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Description archivistique
University of Toronto Poster Collection Série organique
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Letters of recommendation

This series includes both requests received by Prof. Prentice for recommendations for former students and colleagues as well as her responses to these requests.

Student days

This series documents Alison Prentice’s days as a student at Smith College (B.A. 1955), while attending the Ontario College of Education ca. 1958 and during her Ph.D. studies in history at the University of Toronto.

B1999-0017 includes essays and papers written while a student at Smith College as well as field essays written as part of her Ph.D. comprehensive examinations at the University of Toronto. These are arranged chronologically.

B2009-0010 contains her correspondence home to her parents while a student at Smith College and during one year at the University of Geneva (1951-1955)

Manuscripts and publications

In the summer of 1983 Professor Barbeau was invited to write an article on mathematical problems for the alumni magazine, University of Toronto Graduate. Thirty-eight columns appeared between September 1984 and the summer of 1993. Associated with it
was the newsletter, After Aftermath, also compiled by Barbeau. Each column contained a cryptic crossword and posed a mathematical problem and, over the years, it drew responses from several hundred readers, including about two dozen “regulars”. The columns were assembled in book format and published as After Math: puzzles and brainteasers in 1995. This column, the resulting correspondence, and the newsletter form the bulk of this series.

Other publications in this series are, in chronological order, The Mathematical Oak, a newsletter of the Department of Mathematics edited by Professor Barbeau between 1986 and 1992; Polynomials (1989), a course book “designed to stand between the high school
and university curricula”2; Power Play (1997), the focus of which is power of numbers; a paper co-authored with P. C. Stangeby, “Some foundations of analysis for engineering science (MAT194F)” (2002); reviews of Pell’s Equations (2003); and a copy of a manuscript by Don Patterson, “University of Toronto – Honours Mathematics and Physics and Chemistry, 1927-1931; some memories as of December 1993.”

The files may contain correspondence, notes, drafts of manuscripts, page proofs, printed columns and newsletters.

Sound recordings

These sound tapes were given to Professor Barbeau by Professor Warwick Sawyer at the time of his retirement in the 1970s. Includes two 1964 lectures by professor Edward F. Assmus, Jr. (1931–1998) on Algebraic Coding Theory as well as a talk by Harvard Mathematics Professor Garrett Birkhoff (1911-1996) on the history of computing math. All three lectures were possibly for the same event in February 1964 “lecture to AYI”.

Travel

Series consists of records relating to 2 trips taken by Dr. Franklin: her return to Berlin in 1969 for the World Peace Congress, and her trip to China in 1981 for the International Conference of Early Metallurgy. See subseries descriptions for more information.

Papers

Series consists of drafts of journal and conference articles by Prof. Ng. Series also includes some contracts with publishers and indexes to articles. Files are arranged in chronological order.

Research

Series consists of records relating to various research projects, including correspondence, research data, interview notes, grant proposals and other records. Projects documented include a book and symposium on anti-racism, feminism and critical approaches to education; Changing work, changing lives: mapping the Canadian garment industry; a history of the International Order of Daughters of the Empire (IODE) in New Brunswick; a bibliography on race relations and multicultural education for the Ministry of College and Universities (MCU); and projects on garment workers and immigrant women Series also includes annual applications and reports for small scale project departmental funding.

Scholars

Series consists of files Prof. Ng kept on particular scholars. File contents include articles, speeches, conference talks, and some correspondence. Copies of widely available journal articles have not been retained. Series also begins with a collection of business cards, miscellaneous CVs and correspondence.

Associations

This small series consists of files kept by Prof. Ng on particular scholarly associations, including the Canadian Association for the Study of Adult Education, the Canadian Sociology and Anthropology Association, the Chinese Canadian National Council Toronto Chapter, the Chinese Canadian National Council Toronto Chapter, Researchers and Academics of Colour for Equality, and the Society for Socialist Studies. Series also includes records relating to Diaspora, indigenous and minority education: An International Journal. Records include newsletters, correspondence, award information, conference records, and calls for papers.

Health

Series documents Ham’s failing health especially from the point that he was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease which eventually claimed his life on September 16 1997. Included are detailed medical records, daily diary, notes, correspondence, negatives of a resonance imaging scan.

