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Chancellor, University of Toronto

Twenty-nine years after Omond Solandt left the University of Toronto with a gold medal in medicine, he returned as Chancellor, taking up his three-year appointment on 1 July, 1965. It was renewed for a further three years in 1968.

The contents of this series includes correspondence, addresses, minutes, programs, reports and photoprints relating to his ceremonial duties and other activities associated with the office. Included are files on awarding of honorary degrees, the Presidential Search Committee, chaired by Dr. Solandt, for the successor to Claude Bissell, and the new (1971) University of Toronto Act. Included is an audiotape of the proceedings of his installation as chancellor.

Institute de la vie

The Institute de la Vie, based in Paris and Geneva, was founded in 1960 by Maurice Marois to safeguard, though science and technology, the

International Centre for Insect Physiology and Ecology (ICIPE)

ICIPE, based in Nairobi, is one of two important international research centres (the other is WARDA) whose origins lie in the native populations of the area in which they operate. Late in 1976, Omond Solandt was asked to join the Board of ICIPE, which was badly in need of help in management. He formally took his seat in June, 1977 and the reorganization that he engineered addressed problems of efficiency, a lingering colonial mentality, and the appointment of a new chair. A financial crisis forced Solandt to assume the duties as chair in April, 1982, a position he retained for a year. He remained actively associated with ICIPE until 1987 and in 1989 was a one of the founders of its Honorary Alumni Association.

The correspondence, minutes, background papers, reports, programs, publications and photoprints and slides provide a thorough documentation of the complex problems that Dr. Solandt faced at ICIPE, the progress that was made in resolving them, and the impact of many individuals involved in it, especially its founder, Dr. Tom Odhiambo.

Photographs

The photographs in this series document portions of Dr. Solandt’s life. There are a half dozen spanning the years 1949 to 1978, and there is one studio photograph of Andrew Lawrence (Laurie) Chute, a former fellow medical student at the University of Toronto and colleague in wartime Britain. There are two folders of colour photoprints by David Grenville of Dr. Solandt at his residence, the Wolfe Den, near Bolton, Ontario and of his last visit in August1986 to his ancestral haunts at Inverness, Megantic County, in the Eastern Townships of Quebec.

Graphic material

This series documents Edith Williams' life, beginning with photoprints of her as a baby, taken probably late in 1900 or 1901, and ending with a colour photoprint of her in old age. In between are numerous black-and-white and several colour photoprints of her at various stages of her life and involved in a variety of activities, including mountain climbing. There are several photoprints of her with Frieda and of Frieda herself. There are also two photoprints of other members of her family as young children, including her elder sister, Betty.

Field Trips

This series documents field trips taken and organized by Prof. McIlwraith beginning in 1963 while still a geography student at the University of Toronto. Most of the files however document field trips that were organized and led by Prof. McIlwraith as part of the Erindale College Field Studies Courses - GGR 301 and GGR 319.

Many of the field trips required students to undertake oral histories in various Ontario Townships. Files include correspondence, memos, notes, forms, photographs and logistical information handed to students. Tapes and transcripts relating to these Field Trips have been deposited in local archives.

Heritage Associations

Records in this series document Prof. McIlwraith active involvement in various conservation groups or initiatives. It includes records relating to his time on the Ministry of Culture, Conservation Review Board of which he was a member and vice chair. Drawing on his academic expertise, he often prepared reports for the Board on properties under review. As a Board member he also acted as one the adjudicators for cases brought before the Board. Other committees documented here are the Cultural Policy Advisory Committee for the Mississauga Arts Council, Mississauga Local Architecture Conservation Advisory Committee (LACAC), and the Erindale College Plaque Committee.

Files contain reports, memos, correspondence and, in some cases, hand drawn maps and photographs.

Articles, Manuscripts, Addresses

This is an extensive series, which documents Dr. Hogg's publishing activities. Since many of her published articles were addresses delivered at symposiums or reports made to professional committees, addresses and talks have also been included in this series. The files, usually titled by the name of the article, book or publisher contain not only manuscripts and drafts but related correspondence, notes, memos and outlines.

The arrangement of this series is as follows, starting from general articles to the specific endeavour

  • Bibliographies and lists of publications
  • General articles, addresses, contributions to encyclopedias
  • Obituaries
  • Academic Papers on Star Clusters
  • Bibliography and Catalogue of Star Clusters
  • Contributions to "Out of Old Books"
  • "The Stars Belong to Everyone"
  • Toronto Star Column
  • Miscellaneous Writings
  • Reprints

Records in this series document both Dr. Hogg's stature as an authority on variable stars and star clusters as well as her role as a teacher of popular astronomy. Draft articles and related notes and correspondence on numerous scientific papers as well as files documenting her contribution to encyclopedias and handbooks reflect both of these roles.

