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Martin L. Friedland personal records

Records documenting the life of Martin L. Friedland, as a student, professor of law and administrator at the University of Toronto; as an expert on legal matters and a contributor to the formation of public policy at the provincial and federal levels; and as an author of sixteen books and numerous articles.

Included in this accession is correspondence, certificates and diplomas, diaries, course and lecture notes, memoranda, minutes of meetings, notes, research material, manuscripts, transcripts of oral history interviews, audiotapes, radio scripts, book reviews, books, pamphlets, reports, press clippings, photographs and maps.

Law School: Student, Professor, and Dean

The four boxes in this sub-series contain documents relating to my experience as a student, my four years at Osgoode Hall Law School, and my time as a law teacher and dean at the University of Toronto Law School.

There are very few documents relating to my student days at law school (files 2 and 3), apart from my moot factum (file 2) and notes and a small paper prepared for Abe Weston’s jurisprudence course and a set of notes taken in Bob McKay’s criminal law course (files 4 and 5). I have included several marked-up texts used as a student, including my international law casebook, the subject that was to be the subject of my graduate studies (file 7). (For a description of why I chose criminal law for my graduate work, see my speech to the Cambridge Boat-Race dinner in box 04, file 42). As I apparently tossed out most of my notes when we went to England in 1960, there is also very little from my articling year and the bar admission course. What has survived is one incorporation I did and a number of cases I argued for the firm of Kimber and Dubin and some legal aid criminal cases that I took on my own (files 8-10). Some of these cases were sensational enough to be covered in the yellow journals of the day, in Hush, Justice Weekly, and Tab.

Similarly, there are very few documents relating to my four years teaching at Osgoode Hall Law School from 1961-1965 (file 11). Research notes and documents relating to the Osgoode years can, however, be found in a number of other boxes, such as those relating to Detention before Trial, Securities Regulation, and Double Jeopardy.

I was appointed to the University of Toronto Faculty of Law commencing on July 1, 1965 (file 12). From that period on there is more material. The files, for example, contain some material on the Law School’s Research Committee and its Long Range Planning Committee, as well as various other memos (files 13-15).

In 1972 I was appointed as the dean and returned from my year as a Law Reform of Canada Commissioner in Ottawa (files 16-20). The files contain a fair amount of correspondence while still in Ottawa relating to the deanship (file 21). There are also various law school plans and speeches made while dean (file 22).

The many files connected with my seven years as dean between 1972 and 1979 will be found in the normal law school files. I did not go through the files to keep any law school records when my term of office was over. There is, however, a fairly lengthy interview done for the student Advocate (file 23). There are also a number of files dealing with student mooting while I was dean which were not part of the law school records but were given to me by some students a number of years later (possibly in the early 1980s) because they didn’t know what to do with them (files 41-44).

In 1975 I started making brief notes of my plans for the coming year (file 24) and kept this up until the present. I usually did these around Labour Day. From about 1980 on I also prepared, as we were required to do, annual reports to the dean on my moonlighting and other activities for the past year (file 27).

Correspondence from 1980 on not found in other boxes is contained in files 28-36. The files also contain material on other aspects of law school life, such as my chairmanship of the Directed Research Committee (files 37 and 38), my involvement as faculty advisor to the Faculty of Law Review (file 40), my membership in the graduate committee (file 48), and my involvement in seeking special salary increases for the faculty (file 39). None of these files is very complete, however. There are also files on my involvement in the law school annual squash tournament, various alumni events, and various talks I gave at the law school (files 45,47, and 51). Other files deal with various sabbatical plans, various media appearances, and ways in which I coped with the changing technology, including the use of the computer (files 46, 49, and 53). A number of law school pictures are contained in file 50.

Writings and publication drafts

Series consists of W. E. Gallie’s writings, manuscripts and reports that eventually went to publication. The series consists of both typed and handwritten reports, drafts, some correspondence related to copying and publishing, and in some cases, medical photographs or images have been attached as figures. A bibliography of many of Gallie’s works is included. Some of the publications in this series are co-authored by Gallie and Dr.’s Robertson, LeMesurier, and Janes. The files in this series have been arranged in chronological order. The titles for the files in this series reflect the given title of each report, if one exists.

