ocean Ranger Marine Disaster

When the Ocean Ranger oil rig tipped over in the Atlantic on 15 April, 1982, it set in motion an inquiry which involved two royal commissions, one federal and the other provincial (Newfoundland) which, due to a public outcry, were forced to amalgamate. David Grenville, secretary of the Commission, drew on advice from Dr. Solandt for the second volume of the report, which addressed safety on the oil rigs. An important part of this exercise was the convening of a conference in St. John

Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical/International Centre for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT)

The Centro Internactional de Agricultura Tropical was founded by the Rockefeller Institute in 1967 in Cali, Columbia. In 1982 a massive fraud was discovered within the organization, with the result that the World Bank in 1984 retained Omond Solandt to conduct a management review of the Centre.

The files in this series provide a good picture of the conduct of the External Management Review and of its results. Included are the Review Team

West African Rice Development Association (WARDA)

The initial aim of WARDA was to have an entirely native West African organization that would apply the latest in rice technology to the problems peculiar to their area, but political interference meant that WARDA never functioned effectively. By the end of 1986, with CGIAR having resolved to continue its support of the organization, Omond Solandt was asked to coach those involved in it on how to operate within a CG style of centre. In 1987 he made three trips to Africa and, while there and in subsequent meetings, worked to ensure that an effective structure and Board were put in place. His official involvement with WARDA ended about August, 1987.

The correspondence, minutes, background papers, reports, photographs and publications provide detailed information about the problems WARDA faced and the problems Solandt and others encountered in resolving them.

Research files (general)

This series consists of the general files that Mr. Grenville assembled in his attempt to write Dr. Solandt’s story. It begins with a variety of biographical information on Dr. Solandt, including curriculum vitae, tributes and obituaries, his memorial service, press clippings, and an article about him. This is followed by grant applications, a project outline, correspondence, and files on sources, family history, and Dr. Solandt’s activities (including summaries of diaries), arranged alphabetically. The principal areas of activity covered are the atomic bomb/nuclear weapons, Canadian National Railway, Defence Research Board, forestry, medical research, operational research, the Science Council of Canada, and ‘voyaguers’. The photographs associated with some of the files have been removed and stored separately.

Interviews

This series begins with two interviews that were not recorded by Mr. Grenville but were collected by him as a part of his research. The first, “Ten minutes with O. M. Solandt", was a CBC television production recorded on 13 December 1961 when he was vice-president of research and development for Canadian National Railways, and broadcast on 3 April 1962. The second, with interviewer Robert F. Legg, is undated but was recorded when Dr. Solandt was chancellor of the University of Toronto (1965-1971), is described as “his personal reactions…to the situation he finds himself involved both as a Director of a commercial corporation [Electric Reduction Company of Canada]..., also as Chancellor of the University of Toronto and also as Chairman of the National Science Council [sic, Science Council of Canada]…”

A central part of Mr. Grenville’s research on Dr. Solandt was the series of interviews (66 cassette tapes) that he conducted in 1985, 1986 and 1990, including nine with Dr. Solandt. The others were with people who had known him well and/or worked with him at various stages in his long professional life. Accompanying these interviews are two notebooks which contain dated entries on his research activities. There are notes on contacts and sources, brief biographical notes about the interviewees along with detailed notes on Mr. Grenville’s interviews with Dr. Solandt and shorter notes on other interviews. There are also tape summaries prepared by Jason Ridler for each of the interviews. The latter were compiled as a condition of Mr. Grenville’s loaning his material to Mr. Ridler for use in his doctoral thesis on Dr. Solandt. The summaries vary in the amount of detail but provide a very useful guide to the interviews. A cautionary note to researchers is that they contain numerous typos, mostly as a result of Mr. Ridler having a limited amount of time to make the summaries and not having a list of names to compare spellings against, many of whom he was unfamiliar with.