Publications

Over his 38-year career, Prof. Israel has written extensively on the history of South Asian people. This series contains records relating primarily to three publication projects: the Safe Haven project for the Multicultural History Society of Ontario (MHSO) and Royal Ontario Museum, Encyclopedia of Canada’s Peoples (1999; also sponsored by the MHSO) and In the future soil: a social history of the Indo-Canadians in Ontario (1994). (See Series 3 for general correspondence related to the MHSO). There is also one file of correspondence and partial manuscript relating to publication of selected articles from History Today, and published as Pax Britannica (1968). Prof. Israel was editor and wrote the introductory essay.

The records relating to “Safe Haven. The refugee experience of five families” consist entirely of the manuscript for the book submitted to Prof. Israel in 1994 for his comments. Prof. Israel also prepared the Preface (not included) and undertook research on the Tamil community. At this time Prof. Israel was Chairman, Board of Directors of the Multicultural History Society. An exhibition was also produced by the MHSO for the new Heritage Gallery of Canada’s peoples at the Royal Ontario Museum.

The records relating to the Encyclopedia of Canada’s Peoples include manuscripts of articles on South Asian people edited by Prof. Israel and files on three of the four articles he prepared for this publication: the Ismailis, South Asians and Pakistanis. The manuscript relating to the article on Ahmadis is not included.

The records relating to In the further soil: a social history of the Indo-Canadians in Ontario consist of correspondence, manuscript, and research notes.

The remaining records deal specifically with his publications on India and Indian migration, especially to Canada. These include notes and correspondence regarding his contribution of chapters in the books, The Congress and Indian Nationalism: Historical Perspectives and Reformers, Writers and Editors: Social Transformation in Maharashtra 1830-1940. They also include notes and research regarding an incomplete work entitled Violence and Empire: James Neill in the Indian Mutiny.

Publications: "Communications and Power"

Correspondence, research material, notes and card files relating to, with drafts of, Milton Israel's book, "Communications and Power: propaganda and the press in the Indian Nationalist Struggle, 1920-1947" (1994).

University of Toronto: Lecture notes and teaching materials

This series documents courses taught by Professor Israel in the Department of History Faculty of Arts and Sciences. It consists of correspondence, course outlines, reading lists, examination questions, and lecture notes. The arrangement is by ascending course number and by lecture topic.

The courses documented in this series are:

HIS 101 : The Emergence of the Third World n.d.
HUM 101 : South Asian Civilization 2001
HIS 232 : The British Imperial Experience 1997
HIS 282 : The History of India 1978-2002
HIS 364 : Studies in the History of Modern India 1986-2005
HIS 394 : South Asian Migration 1996-2004
HIS 491/JHA 1690 : Nationalism in India 1981-2002

Grant applications/reviews

This series contains records documenting Dr. Fowler’s application for funding for various research projects throughout his academic career and then as President of his not-for-profit company, Center for Early Learning Inc. It includes files for successful as well as unsuccessful applications. Files contain correspondence, written research proposal, application and other supporting documentation. Research projects included, among others, cognitive learning, reading and general intellectual training, developmental learning, establishment of an infant early childhood research laboratory, gender differences, and early language stimulation. Note that applications relating to the Mothercraft project will be found in Series 9.

As well, files relating to Dr. Fowler’s assessment of other individual’s applications to funding bodies are also included. These include mainly requests for assessment from the Canada Council (later Social Sciences & Humanities Research Council).

Correspondence

This series consists of all forms of professional correspondence touching on all aspects of Prof. Stoicheff’s career and relate directly to work and activities described in most other series. Examples of the types of correspondence include requests and acknowledgements to attend conferences, to present papers, to act as a referee or examiner, to accept positions on committees or board positions of associations. Also included is some correspondence and memos relating to professional associations, university offices and the Department of Physics. Stoicheff was also consulted regularly for research and career advice and to act as peer reviewer for appointments. This is also evident throughout the correspondence. Original arrangement of correspondence by year has been kept. There are two files of Letters of Recommendation filed at the end of this series.

Books

Research notes, draft manuscripts, correspondence with publisher document Prof Stoicheff’s book, Gerhard Herzberg: an Illustrious Life in Science (2002). Also included in this series is similar documentation for an unpublished book that Stoicheff was editing The Riddle of Light that was based on the Seminar course by the same name. (See Series 10). While many of the seminar participants contributed to this manuscript, it was never published.

Professional associations and activities

This series documents membership on various professional and academic bodies, consulting and commercial work, participation on government committees and advisory boards, as well as his role as reviewer for programs or referee for grants or appointments.

