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Personal/biographical

This series contains material relating to Prof. York’s life. It includes a curriculum vitae from 1998 and a copy of the U of T National Report on Derek York and his work with laser probe argon-argon dating.

Photographs

Series consists of images of Prof. Venkatacharya and his colleagues, in addition to family portraits. Images cover multiple trips to India, including to Srisailam, the presentation of Prof. Venkatacharya’s honorary degree at Rashtriya Sanskrit Vidyapeetha, as well as formal portraits of Tuppil and Vijaya Venkatacharya.

Photographs

This series consists of personal photographs of Mary O'Brien with her partner Cath McNaughton, friends, and colleagues. Includes early photographs of O'Brien as a nurse in Scotland and Montreal, two photographs of O'Brien at the Annual Conference of the UK Labour Party in October 1956, O'Brien receiving the City of Toronto's Constance E. Hamilton award in 1982. Also included are professional portraits of O'Brien taken for her books and a 1985 interview with the Kingston Whig-Standard.

Research, publications and presentations

Series consists of records related to Joan and Frederick Winter’s archaeological research, particularly their study of Pausauias’ travels. Material includes typescripts, background research material, and images. In addition to a published article, a significant portion of the material documents the presentation of the couple’s research through scripts, a ‘photographic companion’ (annotated) album, and slides.

Professional associations and conferences

This series consists of files on organizations, conferences, symposia and workshops, arranged alphabetically. The most thoroughly documented ones are those in which Professor McLeod was involved in an organizational or executive capacity. The earliest files document his involvement in multicultural issues in Saskatchewan, specifically problems associated with language instruction in French. They contain correspondence, notes, briefs submitted to the Royal Commission on Bilingualism and Biculturalism and to the Saskatchewan Committee on Instruction in Languages other than English, associated
reports, and a seminar on bilingual education (1964-1966). Later, in Ontario, his overlapping duties as chair of the Ontario Multicultural Education Conference Committee (1980-1983) and president of the Canadian Council for Multicultural and Intercultural Education (1981-1985), for example, enabled him to play a central role in organizing the early national conferences on multicultural education. He organized and chaired two colloquiums on “Multiculturalism – Teaching and Learning”, sponsored by FEUT (1990, 1991), and was a co-organizer of the International Colloquium on Ethnicity, Conflict and Cooperation held in Moscow in 1992. McLeod also attended a number of international conferences as a Canadian representative. These include four (1977-1987) world congresses of the Comparative and International Education Association, and the Circumpolar Conference of Indigenous People in Iceland (1993).

McLeod was involved in an executive capacity in many organizations, the files for which contain the correspondence, notes and memoranda, minutes and reports that reveal the extent of his involvement. The principal bodies, for which there is extensive documentation, are the Canadian Association for Second Language Teachers (CASALT), Canadian Ethnic Studies Association (CESA), Canadian Council for Multicultural and Intercultural Education (CCMIE), Canadian History of Education Association (CHEA), Multicultural Health Coalition (MHC), the Multiculturalism and Aging Seniors Coordinating Committee (MASCC), and the Ontario Multicultural Association (OMAMO). He was also frequently asked to advise governments on policy. He gave, for example, evidence to the House of Commons Standing Committee on Multiculturalism and served on the Ontario Advisory Committee on Multiculturalism.

Photographs

Formal portraits, publicity prints and snapshots documenting Professor Guillet’s research. In particular there are prints showing Professor Guillet in his lab with Arthur Stein and Andjelka Lavoie, working with the molecular probe apparatus in 1969. This probe was used to study the glass transition of polypropylene.

Graphic material

The photographs in this series document the personal and professional life of Professor Friedland. The series beings with eleven files of photographs relating to Professor Friedland and his family, including formal portraits of himself, and informal images of his parents, his wife and children, and other relatives. Other images document events at the Faculty of Law, including informal parties and reunions; honours (including awards and honorary degrees) bestowed upon Friedland and his colleagues in law and university administration; and photographs relating to some of his research projects, including the University of Toronto history project.

Studio work, exhibitions and performances

This series begins with Frederick Urban’s formative years as an artist when he created a large number of exhibits and participated in some performance pieces, primarily in Halifax and New York City. For some of these, he drew on his personal experiences. Two examples are An Acadian genealogy (April 1977), inspired by his family roots in the Acadian region of Brunswick, and Monk (July 1977) by his training as a novice in 1961-1962.