Personal and education

This series consists of records such as her curriculum vitae, her association with the Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing, personal documents such as register of birth, certificates and diplomas relating to her nursing education at the University of Toronto, and her association as an elder with St. Andrews Presbyterian Church, Owen Sound. Records relating to her education also include her personal scrapbook of photographs, clippings, correspondence and other documents recording her years as a student of nursing in the diploma programme at the University of Toronto. This series also contains a file relating to her Honorary Doctorate in Nursing Science from the University of Turku in Finland in 1993.

In addition to photographs in the scrapbook, portrait photographs of Prof. Jones as a graduate in nursing in 1950, as Dean (ca 1979-1988) and informal photographs of the honorary degree ceremony at University of Turku will be found in /001P.

Correspondence

This extensive series contains both personal and professional correspondence received by Prof Berger during his academic career. Some of Prof. Berger’s draft replies will be found in later files. The earliest letters document his doctoral education and his appointment to the Department of History at the University of Toronto. Correspondence from the 1970s through the 1990s document his flourishing career as prominent historian, author, teacher and advisor, etc. Later correspondence is dominated by requests from editors and other scholars relating to his publications, requests for review of other manuscripts, as well as his history of the Royal Society (1996)

Correspondents include, among others, prominent academics such as Prof. Ray MacLean, Dept. of History, St. Francis Xavier University (b 1927 d. 2004), Prof. Ramsay Cook, George (now Sir George) S. Bain, a former classmate at the University of Manitoba and member of Board of Bombardier Aerospace, as well as former students such as Doug Owram (professor, University of Alberta 1976-2006), and colleagues at Canadian and foreign universities. Subjects include personal information about family, friends and colleagues, academic correspondence with students and other academics about research progress, requests for letters of reference and support, comments on recent publications, and other academic activities. Two files at the end of this series contain letters to single correspondents: M. Brook Taylor (1986-2006) former student and faculty member in Department of History, Mount St.Vincent University and Sam Waller, amateur historian and founder of the Sam Waller Museum in The Pas, Manitoba.

Actor René Maupré (René de Chauffour)

-Press clippings (221 pages) following the career of actor René Maupré – clippings ranging from 1904-1930 approx. (many clippings are not dated) – some clippings with photographs – great variety of important French newspapers: L’Humanité, Le Matin, La Petite République, L’Aurore, Le Monde illustré, Le Figaro, etc. – clippings about the Théâtre Antoine (Maupré was one of its stars) – some playbills from the Théâtre Antoine – some clippings from American and English newspapers (from p. 145) and some from Italian newspapers (p. 192 sq.) – a very interesting article by Maupré himself (1920?) on the future of cinema as a new art for the “masses” (p. 177).
-8 photographs (black and white) glued on coloured cardboard – Antoine, Camaret, staging of Coriolan by Antoine.

Biographical

This series gives researchers a good overview of Prof. Hume’s career and highlights. It includes biographical sketches, C.V., clippings, awards and correspondence regarding his various appointments. Photographs of Prof. Hume and relating to his career have also been placed in this series including portraits, a photo of Prof. Hume at a 1969 IFIP meeting and early computer installations in the Computer Centre. Finally, there is one framed painting of the Sanford Fleming building that hung in his office.

Page 1 of Album 10

File consists of page 1 of Album 10. There are seven photographs on the page [P7547, P7548, P7549, P7551, P7552, P7553]. Henri Nouwen is seen conducting Easter Sunday Mass, wearing clerical robes and a stole, outdoors as a crowd looks on. Friends, including Mich Zeman with his son Ben [P7547], James Watfor [P7547] (3rd from left), Joseph Nunez [P7547] (black beard), Carol Plantinga [P7548] (back to camera in plaid) and Virginia E. Van Dooren [P7551] (middle of photo with short, blonde, curly hair) are seen watching and participating in the service.