Notably, her work on various editions of "A Catalogue of Variable Stars in Globular Clusters" (1st ed. 1939, 2nd ed. 1955, 3rd. ed. 1973 and 4th incomplete), as well as her time spent on "A Bibliography of Individual Globular Clusters" (1947, 1st supplement 1963) is extensively documented through drafts, research data, original manuscripts. These records relate specifically to the card index found in Series IV, Star Cluster Files and Index Cards.

Research

Throughout his career, Dr. Fowler conducted numerous studies relating to infants, toddlers and school age children. Some of these have been highlighted in the previous series and relate to his long time interest in twins, day care, child rearing and the impact of developmental stimulation.

This series contains only a sampling of the voluminous original and secondary research materials collected and compiled by Dr. Fowler. Much of the original data containing personal identifiers of children has not been retained for obvious privacy and ethical reasons. Represented in this series are files relating to research spanning some 25 years on topics such as reading, cognitive style, language stimulation and development (with specific reference to the Italian and West Indian studies), and specific studies such as the Bassari, Manitoulin Island and Woodbine Day Care. Files may contain correspondence, drafts of manuscripts, notes, cumulative data, original forms developed by Dr. Fowler for a specific study, notes, and reports. The Bassari project is also documented in photographs showing Dr. Fowler at work in the field.

Education and personal activities

The series documents Allan Irving’s activities as a doctoral candidates at the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Social Work, between 1976 and 1983 : his application and registration; the fellowship he received from the department of National Health and Welfare of Canada; lecturer position at the Faculty for Professor Albert Rose; doctoral seminars he attended, papers he prepared during his graduates years and academic results. The series also documents his membership with historical associations such as the Ontario Historical Society and the University of Tennessee’s Social Welfare History Group. The series documents Allan Irving’s applications for teaching positions in Canadian universities, from 1982 to 1994 ; his nomination for the Ontario Confederation of University Faculty Association’s Teaching Award in 1994, nomination prepared by Marion Bogo, associate professor and acting dean of the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Social Work, and Mary Lee. This series also partially documents Irving’s friendship with professors and/or colleagues.

The series consists of 37 files including application for fellowship and report on his doctoral work at the intention of the department of National Health and Welfare of Canada ; statements of academic records ; library card; seminar notes; working notes, bibliographies, drafts and final version of papers (some annotated) ; curriculum vitae ; letters of support ; personal correspondence and press clippings. The series also includes one photograph of Allan Irving with James Gripton’s son, Stuart, at the age of 6 in Calgary (Alberta) ; one photograph of Ernie Lightman’s daughter, Naomi.

Research files

This series partially documents Allan Irving’s research activities and interest in the field of history of social work from 1978 to 1998. Irving used these thematic files in preparing courses and/or publications. It also partially documents his interest in current affairs.

The series consists of 25 files including articles, bibliographies, Irving’s notes and press clippings. It also includes photographs of Toronto disadvantaged neighbourhoods at the beginning of the 20th century ; photographs (slides) of Toronto in the 1940s and 1950s including streets, news papers headlines and advertisements, women at work in war factories, TTC subways and streetcars.

Only significantly annotated published material have been kept as a whole; in all other cases, only the first page and/or the bibliographical reference have been preserved

Personal

The series consists of records documenting Gilbert Edward Jackson’s family life and professional career, from the early 1920s to his death in 1959. Arranged alphabetically by function, the files of the series include: typed autobiographical notes illustrating Mr. Jackson’s life from the day he was born until 1919, prior to his emigration to Toronto; two biographical sketches highlighting key moments within Mr. Jackson’s personal and professional career; typed and handwritten incoming and outgoing correspondence from family members, friends, colleagues and acquaintances regarding the death of his son, John Denison Jackson (1944), Mrs. Maria Elizabeth Jackson’s estate (1952-1953), notes of thanks for reference letters, gifts and lunch meetings, personal regards for his family, and an unsigned letter to Misses Jackson, Mr. Jackson’s sisters regarding the economist’s declining health (1959); a handwritten copy of Mr. Jackson’s obituary (1959); and a photograph of a portrait of Mr. Jackson (B2004-0019/001P). Within the files of correspondence, the letters are arranged chronologically, except for those offering condolences to Mr. Jackson for the loss of his son which are arranged alphabetically by the last-name of the sender.