The files cover his years at the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design (1976-1977), continue through his post-graduate studies at the Whitney Museum of American Art, his interest in the art and architecture of Italy (spurred on by his meeting Giuseppe Panza di Biumo), and several installations connected to Canadian architecture and architectural history. The last exhibition, ‘The place of work’, accompanied the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada’s annual conference in Winnipeg in 1989. The arrangement is primarily chronological.

The series ends with several files on performance pieces, the most significant being Anne Wilson and her Butler’s lives of the saints, which was performed both in Halifax and New York City, and an oversized folder of posters for exhibitions and performance pieces collected by Urban.

Some of the exhibitions and performance pieces contain correspondence, drawings and sketches, photographs and/or slides. A number are represented by a combination of photographs and slides or slides alone, with no textual accompaniment. There are also several oversized folders of sketches and drawings for of posters for exhibitions and performance pieces with which Urban was involved and one of posters for events which he may have attended but to which he did not contribute.

University of Toronto Blues men's baseball team

This series documents Professor Lang’s years of service to the University of Toronto Blues Men’s Baseball team which he coached from 1994 to 2011. The files contain information on team lists, coaches, financing and fundraising, equipment, rosters and players, and statistical records. There is also some press coverage. There is documentation of tournaments in Columbus, Ohio (1998) and Durham College in Oshawa (1999). Photographs and digital images document the team from 1999-2007, including many images and graphics used to boost the website for the team Also included is an Ontario University Athletics medal for 2001.

Digital files in B2018-0001 include email correspondence with players, university officials, and sponsors; rosters and team photographs; and files related to the construction of a new baseball diamond on the University of Toronto Scarborough campus, which opened in 2006. In 2011, it was renamed the “Dan Lang field” in honour of his many years of service to the Varsity Blues baseball program.

Personal and biographical

The biographical information in this series is provided largely by several versions of Frederic Urban’s curriculum vitae. The other files contain a notebook (1975-1977) primarily on life in Boston and Halifax, a wall calendar (1981), greeting cards from his partner, Larry Richards, and others, design elements for a garden at Urban and Richards’ penthouse in Etobicoke, and material from a trip to Columbia at Christmas, 1976. Accompanying this textual material are two files of slides, one of “Danny, Halifax”, and the other “Studies for Natchitoches”, Urban and Richards’ property in Louisiana.

Professor Urban has always had a great interest in history, American politics and the presidency; the passion for politics he shared with his partner, Larry. In the late 1960s they both took part in demonstrations on the Boston Common against the Vietnam War; a poster by the Vietnam Moratorium Committee is a memento of that struggle. Another from that era is a special issue of Life (5 July 1968) on the Presidency.

Family records and correspondence

Series consists of copies of photographs and documents pertaining to Johnstone's family. Documents include correspondence between Mary F. Williamson and Helmut Kallmann of the National Library of Canada; a copy of the petition for divorce filed by Catherine (McGregor) Johnstone against her husband John Francis Johnstone, which was later withdrawn (January 8, 1979); a copy of an article in the Toronto Star (November 26, 1927) regarding Amelia Hart and her seven husbands (Johnstone was the fourth); a copy of a letter from Mary F. Williamson to Professor Carl Morey at the Faculty of Music, University of Toronto regarding Johnstone and performances of his songs; a copy of Johnstone's obituary (February 25, 1913); and a copy of scanned portraits of Johnstone. The series also consists of electronic records, including scanned images from the Johnstone family photo album (ca. 1900).

Research materials

Series consists of research materials collected by Carl Morey, predominantly relating to Canadian music and opera.

Biographical and personal records

The series consists of biographical and personal records of Professor Bay. The material reflects his personal life, and includes press clippings, articles, and a thesis about him; personal documents such as educational records; documents of identification; personal papers related to life events (baptism, marriage, home ownership, inheritance, death certificates); calendars and a condolence scrapbook.

The arrangement of the material begins with biographical information (press clippings, biographies, curriculum vitae, referees, work about Bay), then personal papers, followed by what he termed “his personal collection”, consisting of items primarily in Norwegian relating to his family and Norway generally. The most intriguing portion of this “collection” is the folders of “illegal papers” [/002(28) – (30)] that Professor Bay buried when he hurriedly left Norway early in World War II and which he dug up sometime after he returned. There are also books about Norwegian resistance, and two books by his uncle.

