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Archival description
University of Toronto Archives and Records Management Services Series
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Certificates

Certificates cover his period as a student, as a professional engineer with the City of Toronto and as an alumnus of the University of Toronto. This series also contains high school diploma from Malvern Collegiate Institute in Toronto (1924), Ritual of the Calling of an Engineer (1929), Association of Professional Engineers (1939), U of T Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering Spring Reunion certificate (June 1979) and Canadian Institute on Pollution Control recognition for period as President 1953-1964 (1965).

Article, addresses and reports

This series contains copies of Hawkin's articles, addresses and reports many of which were written while advisor to various levels of governments. Subjects that are covered include immigration law and policy, immigrants, migrants and refugees, multiculturalism and race relations. Of some significance is a copy of the "Tremblay Memo", to the then minister of Citizenship and Immigration which sought to redefine the role of voluntary agencies concerned with immigration.

University of Toronto Administration

Files in this series contain minutes of meetings and correspondence documenting activities in the Centre of Linguistics Studies and the Department of Linguistics. Files containing correspondence of the Centre of Linguistics for the 1960s (prior to Prof. Chambers appointment to the University), were acquired by Prof. Chambers from Prof. C.D. Ellis in 1991. In addition to these files, are files documenting Prof. Chambers’ activities relating to honorary degrees, search committees and visiting lecturers.

Professional activities

Throughout his career, Prof. Irving was involved in many associations relating to sociology, archaeology and anthropology both in Canada and the United States. Files in this series contain correspondence, manuscripts of papers, and other documents relating to his activities with the American Anthropological Association, Canadian Archaeological Association, Canadian Sociology and Anthropology Association, Council for Canadian Archaeology (of which he was chair 1968-1970), and Society for American Archaeology. Also included are records relating to some conferences such as the Conference on Japanese Thought and Culture (1975).

University of Toronto

Prof. Irving joined the University of Toronto as professor of anthropology in 1968 after four years at the National Museum of Canada. The files in this series document, among others, include activities of the South West Campus Users Committee, a committee established in 1978 as a result of the report of the South-West Campus Redevelopment Task force. The Task Force reported on space needs and sharing of resources among academic units. The Department of Anthropology was one of many in the “Social Sciences” group who submitted briefs. The Task force recommended the relocation of the Department of Anthropology to Sidney Smith Hall.

There is only on file of lecture notes for ANTH 417, 418 (1973-1974).

Correspondence

This small series contains correspondence, largely of a professional nature and substantially relating to Professor Goudge's activities at the University of Toronto. The topics range from his employment and honours bestowed on him, to matters relating to his students and their academic work, to duties stemming from his sitting on the boards of academic journals. The arrangement is largely by these three groups.

The correspondence in the first files includes offers of employment generally (1934-1970), and employment at the University of Toronto along with annuities, academic leave, and honours, including Goudge's festschrift (1942-1981). Then come files on the supervision of students and the appraisal of doctoral theses (1946-1981) and letters of support for fellowships and scholarships (1967-1985). There is little correspondence relating to the development of administrative policies at the University, though there is a submission by Professor Goudge, in his capacity as chair of the Department of Philosophy, to the Macpherson Committee in 1966.

One of Professor Goudge's long-time friends was A. G. Huntsman, Professor of Marine Biology, with whom he carried on a lengthy (1958-1970) correspondence on philosophical issues relating to science and evolution. This file is followed by one containing Goudge's recollections of his association with A. N. Whitehead at Harvard and the University of Toronto in the 1930s. Professor Huntsman's personal records, which are in the University Archives, complement this correspondence.

The remainder of this series contains correspondence relating to Goudge's involvement with the American Philosophical Association, the Charles S. Peirce Society, the 1979 "Philosophy in Canada" conference, the Royal Society of Canada, and the journals, Dialogue, Encyclopedie Philosophique, Encyclopedia of Philosophy, The Monist, and Philosophy of the Social Sciences.

Correspondence

This series contains, in addition to letters, a wide range of material associated with the ongoing production of the Atlas: notes, memoranda, reports, brochures, partial drafts of the manuscript, photoprints and maps. The arrangement is generally chronological, except where otherwise noted.