Page 1 of Album 5

File consists of page 1 of Album 5. There are two photographs on the page [P6578, P6579]. Taken in Scheveningen, the Netherlands during the late 1940s the photos include Laurent, Henri, Maria, Laurien and Paul Nouwen outside of their home in Schevenigen at Nieuwe Duinweg 20; and Laurent, Maria and Laurien Nouwen at the beach.

Manuscripts

Series consists of draft manuscripts and typescripts of more than 150 books and articles, forewords and introductions, sermons, and talks by Henri Nouwen. The date range of the materials is from 1956 to 1996. The series contains drafts of 49 of his articles and drafts of 41 books (Nouwen published over 300 articles and 39 books in his lifetime). In addition to handwritten drafts or typescripts some files may also include loose notes (usually background reading notes), galley and print proofs, administrative papers, correspondence regarding the materials, and photographs and artwork used in the process of publication.

The materials in the Series reflect Nouwen’s general writing process: for the most part he hand-wrote his works on foolscap or in hard-back journals, often he created reading notes pertaining to the subject he was writing on, drafts were typed by an administrative assistant and then circulated to friends and other readers for comment. He saved all of the drafts, often incorporating the notes made by himself and other readers, in order to create one final work.

Common themes present in the drafts include: spirituality, love, God, psychology, theology, relationships, prayer, ministry, and Christian life. Nouwen often reflected on his own spiritual journey and experiences in his works in journal form. This writing was often deeply personal and it is for this reason that some of the manuscripts and drafts are restricted from use, including Man at the Watershed, A Spiritual Journey, Taken, Blessed, Broken, Given (parts of which were published in Life of the Beloved), The Inner Voice of Love, Adam, and Sabbatical Journey.

With exception of the sermons, most material has been published. Eight transcripts have been identified as unpublished, including a book on Anton T. Boisen based on Nouwen’s doctoral thesis, a draft of a work about Nouwen’s friend Richard Alan White, and notes for a book Nouwen began in 1991 regarding the trapeze and the spiritual life as well as some of the restricted material listed above. See file descriptions for more information on each work.

The series has been arranged into two sub-series:

    1. Books and articles
    1. Talks and sermons

Each of these sub-series has sub-sub-series, files, and items. They have been arranged chronologically.

Papers of Father John O'Connor

Series consists of a collection of hand-written and typed manuscripts, poems, translations and radio transcripts created and accumulated by Monsignor John O'Connor, as well as his correspondence, collected ephemera (including news clippings, Christmas cards, posters, pamphlets, and small press publications) and research notes. The majority of the material relates to O'Connor's friendship with the author G.K. Chesterton, although O'Connor also translated Latin religious poetry and composed his own verse and wrote prose pieces on literature, Church history, morality, religion and philosophy.

Personal

Davidson Black kept a diary throughout much of his adult life. There are 28 volumes in this series. The earliest is for 1902, the year he entered medicine at the University of Toronto; it includes a tally of monthly expenses. The last diary is for 1934, the final entry being for 9 March, six days before his death. For each of the years 1922 and 1925, there are two volumes of diaries. There are no diaries present for the years 1907, 1908, 1909, 1911, and 1912. The diary Davidson kept while on active service during World War I is filed with his service records in Series 4. Most of the entries are brief as the diaries, except for 1902, are small. Some of the loose entries with the diaries are longer.

A number of items document his personal activities. The earliest is a small well-thumbed copy of 'The Book of Common Prayer', presented to him by his mother on his 9th birthday in 1893. A notebook, a journal, and permits document his early interest in ornithology. Finally, there are files of memorabilia, poems and sketches, and on honours bestowed on him later in life, along with twelve diplomas and certificates.

Skilling family sous-fonds

This sous-fonds documents the activities of various members of the Skilling family, principally Gordon’s father, William Watt Skilling, and brothers, Andrew Douglas and Edward Donald Skilling; his uncle, Ernest John Skilling, and his (Ernest’s) mother, Emma Louise Skilling. Included is correspondence, biographical and other notes, programmes for wedding anniversaries, obituaries, a will, photographs, a photograph album, and a box of mementos of military service during World War I.