Graphic

Photographs and portraits document many of Dr. Evans professional activities and milestones in his career. They show him receiving awards, at meetings and conferences, in groups at ceremonies. There are also some family photos and photographs of his trips to China and Nepal.

Research

Throughout his career, Dr. Fowler conducted numerous studies relating to infants, toddlers and school age children. Some of these have been highlighted in the previous series and relate to his long time interest in twins, day care, child rearing and the impact of developmental stimulation.

This series contains only a sampling of the voluminous original and secondary research materials collected and compiled by Dr. Fowler. Much of the original data containing personal identifiers of children has not been retained for obvious privacy and ethical reasons. Represented in this series are files relating to research spanning some 25 years on topics such as reading, cognitive style, language stimulation and development (with specific reference to the Italian and West Indian studies), and specific studies such as the Bassari, Manitoulin Island and Woodbine Day Care. Files may contain correspondence, drafts of manuscripts, notes, cumulative data, original forms developed by Dr. Fowler for a specific study, notes, and reports. The Bassari project is also documented in photographs showing Dr. Fowler at work in the field.

Photographs

As a long time professor in the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering, L. E. Jones photographed and collected images of many Faculty and campus events including convocations, memorials, award ceremonies, retirements and open houses. Of particular notice are images of: the Engineering Centenary celebrations in 1973: the mounting of the lintel from the Old S.P.S. building and the installation of Becca's H in front of the Galbraith building; the fire, rebuilding and reopening of the Sandford Flemming building, 1977-1982; the excavation of the site of the Old Magnetic Observatory, 1979; the design, construction and installation of the Sundial, 1993.

As Engineering Archivist, Jones also collected many historical images documenting the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering as well as its predessor the School of Practical Science. Included in this collection are portraits of faculty and students groups, images of student activities, buildings, Gull Lake Survey Camp and Ajax Campus. These photographs mainly document the first half of the 20th century.

Graphic material

Two black-and-white photoprints of the graduating class in Arts, Victoria College, 1948. Two photographs were taken because of the large number of graduates

Personal

The series consists of records documenting Gilbert Edward Jackson’s family life and professional career, from the early 1920s to his death in 1959. Arranged alphabetically by function, the files of the series include: typed autobiographical notes illustrating Mr. Jackson’s life from the day he was born until 1919, prior to his emigration to Toronto; two biographical sketches highlighting key moments within Mr. Jackson’s personal and professional career; typed and handwritten incoming and outgoing correspondence from family members, friends, colleagues and acquaintances regarding the death of his son, John Denison Jackson (1944), Mrs. Maria Elizabeth Jackson’s estate (1952-1953), notes of thanks for reference letters, gifts and lunch meetings, personal regards for his family, and an unsigned letter to Misses Jackson, Mr. Jackson’s sisters regarding the economist’s declining health (1959); a handwritten copy of Mr. Jackson’s obituary (1959); and a photograph of a portrait of Mr. Jackson (B2004-0019/001P). Within the files of correspondence, the letters are arranged chronologically, except for those offering condolences to Mr. Jackson for the loss of his son which are arranged alphabetically by the last-name of the sender.

The series also consists of several files of press clippings about Mr. Jackson’s personal life, career moves, thoughts, views, as well as Canada’s economic stance on various issues. The subject matter of the newspaper clippings include: France and Germany’s economic situation after World War I; Canada’s immigration policies (1923), tariff fallacies and taxation system (ca. 1935); unemployment insurance within Canada; the analogous trading problems with England (1934); Mr. Jackson’s speech on overcoming the depression and difficulties through the improvement of the human character before the Empire Club in the Royal York Hotel (1933) and Canadian Club in Ottawa (1934); being appointed Economic Adviser to the Governors of the Bank of England (1935); the selling of Mr. Jackson’s house in Toronto prior to leaving for England (1935); the return of economic liberalism to Canada; the doctrine of free trade; and reviews about Mr. Jackson’s book An economist’s confession of faith (1935). Letters to the editor can also be found within the press clippings regarding similar themes. Arranged chronologically within their individual files, the press clippings, which are from newspapers across Canada and England, were possibly collected by Mr. Jackson.

Manuscripts and off-prints

This series consists of articles, memoranda, reports, speeches, lectures, pamphlets, off-prints and books written by Mr. Jackson over a forty year span. Within the series, a “wordage of memoranda” written by Mr. Jackson illustrating the numbers of terms utilized within articles written from 1940 to 1946 is also provided.