Manuscripts and publications

Professor Dean, in collaboration with his colleagues on the Atlas project, began speaking and writing about it almost as soon as it began. These addresses and articles helped maintain scholarly interest in the project as it proceeded and also created a wider public awareness. Both are reflected in the reviews that the Atlas received, and the articles that were written about it, particularly after the Leipzig prize was awarded.

Personal correspondence

This series consists of chronologically arranged, incoming personal correspondence, documenting Ms. Walker’s personal life from 1936 to 1998. Correspondents include family, friends, Hart House Theatre colleagues, sorority sisters and fine art students. Major correspondents are: Burgon Bickersteth, Pat Carson, Norman Endicott, Robert Gill and James Reaney. The letters, mostly written in the 1950’s, document Ms. Walker’s friendships, romances, interest in theatre, and travels throughout Europe.

Hart House Theatre

Marion Walker was Production Assistant at Hart House Theatre from 1946 to 1957. Under the directorship of Robert Gill, she designed sets and costumes for each of the Theatre’s annual four plays. Her first production was St. Joan, starring Charmian King. Other early performers who worked with Ms. Walker at Hart House Theatre included Kate Reid, Donald Sutherland, and William Hutt.

The records in this series pertain to Ms. Walker’s involvement with Hart House Theatre. Textual records include scripts 1946, annotated Hart House Theatre programmes 1946 – 1957, and obituaries for Robert Gill, 1974.

Series also includes approximately 100 photographs of various productions for which Ms. Walker designed costumes and sets. The photographs depict various scenes, actors and set designs. Productions represented are: Romeo and Juliet, 1947; Julius Caesar, 1948; the Seagull, 1948; The Skin of Our Teeth, 1948, The Doctor’s Dilemma, 1948; Crime and Punishment, 1949; Othello, 1949; Fortune My Foe, 1950; The Guardsman, 1950; Captain Brassbound’s Conversion, 1950; Medea, 1950; Henry IV, 1950; Marco Millions, 1950; Richard II, 1951; Pygmalion, 1951; The Madwoman of Chaillot, 1951; The Admirable Crichton, 1952; The Winslow Boy, 1952; Macbeth, 1952; The Wild Duck, 1953; The School for Wives, 1956; and The Innocent, 1957.

Series also contains 8 sketchbooks of costume designs for the following Hart House productions: The Internal Machine, 1946; Othello, 1949; Medea, 1950; Richard II, 1951; School for Wives, 1956; Hamlet, [n.d.]; and King Lear, [n.d.].

Personal/Family

Consists of family biographical information on the Rhodes ancestry, submissions to American and Canadian Who’s Who volumes

Correspondence

This series contains general correspondence files arranged chronologically, and separate individual files arranged alphabetically by correspondent. General files include correspondence relating to his early education at the University of Edinburgh, appointments in Scotland and England, and appointment to the School of Hygiene, University of Toronto. Individual correspondents include, among others, faculty members at the University of Toronto such as Dr. Morris Goldner, Dr. John Hastings, Prof. Hannah Farkas-Himsley, Dr. W. Harding le Riche, former students, professional associates and personal friends.

Church of St. Leonard, Toronto

Dr. Rhodes was Vestry Clerk for Church of St. Leonard (Anglican Church of Canada) for ten years (1980 to 1990). His wife, Harriet, was a member of the Outreach Committee. The series consists of annual reports, budgets, minutes of meetings and some correspondence with the Reverend J. Taylor Pryce.

Laboratory Services Branch, Ministry of Health

This series documents Dr. Rhodes employment with the Ontario Ministry of Health as Associate Medical Director and later Medical Director of the Laboratory Services Branch, including appointment negotiations in 1969 to his retirement in 1977. Dr. Rhodes joined the Laboratory Services Branch following his resignation as Director of the School of Hygiene in 1970.
Files consistent of general correspondence and subject files relating to Autoclaving, Disinfectants in the TB Laboratory, Report of the Technical Advisory Committee on Laboratory Safety, Immunization and surveillance and Task force on care and transportation of communicable disease cases.

