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University of St. Michael's College, John M. Kelly Library, Special Collections
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Nouwen wil pastoraat dat over geloof spreekt

Item consists of an article by Jurjen Beumer titled "Nouwen wil pastoraat dat over geloof spreekt" [Nouwen ministry would like to speak about faith]. Beumer discusses Nouwen and his writings and his thoughts on faith.

Henri Nouwen

Item consists of an article about Henri Nouwen (in the section of the magazine titled "Faces of Faith). Boers describes his meeting with Nouwen, and describes his visit at L'Arche Daybreak. Boers interviews Nouwen and asks him about his experience in Latin America and attempt to find a vocation there, his 1984 speaking tour [An Interrupted Journey], his decision to join L'Arche, and Nouwen's role at L'Arche and his feelings about the community.

"Vieren van elkaar": in gesprek met Henri Nouwen

Item consists of an interview titled "Vieren van elkaar" ["Celebrating together"]. Item also includes Nouwen's handwritten notes that he made during the interview. The notes include his drawings of the time-line and a wagon-wheel like figure with a dark centre.

Brieven van lezers

Item consists of an article which criticizes Nouwen's article "Toekomstige parkeerplaats tussen de sterren" [according to a brief translation].

De magneet van Ars

Item consists of an article which discusses Nouwen's visit to Ars [according to a brief translation].

Spiritual direction

Item consists of a booklet regarding spiritual direction with subtitles such as: The Movement from Absurdity to Obedience and The Three Disciplines of the Spiritual Life.

Mary, mother of priests

Item consists of a booklet featuring a homily by Nouwen on Mary for the Feast of the Visitation of the Blessed Virgin Mary at the Cathedral Church of St. Michael, Toronto, during Marian year 1988.

Intimacy: pastoral psychological essays

Item consists of a book which Nouwen wrote about intimacy. The book has been divided into the following: Introduction; The context, Chapter 1--From magic to faith; Intimacy and sexuality, Chapter 2--The challenge to love, Chapter 3--Homosexuality: Prejudice or mental illness?; Intimacy and prayer, Chapter 4--Student prayers: Between confusion and hope, Chapter 5--Pentecostalism on campus; Intimacy and community, Chapter 6--Depression in the seminary; Intimacy and the ministry, Chapter 7--The priest and his mental health, Chapter 8--Training for the campus ministry; Conclusion.
As is stated on the back cover: "Intimacy is the theme which binds the divergent subjects of this book together. Intimacy in the relationship between man and woman, between man and man, and between man and God; intimacy also in the life of the man who wants to live in a religious community, intimacy finally for the minister or priest who wants to give a home to others but risks losing his own."

The Genesee diary: report from a Trappist monastery

The item consists of a book which Nouwen wrote about the seven months he spent at the Abbey of the Genesee in upstate New York during 1974. The book has been divided into the following: Introduction; 1 June: A Stranger in Paradise; 2 July: You Are the Glory of God; 3 August: Nixon and St. Bernard; 4 September: Pray for the World; 5 October: Strangers and Friends; 6 November: Many Saints but One Lord; 7 December: Waiting Quietly and Joyfully; Conclusion; References.
As is stated in the front flap: "Participating fully in the life of the monastery by working in the bakery, helping in the construction of a new chapel, and following the daily hours of prayer, Nouwen brought many typical human experiences and questions to his spiritual director: questions about the aim of the contemplative life and the place of prayer and politics in his life, but also feelings of impatience, jealousy, and self-depreciation, excitement over new spiritual insight, and struggle with the subtle difficulties of allowing Jesus Christ to be the center of his existence."

In memoriam

Item consists of a book which Nouwen wrote about his mother's death.
As is stated on the front flap: . . . ."in life she belonged to a few, in death she is for all."

