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Archival description
University of St. Michael's College, John M. Kelly Library, Special Collections
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A different accent

Item consists of a book which features Nouwen in a chapter "Peace", subtitled "Living peace" dated April 28, 1983 and beginning on p. 35.

A dream after cardiac surgery

Item consists of an offprint of an article called "A dream after cardiac surgery" by Paul W. Pruyser. The article is about the author's recollection and analysis of a dream he had after undergoing cardiac surgery.

A dry roof and a cow: dreams and portraits of our neighbours

Item consists of a pamphlet in which Nouwen has written the introduction, stating: "The people portrayed in the book 'are in touch with something larger than a wish for a gift from a stranger who might come along and show pity on them. They are in touch with a dream that makes them visionaries of a new future.'"

A dry roof and a cow: dreams and portraits of our neighbours

Item consists of a book in which Nouwen has written the introduction, stating in part: "I trust that, as we let the words and images in this book penetrate our hearts, we will experience a deep desire to do whatever possible to make the dream of a worldwide community of love and peace become a reality."

A glad Christmas

Item consists of 1 embossed picture postcard with a divided back with a Christmas greeting and a dog. The postcard has 1 Benjamin Franklin one cent U.S. postage stamp.

A glimpse behind the mirror: reflections on death and life

This item is an 11 page article by Henri Nouwen entitled, ‘A Glimpse behind the Mirror: Reflections on Death and Life’ published in Weavings, A Journal of the Christian Spiritual Life, Vol. IV, No. 6, November/December 1989, PP. 13 – 23. This article is about Nouwen’s experience with possible death after a road accident. Nouwen begins the article by describing the accident, his experience of the hospital emergency room and intensive care ward. Nouwen describes his gradual awareness that he might die; that he was at peace. ‘I kept thinking that dying was quite possible and that I had to prepare myself and my friends for it. And so I let myself enter a place I had never been before: the portal of death.’ Nouwen describes his experience of the presence of the love of Jesus and his deep sense of wanting to make the journey of dying to life. Nouwen is hesitant however because he knows there are relationships unhealed and forgiveness not yet given nor received. Nouwen slowly realizes that he will not die and believes that he has work to do. ‘I believe that I am asked to proclaim the love God in a new way.’ Pondering the way Jesus was in the world Nouwen asks, ‘Can I become like Jesus and witness to what I have seen? Yes, I can live in God and speak to the human reality’. Nouwen concludes the article with a quote from Phil. 1:21 -26, words of Paul that Nouwen hopes will be his guide.

A glimpse of the "gay world" in San Francisco & the "fast world" in Los Angeles: struggling to remain anchored in Jesus

This item is a 5 page article by Henri Nouwen entitled, ‘Struggling to remain anchored in Jesus, published in the New Oxford Review, July-August 1987, pp. 5 – 9. This item is part 10 and the final installment of a series of articles written during the year that Nouwen was resident at L’Arche, Trosly-Breuil , France. The items date from May 31, 1986 to July 6, 1986. The first entry describes a visit Henri and a friend make to the Castro district of San Francisco, a gay area. He writes of seeing the fearful, lonely faces of men struggling with the awareness of AIDS. Nouwen concludes the entry stating that his friend commented, ‘I am glad you came. There are too few people who mention his Name in the district. There are so many negative associations with his Name and still he is the greatest source of hope.’ The next entry describes his visit to Los Angeles and the atmosphere of what he describes as ‘the enormous superficiality of our culture’. Nouwen then flies to Madison, Wisconsin for a visit with Parker and Sally Palmer to discuss theological education and a possible one-week summer institute for seminary professors. Palmer and Nouwen discuss the need for theological students to have spiritual help, not to separate theology and spirituality. Nouwen notes that: ‘the study of theology must have the quality of prayer; theological study must also foster the creation of communities of faith… and finally, the study of theology must always lead to witness’. The final three entries are written when Nouwen returns to France and finds himself assessing his year there. He writes of wanting to share with Nathan but having to wait to do that, he notes that he feels scattered and finds it hard to pray for an hour in the morning, he is not sleeping well and feels ‘somewhat indifferent’ but not depressed. Nouwen realizes that he has not really got to know the handicapped people as well as he hoped. In the last entry Nouwen notes that he is leaving Trosly, will visit his family, go to Boston and then on to Daybreak for a three year commitment. He notes three graces from his time at L’Arche: being in Europe again, renewing and making friendships, and beginning to make a deeper contact with the handicapped.