Ministry of Natural Resources. Rabies Advisory Committee

In 1979 Dr. Rhodes accepted an appointment as Chairman of the Rabies Advisory Committee within the Ministry of Natural Resources. This series documents some of the activities of this committee focusing primarily on immunization against rabies nationally and internationally. Included are general correspondence relating mainly to his appointment and reappointment to this committee and his retirement, and subject files relating to the World Health Organization conference in Essen, Germany, oral immunization of wildlife, safety standards and a seminar in Maple, Ontario on “Public, Intra- and Inter-Agency Relations in Rabies Control programs: a review”

Talks and addresses

This series contains copies of talks and addresses by Prof. French at professional meetings, symposia, and conferences. They are arranged chronologically and cover such research topics as upper atmospheric mass spectroscopy, the Trace Atmospheric Gas Analyser (TAGA), satellite aerodynamics, molecular beams and ion clustering. Not all talks were scientific in nature. Prof. French was often asked to speak about the role of engineering in space exploration and the relationship between university engineering research and industry as well as the commercialization of scientific applications. Historical talks include a paper on Canadian post-war aerospace development, a 1968 talk on Canadian development in space research, as well as papers telling the story of key scientific innovation such as the story on how TAGA and SCIEX came about and the role of the University of Toronto Innovation Foundation.

Memos

This series is one file of memos mainly written by Prof. Prentice dealing with issues within the Department of History and Philosophy at the Ontario Institute of Studies in Education. Memos document Prentice’s views on staffing, research direction, and courses being offered.

Letters of recommendation

This series includes both requests received by Prof. Prentice for recommendations for former students and colleagues as well as her responses to these requests.

Student days

This series documents Alison Prentice’s days as a student at Smith College (B.A. 1955), while attending the Ontario College of Education ca. 1958 and during her Ph.D. studies in history at the University of Toronto.

B1999-0017 includes essays and papers written while a student at Smith College as well as field essays written as part of her Ph.D. comprehensive examinations at the University of Toronto. These are arranged chronologically.

B2009-0010 contains her correspondence home to her parents while a student at Smith College and during one year at the University of Geneva (1951-1955)

Manuscripts and publications

In the summer of 1983 Professor Barbeau was invited to write an article on mathematical problems for the alumni magazine, University of Toronto Graduate. Thirty-eight columns appeared between September 1984 and the summer of 1993. Associated with it
was the newsletter, After Aftermath, also compiled by Barbeau. Each column contained a cryptic crossword and posed a mathematical problem and, over the years, it drew responses from several hundred readers, including about two dozen “regulars”. The columns were assembled in book format and published as After Math: puzzles and brainteasers in 1995. This column, the resulting correspondence, and the newsletter form the bulk of this series.

Other publications in this series are, in chronological order, The Mathematical Oak, a newsletter of the Department of Mathematics edited by Professor Barbeau between 1986 and 1992; Polynomials (1989), a course book “designed to stand between the high school
and university curricula”2; Power Play (1997), the focus of which is power of numbers; a paper co-authored with P. C. Stangeby, “Some foundations of analysis for engineering science (MAT194F)” (2002); reviews of Pell’s Equations (2003); and a copy of a manuscript by Don Patterson, “University of Toronto – Honours Mathematics and Physics and Chemistry, 1927-1931; some memories as of December 1993.”

The files may contain correspondence, notes, drafts of manuscripts, page proofs, printed columns and newsletters.

Questionnaire

In 1993, Ms. Heaton conducted a mail survey to medical school library directors to gather information on reference services. This series consists of records documenting the questionnaire such as correspondence, draft questionnaires, and raw data. The series has been divided into subseries.

Visits and interviews

Ms. Heaton followed up the questionnaire with visits and interviews to selected medical libraries in Canada and the United States. This series consists of correspondence and notes concerning these interviews. Also included are 28 photographs of libraries visited.

Publications

Ms. Heaton wrote numerous articles as a result of the questionnaire and interview. This series contains manuscripts and correspondence related to these publications.

Consulting

Professor Fuss has served as a consultant to government and industry for many years, but only two projects are documented in this series, his work as a member of the Price Measurement Advisory Committee at Statistics Canada and a study he did for United Communications Ltd. on long distance telephone service in Canada.

Family correspondence

Note from Bliss: "These files include extensive correspondence with my mother; some correspondence with my brother, J.Q. Bliss, who died in 1969; much correspondence regarding my young brother, R.Q. Bliss; letters from members of Elizabeth Bliss's family; and the beginnings of correspondence with our children."