The photo album was assembled by Ernest John Skilling and begins with a trip he made to the western United States in 1926 to a Shriner’s convention. The trip back across Canada by train includes images of ‘Hindus [in] British Columbia’, of the Royal North West Mounted Police, Indian chiefs in regalia, the Rocky Mountains, the prairies, northern Ontario and Lake Superior. The album concludes with photos taken during a tour of Kentucky and Alabama and Tennessee by the 48th Highlanders; photos of the Canadian Expeditionary Force cemetery in France and Donald Skilling’s grave, taken on a family visit to the site in 1919; and of ‘natives in Africa’, showing domestic and hunting activities associated with the missionary work of Reverend Albert Wilkinson. Many of the photoprints in the album have detailed information written on the backs thereof.

The box of military service mementos belonged to Gordon’s brother, Private Edward Donald Skilling, #157689, 1st Battalion, Canadian Infantry, Canadian Expeditionary Force, who was killed on his first day in action at the front on 4 May, 1917. It contains the following items: a Queen’s Own Rifles pin (Donald spent 6 months with the QOR before the war as a bugler in its bugle band); his ‘dog tag’ (1st Battalion); a shoulder badge – ‘Canada’ [CEF]; two hat badges, one marked ‘Canada’ and the other ‘111, Canada’ [111th Battalion] (probably a souvenir); two brass buttons (tunic and cuff); a piece of soldier’s ration; a hollow candle of the type used in dugouts in the trenches; a .303 calibre bullet and a shell fragment; two medals – the British War Medal and the Victory Medal (Inter-Allied War Medal), each inscribed on the rim: ‘157689 Pte. E. D. Skilling 1-Can. Inf.’, and a silver cross presented to Donald’s parents in his memory by the Minister of Militia and Defence.

Biographical and personal files

This series is divided into two sections. The first contains biographical sketches and curriculum vitae, press clippings and articles about Dr. Solandt, along with photocopies of his birth certificate and copies of his will and that of his first wife, Elizabeth. There is correspondence with Elizabeth regarding their marriage, with relatives and friends, and relating to appointments. Also present is a cash book detailing personal expenses between 1923 and 1946, a diary of Dr. Solandt’s first trip to Europe in 1929.

The first portion of this series concludes with the programme for the Solandt Symposium on Organizing and Managing the Practical Application of Science to Problems in Peace and War (Queen’s University at Kingston, 1994), programs for dinners of the Royal Canadian Engineers 3rd Field Engineer Regiment and the Royal Canadian Signals 11th Signal Regiment, a presentation copy of Donald Y. Solandt’s Highways to Health, and a resolution by Donald M. Solandt (Omond and Donald’s father) to the Presbyterian Synod of Manitoba in 1915.

The second section of this series consists of diaries and daybooks (largely the latter), beginning with an account of Dr. Solandt’s trip to Europe in the summer of 1929 while he was an undergraduate at the University of Toronto. Dr. Solandt kept only the occasional diary, of which three are represented in this series. The first is for May, 1945 as the war ended in Europe. The last two both cover his trip to Japan in October-December, 1945 to study the effects of the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. These diaries are followed by "CDRB's U.K. Visit" (undated); an account book of Solandt's visit to the United Kingdom in November, 1966, and his American address book.

The remainder of the volumes in this series are daybooks and “pocket diaries”, of which Dr. Solandt created a large number. In the former, usually with the manufacturer’s label of as “diary” or “date book”, he recorded his appointments and, occasionally, his expenses and other related notations. These date from 1941, when he first went to Lulworth, to 1988. The volumes for 1945, 1947,1948, 1957, 1958, 1979, and 1986 are absent, either because they were never kept or, perhaps, were not written up in the same manner. For 1945, for instance, there are entries for January, June, and July in two different volumes, but none for the whole year. For two years (1956; 1971, where the second volume has "Mayo Muir" below Dr. Solandt's name and the entries are not in his hand) there are two volumes.

The "pocket diaries" complement the appointment books. The earliest year represented is 1945, the latest, 1988. There are no volumes for 1948-1951, 1953, 1957, and 1959-1965. For 1958, there are also two volumes containing notes on Dr. Solandt's European trip in March and appointments for another in July, and "at a glance" volumes both for 1958 and 1959.