The series also consists of several files of press clippings about Mr. Jackson’s personal life, career moves, thoughts, views, as well as Canada’s economic stance on various issues. The subject matter of the newspaper clippings include: France and Germany’s economic situation after World War I; Canada’s immigration policies (1923), tariff fallacies and taxation system (ca. 1935); unemployment insurance within Canada; the analogous trading problems with England (1934); Mr. Jackson’s speech on overcoming the depression and difficulties through the improvement of the human character before the Empire Club in the Royal York Hotel (1933) and Canadian Club in Ottawa (1934); being appointed Economic Adviser to the Governors of the Bank of England (1935); the selling of Mr. Jackson’s house in Toronto prior to leaving for England (1935); the return of economic liberalism to Canada; the doctrine of free trade; and reviews about Mr. Jackson’s book An economist’s confession of faith (1935). Letters to the editor can also be found within the press clippings regarding similar themes. Arranged chronologically within their individual files, the press clippings, which are from newspapers across Canada and England, were possibly collected by Mr. Jackson.

Manuscripts and off-prints

This series consists of articles, memoranda, reports, speeches, lectures, pamphlets, off-prints and books written by Mr. Jackson over a forty year span. Within the series, a “wordage of memoranda” written by Mr. Jackson illustrating the numbers of terms utilized within articles written from 1940 to 1946 is also provided.

Documenting Mr. Jackson’s career, thought, views and influences in Canadian economics, the manuscripts document his work in: international exchange; Canada’s economic prospect and stance on trade; the economic conditions of countries such as the United States and the United Kingdom; the effects of the war(s) on Canada’s financial situation; the population and employment opportunities; unemployment; textiles and other merchandise; capitalism; conditions affecting interest rates; inflation; and the great depression.

Graphic material

Consists of graphic material, including photographs of Gill and some taken by him and photographs and postcards of European locations, art and architecture.

Correspondence and committees

Alphabetically arranged files contain correspondence with individuals and groups and give a good overview of Etkin’s professional activities and relationships. Included are files with colleagues at many Canadian and American universities as well as with representatives of the aviation industry including Boeing, DeHavilland and Royal Aircraft Establishment. This series also contains correspondence and related documents for various committees and professional associations such a committee of NATO called AGARD (Advisory Group for Aerospace Research), the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, the Association of Professional Engineers and the Canadian Aeronautical Space Institute. There is documentation on Etkin’s time as chair of the Aeronautics Advisory Board of Transport Canada. Some files relate to professional trips or visits including Etkin’s trip to China in 1982 and the Chinese subsequent visit to IAS.

Also found in this series is correspondence with Ph.D. students and colleagues within the University of Toronto such as G.N. Patterson, Israel Glass, J.B. French, James Gotlieb and many more.

Research files

This series contains mainly correspondence, manuscripts, drafts and notes relating to some of the many research papers, reports and proposals that were published or presented by Etkin over a 40 year span. To list only a few, papers document his work in: wind engineering, flight dynamics, satellite stability, flight in turbulent winds, supersonic wing design, wind tunnel design and aerodynamic particle separator design.

Of particular note are files relating to his research on the spin decay of the Alouette I Satellite and his subsequent design modifications for Alouette II. Etkin identified the deceleration of the early Alouette I satellite as one of the most interesting science and engineering problems that he was faced with throughout his career. Scientific papers presenting his findings can be found in this series while records relating to grants to design a modification for Alouette II are found in Series 5 – Grants.

A second file to note, documents the role he and his IAS colleagues played in the safe return of the Apollo 13 mission. Identified by Etkin as the most dramatic event in his career, the story is preserved here in correspondence, notes, clippings and a photo. Etkin’s discussion of the event can be found in a recent talk to the Engineering Alumni Association found in Series 2 - Lectures, Talks and Seminars (B2004-0017/005(42).

Finally Etkin’s comments on peer publications, referee reports and reviews for several journals can also be found in this series along with files relating to his time as one of the editors of Progress in Aerospace Science.

Professional organizations, associations and societies

This series documents Dr. Mastromatteo’s participation in organizations, associations and societies. These groups pertain mainly to medicine, occupational health and safety, and labour conditions. The largest amounts of material are from the Ontario Medical Association, the International Labor Office, the Industrial Accident Prevention Association, the Canadian Public Health Association, the Canadian Medical Association, and the Atomic Energy Control Board.

Records in this series include notes, drafts, papers, correspondence, minutes, reports and memoranda.

Sri Lanka

Prof. Cameron joined the Board of the Forum of Federations in 2002. His work with the Forum led him to provide technical support to the Sri Lankan Peace Process, which was seeking resolution to the dispute between the Sri Lankan government and the Tamil Tigers. Prof. Cameron participated in peace process meetings in Sri Lanka (26-30 April 2002, 30 August-5 September 2002) Sri Lanka/Oslo (25 November-5 December), London (22-23 December), Thailand (3-10 January 2003), Berlin (5-9 February 2003), and Sri Lanka/Tokyo (10-20 March 2003; 24 August-3 September 2004; 26 March-7 April 2005). He also wrote papers and delivered presentations on peace and governance in Sri Lanka.