Documenting Mr. Jackson’s career, thought, views and influences in Canadian economics, the manuscripts document his work in: international exchange; Canada’s economic prospect and stance on trade; the economic conditions of countries such as the United States and the United Kingdom; the effects of the war(s) on Canada’s financial situation; the population and employment opportunities; unemployment; textiles and other merchandise; capitalism; conditions affecting interest rates; inflation; and the great depression.

Photographs

Portraits of Professor Macallum; copies of illuminated address presented to Professor Macallum on 9 March 1906 by undergraduates in the Faculty of Medicine, on the occasion of his election to the Royal Society of Canada. Taken by Steffens-Colmer, Vancouver; C.T. Blackburne; Freeland, Toronto; Lafayette, Glasgow; McCaul's Pond, c. 1880. Also includes photo of McCaul's Pond, ca. 1880.

Sri Lanka

Prof. Cameron joined the Board of the Forum of Federations in 2002. His work with the Forum led him to provide technical support to the Sri Lankan Peace Process, which was seeking resolution to the dispute between the Sri Lankan government and the Tamil Tigers. Prof. Cameron participated in peace process meetings in Sri Lanka (26-30 April 2002, 30 August-5 September 2002) Sri Lanka/Oslo (25 November-5 December), London (22-23 December), Thailand (3-10 January 2003), Berlin (5-9 February 2003), and Sri Lanka/Tokyo (10-20 March 2003; 24 August-3 September 2004; 26 March-7 April 2005). He also wrote papers and delivered presentations on peace and governance in Sri Lanka.

Records in this series include correspondence, reports, research, proposals from the Tamil Tigers and Sri Lankan government, and articles and presentations on the peace process. Records from particular peace talks include press releases, debriefing comments, texts of speeches, correspondence, maps and other travel documents, news clippings, and notes.

Series also consists of 2 photographs of Prof. Cameron, taken on his travels.

Manuscripts and publications

Professor Skilling began writing at an early age; his first attempt at publication, a short story 'Trapping in the Rockies’, was submitted to the Toronto Evening Telegram in 1923. While this series documents his prodigious output over a period of almost 80 years, the focus is on his youth and his early career (before 1960) and from the early 1980s until his death.

The series begins with a file of correspondence regarding offprints (1984-1985), followed by three files of book notices and reviews (1940-1999). Professor Skillings writings are arranged by the title of the manuscript or publication and are filed chronologically. The files contain drafts of manuscripts, sometimes with notes and often with covering correspondence, reviews and offprints. Much material relating to Skilling’s writings may be found in other accessions in this fonds.

The earliest entries were written while a public, high school and university student. Skilling managed one publication from his trip across the United States and Canada in 1933, an article in the local paper in The Danforth region of Toronto where he lived. What may be is his first ‘academic’ article, “The Marxian dips into the future”, was published in University College’s student periodical, The Undergraduate, in March 1933. At Oxford, he really began to find his footing. His reported in the New Statesman on the British Labour Party’s annual conference in 1936; this was followed shortly by a series of articles in the Canadian Forum (1937-1939), most of which discussed the evolving political situation in Czechoslovakia. During World War II, he wrote on a variety of topics, ranging from the political situation in the Balkans to Canadian-American relations.

After his retirement, Professor Skilling had more time to write. Some of his projects, including a selection of essays under the title, ‘The riddle of Communist politics’, and a proposed book on the Velvet Revolution, did not materialize. His observations of the changing political landscape in Czechoslovakia and Eastern Europe, especially on Charter 77 and samizdat, rapidly found their way into print. In the late 1980s and the 1990s Skilling turned his attention to historical figures in Czech history, especially the Masaryks – Tomas, Charlotte, and Alice, and to his own memoirs. His book, T. G. Masaryk: Against the current [see box 042], appeared in English in 1994 and Czech in 1995. He prepared two long articles on Charlotte and Alice for Komas, and Gender Studies in Prague published his Mother and daughter: Charlotte and Alice Masaryk in 2001 [see box 044]. His translation of Alice’s correspondence with Josip Plecnik, the architect of Prague Castle [see boxes 045-047], appeared just before his death.

Professor Skilling’s memoirs, The education of a Canadian, appeared in English and Czech in 2001 [see boxes 047-049], a few weeks before he died. The numerous delays in publication, caused in part by the collapse of Carleton University Press, are well documented.