For accounts of travel experiences, either for pleasure or work, see Series 11: Canoe trips and Series 13: Travel.

Frank Buck

The series contains material related to Frank Buck the animal hunter, movie actor, producer, director and author. Material consists of ads, movie stills, books (primarily in comic book style), and trading cards.

Academic activity files

This series contains documents pulled together by Prof. Armatage for her tenure review as well as for subsequent yearly reviews. Files contain mainly professional correspondence, descriptive reports on research and teaching activities, yearly activity reports and clippings about her work. There is information on promotions, awards, research leaves and grants. Clippings in this series also give evidence to Prof. Armatage’s work outside mainstream academia including her role as a documentary filmmaker and curator for the Toronto International Film Festival.

Menus

The series comprises menus from around the world featuring a variety of cuisines including Afghan, American Argentinian, Armenian, Asian, Bangladeshi, Brazilian, Burmese, Cambodian, Caribbean, Chinese (Peking, Szechuan, Shanghai, Yunnan, Mandarin, Cantonese, Hunan and Jiangnan), Colombian, Cuban, Dutch, Ecuadorian, Egyptian, European, Filipino, Finnish, French, Hong Kong style, Indian, Indochinese, Indonesian, Islamic, Israeli, Italian, Jamaican, Japanese, Korean, Laotian, Latin American, Lebanese, Malaysian, Mediterranean, Mexican, Middle Eastern, Mongolian, Moroccan, Mughlai, Nepalese, Pakistani, Pan-Asian, Peruvian, Russian, Scandinavian, Singaporean, Southwestern, Spanish, Taiwanese, Thai, Tibetan, Turkish, Venezuelan, Vietnamese, seafood and vegetarian.

Menus are from restaurants located in Kenya, Morocco, South Africa, China (Beijing, Hangzhou and Shanghai), Egypt, Guam, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Israel, Japan, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand, Tibet, Turkey, Vietnam, Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Denmark, England, Finland, France, Germany, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Malta, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Russia, Scotland, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Wales, Antigua and Barbuda, the Bahamas, Bermuda, Canada (British Columbia, Manitoba, Newfoundland and Labrador, Northwest Territories, Nova Scotia, Ontario, Quebec, Saskatchewan and Yukon Territory), Costa Rica, Cuba, Curaçao, El Salvador, Greenland, Guatemala, Mexico, Panama, the United States (Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin and Wyoming), Australia, New Caledonia (France) New Zealand, Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Peru and Venezuela.

Menus types included placemat menus, single sheet menus, trifold and four fold, five fold and seven fold menus and menus in booklet style. Some menus are laminated while others are in vinyl enclosures. Menus range from take away and delivery to eat in and include wine lists as well.

Menus from hotels, cruises and airlines are also included in this series.

The series is divided into 6 subseries: Africa, Asia, Europe, North America, Oceania and South America. The division is based on the 7-continent model, substituting Australia as a continent and replacing it with Oceania for greater geographical coverage.

Photographs of Canadian musicians

File contains photographs of Canadian musicians, many of which are signed, and most of which are not dated: S. C. Eckhardt-Gramatté with string quartet including Peggie Sampson and Victor Feldbrill; Herman Geiger-Torel; Irene Jessner; Greta Kraus; Sir Ernest MacMillan; Lois Marshall (2 photographs); Oskar Morawetz; Charles Peaker; and Redferne Hollinshead.

Personal files

This small series contains Dr. Glass' curriculum vitae, entries for biographical dictionaries, press clippings and articles; appointment calendars for 1974 and 1976; files from his employment as a stress analysts at Canadair (1945) and in 1947 as an aeronautical engineer with the Canadian Car and Foundry; and a file containing an offer of a position at Technion, the Israel Institute of Technology (1971-1972).

Elgin Rowland Hastings

This series is comprised almost wholly of material assembled by Elgin Hastings while a student in the then new five-year Bachelor of Medicine program at the University of Toronto between 1908 and 1913. The records consist primarily of a comprehensive collection of course notes, laboratory notes and drawings. Hastings kept detailed notes, dated his notebooks and many of the lectures and exercises, and often recorded the name of the professor or tutor teaching the course. He also preserved a list of all the courses for which he had registered at the beginning of each academic year and the professors who taught them. He did, however, take some additional courses that were not listed; one example is a course in psychiatry taught by Ernest Jones during the Easter term 1912. The course notes are arranged by academic year and alphabetically by name of course within each year.