Of all the interviewees, Laurie Chute probably knew Dr. Solandt best, certainly the longest. He was a boyhood friend, fellow student (along with his wife, Helen Reid) and, during World War II, was with the Physiological Research Laboratory at Lulworth in Dorset, England, and, from 1943, commanded the No. 1 Canadian Medical Research Laboratory where he specialized in the medical hazards of tank warfare. He was dean of medicine at the University of Toronto (1966-1973) during much of the time Dr. Solandt was chancellor. Another fellow medical student was Reginald Haist who became a professor of physiology at the U of T. All three had interesting observations on Dr. Solandt’s formative years, including his relationship with Charlie Best. Barbara Griffin, the widow of his brother Donald, provided detailed information about the Solandt family generally and the relationship between the brothers in particular.

Charles Crawley; Anne Ellis Lewis whose husband ‘Tel’ had worked with Dr. Solandt, Wilhelm Feldberg, and Lancelot Fleming, were all Trinity Hall, Cambridge friends and interviewed for their recollections of him while at Trinity and in England generally. Maggie and Patrick Mollison reminisced about their work with him at the South West Blood Supply Depot at Sutton, Surrey. Donald Kaye, George Lindsey, Tony Sargeaunt, Ronnie Shephard, and Ted Treadwell all provided information on their work when Dr. Solandt was director of the Medical Research Council’s Physiological Laboratory at the Armoured Fighting Vehicle School at Lulworth (1941-1942) and subsequently with the Army Operational Research Group there and elsewhere (1942-1945).

Dr. Solandt’s years at the Defence Research Board (1947-1956) were thoroughly reviewed in the interviews with Alec Fordyce, Geoffrey Hatterley-Smith, George Lindsey, Archie Pennie, and Elliot Rodger, and Graham Rowley. His years with the Canadian National Railways (1956-1963) were covered by Herb Bailey, at deHavilland (1963-1966) by Philip Lapp, at the Electric Reduction Company of Canada (1963-1970) by Lloyd Lillico, and science policy generally and Dr. Solandt’s years as founding chair of the Science Council of Canada (1966-1972) by James Mullin. In November 1967 Dr. Solandt accompanied the National Science Foundation (USA) expedition to Antarctica and the South Pole. Raymond Aidie, a geologist from South Africa and an expert on Antarctica, was interviewed about this trip. One of Dr. Solandt’s passions was the Canadian wilderness. Dennis Coolican, president of the Canadian Bank Note Company, and Elliot Rodger were two of the ‘voyageurs’ who made numerous canoe trips with him; both were on the famous 1955 Churchill River trip.

Solandt Symposium

The Solandt Symposium on Organizing and Managing the Practical Application of Science to Problems in War and Peace was held in Kingston, Ontario from 8-10 May 1994. Its purpose was to honour and celebrate Dr. Solandt and his achievements relating to various aspects of science and technology and, in particular, operational research.

The files contain correspondence and notes regarding various aspects of organizing the conference, along with minutes of the organizing committee; budget and funding information; files on participants, session chairs and speakers; the programme; files relating to the publication and distribution of the proceedings, and a copy of the published proceedings, Perspectives in science and technology: the legacy of Omond Solandt.

Articles and Papers

This series contains research notes and data, drafts and final versions of some of MacIntosh’s articles and papers. Not all of these papers were published – many were written to present at various talks, or to document various medical procedures which MacIntosh was working on. Some of the records in this series appear to be papers that MacIntosh started and never completed, or that led to different papers all together. The series also contains several papers that MacIntosh either co-wrote, or helped to edit.

Hospital Employment

This series is comprised of most of MacIntosh’s records dealing with his employment and involvement at several hospitals, including Sunnybrook Hospital, Toronto General Hospital, Mount Sinai Hospital, and The Riverdale Hospital. The series also contains material MacIntosh accumulated while serving on hospital boards and committees, as well as employment information detailing MacIntosh’s work with the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Medicine, and information on work MacIntosh completed for the Worker’s Compensation Board.

Medical Practice Administration

This series contains records from MacIntosh’s medical practice. The series includes MacIntosh’s day planners and appointment books, account books, office income and expenses information, telephone message books, and his patient Simplex System, which helped MacIntosh keep track of patient appointments and payment information. The series also contains some records dealing with office space rentals, and some correspondence with various prosthesis manufacturers regarding the use of their projects within the clinic.