Records in this series include correspondence, reports, research, proposals from the Tamil Tigers and Sri Lankan government, and articles and presentations on the peace process. Records from particular peace talks include press releases, debriefing comments, texts of speeches, correspondence, maps and other travel documents, news clippings, and notes.

Series also consists of 2 photographs of Prof. Cameron, taken on his travels.

Photographs

Portraits of Professor Macallum; copies of illuminated address presented to Professor Macallum on 9 March 1906 by undergraduates in the Faculty of Medicine, on the occasion of his election to the Royal Society of Canada. Taken by Steffens-Colmer, Vancouver; C.T. Blackburne; Freeland, Toronto; Lafayette, Glasgow; McCaul's Pond, c. 1880. Also includes photo of McCaul's Pond, ca. 1880.

Education

This series covers the Gordon Skilling’s formal education from his attendance at Grace Street Public School through Harbord Collegiate, the University of Toronto (BA 1934), taking his Rhodes Scholarship at the University of Oxford, and the writing of his doctoral thesis at the University of London. The files are arranged chronologically by degree.

For Grace Street Public School, the files include letters from his classmates at Grace Street Public School and certificates. At Harbord Collegiate, in addition to his studies and piano lessons from the Toronto Conservatory of Music, Skilling was very active in extra-curricular activities: he was president of the Literary Society, editor of the Harbord Review, battalion commander of the cadet corps, and played defence on the basketball team which won the city high school championship in 1928-1929. These activities are documented in the form of term papers, examinations, speeches, scholarship essays, and a scrapbook [box 011] that covers his activities at Harbord Collegiate and the University of Toronto, and documents his trip across North America in the summer of 1933 (see also Series I in this sous-fonds). The scrapbook contains correspondence, dance cards, maps, press clippings, programmes, announcements of student activities, pamphlets, and photographs.

At the University of Toronto, Skilling studied British and colonial history and some modern Canadian and American history, standing first in his class in all but his final year. He was very active in campus politics, including the University College Literary and Athletic Society (of which he was elected president), the Students’ Administrative Council. He helped reorganize the Fabius Club in the autumn of 1932 and a year later, following his momentous trip across North America, was a founder of the CCF Club. Other activities included serving as associate editor of the Varsity and as a member of the Hart House Debates Committee.

His academic activities are well documented in the form of term papers for each of his undergraduate years and in his BA thesis. These files and those on the CCF Club and the Hart House debates are of particular interest. They document his movement from an apolitical period in high school to an activist in the social and political ferment of the time and, soon, to accepting the socialist philosophies promoted by many of his professors at the U of T and, later, at Oxford.

In December 1933 Gordon was informed that he had been awarded a Rhodes scholarship to study at Oxford University. He left for Christ Church, Oxford, in September of 1934, where he remained until 1936. While there, he studied under what he described as “outstanding dons, including Michael Foster and A. J. Ayers, in philosophy; Roy Harrod, in economics; Keith Feiling, in British history; and the Hon. Frank Pakenham in politics and international relations. He also, in the summer of 1935, visited Central Europe for the first time and in the autumn met Sally Bright, then a student at the London School of Economics. In the fall of 1936, having received a high second at Oxford, and having had his scholarship extended, Gordon went to London to complete his doctorate under R. W. Seton-Watson, under whom his growing interest in Czech culture and politics flourished, as did his relationship with Sally. At Easter in 1936 he and Sally spent five weeks in Chepstow in Monmouthshire, a time that is preserved in an album that he compiled (see Series XII, Appendix III). In 1940 Gordon successfully defended his thesis, ‘The German-Czech national conflict in Bohemia, 1879-1893’.

The files on his graduate work contain detailed notes on readings and tutorials, especially on political theory, social philosophy and social psychology. There are also exam questions for his courses at Oxford, correspondence relating to the degrees of BA and MA (Oxon.), and a copy of his doctoral dissertation. Accompanying these files is
a scrapbook, containing press clippings, programmes, photographs and memorabilia covering his years at Oxford and the University of London, with additional material for his visit to London in 1948 [see /012].

Skilling’s diploma from Harbord Collegiate is filed in /003(03).

Photographs relating to his basketball team at Harbord Collegiate have been removed from box 008 (08) to box 009P (01) – (03). Loose photographs relating to his activities at the University of Toronto have been removed from the Harbord Collegiate/ University of Toronto scrapbook [box 011] to box 009P(04) – (07).