The series also contains certificates relating to Hastings’ medical education and professional certification, a student handbook, memorabilia of his extra-curricular activities, photographs of some of his classmates, photographs including family members and the graduating Class of 1913 (Medicine), and a transcript of the evidence given in a court case in 1914 (two pages of Hastings’ evidence have been torn out).

Correspondence and biographical

Consists of correspondence with colleagues, publishers, and his wife. Also includes a framed letter from Duncan Campbell Scott, 2 annotated books, educational diplomas and certificates, memoirs, scrapbooks, graduation robes, and various medals.

Incoming correspondence

Series consists of Fred T. Flahiff's personal correspondence, deposited with the library due to its relevance to Flahiff's work on Sheila Watson. Includes 53 letters from Sheila Watson, 3 letters and 34 pages of poetry and 20 illustrations in ink and pastel (17 of which are photocopied) from Wilfred Watson. Also includes letters from others: one letter from B.J. Mitchell; one letter from a Mike (last name unknown), regarding an entry on Sheila Watson in the UBC yearbook "Totem" from 1931; one letter from Douglas M. Gibson, publisher at McClelland and Stewart.

Personal

These boxes contain personal materials relating to my early years, my undergraduate years, various correspondence from and to family members and others, materials relating to the immediate family, files involving homes and other property that we owned, my income tax returns, other financial matters, and assorted other files.

There is relatively little material relating to my early years, including my high school years (files 3 and 4). I saved very little of that material. Similarly there is very little with respect to my University undergraduate years (files 5-16). There are no files relating to courses in Commerce and Finance (file 7). There are a few scattered things involving the university fraternity, the University College Literary and Athletic Society (UC “Lit”), U of T athletics, Hart House, and the Historical Club (files 6-13). A few postcards and letters and newspapers relate to the World University Service (WUS) trip to West Africa in the summer of 1955 and the many trips thumbing through the states while an undergraduate and law student (files 14 and 15). Material relating to my time at law school is contained in the “Law School” sub-series in Series 4.

I have included correspondence and other documents involving our children and the immediate family (files 17-27) and letters received from Judy’s and my folks while we were in Israel (files 28-30). Letters relating to our times in Cambridge are found in the boxes on Double Jeopardy and Law Reform (Series 5).

There are files relating to the purchase and sale of 169 Hillsdale, our first house, and the purchase and rentals while away of 77 Belsize Drive, our second house (files 31-38). There is also a file on the purchase and sale of property in Barrie, Ontario (file 39). I have not included at this time the material that I have on the purchase from Dean WPM Kennedy’s son, Frere, in 1983 of the Kennedy property in Kearney, Ontario, where our summer place is.

I have included a file relating to the estates of Ben and Sarah Garfield, Judy’s uncle and aunt, of which I was an executor (file 48). There are also other financial matters in the files, particularly my income tax returns for the years 1963-1992 (files 50 and 52-57).

Other miscellaneous files include records of the Public Lending Rights scheme (file 41), a Cambridge Boat Race Dinner speech that I gave in 1990 (file 42), some correspondence with Jewish groups (file 43), and various who’s who entries (file 40).

Biographical

This series gives a good overview of Prof. Prentice’s career. It includes biographies, C.V.s, correspondence on appointments, newspaper clippings, honours received and photographs.

Correspondence

Prof. Heichelheim maintained a regular correspondence with friends, family and colleagues both in Canada and around the world up to the year of his death. His brother’s name was Arthur Heichelheim and he lived in London England. This series dominates this fonds and includes correspondence with classical scholars at Cambridge and Oxford and at the University of Giessen (Prof. Heichelheim’s former employer), as well as at the University of Toronto. Such scholars include many of his co-authors such as E.N. Adler, Prof. F. L. Griffith, J. G. Tait, T. Frank, H. Michel, Prof. Elemer Balogh and Prof. Cedric Yeo. Correspondence is in English or German, depending on the nationality of the correspondent.

