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Addresses

Professor Franceschetti has given many public lectures and delivered many papers at conferences and seminars. Some of the latter were published and readers may want to check Series 6 for them. Additional correspondence about addresses may be found in Series 2. Only about a third of the addresses listed in Professor Franceschetti’s last curriculum vitae (April 2004) are found in this series. The files may contain any or all of the following: notices of and posters for addresses (for oversized ones, see B2009-0039/015), covering correspondence, programmes, notes for and drafts of the addresses, and posters.

Hartle Consulting Records

Included is correspondence, contracts and proposals relating to projects undertaken by Hartle Consulting Ltd. for such groups as the Economic Council of Canada, Ontario Economic Council, Department of Energy, Mines and Resources, Canada Cable Systems and the Commission of Inquiry into Residential Tenancies.

Personal files

The three files in this series contain copies of Professor Hartle's curriculum vitae, printouts of his computer directories and logs, and a list of his journals.

Education

This series begins with a single file of course notes taken by Frieda Fraser while a Form V student at Havergal College in 1915-1916. It is followed by others containing course and laboratory notes for the Physics and Biology section of the undergraduate honours Arts program at University College for second, third, and fourth year (1918-1921).

This is followed by a notebook for a biological project at St. Andrew's, New Brunswick, for the summer of 1921. It also contains a number of sketches that have no relationship to the course.

The series ends with some course and laboratory notes for the Bachelor of Medicine program at the University of Toronto.

Manuscripts, publications, and addresses

Professor Fraser had eleven scientific papers published between 1928 and 1964, though she wrote many reports and some papers that were not published. This series contains offprints of all of her published papers and a draft of one. Also included in this series is a short story she wrote in 1909, at the age of 10; a typescript of her undated "Report of a case of pernicious anemia", and an address, "D.P.T. vaccines" that she delivered on 4 December, 1964.

Research: general files

Beginning in the mid-1920s and even after her retirement in 1965, Dr. Fraser carried on research at the University of Toronto. For the first twenty years, usually with her brother, Donald, her research concentrated on the development of scarlet fever and other antitoxins. This research formed part of ongoing studies of certain aspects of infection and immunity in pneumonia, diphtheria, and scarlet fever, often in conjunction with health departments across Canada. It also involved the testing of products and the monitoring of scarlet fever outbreaks.

As the Second World War began, she started investigating the incidence of agglutinative types of strains of haemolytic streptococcus in a small scarlet fever ward at the Riverdale Isolation Hospital. Through the use of exacting technical procedures, she was able to prove the transfer of agglutinative types from one patient to another in the same ward. She continued work in this field and, in 1941-1942, by examining cultures from 650 people, was able to identify the incidence of particular types of streptococci in various groups of persons. The techniques perfected proved of particular use in studying the outbreak of scarlet fever in Royal Canadian Air Force bases across southern Ontario between 1941 and 1944. In 1942-1943 she worked on the preparation of a combined antigen containing diphtheria toxoid, tetanus toxoid, and tannic acid precipitate of scarlet fever toxin.

During the war, her research also included the development of penicillin, especially in relation to the campaign to combat venereal disease. From January, 1944, in co-operation with the penicillin committee of the armed forces, she conducted a bacteriological investigation of clinical material from patients treated with penicillin. At the same time she was actively engaged in the investigation of two antibiotics, streptothricin and streptomycin.

After the War Dr. Fraser continued her laboratory and clinical studies in antibiotics. One aspect of her research, between 1946 and 1948, was to test the effectiveness of penicillin in oil and wax in the treatment of gonorrhoea. In 1947, as a member of team including researchers from the Department of Botany, she spent much of her available time testing a group of new strain of micro-organisms for their activity against selected cultures. A number of new preparations of penicillin designed to prolong its action were also tested on laboratory animals and then on humans, this project extending into 1949. Further refinements in the testing of the effectiveness of penicillin were continued the next year.

In 1948 Dr. Fraser began a major study of antibiotic substances with special reference to tubercle bacillus and gram-negative cocci. A year later she was studying the antibiotic activity of several strains of penicillin against gram-negative bacilli of the enteric group. In 1950 she began another two-year project, studying the toxicity and protective effect of partially purified antibiotic substances isolated from fungi, utilizing
samples of Arctic soil. She also investigated the conditions for the production of antibiotics in deep culture.