Oversized material has been removed from /040(25) to folder .(03).

Photoprints relating to Professor Skilling’s research on and writing about Charlotte Masaryk have been removed from /044(03) to /009P(13); from /044(04) to /009P(14), from /044(06) to /009P(15), and from /044(07) to /009P(16).

Slides of the portrait of Gordon Skilling by Maria Gabanhova have been removed from /048(07) to /009P(17).

Education

This series covers the Gordon Skilling’s formal education from his attendance at Grace Street Public School through Harbord Collegiate, the University of Toronto (BA 1934), taking his Rhodes Scholarship at the University of Oxford, and the writing of his doctoral thesis at the University of London. The files are arranged chronologically by degree.

For Grace Street Public School, the files include letters from his classmates at Grace Street Public School and certificates. At Harbord Collegiate, in addition to his studies and piano lessons from the Toronto Conservatory of Music, Skilling was very active in extra-curricular activities: he was president of the Literary Society, editor of the Harbord Review, battalion commander of the cadet corps, and played defence on the basketball team which won the city high school championship in 1928-1929. These activities are documented in the form of term papers, examinations, speeches, scholarship essays, and a scrapbook [box 011] that covers his activities at Harbord Collegiate and the University of Toronto, and documents his trip across North America in the summer of 1933 (see also Series I in this sous-fonds). The scrapbook contains correspondence, dance cards, maps, press clippings, programmes, announcements of student activities, pamphlets, and photographs.

At the University of Toronto, Skilling studied British and colonial history and some modern Canadian and American history, standing first in his class in all but his final year. He was very active in campus politics, including the University College Literary and Athletic Society (of which he was elected president), the Students’ Administrative Council. He helped reorganize the Fabius Club in the autumn of 1932 and a year later, following his momentous trip across North America, was a founder of the CCF Club. Other activities included serving as associate editor of the Varsity and as a member of the Hart House Debates Committee.

His academic activities are well documented in the form of term papers for each of his undergraduate years and in his BA thesis. These files and those on the CCF Club and the Hart House debates are of particular interest. They document his movement from an apolitical period in high school to an activist in the social and political ferment of the time and, soon, to accepting the socialist philosophies promoted by many of his professors at the U of T and, later, at Oxford.

In December 1933 Gordon was informed that he had been awarded a Rhodes scholarship to study at Oxford University. He left for Christ Church, Oxford, in September of 1934, where he remained until 1936. While there, he studied under what he described as “outstanding dons, including Michael Foster and A. J. Ayers, in philosophy; Roy Harrod, in economics; Keith Feiling, in British history; and the Hon. Frank Pakenham in politics and international relations. He also, in the summer of 1935, visited Central Europe for the first time and in the autumn met Sally Bright, then a student at the London School of Economics. In the fall of 1936, having received a high second at Oxford, and having had his scholarship extended, Gordon went to London to complete his doctorate under R. W. Seton-Watson, under whom his growing interest in Czech culture and politics flourished, as did his relationship with Sally. At Easter in 1936 he and Sally spent five weeks in Chepstow in Monmouthshire, a time that is preserved in an album that he compiled (see Series XII, Appendix III). In 1940 Gordon successfully defended his thesis, ‘The German-Czech national conflict in Bohemia, 1879-1893’.

The files on his graduate work contain detailed notes on readings and tutorials, especially on political theory, social philosophy and social psychology. There are also exam questions for his courses at Oxford, correspondence relating to the degrees of BA and MA (Oxon.), and a copy of his doctoral dissertation. Accompanying these files is
a scrapbook, containing press clippings, programmes, photographs and memorabilia covering his years at Oxford and the University of London, with additional material for his visit to London in 1948 [see /012].

Skilling’s diploma from Harbord Collegiate is filed in /003(03).

Photographs relating to his basketball team at Harbord Collegiate have been removed from box 008 (08) to box 009P (01) – (03). Loose photographs relating to his activities at the University of Toronto have been removed from the Harbord Collegiate/ University of Toronto scrapbook [box 011] to box 009P(04) – (07).

Skilling’s University College ‘letter’ [badge] is filed as B2001-0017/008(26).

Graphic material

Consists of graphic material, including photographs of Gill and some taken by him and photographs and postcards of European locations, art and architecture.