Scholarly papers

In addition to published works, Prof. Richardson made numerous presentations at conferences, symposia, invited lectures, memorials, convocations, and other occasions. The papers contained in this series were, for the most part, prepared for academic and other scholarly activities such as meetings of associations like the Society for Biblical Literature, Canadian Society of Biblical Studies, Canadian Society for the Study of Religion and the SNTS and represent a significant portion of Prof. Richardson’s body of work. Other presentations were made at many Canadian universities as invited lecturer and to various groups at the University of Toronto. A few files contain papers submitted, but never published. Indeed, many of these presentations are on topics that formed the basis of future publications. Researchers are therefore referred to Series 10 for topics of written works not represented in this series.

Files may contain correspondence, manuscripts, and notes.

Lecture notes

Most are titled and dated and include pencilled dates of revision on the title pages. Where loose holograph sheets were found, they were placed, in the original order, in small neutral paper folders. The bulk of the material was prepared between 1936 and 1939. The series was not completely organized, but the lectures seem to have been grouped by course.

The lecture notes consist of holograph outlines of lectures of half sheets of paper interspersed with holograph and typewritten sheets of the actual text of the presentation.

Lecture notes filed in black file boxes

Except for their organization in to file boxes, this material is of the same type as that in Series 2. The titles of the file boxes are as follows:

Romantic Poetry
Arnold II [note there is no Arnold I]
English Novel I
English Novel II
Browning
Browning II
Nineteenth Century Minor Prose
Carlyle
Seventeenth Century

Teaching

Series consists of records related to Prof. Frederick Winter’s teaching both at the University of Toronto and the American School of Classical Studies at Athens. Records include syllabi, lecture notes, class assignments, and hand-outs, as well as agendas, reports and other administrative documentation related to Winter’s time at the American School of Classical Studies at Athens.

Personal and biographical

Series consists of the personal and biographical records of Joan Hay including diaries, notes and exercise books from her early education, and memorabilia from the University of Alberta.

Travel diaries

Series consists of diaries kept by Joan Winter from research trips in Europe taken by her and her husband, Frederick Winter. Content covers trips to various sites across Europe including those with students, notes on artifacts, listings of photographs taken, and additional noted travel details.

Research, publications and presentations

Series consists of records related to Joan and Frederick Winter’s archaeological research, particularly their study of Pausauias’ travels. Material includes typescripts, background research material, and images. In addition to a published article, a significant portion of the material documents the presentation of the couple’s research through scripts, a ‘photographic companion’ (annotated) album, and slides.

Work by others

Series consists of offprints, manuscripts, and other copies of works by other authors, including limited student work and exams from the 1960s.

Bible Project

Series consists of records relating to the Bible project of Peter Brieger and Jürgen Paul. The original idea of the project was to compile a complete collection of photographs of French and English illustrated Bibles produced between the end of the eleventh century and around the year 1270, with a focus on the iconography of their illustrations. The project likely began in the late 1950s. In 1965, Dr. Brieger met Dr. Jürgen Paul, who moved to Toronto, from Germany, in 1967 to help Dr. Brieger finish the book.

Dr. Paul helped define the focus of the book, from a multi-volume corpus of all illustrations, to a study of “questions of iconography, the variety and development in the choice of subjects for illustrating the biblical books, and to concentrate on the Old Testament. It was to be demonstrated how over the period of the two centuries changes in subjects of illustration selected were influenced by changes in Christian theological exegesis of the Old Testament.” [1] The pair worked together in an office in Sydney Smith Hall during the winter and spring of 1967/68.

The pair later organized trips to several repositories to examine manuscripts. As Dr. Paul writes, “I had already realized that the material of French and English illustrated Bible manuscripts was still incomplete. Therefore, during the summer of 1968 we, together with Mrs. Brieger, spent several weeks in England checking the college libraries in Oxford and Cambridge. It turned out that in both universities large numbers of most interesting Bible manuscripts existed that were not even registered. No catalogues existed. After the stay in England we went by car through France checking the manuscript collections in Paris and provincial libraries between Avranches and Dijon. After that, we went to Italy checking the manuscripts in the Vatican library and in Laurenziana in Florence.”

When Dr. Brieger’s health began to fail, Dr. Paul continued the project, to a lesser degree, with Ann Hilty. The project was never published.


[1] From an account written by Dr. Paul. The full account can be found in the case file for B2016-0007.