In 1952 she began expanding on earlier research by exploring methods for the concentration of antibiotic from one of the strains of penicillin previously studied. The following year she was investigating methods for the electrophoresis on paper strips of vaccinia virus and a strain of bacteriophage, research that continued to be refined over the next several years with particular references to viruses. By 1957 she was beginning chemical tests of the fractions obtained by electrophoresis separation. Simple synthetic media were also developed for the propagation of phage on a non-pathogenic mycobacterium. In the late 1950s and the early 1960s Dr. Fraser's principal research was in a major project on the development of the anti-tuberculosis antigen, compound 377.

The eight boxes in this series contain research notes, background material, correspondence, data, articles and reports. The associated nine boxes of records of laboratory experiments are found in the next series.

The series begins with three boxes (019-021) of mimeographed and printed articles, and reports, and research notes on areas of interest, especially scarlet fever, tuberculosis, cultures, penicillin, electrophoresis, rheumatic fever, serum sickness, smallpox, spectrophotometry staphylococcus, streptococcus and venereal disease. The arrangement is largely alphabetical by topic.

Box 022 contains applications for, reports on, and correspondence regarding research grants for the years 1944-1964, on projects such as testing the effectiveness of penicillin, on new antibiotics, the electrophoresis of viruses, and tuberculosis vaccine trials.

Boxes 023 and 024 contain correspondence, notes, Dick, skin and lethal test results for research on scarlet fever streptococcus toxin production, and papers describing the results. Included are data for tests on rabbits, in schools, isolation hospitals, the Ontario School for the Deaf, orphanages, and students in the Public Health Nursing program at the University of Toronto. Much of this research was carried out at
the Connaught Laboratories, and the researchers corresponded with several other research institutes including the Richardson Pathological Laboratory at Queen's University.

Box 025 contains files on scarlet fever outbreaks amongst the Royal Canadian Air Force and other military personnel in bases across Ontario between 1941 and 1944. There are also more files of correspondence, notes, and reports, primarily from the 1930s and the early 1940s, on the development of scarlet fever antitoxin, on testing the effectiveness of penicillin in oil and wax in the treatment of gonorrhoea, and on the survival of streptococci and staphylococci in various products. The files from the 1950s relate largely to work on bacteria and viruses and to research methodology.

Box 026 contains the last general research files in this series. The correspondence, data, and reports are associated with a the development of compound 377. Sensitivity tests, clinical and drug trials were carried out at the Mountain Sanatorium in Hamilton, at the Toronto Hospital for Tuberculosis in Weston, and in London and Woodstock.

Personal and biographical

This series consists of a volume of Longfellow's poetry (last part, including back cover missing), with a bookplate with the coat-of-arms of the Williams family (Sir John Bickerton Williams, Kt., LLD, FSA), a certificate for the family plot in Mount Pleasant Cemetery (1916), a medical certificate for Edith (Bud) Williams from England (1927), and press clippings about her passion for mountain climbing (1962).

Tenure Documentation

This series contains two sets of documentation. The first compiled in 1976 when Prof. McIlwraith was applying for promotion to Assistant Professor. This documentation includes course files as described in Series 1 that complete this series for the years prior to 1976. Also included are copies of some of his early papers, reviews and talks often accompanied by an explanatory note meant to put the work in context to his entire output.

The second set of documentation is made up entirely of course related material, again with explanatory notes that most often fill the gap of similar course related files found in Series 1. This binder was amassed as part of the tenure review process to full professor in 1997.

Personal and biographical

The material in this series consists of copies of Professor Franceschetti’s curriculum vitae, correspondence on his gaining Canadian citizenship in 1979, a folder of greeting cards and a copy of his 'dottore in lettre' thesis from the University of Padua (1963), and two certificates.

Research

Series consists of records documenting Prof. Fletcher’s research activity. It includes substantial coverage of his work within two major projects, The Charter Project and the Australian Rights Project. Series also includes additional smaller-scale studies as well as miscellaneous research files. Records relate to both the administration of these projects as well as their findings. See listing of component sections below.

Canadian attitudes towards the Charter of Rights and Freedoms: This section contains records related to research on Canadian attitudes towards civil liberties and is comprised primarily of material from the Charter Project (1986-1990) which was conducted with fellow investigators Paul Sniderman, Peter Russell, and Philip Tetlock. This research project investigated how the recent adoption of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms was reflected in Canadian attitudes towards civil liberties among various population groups. This section includes additional records from projects that followed the Charter Project and reflect Prof. Fletcher’s continued research within the area. Material includes data print-outs, draft and final surveys, indices, correspondence, notes, progress documentation, and background material.