Biographical and personal

This series contains files with Joan Winearls' curriculum vitae and other information on professional activities, followed by several files of professional correspondence, including commentary on specific manuscripts. There are also files on her employment at the University of Toronto and her applications for research leave, on the Historical Atlas of Canada project, and relating to her consultative position with the Legislative Library of Ontario in 1983. The series concludes with several files on honours and awards bestowed on her.

Conferences and exhibitions

This series documents the conferences on map librarianship in which Ms Winearls participated, exhibitions she prepared, and publications arising from them. It begins with several files containing correspondence and research notes on cartography and the early lithography of maps in Canada that Ms Winearls compiled between 1973 and 1998, and many of her applications to attend the conferences. Then follow the conferences and exhibits, the arrangement for which is generally alphabetical, beginning with the Association of Canadian Map Librarians 1993 workshop on the cataloguing rare maps.

Next is a file on the formative years (1975-1978) of the Canadian Cartographic Association and its History of Cartography Interest Group. This group drew on the formation three years earlier of a working group on the history of cartography within the International Cartographic Association. Ms Winerals was the co-ordinator of the cartobibliography section of the ICA, which organized the 11th International Conference on the History of Cartography in Ottawa in 1985. The files on this conference contain correspondence, notes, programs, and the papers presented by some of the participants. Also included are files on the Working Group on Cartobibliography’s proposal to

publish as a manual Coolie Verner’s manuscript on carto-bibliography. There also files on the ICHC conferences in 1987, 1989, and 1991. This part of the series ends with a file from 1992 for a project on cataloguing maps. All of these files are in B1998-0012, boxes 012 and 013, files 01-04.

In 1984, in conjunction with the sesquicentennial celebrations of the City of Toronto, Ms Winerals was invited to be a guest curator for an exhibit at the Canadiana Gallery of the Royal Ontario Museum, “Mapping Toronto’s first century, 1787-1884.” The files [B1998-0013/013(05) – (13), /014(01) – (02)], trace the development of the exhibition and include drafts of the catalogue and photographs. There is also a diary [B1996-0021/003(05)] that she kept while planning the exhibition.

Ms Winearls began attending meeting of the Conference on Editorial Problems in 1991 as convenor of its 29th annual conference in 1993 that coincided with the publication of The Historical Atlas of Canada. The title of the conference was “Editing early and historical atlases”. In conjunction with the conference she mounted an exhibition, “The atlas as a book”, in the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library. She also edited a volume of selected conference papers that was published by the University of Toronto Press in 1995. Most of the files are in B1998-0013 but there is one in B2007-0015.

The Conference files contain minutes, correspondence, grant applications, editing notes, drafts of the papers published, and reviews. The exhibition files contain background notes, research files for each exhibition case, collations, and drafts of the catalogue.

Finally, Ms Winearls curated an exhibit in the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library called “Art on the Wing” in 1999. Records includes notes on cases, drafts and final copy of the catalogue as well her lecture. The Conference files contain minutes, correspondence, grant applications, editing notes, drafts of the papers published, and reviews. The exhibition files contain background notes, research files for each exhibition case, collations, and drafts of the catalog.

Subject files

Series consists of newspaper clippings and photocopies of articles, press releases, newsletters, reports, one photograph, and other materials from organizations of interest or pertaining to issues of concern to New Catholic Times members and staff.

Financial files

  • CA ON00389 F4-6
  • Series
  • December 1980 - December 1997, predominant August 1986 - September 1996
  • Part of Henri Nouwen fonds

Series consists of Nouwen's financial files dating from 1980 and 1997, predominantly from 1986 -1997. Prior to 1986 Nouwen's personal accountant kept the majority of Nouwen's records and likely discarded them after the mandatory seven years retention period. The records from this time period are therefore minimal and consist primarily of financial overviews, cash books and American bank and retirement accounts and insurance files. After 1986, the records become more detailed and voluminous, including files about Nouwen's income (stipends, donations and royalties), expenses, taxes, insurance, retirement plans, credit cards and bank accounts.

Although the boxes were in no discernable order, they have been arranged in the following six sub-series by taking into account both the function of the records and the Nouwen staff member responsible for the maintenance of the majority of the records in that grouping:

1.6.1. General Files
1.6.2. Ledgers
1.6.3. Personal Accountant Files
1.6.4. Expenses Files
1.6.5. Cheque and Deposit Books
1.6.6. Donations Files

A more detailed description of each sub-series, as well as each sub-series arrangement can be found in the sub-series descriptions.