Skilling’s University College ‘letter’ [badge] is filed as B2001-0017/008(26).

Manuscripts and publications

Professor Skilling began writing at an early age; his first attempt at publication, a short story 'Trapping in the Rockies’, was submitted to the Toronto Evening Telegram in 1923. While this series documents his prodigious output over a period of almost 80 years, the focus is on his youth and his early career (before 1960) and from the early 1980s until his death.

The series begins with a file of correspondence regarding offprints (1984-1985), followed by three files of book notices and reviews (1940-1999). Professor Skillings writings are arranged by the title of the manuscript or publication and are filed chronologically. The files contain drafts of manuscripts, sometimes with notes and often with covering correspondence, reviews and offprints. Much material relating to Skilling’s writings may be found in other accessions in this fonds.

The earliest entries were written while a public, high school and university student. Skilling managed one publication from his trip across the United States and Canada in 1933, an article in the local paper in The Danforth region of Toronto where he lived. What may be is his first ‘academic’ article, “The Marxian dips into the future”, was published in University College’s student periodical, The Undergraduate, in March 1933. At Oxford, he really began to find his footing. His reported in the New Statesman on the British Labour Party’s annual conference in 1936; this was followed shortly by a series of articles in the Canadian Forum (1937-1939), most of which discussed the evolving political situation in Czechoslovakia. During World War II, he wrote on a variety of topics, ranging from the political situation in the Balkans to Canadian-American relations.

After his retirement, Professor Skilling had more time to write. Some of his projects, including a selection of essays under the title, ‘The riddle of Communist politics’, and a proposed book on the Velvet Revolution, did not materialize. His observations of the changing political landscape in Czechoslovakia and Eastern Europe, especially on Charter 77 and samizdat, rapidly found their way into print. In the late 1980s and the 1990s Skilling turned his attention to historical figures in Czech history, especially the Masaryks – Tomas, Charlotte, and Alice, and to his own memoirs. His book, T. G. Masaryk: Against the current [see box 042], appeared in English in 1994 and Czech in 1995. He prepared two long articles on Charlotte and Alice for Komas, and Gender Studies in Prague published his Mother and daughter: Charlotte and Alice Masaryk in 2001 [see box 044]. His translation of Alice’s correspondence with Josip Plecnik, the architect of Prague Castle [see boxes 045-047], appeared just before his death.

Professor Skilling’s memoirs, The education of a Canadian, appeared in English and Czech in 2001 [see boxes 047-049], a few weeks before he died. The numerous delays in publication, caused in part by the collapse of Carleton University Press, are well documented.

Oversized material has been removed from /040(25) to folder .(03).

Photoprints relating to Professor Skilling’s research on and writing about Charlotte Masaryk have been removed from /044(03) to /009P(13); from /044(04) to /009P(14), from /044(06) to /009P(15), and from /044(07) to /009P(16).

Slides of the portrait of Gordon Skilling by Maria Gabanhova have been removed from /048(07) to /009P(17).

Photographs

As a long time professor in the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering, L. E. Jones photographed and collected images of many Faculty and campus events including convocations, memorials, award ceremonies, retirements and open houses. Of particular notice are images of: the Engineering Centenary celebrations in 1973: the mounting of the lintel from the Old S.P.S. building and the installation of Becca's H in front of the Galbraith building; the fire, rebuilding and reopening of the Sandford Flemming building, 1977-1982; the excavation of the site of the Old Magnetic Observatory, 1979; the design, construction and installation of the Sundial, 1993.

As Engineering Archivist, Jones also collected many historical images documenting the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering as well as its predessor the School of Practical Science. Included in this collection are portraits of faculty and students groups, images of student activities, buildings, Gull Lake Survey Camp and Ajax Campus. These photographs mainly document the first half of the 20th century.

Personal and biographical

The biographical information in this series is provided largely by several versions of Frederic Urban’s curriculum vitae. The other files contain a notebook (1975-1977) primarily on life in Boston and Halifax, a wall calendar (1981), greeting cards from his partner, Larry Richards, and others, design elements for a garden at Urban and Richards’ penthouse in Etobicoke, and material from a trip to Columbia at Christmas, 1976. Accompanying this textual material are two files of slides, one of “Danny, Halifax”, and the other “Studies for Natchitoches”, Urban and Richards’ property in Louisiana.

Professor Urban has always had a great interest in history, American politics and the presidency; the passion for politics he shared with his partner, Larry. In the late 1960s they both took part in demonstrations on the Boston Common against the Vietnam War; a poster by the Vietnam Moratorium Committee is a memento of that struggle. Another from that era is a special issue of Life (5 July 1968) on the Presidency.