Patient files

This series contains a selection of MacIntosh’s patient files from several medical practices – the Toronto General Hospital, the Princess Margaret Hospital, Sunnybrook Hospital and the Hart House Clinic for student athletes at the University of Toronto. Included in this series are patient files for MacIntosh’s own practice at the University of Toronto’s Medical Arts Building as well as patient files and case information for the many litigations and Workers Compensation Board/Workplace Safety Insurance Board cases for which MacIntosh served as an expert medical consultant. Lastly, included in this series are a set of patient files from Drs. Allan Gross and John C. Cameron, two younger doctors who worked in the orthopedic field with MacIntosh.

Most of the files in this series contain patient intake information, background medical charts, diagnoses, treatment plans and follow-up reports. Occasionally, the patient files will include photographs and x-rays. The series is arranged in order to reflect how MacIntosh kept his patient files under several different systems. MacIntosh arranged some of his patient files based on the injury or affliction facing the patient. Other files were arranged alphabetically, and many were arranged using a numbered system. The patient files belonging to patients seen at the Hart House Clinic were also kept separately by MacIntosh.

The series also includes several different sets of patient indices, which are presumably index cards for every patient MacIntosh treated. Most of the indices are alphabetical or chronological, however there are several miscellaneous or misfiled boxes are patient index cards.

Education

Robert Spencer received his elementary, high school, and undergraduate education in Montreal, at Kensington School, the High School of Montreal, and McGill University respectively. The files relating to these stages of Professor Spencer’s education contain correspondence, report cards and certificates, term papers, programmes for student dinners and graduation ceremonies, short stories, student newspapers and yearbooks, flyers and other material relating to student organizations, and social activities.
The basic arrangement is by the institutions that Professor Spencer attended, with some files on teacher training during and after his undergraduate years at McGill.

Professor Spencer was on military service in Europe from 1942 to 1946. Once back in Canada, he decided to undertake post-graduate work in history. C.P. Stacey, Director of the Historical Section of the General Staff at Canadian Military Headquarters in London, England, for which Spencer had been working since the beginning of 1946 under the direction of Eric Harrison, could not find funds to assist him. Harrison, who in civil life was a professor of history at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario, supported Spencer’s applications for scholarships; he was successful in getting the James C. Cumming Fellowship from Trinity College in the University of Toronto. From 1946 to 1950, he also received ‘university training” funds from the Department of Veterans Affairs. Spencer spent a year (1946-1947) at the U of T, studying under Professors Ralph Flenley and G.P. de T. Glazebrook and reading widely. His MA thesis, “History of the Fifteenth Canadian Field Regiment, Royal Canadian Artillery, 1941-1945”, was essentially the study he had written while with the Canadian Forces in the Netherlands in 1945; 1,000 copies of which had been printed by Elsevier in Amsterdam.

Following his graduation from the University of Toronto, Spencer applied to study modern history at Oxford University and was accepted by St. John’s College. He received funding from McGill University (Moyse Travelling Fellowship worth $350), the Imperial Order of the Daughters of the Empire (Overseas Scholarship, $800), and part (₤30) of a scholarship from the British Council. In September, 1947 he sailed on the Queen Mary to Southampton. He studied under W. Norton Medlicott and A.J.P. Taylor, receiving his B.Litt in 1950. He was then accepted to do a Doctor of Philosophy.

The files relating to his graduate studies contain correspondence, official documents, essays, programmes, flyers, press clippings, booklets relating to Oxford, St. John’s College, and the Bodleian Library, greeting cards and other souvenirs of his time at Oxford.

Radio and television

This series contains the texts of Spencer’s CBC radio broadcasts from Canada and Germany, his radio documentaries and his television performances, and the related correspondence. Also included are files of correspondence and notes re television appearances on CTV’s “Canada AM” program and on radio stations in Toronto, Ottawa, and Vancouver (1983-1991).

Conferences, seminars, roundtables

This series consists of files on conferences, seminars, roundtables, and panel discussions that Robert Spencer attended, was due to attend but had to cancel, or participated in, but at which did not give formal presentations. See Series 13 for documents relating to his formal addresses, talks and speeches.