A handlist of Newman's Anglican sermons and related manuscripts, volume II

File consists of a bound ledger containing handwritten reference lists and bibliographic descriptions of sermons by John Henry Newman and related published and archival material relevant to Pett's research. This appears to have been a continuation of Pett's notes from a previous ledger "A Handlist of Newman's Anglican Sermons and Related Manuscripts", as it continues the previous volume's pagination.

A happy Christmas

Item consists of 1 embossed picture postcard with a divided back of chimes and holly. The postcard has 1 Edward VII one cent Canada postage stamp.

A happy Christmas tide

Item consists of 1 embossed picture postcard with a divided back of a Christmas greeting with a calendar date and holly. The postcard has 1 Benjamin Franklin one cent U.S. postage stamp.

A happy Easter

Item consists of 1 embossed picture postcard with a divided back of baby birds and eggs within a wicker basket with some blue flowers and cotton. The postcard has 1 series of 1902 Franklin one cent stamp.

A happy Easter

Item consists of 1 picture postcard with a divided back from the Raphael Tuck & Son's "Easter Fancies" series, no. 763, with a boy feeding a rabbit. The postcard has 1 George Washington one cent U.S. postage stamp.

A happy New Year

Item consists of 1 embossed picture postcard from the Raphael Tuck & Sons' "New Year Greetings" series, no. 600, with a divided back of a girl with flowers and a clock. The postcard has 1 George Washington one cent U.S. postage stamp.

A happy New Year

Item consists of 1 embossed picture postcard with a divided back with a New Years greeting. The postcard has 1 Benjamin Franklin one cent U.S. postage stamp.

A joyful Christmas

Item consists of 1 embossed picture postcard with a divided back of red poinsettias. The postcard has 1 Benjamin Franklin one cent U.S. postage stamp.

A joyful Christmas

Item consists of 1 novelty picture postcard with a divided back of an angel with coloured in flowers. The postcard has 1 Benjamin Franklin one cent U.S. postage stamp.

A joyful Eastertide

Item consists of 1 embossed picture postcard with an undivided back with Easter greetings and a scene of cattle by a windmill. The postcard has 1 series of 1902 Franklin one cent stamp.

A joyful Eastertide

Item consists of 1 embossed picture postcard with a divided back from the Raphael Tuck & Sons' "Easter Post Cards" series, no. 703, with Easter greetings. The postcard has 1 series of 1902 Franklin one cent stamp.

A joyous Easter

Item consists of 1 embossed picture postcard with a divided back of purple flowers and an Easter greeting. The postcard has 1 George Washington one cent U.S. postage stamp.

A letter of consolation

Item consists of a book which Nouwen wrote as a letter of consolation to his father six months after the death of Henri's mother.

A life through Adam

This item is an article by Henri Nouwen entitled, ‘A Life Through Adam’ published in British edition of The Reader’s Digest, September 1990, pp. 75 -77. This item is a slightly revised version of the article published in the January 1990 U.S. edition of The Reader’s Digest (see item 1753). This item is condensed from an article published in Weavings, March/April 1988. Nouwen begins by stating that he has recently moved from academia to living at the l’Arche community of Daybreak with men and women who have mental disabilities. He describes being assigned to help a very severely handicapped man named Adam. Nouwen describes his daily routine with the totally helpless 25 year old man and his growing awareness that Adam was doing more for him than he for Adam. ‘This severely handicapped young man, whom outsiders sometimes describe with very hurtful words, started to become my dearest companion’. Nouwen goes on to describe the very special effect Adam has on the people with whom he lives and the peace that, because of Adam’s need, helps them to work together.

A merry Christmas

Item consists of 1 embossed picture postcard with a divided back with Christmas greetings. The postcard has 1 George Washington one cent U.S. postage stamp.

A merry Christmas

Item consists of 1 embossed picture postcard with a divided back with a Christmas greeting and holly. The postcard has 1 series of 1902 Franklin one cent stamp.

A merry Christmas

Item consists of 1 picture postcard with a divided back with a Christmas greeting and poinsettias. The postcard has 1 George Washington two cents U.S. postage stamp.

A merry Christmas

Item consists of 1 embossed picture postcard with a divided back with a Christmas greeting. The postcard has 1 Benjamin Franklin one cent U.S. postage stamp.

A merry Christmas

Item consists of 1 embossed picture postcard with a divided back with a Christmas greeting and poinsettias. The postcard has 1 Benjamin Franklin one cent U.S. postage stamp.