Ontario Laser and Lightwave Research Centre

This multidisciplinary research center was originally set up as one of the Ontario Centres of Excellence. Its principal investigators were all University of Toronto faculty. Prof Stoicheff was the founding executive director from 1987-1991. One of the Centre’s key goals was to bring together the academic community with the business community so as to further find application and markets for these new technologies.

Film

Film entitled "Undergraduates Presentation and Farewell to Sir Robert Falconer". This is a black and white silent film showing the presentation of a gift book to President Falconer in Convocation Hall.

Professional correspondence

This series contains correspondence between Dr. Fowler and colleagues, students, associates and others documenting his career as an academic in both Canada and the United States. The first files contain general correspondence in chronological order followed by subject files in alphabetical order. The subject files contain correspondence with particular individuals or organizations or topics. Titles of these files include correspondents such as former students such as Irene Beley, and Amy Swenson, colleagues such as J. McVicker Hunt (University of Illinois), Dr. Alice Honig (Syracuse University), Dr. Myrtle McGraw, Dr. Robert Hess (University of Chicago) and others. Topics and organizations include President’s Committee on Mental Health, and the Telegraph Hill Co-op Nursery School, among others.

Researchers are advised to check both general and subject files for related correspondence as well as other series in this accession.

Administration

Series consists of correspondence and documents (memos, reports, meeting minutes) relating to various administration positions held by Anne Lancashire throughout her career at the University of Toronto. The series is subdivided by administration files that are University-wide, from University College, the English Department, University College English Department, Graduate Drama Centre, and Cinema Studies.

Research files – Other projects

The principal research project in this series is described by Ms Winearls as “The mapping of western North America in the 19th century with particular reference to the De Fonte fantasy and the earlier ‘Sea of the West’ fantasy”. (The maps showed purported water routes between the west coast
and the Northwest Passage or the central North American plains.) This project was begun in the early 1990s but not completed as planned and led to an article on one particular map, “Thomas Jefferys Map of Canada and the mapping of the western part of North America, 1750-1768’, that appeared in 1996. The second research project is on carto-bibliographic analysis and methodology re 18th century printed maps of North America [1].

The series begins with map bibliography & notes, consisting of preliminary bibliographic entries for Mer de l’Ouest/Riviere Longue de l’Ouest, and an early draft of a bibliography of maps relating to the De Fonte fantasy, followed by files of maps arranged by area: World, Arctic, Western hemisphere, North America, and Canada. There are also source files with notes, correspondence, and copies of documents, maps and other source material, covering De Fonte, early Canadian maps, and archival sources in British Columbia, the United States and Europe. Much of the photocopied material that has been retained is annotated. These files are followed by research notes and correspondence on Northwest-De Fonte and biographical sources, and on related maps, along with requests for microform and maps. Included are reproductive copies of maps and other copies.

The files for the research project on carto-bibliographic analysis and methodology re 18th century printed maps of North America include sample entries, copies of maps and published bibliographies and sources (largely annotated), along with bibliographical analyses and North American maps sources for analysis. Some oversized maps are included.

The series ends with Ms Winearls’ research on book illustration in Canada for the History of the Book in Canada project. Three volumes were planned under the general editorship of Patricia Lockhart Fleming and Yvan Lamonde, and they appeared between 2004 and 2007. Ms Winearls’ contribution was to the first volume. The files contain correspondence, contracts, notes, and source material. Drafts of the manuscript are in Series 8.

B2016-0009 contains research Ms Winearls did on Canadian bird artist J. Fenwick Lansdowne from 2000-2013. Included are original photographs of the artist, interviews, notes, compiled bibliography and exhibition list. There is also collected photocopies of ephemera relating to the artist, reviews of his works and exhibition catalogues. Finally, Winearls collected copies of correspondence and contracts between Lansdowne and his agent Bud Feheley (restricted to 2026).

NOTES

[1] The descriptive portion of this series is drawn largely from notes provided by Ms Winearls in a container list she provided to the compiler of this inventory.

Manuscripts and publications

Ms Winearls has published widely on maps and map librarianship, beginning in 1967. This series consists of book reviews, articles, directories, exhibition catalogues, and chapters in books. A file in this series may contain draft of a manuscript, along with notes, covering correspondence, and reviews. The arrangement is chronological by date of publication.