Entering the heart of God

This item is a 2 page article by Henri Nouwen entitled, ‘Entering the Heart of God’, published in The Catholic Agitator, February 4, 1984, pp. 4-5. This article is identified as a condensation from a talk which Nouwen gave in Pasadena, Ca. on October 10, 1983. Nouwen opens the article by stating, ‘Every time we celebrate the Eucharist we say, “Christ has died, Christ has risen, Christ will come again”. I have repeated those words over and over again daily, but since I went to Central America they have taken on new meaning for me’. In the first section of the article entitled ‘Christ has died”, Nouwen says that in his visit to Nicaragua ‘I saw Christ being crucified again’. He reminds people that even though they may have many troubles at home the Christian also enters into the heart of God who ‘became all humanity’ and that there is therefore a broader responsibility for one another. Nouwen discusses his hope that the church in Central America would at least be providing a word of peace and hope but that instead he found division and confusion. In the second section entitled, ‘Christ has risen’ Nouwen begins by stating that this means that ‘there is no pain or agony or confusion or conflict that has the final say’. Nouwen speaks of the meeting between a number of Americans and some women of Nicaragua who had lost children, husbands and others to U.S. supported violence from Honduras. The Americans asked forgiveness for the actions of their government and in a moment of powerful presence, it was given. ‘They wanted us to be free from our guilt so that we could speak for them and for peace. In the third section entitled, ‘Christ will come again’ Nouwen says that that moment will be when Christ does not ask if you were successful but what we have done ‘for the least of these’.

Intimacy, fecundity and ecstasy

This item is a 7 page article by Henri Nouwen entitled, ‘Intimacy, Fecundity and Ecstasy’ published in Radix, May/June 1984, N 8 – 23, pp. 8 – 12, 22-23. Nouwen begins with a quotation from John’s Gospel, Chapter 15, and introduces a connection with this gospel passage and the work of Jean Vanier, the founder of L’Arche. ‘Out of that experience of living with severely handicapped people, Jean Vanier came to a conclusion, a kind of vision, that all human beings have three rights, or three privileges. They are the right and privilege of intimacy, the right and privilege of fecundity, and the right and privilege of ecstasy’. Nouwen then goes on to discuss each of these three ‘rights’. He begins by noting how difficult intimacy is for modern people; that people are unhappy and often at the mercy of their needs and the wounds of generations. Nouwen then asks, ‘Is there another way of living?’ and suggests that when Jesus says ‘make your home in me’, the answer is to be found there. With regard to fecundity, Nouwen begins by distinguishing between fruitfulness and productivity. He goes on to describe our society’s need to measure and control and duplicate, which he sees as productivity. Fruitfulness, Nouwen describes as a gift of vulnerability. ‘Probably the most important quality of fruit is that we have to leave it alone in order for it to grow’. In the final section on ecstasy Nouwen speaks of joy, the joy given by Jesus. Nouwen suggests that so many people live at a level of busyness, boredom and a sense of meaninglessness. He suggests that to be ecstatic is to move out of a state of being static; being willing to change and grow; to choose life. Nouwen concludes by saying,’ Wherever we live, we can live celebrating ecstatically, always having a party. There’s something new, a smile, because God is with us and we want to live’.

Letting go of all things

This item is a 2 page article by Henri Nouwen entitled: ’Letting Go of all things’, published in Baptist Peacemaker, Vol. V, No. 2, April 1985, pp. 1 & 5. It was previously published in Sojourners, May, 1979.
Nouwen begins by stating ‘The call to prayer is not an invitation to retreat to a familiar piety, but a challenge to make a radical move toward prayer as “the only necessary thing”’. Nouwen suggests prayer is a dying to self, a call to martyrdom, an opening to God, and is the ground from which people move out into the world of action. Nouwen quotes from a recent book by holocaust survivor Floris B. Bakels about the power prayer had for him in the camp. Nouwen writes about our ambivalence toward prayer, being drawn to it and yet resistant to it because of the demands we feel will be made by God. Nouwen concludes, ‘ When …our act of prayer remains the act from which all actions flow, we can be joyful even when our times are depressing, peaceful even when the threat of war is all around us, hopeful even when we are constantly tempted to despair’.