Notebooks and notes

Series consists of various notes and notebooks kept by Dr. Brieger, containing research notes, course notes, travel information, sketches, and other information. Many date from his time in Germany in the early 1930s.

Lectures

Series consists of typed and hand written lecture notes on various topics in art history, especially medieval and Baroque art. See file listing for more details.

Writing

Series consists of manuscripts, drafts and offprints of writing by Dr. Brieger. See file listing for titles.

Work by others

Series consists of offprints, manuscripts, and other copies of works by other authors, including limited student work and exams from the 1960s.

Bible Project

Series consists of records relating to the Bible project of Peter Brieger and Jürgen Paul. The original idea of the project was to compile a complete collection of photographs of French and English illustrated Bibles produced between the end of the eleventh century and around the year 1270, with a focus on the iconography of their illustrations. The project likely began in the late 1950s. In 1965, Dr. Brieger met Dr. Jürgen Paul, who moved to Toronto, from Germany, in 1967 to help Dr. Brieger finish the book.

Dr. Paul helped define the focus of the book, from a multi-volume corpus of all illustrations, to a study of “questions of iconography, the variety and development in the choice of subjects for illustrating the biblical books, and to concentrate on the Old Testament. It was to be demonstrated how over the period of the two centuries changes in subjects of illustration selected were influenced by changes in Christian theological exegesis of the Old Testament.” [1] The pair worked together in an office in Sydney Smith Hall during the winter and spring of 1967/68.

The pair later organized trips to several repositories to examine manuscripts. As Dr. Paul writes, “I had already realized that the material of French and English illustrated Bible manuscripts was still incomplete. Therefore, during the summer of 1968 we, together with Mrs. Brieger, spent several weeks in England checking the college libraries in Oxford and Cambridge. It turned out that in both universities large numbers of most interesting Bible manuscripts existed that were not even registered. No catalogues existed. After the stay in England we went by car through France checking the manuscript collections in Paris and provincial libraries between Avranches and Dijon. After that, we went to Italy checking the manuscripts in the Vatican library and in Laurenziana in Florence.”

When Dr. Brieger’s health began to fail, Dr. Paul continued the project, to a lesser degree, with Ann Hilty. The project was never published.


[1] From an account written by Dr. Paul. The full account can be found in the case file for B2016-0007.

Personal and biographical

This small series consists of biographical information, including copies of Professor Munro’s curriculum vitae, the family scholarship he created at the University of British Columbia, and most of his activity and appointment calendars from 1981 to 2012. Some of the entries on the last were made by him and others by his wife, Jeanette.

Correspondence

This is an extensive series of correspondence with friends, colleagues, students and former students, editors and other individuals documenting his many writing, publishing, teaching and research activities. Includes correspondence with his mentor and thesis advisor, Prof. Robert S. Lopez of Yale University as well as early correspondence relating to his employment at UBC and subsequent move to the University of Toronto (1962-1968) (Box013). The alphabetical files contain correspondence with and about individuals as well as organizations. Letters of reference with colleagues and friends relate mainly to employment applications or grant applications and are filed separately from those relating to students. Files relating to students contain information on evaluation of progress on dissertation, dissertation defence and some letters of reference for teaching appointments.

University of Toronto

This series contains files relating to Prof. Munro’s administrative and academic activities in the Department of Political Economy, Department of Economics, and the Centre for Medieval Studies. Such files include among others, files on PhD comprehensive examinations (with copies from Yale University), and the Graduate programme in Economics. Also included in this series are Prof. Munro’s annual activity reports submitted to the Chair of the Department. Prof. Munro also undertook appointments to other university bodies such Users’ Committee of the Robarts Library (1974-1977), the U. of T. Research Board, Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology, and various search committees. Files relating to these activities contain correspondence, minutes of meetings, reports, and notes.

Other Activities

This series contains files relating to Prof. Munro’s activities in conferences, associations, and other external organizations. Some files, therefore, may relate to individuals and organizations documented in Series 3: Correspondence. The files contain correspondence, some manuscripts of papers or presentations, minutes of meetings, notes and reports.