Australian Rights Project and comparative study: The Australian Rights Project (1988-1993), led by Brian Galligan, Ian McAllister, and Joseph Fletcher, investigated the level of Australian support for civil rights and freedoms. The study evaluated the beliefs of both the general public and a population of elites, mostly those in the legal community. The project was also designed to compare its results with those in other countries, in particular Canada. Material in this section includes data-print outs, notes, correspondence, indices, granting applications and records, recruitment material, research summaries, and background research.

Task Force on Foreign Students survey (University of Toronto): Records in this section relate to a study beginning in 1984 of international students at the University of Toronto organized by the Task Force on Foreign Students. The mail survey evaluated the overall experiences of foreign students at the University looking in particular at academic, financial, and personal issues faced. Material includes data, notes, reports, and background material.

Survey of Recent and Current Doctoral Students at the University of Toronto: Records in this section relate to a survey conducted regarding the attitudes, issues, and practices surrounding doctoral dissertations at the University between 1989 and 1991. The study was organized by the Committee on the Role and Nature of the Doctoral Dissertation on behalf of the Dean of Graduate Studies. Material in this section includes data, reports, notes, surveys, and correspondence.

Miscellaneous research: Records in this section cover multiple projects and ancillary areas of research, including several survey-based projects: a recurring national election study; a 1993 referendum survey, and a survey of legal scholars and professionals. Additionally, the section includes research files on topics including party identification, Canada’s mission in Afghanistan, and same-sex marriage. Records comprise data print-outs, analysis, correspondence, reports, notes, and background material. Additionally, section contains copied and original material created by Prof. Fletcher’s former supervisor and colleague, Christian Bay.

Intermediate Dynamics (unpublished)

This series contains correspondence, notes, captions, diagrams and complete typescript of the unpublished manuscript written by Derek Paul entitled Intermediate Dynamics, a textbook for undergraduate students in physics to be published by Prentice-Hall,Inc. Chapter titles are: the principles of dynamics, particle motion in one and two dimensions, central forces, perturbations of elliptic orbits in the plans of the ellipse, particle motion in three dimensions, systems of many particles, and the rigid body and its motion in three dimensions.

For photoprints for frontespiece and chapter 5 see B1995-0020/001P(01).

Correspondence

In-coming as well as out-going correspondence was arranged by Lee in various runs. Filed at the beginning is a chronological series of files containing letters from 1967-1972. One file contains job offers from various universities in 1969-70 while another file relates to correspondence around his job offer at the University of Toronto. Apart from job offers, most of the correspondence is with colleagues world wide and is of both a professional and personal nature. Much of the early correspondence relates to field trips to the Kalahari and related research.

The second run of files is general alphabetical files with correspondence dating from about 1970 to 1975. Again this correspondence relates mainly to Prof. Lee’s research and is from colleagues and students. It includes comments on his publications and routine requests for information and advice, requests to attend seminar and talks and other professional meetings, as well as Prof. Lee’s reports or comments as a peer reviewer of papers. There are also letters of recommendation, reviews of theses and general correspondence documenting his role as a teacher.

A third run is an alphabetical run of files arranged by the correspondent. Correspondence is similar in nature to the general alphabetical files described above but is more voluminous for each person and covers a time period mainly from 1965-1975 with the bulk dating from the late 1960s to 1972. Included is correspondence with well known anthropologists such as Carl Heider (Brown University / University of Southern California), Adam Kuper (University College, London), Mary Leakey, Sidney Mintz (Yale University), Julian Steward (Colombia / University of Illinois), Sherwood Washburn (Harvard University and Lee’s advisor) and Eric Wolf (City University of New York).

Finally, Prof. Lee himself arranged a small run of correspondence files from famous people or people influential in his professional development. They include people such as Margaret Atwood and Carl Sagan as well as fellow anthropologists Philip Tobias and Bruce Trigger.

In addition to the correspondence from the 2007 donation, there is a grouping of correspondence from the 2012 addition. This is arranged alphabetically by correspondent, with occasional subject file as designated by Lee. Many of the earlier correspondents appear in this section again.

Publications

While Prof. Lee has published over a hundred papers, reviews, chapters in books as well as several books, this series contains manuscripts and typescripts for only a handful. Some of the files contain related correspondence and drafts. There are reviews written by Lee as well as correspondence with publishers especially for his Man the Hunter. Except for one paper, all date from 1965-1975. They are arranged chronologically.