The files were created and kept by various secretaries and financial secretaries that Nouwen hired to control his complicated and extensive financial accounts. In the mid-1970s Nouwen hired Joe Sarno as his personal accountant. Sarno was responsible for Nouwen's income tax returns, American bank accounts and retirement funds until 1994 when Nouwen decided to consolidate his accounts to Daybreak. Carol Plantinga served as his financial secretary from the mid-1970s to 1986. From 1983-1985 Nouwen's assistant Peter Weiskel also worked with the financial files. At Daybreak, Connie Ellis took on the roles of both administrative assistant and financial secretary. After Ellis' became ill in 1992 Kathy Christie became Nouwen's administrative assistant and Lydia Banducci was hired as his financial secretary. Christie remained with Nouwen until his death in 1996. In 1993 Banducci was replaced by Margaret Sutton. Sutton remained in this position until 1997. In 1994 Nouwen began to consolidate all his financial and accounting information at Daybreak. Completing Nouwen's 1994 tax return was Sarno's last responsibility as his accountant. In 1996 Sutton arranged for all the records created and kept by Sarno to be transferred to Daybreak. Nouwen began transferring his accounting to account manager Alka Vijan at Canada Trust in 1994.

Photographic Prints

Series C: Photographic Prints contains all of photograph prints that were housed in paper folders and filing cabinets in the office of Ken Jones. The folders were arranged by subject. For the most part, folders are labelled by subject but the folders and some photographs were out of order when the records were transferred to UTSC Library. In some cases, folders contain photos that do not reflect the subject of the original folder label.

Ephemera and artifacts

  • CA ON00389 F4-14
  • Series
  • [1957 - 1996], predominant 1980 - 1996
  • Part of Henri Nouwen fonds

Series consists of ephemera and artifacts collected by or given to Nouwen throughout his lifetime, including awards and honorary degrees, materials kept in his office and home, promotional materials, artwork, postcards, religious artifacts, and personal artifacts.

Series has been arranged in the following seven sub-series according to their function:
1.14.1. Awards and honourary degrees;
1.14.2. Contents of Nouwen's office;
1.14.3. Promotional material for lectures, workshops and special events;
1.14.4. Collected artwork;
1.14.5. Personal effects;
1.14.6. Postcards, cards and prints;
1.14.7. Religious artifacts.

General correspondence

This series is made up of general correspondence files, arranged alphabetically by the name of the correspondent or by the name of the person about whom Prof. McNeill is corresponding. Incoming and outgoing correspondence cover such areas as research, supervision of graduate students, editing of papers, trips, as well as numerous letters of reference for past students and colleagues seeking recommendations for appointments, tenure, awards and grants. Some correspondence relates to consultancy work such as files on the Ministry of the Solicitor General, Advanced Medical Systems, Inc., and Scintrex Ltd.. There is extensive correspondence with colleagues in Australia regarding his involvement in the development of a body compositional laboratory at Prince Henry Hospital in Melbourne.

The files often contain attached documentation to the correspondence. This is most often the case when corresponding with or about students under his supervision. Files may include drafts of thesis, research reports and Ph.D. oral assessments.

Archives of Newfoundland Mines Study

This series is a collection of documentation in form of reports, data, research materials and articles relating to the study of radon levels in Newfoundland Mines conducted by the Federal Government in the 1960s. Most of this material is copies given to Prof. McNeill to conduct his research on radon exposure for the Atomic Energy Board of Canada. There is however a scattering of his original notes and correspondence from the 1995 that he produced while writing his report entitled Measurements of Radon Progeny in Canadian Mines before 1968. The report itself can be found in Series 8 – Consultancy, Box B2005-0004/003 (13). The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission has requested that these records remain with Kenneth G. McNeill Fonds since Prof McNeill was their last custodian.

Professional associations and conferences

Dr. Glass belonged to many professional associations, in some of which he played a very active role. He was also much in demand as an adviser to and participant in conferences in his areas of specialization. This series reflects his involvement in these areas; additional information may also be found in the addresses in series 10.

There are extensive files are on the fluid dynamics divisions of the American Physical Society and NASA, on the aerodynamics committee of the National Research Council of Canada, and on the geothermal energy study of the Science Council of Canada, which Dr. Glass headed. The conferences represented are mostly international ones on gasdynamics and shock tubes. Dr. Glass also sat on a number of editorial boards and was the founder of the journal, Shock Waves.