Teaching

This series documents Prof. Munro’s teaching activities as they relate to courses delivered to undergraduate and graduate students during his first teaching appointment at University of British Columbia (1964-1968) and at the University of Toronto (1968- 2013). The University of British Columbia courses include History 304, “Economic and social history of the Middle Ages”; Economics 320, “Economic development of Modern Europe”; and History 416, “France in the Middle Ages”. The UBC files include course outlines, essay topics, examinations and typescripts of lectures.

Files for University of Toronto courses are understandably more extensive and include course outlines, reading lists, examination questions, typescripts of lectures, and overheads (for two courses offered after 1995).

The overheads apply to ECO 301Y and 303Y. ECO 301Y, “The economic history of Late-Medieval and Early-Modern Europe, 1300-1750”, was offered from September, 2004. It was the same as ECO 201Y, but given at the third year with corresponding prerequisites (ECO 200Y/206Y and seven other courses). ECO 303Y, “The economic history of Modern Europe, 1750-1914”, was given from January, 1995 as a revised version of the former ECO 203Y, with corresponding pre-requisites (ECO 200Y/206Y plus seven other courses).

Biographical and personal

This series contains passports, daily agendas (58 volumes) and an address book, as well as files relating to the Banff School of Fine Arts, Professor Peers’ academic life, awards that he received and books that he wrote. Also included are a class photograph of the East Coulee School where Peers taught and was principal from 1939-1942, personal correspondence, photographs of Peers with friends, travel documents and records relating to his 90th birthday and the memorial service held upon his death. The series concludes with a file of records relating to David Rayside, a U of T professor and close friend of Peers.

The “biographical information” file [/003(04)] contains, amongst many other items, several pieces that Professor Peers himself penned between 1980 and 2002 about his family and background and his years as a high school teacher. Included with this is a CD from one of his nieces, Bev Swanton, titled “Acadia Valley Homecoming 2012”, that celebrates the hamlet, the surrounding farms (including that of the Peers family) and includes the centennial parade.

University of Toronto

This series contains records relating to Professor Peers’ activities as a professor and professor emeritus, as an alumnus, and as a very generous donor to the University of Toronto and also to Queen’s University. Included is general information about his retirement, correspondence and related material regarding the Department of Political Science. There are also extensive files of correspondence, donor agreements, endowment reports, and other material regarding scholarships and fellowships that he funded in the Department of Political Science and elsewhere, and a file on the purchase of and later transfer to the University of Toronto of his condominium at 190 St. George St.

Manuscripts and publications

This series consists of Professor Helleiner’s numerous publications and unpublished manuscripts spanning his career during the 1920s and 30s as an archivist in St. Pölten, Austria, and throughout the over 30 years he was an economic historian at the University of Toronto. Records include off-prints of the majority of his publications appearing in European and North American academic journals; unpublished manuscripts and notes; drafts of his books The Imperial Loans: A Study in Financial and Diplomatic History and Free Trade and Frustration: Anglo-Austrian Negotiations 1860-70; chapters in books he edited or contributed to; and numerous review articles and book reviews. Files in this series have been arranged chronologically, with book reviews arranged separately in 8 files at the end of the series.

Lectures and notes

This series documents Professor Helleiner's teaching career in the Department of Political Economy at the University of Toronto. Records largely consist of his lectures and lecture notes for two courses he taught there entitled 'Economic History of Europe' and 'Problems of Economic Development.' Other teaching material, such as reading lists, outlines, and bibliographies, is occasionally included with the lecture notes.

Department of Occupational Therapy

Series consists of records related to the administrative and academic operations of the University of Toronto’s Department of Occupational Therapy during Prof. Friedland’s tenure as Department Chair. Material covers developments within the department, including correspondence, proposals and reports regarding departmental status, component programs, budgetary issues and strategic planning. Series also includes some documentation of awards, lectureships, and events run by the Department. Following Prof. Friedland’s retirement, material covers the Judith Friedland Fund, a grant administered by the Department for occupational therapy research in oncology and palliative care, as well as her role as Chair of Research Ethics Policy and Advisory Committee (REPAC). Five additional files of student correspondence reflect issues with the evaluation of admission requirements for the Department of Occupational Therapy’s Degree Completion Program.