Nevertheless, this series does contain the original manuscript of Prof. Lee’s acclaimed "The !Kung San: Men and Women and Work in a Foraging Society". This book was included in a list by American Scientist of important books in science for the 20th century. Under the category of “The Nature and the Rise of our own Species”, Lee’s book shares the list with books by Sigmund Freud, Mary Leaky, Noam Chomsky and Ivan P. Pavlov to name but a few.[1]

[1] Morrison, Philip and Phylis Morrison, “100 or so books that Shaped a Century of Science” in American Scientist, Fall 1999.

Teaching

This series consists of course files containing lectures, course outlines and reading lists for courses taught by Prof. at Lee at Harvard, Rutgers, the University of Toronto, the Marxist Institute, and others.

Grants

This series consists of grant proposals and their resulting paperwork, primarily from the Canada Council and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council. These include grants for Prof. Lee’s work in Africa.

Student Notebooks

These are Prof. Lee’s notebooks from when he was a student. Many of his instructors are well known in the field of anthropology or worked with Lee during his career. For some of them, their records are also held by the University of Toronto. Instructors include: Ronald Cohen, Dr. C. D. Ellis, J.N. Emerson, Dr. Nathan Keyfitz, Dr. Thomas F. MacIlwraith, Cranford Pratt, Dr. James W. Vanstone, Dr. Fred W. Voget.

Education

This series contains certificates and diplomas, correspondence, course and lab notes, term papers and memorabilia documenting aspects of Davidson Black’s education, running from the Wellesley School through Harbord Collegiate and the Faculties of Medicine and Arts at the University of Toronto. There is also a file on Davidson’s summer project in 1907 to earn money for his Bachelor of Arts program, prospecting in the Temagami Forest Reserve.

Publications and addresses

This series documents only one of Davidson Black’s publications, but more of his addresses, in particular some he delivered in 1925 before his discovery of Peking Man, and the Croonian Lecture in December 1932 that cemented the acceptance of his research.

Published Manuscripts

This Series consists of articles, reviews and monographs written by Harold Innis. Includes chapters of books, which also appeared as journal articles, annotated versions of chapters and articles, and several revisions of his book "Empire and Communications".

University of Toronto

This Series consists of files relating to his departmental activities at the University, and to the "Values" Discussion Group of which Innis was a member.

Research and reference material

Series consists of bound and loose leaf research and reference notes handwritten and typed by Douglas Ellory Pett relating to his thesis and extensive research on the early Anglican sermons of John Henry Newman. Includes detailed bibliographic entries on published works; meticulous notes on biblical references used by Newman in his sermons; transcriptions of Newman's correspondence and archival records; as well as notes on contemporary accounts of Newman's preaching activities.

Lecture Notes

Consists of:

  • lecture notes; course material; term papers, 1967-1986; student files, 1978-1981 [boxes /003 to /009]
  • non-University of Toronto lecture notes [box /010]

Education and Personal Activities

The series partially documents Francess Halpenny’s education received at Maxville Sunday School in 1927 ; at the Public Schools of the Counties of Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry in 1928 ; and at the Oakwood Collegiate Institute, from 1931 to 1936. It also partially documents her undergraduate education, from 1937 to 1940, (B.A. in English literature) and her graduate studies (M.A. English literature) at the University of Toronto, in 1940 and 1941. The series documents the friendship between Francess Halpenny and Elizabeth and Jennifer Harper, between 1983 and 1986 ; Halpenny’s participation to social events, such as the dinner for 40th wedding anniversary of Morley and Clara Thomas in 1982, a dinner at Rideau Hall in 1983 and an evening in honour of Floyd S. Chalmer, Jean A. Chalmer and John Beckwith in 1984.

The series consists of 7 files including certificates and diplomas, course notes, Faculty of Arts Class and Prize Lists, correspondence and press clippings. It also includes one letter received from J. Mavor Moore, 16 October 1989 regarding Halpenny’s course notes he had kept from the University years ; a certificate of Honour Award received in recognition of her contribution to the undergraduate life at the University of Toronto, 7 June 1940 ; personal correspondence received after a period of illness in 1984 ; the address she gave at J. Russell Harper funeral and his obituary for the Royal Society of Canada.

Honours and Awards

The series documents the honours and awards received by Francess Halpenny during her career. It also documents the lectures and seminars she gave as Distinguished Visitor at the University of Alberta in 1989.