Studio work, exhibitions and performances

This series begins with Frederick Urban’s formative years as an artist when he created a large number of exhibits and participated in some performance pieces, primarily in Halifax and New York City. For some of these, he drew on his personal experiences. Two examples are An Acadian genealogy (April 1977), inspired by his family roots in the Acadian region of Brunswick, and Monk (July 1977) by his training as a novice in 1961-1962.

The files cover his years at the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design (1976-1977), continue through his post-graduate studies at the Whitney Museum of American Art, his interest in the art and architecture of Italy (spurred on by his meeting Giuseppe Panza di Biumo), and several installations connected to Canadian architecture and architectural history. The last exhibition, ‘The place of work’, accompanied the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada’s annual conference in Winnipeg in 1989. The arrangement is primarily chronological.

The series ends with several files on performance pieces, the most significant being Anne Wilson and her Butler’s lives of the saints, which was performed both in Halifax and New York City, and an oversized folder of posters for exhibitions and performance pieces collected by Urban.

Some of the exhibitions and performance pieces contain correspondence, drawings and sketches, photographs and/or slides. A number are represented by a combination of photographs and slides or slides alone, with no textual accompaniment. There are also several oversized folders of sketches and drawings for of posters for exhibitions and performance pieces with which Urban was involved and one of posters for events which he may have attended but to which he did not contribute.

Graphic

Photographs and portraits document many of Dr. Evans professional activities and milestones in his career. They show him receiving awards, at meetings and conferences, in groups at ceremonies. There are also some family photos and photographs of his trips to China and Nepal.

Photographs

Series consists of photographs, glass plates and negatives relating to H.A.Innis' education, travels and career at the Department of Political Economy.
Includes: Innis family photoprints and negatives; military photoprints of Harold Innis during World War I; graduation portraits of Innis from McMaster University; photoprints taken while Innis was on holiday on the MacKenzie River, in Churchill, Manitoba, and in Russia; group photoprint of the staff of the Dept. of Political Economy; passport photos of Harold Innis; various unidentified photoprints.

Employment

The records in this series document Professor Helleiner's employment at Yale University and the University of Toronto. Most of the material for the former relates to his being seconded to the Nigerian Institute of Social and Economic Research (NISER) at the University of Ibadan in 1962-1963.

The files for the University of Toronto document his employment record generally, his leave as director of the Economic Research Bureau, University College, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, (September, 1966 to June, 1968), his sabbatical leave at the Institute of Development Studies at the University of Sussex, and his committee work in the Department of Political Economy (from 1981, Economics). There are also files on planning projects and on the Centre for International Studies and other international programs. There is extensive correspondence with his undergraduate, graduate, and post-graduate students and students from other universities and countries, much of it contained in the individual files on graduate students that he supervised or on whose thesis committee he sat, as an internal or an external examiner. These files contain correspondence, progress and research reports, thesis committee reports, and references. The arrangement is alphabetical by name of student.

Personal and biographical

Series consists of textual records and graphic material documenting Ian Hacking’s personal life and career, with eight files related to the histories of both the Hacking and MacDougall families. Records include a passport, birth and marriage certificates, family snapshots, drawings by his children, as well as correspondence detailing financial contributions made to various charities and initiatives. Ian Hacking’s professional and academic activity is reflected in written and photographic documentation of awards and honours received, including the Killam Prize for the Humanities, the Companion to the Order of Canada, and the Holberg International Memorial Prize. Also included in the series is an autobiographical document written by Dr. Hacking detailing the orientation of his research.

Graphic Records

Includes slides and photoprints documenting both Dr. Hogg's personal and professional life including family gatherings and events, trips, astronomical conferences, ceremonies, visits to various observatories. Also included are images she collected regarding the history of Astronomy as well as publicity shots of her taken for various publications.

Photoprints from B1996-0020 document the meeting of the International Astronomical Union Held in the Soviet Union [Russia], 1958. Helen Hogg, as well as other Canadian astronomers including A. Batten and S. van de Bergh, were present and can be seen in these shots.

Graphic material

Photographs of Gordon Patterson, director of the Institute of Aerospace Studies from 1949-1974; early images of building, equipment and staff of the Institute including a composite of the 1st graduating Ph.D. class in 1950.

Canada. Canadian Officers' Training Corps, University of Toronto Contingent

This series consists of the financial and administrative records of the Board of Trustees, including photographs of special events. It also includes documentation of a project to publish the history of the COTC that was never completed. Spencer subsequently wrote his own history of the COTC, the notes and correspondence of which are included under Series 10: Publications.