During World War II he continued to maintain ongoing correspondence with his brother and other family members, along with other scholars left in Europe and frequently describe living conditions, lost friends, the death camps and establishment of a Jewish state in Palestine. Correspondence with family and friends is often in German.

Family scrapbooks

This series contains three scrapbooks that were assembled by Gordon Skilling to document the history of his family.

The first, titled ‘Dad Skilling (W. W. Skilling) and his father, John Skilling’, documents the history of the family from 1828 until 1927. It includes poems,
correspondence, photographs, telegrams; birth, baptismal and citizenship certificates, and wills documenting the history of the family from the time William Watt Skilling’s grandfather left Leith in Scotland about 1828, through his move to London and, subsequently, the family’s emigration to Canada in 1907 and eventually to Toronto. It ends with correspondence and documents relating to deaths in 1917 of John Skilling and Gordon’s brother, Donald, killed in action at the age of 19, and subsequent correspondence relating to John’s estate.

The second and third scrapbooks were compiled later in life by Gordon Skilling as a memorial to Donald; they also contain material relating to his brother, William, who was seriously wounded in battle but recovered. The second scrapbook contains photographs of Donald’s childhood and youth, and as a member of the 81st Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force; letters and postcards home while training in England and later from France, along with a diary (1916), a copy of the CEF’s Regimental Songs, 1914-1915, press clippings and memorabilia. There are also some letters from William and, finally, telegrams and letters to family from military authorities on Donald’s death.

The third scrapbook contains letters to Donald from his brother, Will, and his comrades, the nurse, commanding officer and chaplain and official letters concerning his grave, personal affects and estate. There are also letters of sympathy from relatives and friends. There are also a number of photographs, including ones of the temporary marker at his gravesite at Aubigny and later photographs of the permanent marker during taken during a family visit in 1919.

Personal

This series includes records documenting personal family life, professional activities including position appointments, medical internship, club memberships, and participation in health related organizations at the national and international level, and honours bestowed. Amongst the last are the Gairdner Foundation International Award (1969), election to the Royal Society (1999), an honorary degree from the University of Toronto and election to the Canadian Medical Hall of Fame (both 2004).

Includes weekly appointment books, daily journals, curriculum vitae, personal and professional correspondence, minutes of meetings, certificates, and photographs.

Personal

Contains personal correspondence mainly documenting Hollander’s achievements including many congratulatory notes from colleagues regarding awards or the publication of his major works.

Correspondence and related documents also document his appointment as University Professor and the campaign beginning in 1991 to procure for him a Nobel Prize in Economics. Also documented are his appointments through the University ranks, his salary, and the awarding of grants to support his research including activity reports and grant applications.

This series also contains records collected by Hollander over his academic and professional career, and includes various graduate school lecture notes, school transcripts, honorary degrees, and a heavily annotated copy of David Ricardo’s book Principles of Political Economy which he kept separate from other professional and academic papers.

Filed at the beginning of each accession is his most updated C.V. at the time the records were acquired (see B1998-0027/001(1) and B2012-0018/001(1)). There is also a portrait of Hollander, to be found in B1998-0027/001P.

Contemporary photographs

Jones was an avid participant at many university activities and events especially those related specifically to the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering. Photographs in this series reflect his role as Engineering Archivist as well as his interest in amateur photography. Contained in this series are photographs both taken by Jones and collected by him to document events such as convocations, memorials, award ceremonies, dinners, graduation balls, dignitary visits, dedications, building openings, retirements and open houses. There are also images that specifically document Jones attending many of the numerous events as well as other professional activities.

The most well documented events include: the Engineering Centenary celebrations in 1973; the mounting of the lintel from the Old S.P.S. building and the installation of Becca's H in front of the Galbraith building; the fire, rebuilding and reopening of the Sir Sandford Fleming building 1977-82; the excavation of the site of the old Observatory, 1979; the installation of John Black Aird as Chancellor of the University; the design, construction and installation of the Sundial, 1993.