Liberation: freedom to love

This item is a 1 ½ page article by Henri Nouwen entitled: ‘Liberation: Freedom to Love’, published in Together by World Vision International, April-June 1985, No. 7. This item is identified as excerpts from Nouwen’s prologue to Gustavo Gutierrez’ book ‘We Drink from our own Wells’. Nouwen begins by stating, ‘The spirituality of liberation is deeply rooted in the lived experience of God’s presence in history’. Nouwen then writes that Gutierrez believes liberation theology cannot be reduced to a political movement nor is it a ‘theological rationale for a class struggle’. Nouwen states that Jesus is the center of the movement and Jesus loves both the oppressed and the oppressor. Nouwen reiterates a theme he has spoken of before that the spiritual well-being of the Americas, north and south are tied together and that the ‘inflamed’ cord of Central America that binds them together is reminding us that there is a deep spiritual crisis that involves the whole of the Americas. He concludes, ‘ In the name of millions of the nameless poor, Gustavo Gutierrez reaches out a hand to us and calls us to open our hearts again to the life-giving Spirit of Jesus…’

Living in joyful ecstasy

This item is a 5 page article by Henri Nouwen entitled, ‘, Living in Joyful Ecstasy, The House of God a Home amid an anxious World’, published in Sojourners, Vol. 14, No. 8, August/September 1985, pp. 27 – 31. This is part 3 of a three part series. Nouwen begins by stating that he does not believe ecstasy is simply for the mystical few but is in fact, for all Christian people. ‘I consider it very important to reclaim the word ‘ecstasy’ for all Christian people who strive to move from the house of fear to the house of love’. Nouwen then points to Jesus emphasis that he has come to bring joy and that all are called to remain in that joy. Nouwen moves from this introduction to a section entitled,’ Ecstasy and Fear’ and begins by stating that ‘just as fear prevents intimacy and fecundity, so too it makes ecstasy impossible’. He suggests that fear makes us cling to routine, to sameness and fear of change. Nouwen speaks of the people of L’Arche with whom he spent time and notes both the presence of routine but also the journey from fear to joy.’ If the world is a fearful place where you need all of your emotional energy just to survive, there is little capacity to move from one way of being alive to another…Where all has become fear, joy cannot be’. In the next section entitled, ‘Ecstasy and Love’ Nouwen points to the great difference between ephemeral happiness and deep joy. Deep joy is the joy of Jesus. It is a joy that holds both happiness and sorrow, good times and bad. ‘[Joy] is the solid ground from which new life can always burst forth’. In a final section entitled, ’A New International Order’ Nouwen moves on to write of the fears that are causing nations to build barriers and to fights battles rather than seek reconciliation and peace. He points to Jesus’ call to ‘the nations’ as well as to individual people. Nouwen notes the situations in Central and South America as places in which fear has brought nations almost to the brink of nuclear war. Nouwen concludes by stating, ‘The word “ecstasy” has opened a new perspective on joy as an essential element of a truly Christian spirituality. It is the constant moving away from the static places of death into the place where life can be recognized and celebrated’.

Saying no to death

This item is a 3 page article by Henri Nouwen entitled, ‘Saying No to Death’ published in Fellowship the journal of the Fellowship of Reconciliation, Vol. 51, No. 9, September, 1985, pp. 9 – 11. Nouwen begins the article by citing a visit to an exclusive preparatory school where everyone seemed polite, intelligent and good mannered. However, at some point they all watched a film containing great deal of violence which was obviously entertaining to the young audience. Nouwen points to ‘the fact that a large portion of contemporary entertainment is fascinated with violence and death’. Nouwen then goes on to write of the various ways in which human beings live death which includes hatred, fear, judgment of others, desire to destroy what we fear. By judging others Nouwen suggests we play God but ‘everyone who plays God ends up acting as the demon’. Nouwen goes on to state that the peacemaker never plays God, never judges but sees others as fellow sinners and fellow saints. He suggests that, ‘As peacemakers we must have the courage to see the powers of death at work even in our innermost selves’. Nouwen points to our need to see ourselves as forgiven people rather than living in self-hatred which brings depression and fear and a form of death. In contrast to death Nouwen suggests that ‘Life mean mobility and change. Wherever there is life there is movement and growth’. Nouwen concludes by stating that ‘real resistance [to death] requires the humble confession that we are partners in the evil we seek to resist’.

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