Photoprints

Three cards of mug shots of students [presumably Professor Clark's], removed from box /014, file entitled "University of Toronto. Dept. of Political Economy. Correspondence. Administration, 1944-1949"

Editorial cartoons

Series consists of Canadian editorial cartoons collected by Hershell Ezrin. Illustrators include Brian Gable, Andy Donato, and Patrick Corrigan. They cover various Ontario and federal political events such as 1995 referendum and former government aide Ms. Durcos’ comments regard President George Bush.

Correspondence

This series contains professional and personal correspondence covering the years 1952-1990. Topics covered include administrative matters in the Department of Slavic Studies, issues relating more widely to slavic studies, and Professor Luckyj's writings, including correspondence with publishers. Interspersed with this correspondence are drafts of book reviews, articles, and memorials; notes, press clippings, and photoprints. Many of the letters are written in Ukrainian, and there are a few also in Russian and French.

Financial files

  • CA ON00389 F4-6
  • Series
  • December 1980 - December 1997, predominant August 1986 - September 1996
  • Part of Henri Nouwen fonds

Series consists of Nouwen's financial files dating from 1980 and 1997, predominantly from 1986 -1997. Prior to 1986 Nouwen's personal accountant kept the majority of Nouwen's records and likely discarded them after the mandatory seven years retention period. The records from this time period are therefore minimal and consist primarily of financial overviews, cash books and American bank and retirement accounts and insurance files. After 1986, the records become more detailed and voluminous, including files about Nouwen's income (stipends, donations and royalties), expenses, taxes, insurance, retirement plans, credit cards and bank accounts.

Although the boxes were in no discernable order, they have been arranged in the following six sub-series by taking into account both the function of the records and the Nouwen staff member responsible for the maintenance of the majority of the records in that grouping:

1.6.1. General Files
1.6.2. Ledgers
1.6.3. Personal Accountant Files
1.6.4. Expenses Files
1.6.5. Cheque and Deposit Books
1.6.6. Donations Files

A more detailed description of each sub-series, as well as each sub-series arrangement can be found in the sub-series descriptions.

The files were created and kept by various secretaries and financial secretaries that Nouwen hired to control his complicated and extensive financial accounts. In the mid-1970s Nouwen hired Joe Sarno as his personal accountant. Sarno was responsible for Nouwen's income tax returns, American bank accounts and retirement funds until 1994 when Nouwen decided to consolidate his accounts to Daybreak. Carol Plantinga served as his financial secretary from the mid-1970s to 1986. From 1983-1985 Nouwen's assistant Peter Weiskel also worked with the financial files. At Daybreak, Connie Ellis took on the roles of both administrative assistant and financial secretary. After Ellis' became ill in 1992 Kathy Christie became Nouwen's administrative assistant and Lydia Banducci was hired as his financial secretary. Christie remained with Nouwen until his death in 1996. In 1993 Banducci was replaced by Margaret Sutton. Sutton remained in this position until 1997. In 1994 Nouwen began to consolidate all his financial and accounting information at Daybreak. Completing Nouwen's 1994 tax return was Sarno's last responsibility as his accountant. In 1996 Sutton arranged for all the records created and kept by Sarno to be transferred to Daybreak. Nouwen began transferring his accounting to account manager Alka Vijan at Canada Trust in 1994.

Ephemera and artifacts

  • CA ON00389 F4-14
  • Series
  • [1957 - 1996], predominant 1980 - 1996
  • Part of Henri Nouwen fonds

Series consists of ephemera and artifacts collected by or given to Nouwen throughout his lifetime, including awards and honorary degrees, materials kept in his office and home, promotional materials, artwork, postcards, religious artifacts, and personal artifacts.

Series has been arranged in the following seven sub-series according to their function:
1.14.1. Awards and honourary degrees;
1.14.2. Contents of Nouwen's office;
1.14.3. Promotional material for lectures, workshops and special events;
1.14.4. Collected artwork;
1.14.5. Personal effects;
1.14.6. Postcards, cards and prints;
1.14.7. Religious artifacts.

Textual records and photographs

This series contains course notes, correspondence, addresses, articles, manuscripts, notes, minutes, and photographs relating to the activities of Thom Greenfield as a professor of educational administration at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education and as a gay activist, especially in relation to "Gay Fathers of Toronto", of which he was one of the founders.

Manuscripts and publications

Over the years Professor McLeod initiated a number of book proposals (mostly edited), a few of which were realized. Some that were not are also documented here. He also wrote a number of articles and compiled bibliographies and chronologies. This series also contains many of his editorials from Multiculturalism, and his book reviews, but letters asking him to review books are mostly filed in Series 1, with a few in Series 4.