Early education and biographical

This series consists of records pertaining to the education and career of Prof MacDowell. It includes academic work (notes and papers) produced while MacDowell was an undergraduate and graduate student. The series also documents her tenure and promotion at the University of Toronto, annual activity reports, internal memos at U of T, and other activities related directly to her career at U of T.

Personal and biographical

This series consists of Dr. Mastromatteo’s biographical and personal records. They document his career, personal life, and professional and personal relationships. This series also contains many files documenting studies, projects and issues that Dr. Mastromatteo included with his personal files. Record types include curriculum vitae, correspondence, photos, cards and certificates, articles, pamphlets, reports, notes, forms, minutes and projector slides.

The material is arranged into two sections. The first section contains personal records, career records, records documenting relationships, education records, and general files. The records are arranged in that order and filed chronologically within each of those sub-sections. The second section contains files on specific work projects or issues and is arranged chronologically.

Professional Correspondence

This series contains records from three accessions: B1994-0002, B2009-0021, and B2015-0007. The bulk of the files are from accession B1994-0002, and consists of general incoming and out-going correspondence mainly of a professional nature. It is arranged in two parts. The first part consists of files created by Helen Hogg containing correspondence and other accompanying material with individuals, institutions, clubs and associations regarding research, special projects, events, visits, excursions, travel, donations, lectures, awards and publications. For access, these have been arranged alphabetically by file title. Some of the more notable correspondence are with colleagues such as Amelia Whelau (University of Western Ontario), Steven Van Agt (Germany), Martha Liller (Harvard Observatory), Bart J. Bok (Harvard and Australia), Chu Yu-Hua (China), and there is also extensive correspondence with Harlow Shapley, director of the Harvard College Observatory and mentor to Prof. Hogg.

The second part of this series consists of miscellaneous correspondence arranged by decade. Far from being extraneous pieces, this correspondence is quite extensive and reveals much about her professional activities and on-going research. These files contain the largest volume of correspondence documenting both her and Frank Hogg's early career in the 1930s and 1940s. These files were created from loose correspondence within the records or from files, which were clearly miscellaneous.

Researchers should note that while this series does not represent the whole of the Hogg correspondence (much of which is specific to each series), it is a good representation of the scope of her interests and activities. Some of the correspondence relates directly to records in other series and researchers should bear this in mind when investigating a particular topic.

Awards and honourary degrees

Sub-series consists of awards and honourary degrees bestowed upon Henri Nouwen by various academic institutions, religious and community organizations, and literary associations, including correspondence and memorabilia relating to the awards and award ceremonies.

Course lectures, handouts, reading, and student notes

Sub-series consists of bound volumes of materials and loose documents created and used by Nouwen for his teaching positions various academic institutions in both North America and Europe. This includes reading notes, preparation notes, lecture notes, typed lecture summaries, course handouts and syllabi, many of which are heavily annotated by Nouwen. It also includes lectures, letters, notes, assignments and course evaluations produced by Nouwen's students and teaching assistants. In addition to the course-specific bound volumes, there are two bound volumes that are labelled as "miscellaneous class material" that relate to Nouwen's early career from 1959 to 1976. This sub-series has been divided into 22 sub-sub series based on the course titles and subjects which Nouwen taught between 1961 and 1994, except for one sub-sub series involving the two-volume set of collected class materials mentioned above.
The sub-sub series are:

  1. Developmental Psychology
  2. Psychology of Personality
  3. Abnormal Psychology
  4. Psychology of Religion
  5. Pastoral Care
  6. Christian Spirituality
  7. Ministry to the Elderly
  8. Hospitality
  9. Discipline and Discipleship
  10. Prison Ministry
  11. Collected Class Materials
  12. The Life and Works of Thomas Merton
  13. Ministry and Spirituality
  14. Ministry in Non-Religious Institutions
  15. The Ministry of Vincent Van Gogh
  16. Compassion
  17. Education and Community
  18. Hesychasm
  19. Desert Spirituality and Contemporary Ministry
  20. Spiritual Direction / Spiritual Life and Spiritual Direction
  21. Introduction to the Spiritual Life
  22. Early Dutch course material
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