Personal and biographical

This small series consists of biographical information, including copies of Professor Munro’s curriculum vitae, the family scholarship he created at the University of British Columbia, and most of his activity and appointment calendars from 1981 to 2012. Some of the entries on the last were made by him and others by his wife, Jeanette.

Correspondence

This is an extensive series of correspondence with friends, colleagues, students and former students, editors and other individuals documenting his many writing, publishing, teaching and research activities. Includes correspondence with his mentor and thesis advisor, Prof. Robert S. Lopez of Yale University as well as early correspondence relating to his employment at UBC and subsequent move to the University of Toronto (1962-1968) (Box013). The alphabetical files contain correspondence with and about individuals as well as organizations. Letters of reference with colleagues and friends relate mainly to employment applications or grant applications and are filed separately from those relating to students. Files relating to students contain information on evaluation of progress on dissertation, dissertation defence and some letters of reference for teaching appointments.

University of Toronto

This series contains files relating to Prof. Munro’s administrative and academic activities in the Department of Political Economy, Department of Economics, and the Centre for Medieval Studies. Such files include among others, files on PhD comprehensive examinations (with copies from Yale University), and the Graduate programme in Economics. Also included in this series are Prof. Munro’s annual activity reports submitted to the Chair of the Department. Prof. Munro also undertook appointments to other university bodies such Users’ Committee of the Robarts Library (1974-1977), the U. of T. Research Board, Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology, and various search committees. Files relating to these activities contain correspondence, minutes of meetings, reports, and notes.

Other Activities

This series contains files relating to Prof. Munro’s activities in conferences, associations, and other external organizations. Some files, therefore, may relate to individuals and organizations documented in Series 3: Correspondence. The files contain correspondence, some manuscripts of papers or presentations, minutes of meetings, notes and reports.

Teaching

This series documents Prof. Munro’s teaching activities as they relate to courses delivered to undergraduate and graduate students during his first teaching appointment at University of British Columbia (1964-1968) and at the University of Toronto (1968- 2013). The University of British Columbia courses include History 304, “Economic and social history of the Middle Ages”; Economics 320, “Economic development of Modern Europe”; and History 416, “France in the Middle Ages”. The UBC files include course outlines, essay topics, examinations and typescripts of lectures.

Files for University of Toronto courses are understandably more extensive and include course outlines, reading lists, examination questions, typescripts of lectures, and overheads (for two courses offered after 1995).

The overheads apply to ECO 301Y and 303Y. ECO 301Y, “The economic history of Late-Medieval and Early-Modern Europe, 1300-1750”, was offered from September, 2004. It was the same as ECO 201Y, but given at the third year with corresponding prerequisites (ECO 200Y/206Y and seven other courses). ECO 303Y, “The economic history of Modern Europe, 1750-1914”, was given from January, 1995 as a revised version of the former ECO 203Y, with corresponding pre-requisites (ECO 200Y/206Y plus seven other courses).

Biographical and personal

This series contains passports, daily agendas (58 volumes) and an address book, as well as files relating to the Banff School of Fine Arts, Professor Peers’ academic life, awards that he received and books that he wrote. Also included are a class photograph of the East Coulee School where Peers taught and was principal from 1939-1942, personal correspondence, photographs of Peers with friends, travel documents and records relating to his 90th birthday and the memorial service held upon his death. The series concludes with a file of records relating to David Rayside, a U of T professor and close friend of Peers.

The “biographical information” file [/003(04)] contains, amongst many other items, several pieces that Professor Peers himself penned between 1980 and 2002 about his family and background and his years as a high school teacher. Included with this is a CD from one of his nieces, Bev Swanton, titled “Acadia Valley Homecoming 2012”, that celebrates the hamlet, the surrounding farms (including that of the Peers family) and includes the centennial parade.

University of Toronto

This series contains records relating to Professor Peers’ activities as a professor and professor emeritus, as an alumnus, and as a very generous donor to the University of Toronto and also to Queen’s University. Included is general information about his retirement, correspondence and related material regarding the Department of Political Science. There are also extensive files of correspondence, donor agreements, endowment reports, and other material regarding scholarships and fellowships that he funded in the Department of Political Science and elsewhere, and a file on the purchase of and later transfer to the University of Toronto of his condominium at 190 St. George St.

Results 101 to 150 of 1602