Very few of Ms Winearls publications are missing from this series. The files relating to the writing of her major bibliographic work, Mapping Upper Canada, 1780-1867, are in Series 9. Files relating to Editing Early and Historical Atlases are found with the Conference on Editorial Problems files in Series 4.

A poster advertising the book, Ontario’s History in Maps (1984), which contains a cartobibliographic essay by Ms Winearls, “Sources for early maps in Ontario,” has been removed from B1998-0013/002(21) to /002(29).

Teaching files

Series consists of correspondence, lectures notes, course outlines and notes related to courses and lectures. It arranged by course or lecture chronologically.

Student files

Student files kept by Dr. Marsden which document the progress of her students (mainly graduate students). Files vary in content but usually contain correspondence, thesis proposals, critiques and analysis, letters of reference, marks, and Ph.D. oral comprehensive exam questions.

University of Toronto Administration

This series records Prof. Eddie’s personal employment arrangements with the University of Toronto from his appointment to the Department of Economics in 1971 as well as administrative activities relating to course and programme development, and committee activities. Files relating to his employment arrangements include annual activity reports and salary administration. There are also files relating to development of the European Studies programme of which he was Director, the International Relations Programme, the establishment of the Chair in Ukrainian Studies and his role as chair of the search committee, and his work as Academic Co-ordinator of the Joint Initiative in German and European Studies/DAAD (1998-2001). In addition there are three files as member of the Executive Committee of RALUT (Retired Academics and Librarians University of Toronto) (2003-2008).

Books

This series contains records relating to three books by Prof. Eddie. Ami “köztudott”, az igaz is? was published in Hungarian and was based on lectures delivered by Prof. Eddie at the Eötvös Lorand University in Budapest during the Spring of 1994. Files relating to this book include the German manuscript, drafts of lectures one to eight, as well as files relating to the scheduling and delivery of the lectures. Files relating to Historisches Verzeichnis der Grundbesitzer des Burgenlandes include correspondence, applications for grants, reviews and the Hungarian manuscript. The third book, his most recent work, is titled Landownership in Eastern German before the Great War: a quantitative analysis. Files include correspondence as well as drafts of the manuscript.

Teaching and research

This series consists of sample examinations from Cambridge University, University of London, Nottingham University and University of Toronto relating to Classical Studies, as well as lectures in both German and English on Roman History, delivered at the University of Giessen (early 1930’s) and at English language universities in Britain (Cambridge, Nottingham) and Canada (University of Toronto). Also included is a file containing his curriculum vitae ca 1940,and a file with a draft bibliography in German.

Papyrus

This series documents Prof. Heichelheim’s expertise as specialist in Latin and Greek translation. During academic year 1938-1939 he gave lectures on select papyri in the Classical Faculty at Cambridge University. Topics included Pap. Eleph.1, Sentimental papyrus, An ordinance of the salt merchants, Teptynis papyrus, and Pap. Gis 40 [Papyrus of Giessen]. This series also contains manuscripts of translations of various papyri such as Rhosos papyrus, Rylands Papyrus, as well as manuscript on the Adler Papyrus, the Zu Pap. Michigan III, and the Zu Pap. Oslo Inv. 504.

Professional correspondence

This series consists of professional correspondence arranged chronologically. Most of the material dates from 1964. A flood in Sidney Smith Hall in 1958 destroyed or damaged much of Professor Careless’ early records. The correspondence in this series provides an overview of J. M. S. Careless’ activities as an historian, teacher, administrator, and researcher from 1954 to 1997. Topics include: the Canadian Historical Association, conferences, George Brown, Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada, the Multi-Cultural Historical Society of Ontario, professional associations, publications, references, research, sabbaticals, and scholarly support.

Associations

This series documents Professor Careless’ involvement in various associations. The records consist of correspondence, research notes, and reports relating to the following associations: CBC Television Projects; Canadian Historical Association; Ontario Archaeological and Historic Sites Board; Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada; and the Multi-Cultural Historical Society of Ontario.

Ceremonies and obligation lists

This series includes copies of addresses and poems used in homilies during the Ritual, obligation booklets, obligation lists for special ceremonies, statistics on obligated engineers and collected correspondence concerning the preparations for the inaugural ceremonies. Several files also include information on special ceremonies for older candidates and proposed special ceremonies that did not occur.