Consultation

Series consists of records relating to Prof. Gunderson’s work as a consultant analyzing particular issues within the workforce and labour market. Material primarily covers Prof. Gunderson’s work for Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC) and includes the Workplace Employee Survey and the Sectoral Partnership Initiative. Additional studies look at the impact of investments in machinery, equipment and skills training as drivers of firm productivity. Series also includes reports and material prepared for other agencies, such as pay equity assessments and evaluations of particular industries and trades. Records include data analysis print-outs, correspondence, draft reports, and background research material.

Professional activity

Series consists of records related to Mr. Ezrin’s professional roles. These focus primarily on his time in government, both federal and provincial. Records cover his work in diplomatic roles in New Delhi, Los Angeles and New York, as well as publicity surrounding the Constitution. Three files document Ezrin’s involvement on the Debate Committee preparing Liberal leader John Turner for the federal debate in 1988.

Biographical files

This series consists of records documenting Mary O'Brien's life and career as a nurse and midwife in Glasgow and Montreal, and her subsequent academic career as a feminist philosopher. Includes: articles and reviews of Mary O'Brien; records related to her involvement with the Feminist Party of Canada; letters from faculty, staff, academic community-at-large, and former students in support of Mary O'Brien for the 1987 OCUFA Teaching Award; sound recordings of an interview and awards ceremony; and obituaries and tributes to O'Brien following her death.

University of Toronto

Series consists of records documenting some of the committees in which Dr. Sessle served at UofT’s Faculty of Dentistry, Faculty of Medicine, and more generally within the University. These include evaluations of curriculum and program development, provostial reviews, decanal searches, faculty appointments and promotions, as well as specific funds and posts such as the L’Anson Professorship. Material includes correspondence, minutes, memoranda, notes, and reports.

Personal/biographical

This series contains material relating to Prof. York’s life. It includes a curriculum vitae from 1998 and a copy of the U of T National Report on Derek York and his work with laser probe argon-argon dating.

Addresses

This series contains material relating to Prof. York’s addresses. Included are research materials, slides, and drafts.

Research notes and publishing

Series consists records that document a sampling of Prof. Thornton’s writing and research spanning from early in his career to 2003. Writing is comprised of predominantly academic articles, book chapters, and reviews on a range of topics including British imperial history, colonial states, power and individual rights. Material include typescripts, drafts, off-prints, and correspondence. Notes also cover similar areas of interest, though many are unidentified and partial.

Education and career

Series consists of records relating to Prof. Cook’s secondary and post-secondary education and career, including grant, fellowship and some project files.

Education records include secondary school certificates and exam results, her application for admission to the University of Toronto, course syllabi, reading lists, examinations, notes on nineteenth-century thought by Prof. A.S.P. Woodhouse, and Prof. Cook’s convocation program. Employment records include letters of offer, contracts, clippings, evaluations, and correspondence. Grant and fellowship records include applications, correspondence, reports, and clippings.

Series also includes project files relating to Prof. Cook’s work with Representative Poetry Online and the Online Poetry Classroom Project of the Academy of American Poets.

Professional Correspondence - Letters of reference

This series consists of inward and outward correspondence regarding references for former students, arranged alphabetically by surname in two groups for the period 1981-1987. One file contains letters of reference for 1973-1974

Publishing

Series consists of records related to the publishing activity of Prof. Venkatacharya. Material includes typescripts, annotated drafts, and some off-prints. Also included is correspondence related to Prof. Venkatacharya’s publisher.

Teaching

Series consists of records related to Prof. Frederick Winter’s teaching both at the University of Toronto and the American School of Classical Studies at Athens. Records include syllabi, lecture notes, class assignments, and hand-outs, as well as agendas, reports and other administrative documentation related to Winter’s time at the American School of Classical Studies at Athens.

Personal and biographical

Series consists of the personal and biographical records of Joan Hay including diaries, notes and exercise books from her early education, and memorabilia from the University of Alberta.

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