Most of the titles in this series are in manuscript form, often with accompanying correspondence and notes. There are more manuscripts for articles than for books. The manuscripts are arranged, within each accession, in chronological order of publication date and by the date written, if not published. The articles document his principal interests – multicultural education and health – though his wider interests are also reflected, as in “Josiah Wedgwood and the potter’s art.” There is also a file on the second issue of the Journal of Ethno-Development, which McLeod co-edited. There are whole or partial drafts of several books, two of which are untitled, but including Aboriginal Languages and Education (1988) and Health and Culture: exploring the relationships (1993). There is also a file on the production of his video, ‘Putting it all together’ (1991), and drafts of ‘The multicultural experience at FEUT’ (1995-1996) (both in B1997-0013/002 and 003). The series concludes with a typescript of Guiseppe Masi’s autobiographical Like a Dream: as short story of my life.

Filmmaking

This series contains the original film elements for several films made by Kay Armatage.
There are also files documenting this facet of her career including correspondence, film proposals, research notes, clippings, grant applications, budget reports, shot lists and scripts. Several files document her films Striptease, Storytelling and Artist on Fire, as well as Prof. Armatage’s attempt at writing and directing a film about Nell Shipman which did not go beyond development.

Photographs in this series include shots taken during the production of several of her films. There is one file documenting the filming of Storytelling which includes shots of Northrop Frye in New York City. There are also three contact sheets by Babette Mangolte taken during the making of Artist on Fire, with views of Joyce Weiland’s Toronto studio and home. The series also contains one file of printing plates used in the creation of publicity material for Prof. Armatage’s early film Jill Johnson, October 1975.

Photographic Prints

Series C: Photographic Prints contains all of photograph prints that were housed in paper folders and filing cabinets in the office of Ken Jones. The folders were arranged by subject. For the most part, folders are labelled by subject but the folders and some photographs were out of order when the records were transferred to UTSC Library. In some cases, folders contain photos that do not reflect the subject of the original folder label.

Family records and correspondence

Series consists of copies of photographs and documents pertaining to Johnstone's family. Documents include correspondence between Mary F. Williamson and Helmut Kallmann of the National Library of Canada; a copy of the petition for divorce filed by Catherine (McGregor) Johnstone against her husband John Francis Johnstone, which was later withdrawn (January 8, 1979); a copy of an article in the Toronto Star (November 26, 1927) regarding Amelia Hart and her seven husbands (Johnstone was the fourth); a copy of a letter from Mary F. Williamson to Professor Carl Morey at the Faculty of Music, University of Toronto regarding Johnstone and performances of his songs; a copy of Johnstone's obituary (February 25, 1913); and a copy of scanned portraits of Johnstone. The series also consists of electronic records, including scanned images from the Johnstone family photo album (ca. 1900).

Correspondence

Series contains letters, cards, and correspondence, including letters from George Crumb; John Leberg; Witold Lutoslawski; R. Murray Schafer; Pierre Trudeau (2). Cards: Vera [Frenkel]; Michael [Snow] (2); Veronica Tennant; Grant [?]; and, David [?] (2). Series also contains autographed photographs from Elly Ameling and Philippe Entremont, and a photograph of Taussig with Natalia Granados (Barcelona, 1980).

Photographs

Series contains photographs collected, maintained, and/or accumulated by Kathleen Parlow. Photographs depict Kathleen Parlow's life, musical career (including photographs of the Parlow Strong Quartet), and travels to various places including Hawaii and Asia. Also includes photographs of various individuals including but not limited to: Kathleen Parlow; Minnie Parlow; Leopold Auer; Thomas Edison; Arthur Hinton; Harold Bauer; Samuel Gilbert Colt; Willen Willeke; Johan Halvorsen; Henry Scheadieck; Erich Wolff; Ernesto Consolo; Wanda De Stein; Mischa Elman; Marie Hall; and, Jascha Heifetz.

Linear Accelerator Committee of the Department of Physics

Records in this series include both the records of this committee as well as the documentation leading up to the design, building and financing of the Electron Linear Accelerator (Linac) in the Department of Physics. The committee itself, of which Prof. McNeill was Chair from 1966-1971, was responsible for overseeing the use of this apparatus for research in nuclear physics, medical biophysics and chemical engineering. This sub-series gives insight into early nuclear research conducted on campus.

Included are general files containing correspondence, minutes, reports on research, project proposals; grant files; sub-committee files; internal reports; and yearly progress reports. Also included are records relating to its planning and design which took six years from the time it began to be seriously considered in 1960 to the time it opened in 1966.

Records are grouped by type of file and are arranged more or less chronologically. Yearly progress reports, covering the period from 1966 to 1975 are filed at the end.

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