Material from accession B1995-0040 (1959-1989) also includes a copy of the ceremony book for Camp Wardens, application forms and considerable material concerning the manufacture and distribution of iron rings, as well as preparations made for campus ceremonies. Material from Accession B2009-0029 includes six files (06-11) containing updated ceremony booklets and guidelines, a certificate for the nomination of an Honorary Camp Warden, several speeches and a candidate list. Files are arranged chronologically. White prints, several photographs and two obligation sheets have been removed for separate storage.

Expansion of the ritual

The series contains primarily correspondence with Camps Two through Nine, much of it dealing with the matter of verifying candidate credentials from different jurisdictions. There is also some correspondence of a social nature related to the establishment of authorities and Camp Wardens in new jurisdictions. The system of record keeping by Camp appears to have stopped in 1954, after which correspondence pertaining to the Camps may be found in the individual correspondence files in series 5. Arrangement is by Camp number, followed by the records pertaining to discussions of expanding the Ritual to the United Kingdom, India and the United States.

Camp Ten records pertain to a proposed camp in Ottawa, which was never established. Camp Ten, when it was established, became the camp for the Université Laval in Québec City in 1956. Camp Twelve was established by Carleton University in Ottawa in 1958. The B1995-0040 accession includes one file of material, from 1978-1987, related to the expansion of the “Links” programme of the Order of the Engineer organization, based in the United States. The records for Camp Five contain an example of an early iron ring.

National Research Council

Series contains is composed of records dating from McKay’s time at the National Research Council. During the Second World War, the organization was mobilized to support the Allied war effort. As a result, most of the series’ records relate to military research and development. Canadian Army Operational Research Group (C.A.O.R.G.) reports compose approximately half the files that make up the series. These reports cover subjects ranging from blast measurements for anti-tank mine clearance to the number and distribution of Japanese paper balloons in North America. There are also two summary reports on Japanese balloon incidents.
The remainder of the textual and graphic records are made up of committee minutes, general Department of Defence documents, and a short paper on Canada’s part in the development of the radio proximity fuse, which McKay contributed to as assistant to project leader Professor Arnold Pitt.

Also included in this series are the remains of a Japanese paper balloon. Paper balloons, also known as balloon bombs, were a by-product of an atmospheric experiment by Axis scientists, which discovered a powerful air current traveling across the Pacific at about 30,000 feet [1]. Taking advantage of this knowledge, the Japanese military developed what may well have been the first intercontinental weapon in the form of explosive devices attached to paper balloons. These balloons were released in Japan and carried along the Pacific by a jet stream, ultimately finding their way to North America’s West Coast. Although the Japanese are thought to have released as many as 9,000 paper balloons, only 1,000 or so are thought to have reached North America, resulting in a total of six casualties [2].

NOTES

  1. Johnna Rizzo, “Japan’s secret WWII weapon: Balloon bombs,” National Geographic, 27 May 2013.
  2. Ibid.

Manuscripts and publications

Series contains manuscripts and publications that McKay either wrote or kept in his files. Although the majority of pieces address scientific matters, the series also includes a Junior Prize Essay (“Fathers Versus Sons”) that McKay wrote while still in high school. A number of pieces, including the aforementioned “Fathers Versus Sons,” are to be found in journals or magazines, which have been included in the fonds both so as to preserve context and because many of them are no longer in print. It is worth noting that four of the articles in the series were coauthored, rather than sole-authored, by McKay. These are: “The Decay of Nitrogen Afterglow,”
“”The Decay of the Populations of Metastable Atoms and Ions from the Same D-C. Discharge in Neon,” “Effect of Previous History on Switching Rate in Ferrites,” and “The Hall Effect and Resistivity in Tellurium.” The series also includes McKay’s PhD dissertation, The Measurement of the Dialectric Constant of Electrolytes, and the high school physics textbook he co-authored with D.G. Ivey and which his sister, Marjorie, illustrated.

Problem sets and examinations

The problem sets in this series were used by Satterly while teaching at the University of Toronto. The files are arranged in chronological order by academic year and term. Annotated examinations are scattered throughout the records. A personal bound copy of all of Satterly's examinations is filed at thend of this series and includes an introductory note him. These examinations are often heavily annotated. At the end of this series are a number of files of a more general nature on miscellaneous mathematical problems.

Records from two of the four accessions are found in this series.