The material in this series includes correspondence, programs, minutes, reports, lecture notes, addresses, press clippings, and photographs.

Personal files

This series contains biographical sketches compiled for internal University of Toronto purposes and for several biographical dictionaries (ca. 1960-1992), including a selection of photographs; a personal data file compiled by Professor Glass in July, 1986; certificates and diplomas for academic and honorary degrees and other awards (1947-1986); and press clippings (1977-1985).

Correspondence

Dr. Glass was a prolific letter writer and this series represents only a small portion of his total output. The remainder will be found in accession B94-0033. There are two "personal correspondence files" from his office, covering the years 1964-1966 and 1968-1971. The remaining eight files contain extensive personal correspondence for the months of April, 1981 to mid-July, 1982, and October, 1987 through October, 1988, witha few letters for 1983, 1985 and 1993.

The "personal correspondence files" from his office encompass the personal side of his professional work, such as invitations to conferences and speaking engagements, references, and internal reports and meetings.

The personal correspondence for 1981-1982 relates primarily to Dr. Glass being appointed a University Professor, to his part in the campaign on behalf of Andrei Sakharov and other Soviet refusniks and dissidents, to exchange programs between the University of Toronto and other universities, and to conferences. The files for 1987 and 1988 contain much correspondence by the Committee of Concerned Scientists on the extradition of Nazi war criminals, particularly Alois Brunner, and on the campaign to allow Soviet Jewish refusniks to emigrate. Most of the remaining letters are devoted to a discussion to Professor Glass's ongoing research and writings and to his interest in Jews in China.

The arrangement is chronological.

Photographs of European trip

These photographs were taken by Acland during a trip to Europe in 1964 and document the architecture and landscape of various cities. These images would have been used for research and to illustrate several published works including a series of articles entitled “Building and Land:…” in Canadian Architect starting in 1968. Interior photographs of cathedrals and churches would have also formed the basis for his research on vaults, some of which were reproduced in his 1972 book Medieval Structure : The Gothic Vault.

Countries documented in this series include: Central European countries such as Czechoslovakia, Poland, Hungary; England; France; Greece; the Islamic Middle East such as Turkey, Iran and Egypt; Italy, Portugal, Spain and Yugoslavia. There are also photographs of Nigeria taken by a photographer Grant Wanzel. These are included here because they were originally filed with the European photographs.

Co-operative Housing Case Study: background materials & research

In addition to the attendance at meetings of CHAT and ASC board, staff and member meetings, and interviews and surveys of users and non-users, the researchers also collected background material on the Ashworth Square Housing Co-operative, and the United Church of Canada Board of Evangelism and Social Service National Housing Committee as one of its main funding bodies.

The background materials on the Ashworth Square Housing Co-operative itself include architectural drawings of the suite plans, a copy of the original proposal for its development, a copy of the occupancy agreement and by-laws, as well as general publicity for the co-op and information regarding the initial election of members to the Board of Directors. There are also seven b/w photographs of co-op members and children. The background materials on the United Church of Canada Board of Evangelism and Social Service National Housing Committee includes minutes of meetings of both the housing committee and the Technical Subcommittee, correspondence, reports, a brief on housing to Hon Paul Hellyer (Minister of Transport).

Professors Breslauer and Andrews also conducted research into housing issues, and co-op housing alternatives across Canada, the US and abroad. These files include information on the Co-op Housing Foundation, and the Canadian Mortgage and Housing Corporation papers on co-op housing and in particular, on the Ashworth Square Housing Co-op. They also include information on co-op housing conferences, other housing co-operatives and organizations, and general housing issues and research published during this time period. Included in this series is a CBC radio special on housing cooperatives which includes a piece on the ASC.

John Fulton Turnbull: Logging reports

Included in the N.J. Turnbull collection are seven logging reports produced by his father, J.F. Turnbull. The majority of the reports are the Annual Report of the Forester of the North Bay District (1923-1929) during his time as district forester there. There are several photographs that are included within the reports that have not been removed or catalogued, but pertain to the content of the report. The final item – a Certificate of Life Membership to the Ontario Professional Foresters Association – is oversized and therefore stored in a separate location.

Turnbull, John Fulton

Photographs

Portrait of Kay Riddell and images of gatherings and events of the International Student Centre and its predecessor Friendly Relations with Overseas Students. Pen sketch of the International Student Centre House.

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