A merry Christmas

Item consists of 1 embossed picture postcard with a divided back of a calendar page and holly. The postcard has 1 George Washington one cent U.S. postage stamp.

A merry Christmas

Item consists of 1 picture postcard with a divided back with a Christmas greeting and children in a snowy field and a pig. The postcard has 1 George Washington one cent U.S. postage stamp.

A new life among the handicapped: farewell to Harvard

This item is a 9 page article by Henri Nouwen entitled, ‘A New Life Among the Handicapped’ published in the New Oxford Review, Vol. LIII, No.7, September 1986, pp.5 – 13. The article is identified as the first installment of a series of articles taken from a Nouwen diary written during his time as priest-in-residence at L’Arche, Trosley-Breuil, France. The excerpts from Nouwen’s diary in this article begin August 13, 1985 and end September 24. In the first entry Nouwen describes this as ‘the first day of my new life! Nouwen writes of meeting Madame Vanier, of his leaving Harvard, his new quarters and his sense of how different this life is from his very busy life in academia. The entries that follow include reflections on how Jean Vanier began L’Arche with Pere Thomas Phillipe, Nouwen’s longing to be able to live a simpler life, his gratitude for the prayerful support of his friends, his hurt and anger when a friend fails to visit him. Nouwen speaks of his daily time spent in the Oratory at Trosly: ‘In many ways the Oratoire is the heart of l’Arche…every time I enter the Oratoire I feel a deep rest coming over me…’ Nouwen also speaks of one of the foyers he visits which is called La Forestiere where the most severely handicapped live. Further entries speak of the people he meets and include his reflections on their lives.

A passing shadow

Item consists of 1 picture postcard with a divided back of a portrait of a woman by Philip Boileau. The postcard has 1 Edward VII 1 cent Canada postage stamp.

A place where God wants to dwell

This item is a one page article by Henri Nouwen entitled ‘A Place Where God wants to dwell’, published in Compass: A Jesuit Journal, Vol. 7, No. 4, September 1989, p. 34. Henri begins the article by describing his reading as a teacher of Christian spirituality and his discovery that you must be poor ‘so God can finally be with you’. Nouwen then goes on to describe his experience at l’Arche Daybreak in Richmond Hill Ontario and in particular his friendship with Adam Arnett. Nouwen describes Adam as a profoundly handicapped man who knows nothing of the world Nouwen has lived in and yet becomes for Nouwen, a teacher. Nouwen writes, “Daybreak turns our expectations upside down…Because of Adam’s weakness – his poverty – we can be united in ways that form the body. Because of Adam’s needs, we come to grips with our own’. Nouwen goes on to describe a l’Arche community as not a romantic place but one of struggle and a school of discipleship.

A prayerful life

This item is a short quote from Henri Nouwen’s book The Way of the Heart and is entitled, ‘A Prayerful life’ published in Christopher News Notes, N.Y. , No. 279. No year is identified but the file suggests ‘after 1981’. The quote outlines the need in prayer to ‘include all people’.

A psychologist on priests' identity crises

Item consists of a one page article by Henri Nouwen entitled: "A psychologist on priests' identity crises" published in The National Catholic Reporter, 17 May 1967, p. 6. The article is about three perceived threats to the mental health of priests. These are described in terms of problems with time, with space and with self-understanding. 1) The new priest starts by giving his whole time to his ministry with little or no demarcation between work and rest. He thrives on being at the center, being available to everyone all the time. In time , because there is little change in fact, this can and does frequently lead to being ‘ an irritated, empty, routine, tired man’. In addition, at a daily level there is no demarcation of time between ‘work’ and ‘home’. No time to stop and reflect or even pray. 2) ‘Besides a healthy use of time, a healthy use of place is of great importance for the mental health of the priest’. Because he is always at work there is no space to find rest; because the people he lives with are the people he works with, there is no personal space. The demarcation lines of authority are vague and unhealthy. ‘…healthy spacing not only refers to healthy defining of places and rooms, but also connected with that, to healthy clarification of responsibilities and authority which belong to the different roofs under which we live’. 3) With a lack of privacy and no demarcation of personal, private relationships the priest often lacks a firm self-identity. ‘Without a spiritual life and a good friend he is like a sounding brass or a tinkling cymbal’. In addition, there is a lack of clarity of his role as a professional, he receives little praise from anyone including superiors so he does not know how well he is doing. The author stresses the importance of the priest’s everyday confrontation with living theology in the people he serves and that is not used or appreciated.

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