University of Toronto. McLuhan Program in Culture and Technology

Marshall McLuhan suffered a stroke during the summer of 1979 and, when it became apparent that he could not continue his duties as Director of the Centre for Culture and Technology, the University decided he should retire (he was 68). He died on 31 December, 1980, six months after the University closed the Centre he had created. This decision created an enormous public outcry.

The closure of the Centre resulted from the report of a review committee which recommended that, in the absence of Dr. McLuhan, it be reconstituted as the McLuhan Program in Culture and Technology within the School of Graduate Studies. The Program would establish "a program of research and scholarship which would extend and preserve the work and ideas of Marshall McLuhan in the area of culture and technology." The committee also recommended that the Program be governed by a board of directors, that the University provide the financial resources for the Program, and that it be subject to periodic review.

Dr. Gotlieb was one of the founding members of the Board in 1982. The University's financial crisis, occasioned by the salary settlements that spring, nearly meant that the Program was stillborn. The Board was to spend a considerable amount of time over the next few years seeking outside funding; the Connaught Foundation proved especially receptive. Professor Gotlieb's resignation from the Advisory Board (as it was known from 1989) was reluctantly accepted in March, 1990.

These files contain correspondence, notes, minutes, financial statements, and reports. The arrangement is chronological.

Correspondence

This series contains a mix of personal and professional correspondence, both incoming and outgoing spanning five decades. The early correspondence (1947-1968) richly documents Gotlieb’s early role in the development of computer science at the University of Toronto, first within the Department of Physics and later the Computation Centre and its successor bodies the Institute of Computer Science and the Department of Computer Science. There are two files marked “historical” that contain correspondence that Gotlieb selected as significant to the history of computing. Most of these early files are marked “personal” but are really professional in nature. This “personal” correspondence mainly deals with appointments, recommendations, advice, visits, lectures and thanks from a wide range of colleagues and former students.

Later correspondence (ca. 1968-1995) was arranged more of less by either activity or organization. Therefore, general correspondence files relating to Gotlieb’s publishing activities, conferences, trips and lectures are grouped together and are followed by files containing correspondence with other universities: Canadian, US and international. These document the breadth of Gotlieb’s contacts and relationships with colleagues all over the world. Files marked University of Toronto document Gotlieb’s activities on campus with respect to some committees, special lectures, planning roles, cross appointments etc.. but only in a very cursory way. There are also a series of files relating to government bodies that mainly document his advisory roles. Finally, there is one box of printed e-mail that can cover any of the above mentioned categories and more. They date from June 1989 to June 1993 and are arranged chronologically.

Also included in this series are three files of Letters of Recommendation, dating from 1983-2001. Some of this correspondence relates to the Student Files found in Series X. Gotlieb was often asked for recommendations for former students long after they graduated.

Professional associations and committees

This series contains correspondence, reports, memos, notes, minutes of meetings relating to Gotlieb's participation in several professional associations and committees external to the University of Toronto. Of some interest for researchers of early computing are the printed proceedings of the Computation Seminar in 1949 and the Scientific Computation Forum in 1950 hosted by IBM. A group photograph taken at the first meeting is part of this series and has been filed at /001P(30). Other early records document the 1968 Congress of the International Federation of Information Processing in Edinburgh that Gotlieb helped organize. A 2001 history of IFIP is also included in this series, a chapter of which deals specifically with Gotlieb’s contribution to the international body. There is also documentation relating to the American Federation of Information Processing Societies, Computer History Project. Gotlieb was interviewed for this project and the 1971 transcript describes early computing at the University of Toronto from 1949 to 1961.

The greatest extent of records in this series documents Gotlieb’s active participation in the Association of Computing Machines – more commonly known as ACM. Included is some early correspondence (1960-1965) as well as correspondence while Editor-in-Chief of two publications Communications and The Journal of ACM. There are three boxes of files documenting his influential position as Chair of the ACM Awards Committee, a position he held from 1988-1993 and from 1998 to the present.

Editing

This series documents Gotlieb's activities on editorial advisory boards, as a referee, consultant and/or editor. It includes documentation on several publications, including the Annals of the History of Computing, the Journal of Computing and Society, Utilitas Mathematicas as well as several encyclopedias. There is also one general file relating to a variety of editorial projects. Not included in this series, are the papers related to his role in editing the publications of ACM. These records can be found in Series IV.

The files may contain correspondence, referee reports, submissions of papers, biographies of contributors, minutes and meeting agenda.

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