The series consists of 20 files including correspondence, ceremony proceedings, diplomas, convocation addresses, personal notes and press clippings. The series also contains 92 photographs of Halpenny taken during various convocation ceremonies or with dignitaries.

University of Toronto Press

The series consists of 1 files including a token received from University of Toronto Press apprentices in sign of recognition for Francess Halpenny’s support ; address she gave at the launch of "The Clear Spirit", in 1967; correspondence received when she retired at the age of 65 in 1984.

National Library of Canada

The series partially documents Francess Halpenny’s activities as a member of the National Library of Canada’s advisory board from 1976 to 1982. It also partially documents Halpenny’s activities as a member of the Advisory board committee on bibliographical services of Canada, from 1981 to 1982 ; and her participation to the "Colloquium on Availability of Publications in Canada", Quebec City, June 17 and 18, 1987.

The series consists of 4 files including correspondence, minutes of meetings, news release, notes and correspondence.

Research and Publications

The series partially documents Francess Halpenny’s research and publishing activities relating to publishing generally, Canadian libraries, Canadian theatre and Royal Society of Canada fellows, from 1969 to 1996. The series also partially documents her participation into activities of the Literary History of Canada’s editorial board from 1984 to 1990.

The series consists of 8 files including working notes, drafts (some hand written), correspondence, minutes of meetings, grant application and reviews.

Talks and Conferences

The series partially documents Francess Halpenny’s participation as lecturer, moderator and/or attendee to talks and conferences on publishing, biography and Canadian studies, between 1972 and 1993. It also documents a talk she gave about staying active and aging at the symposium "Age-itation", in 1986.

The series consists of 20 files including correspondence, conference programs, lists of participants, working notes, drafts (some hand written) of addresses and/or papers and press clippings.

Manuscripts and Publications

W. H. Fraser's principal writing were of textbooks on French and German grammar, co-authored by John Squair and William Henry Van der Smissen. They were used for two generations in Ontario schools and had wide acceptance elsewhere. They went through many editions, being published in Canada by Copp Clark, in the United States by D. C. Heath of Boston, and in the United Kingdom by George Harrap in London. On his own, Fraser wrote, in 1887, Un Philosophe sous les toits, Journal d'un Homme Hereux, par Emile Souvestre, and, later, a slim volume of Italian Exercises. Associated with the last is a scrapbook, mounted pages cut from a French grammar text with annotations in Italian.

Professional associations and conferences

This series consists of files on organizations, conferences, symposia and workshops, arranged alphabetically. The most thoroughly documented ones are those in which Professor McLeod was involved in an organizational or executive capacity. The earliest files document his involvement in multicultural issues in Saskatchewan, specifically problems associated with language instruction in French. They contain correspondence, notes, briefs submitted to the Royal Commission on Bilingualism and Biculturalism and to the Saskatchewan Committee on Instruction in Languages other than English, associated
reports, and a seminar on bilingual education (1964-1966). Later, in Ontario, his overlapping duties as chair of the Ontario Multicultural Education Conference Committee (1980-1983) and president of the Canadian Council for Multicultural and Intercultural Education (1981-1985), for example, enabled him to play a central role in organizing the early national conferences on multicultural education. He organized and chaired two colloquiums on “Multiculturalism – Teaching and Learning”, sponsored by FEUT (1990, 1991), and was a co-organizer of the International Colloquium on Ethnicity, Conflict and Cooperation held in Moscow in 1992. McLeod also attended a number of international conferences as a Canadian representative. These include four (1977-1987) world congresses of the Comparative and International Education Association, and the Circumpolar Conference of Indigenous People in Iceland (1993).

McLeod was involved in an executive capacity in many organizations, the files for which contain the correspondence, notes and memoranda, minutes and reports that reveal the extent of his involvement. The principal bodies, for which there is extensive documentation, are the Canadian Association for Second Language Teachers (CASALT), Canadian Ethnic Studies Association (CESA), Canadian Council for Multicultural and Intercultural Education (CCMIE), Canadian History of Education Association (CHEA), Multicultural Health Coalition (MHC), the Multiculturalism and Aging Seniors Coordinating Committee (MASCC), and the Ontario Multicultural Association (OMAMO). He was also frequently asked to advise governments on policy. He gave, for example, evidence to the House of Commons Standing Committee on Multiculturalism and served on the Ontario Advisory Committee on Multiculturalism.

Correspondence

The correspondents in this series number just under four hundred individuals, of whom sixty-two read and commented on the entire manuscript (these names are listed on page 723 of the 2002 hardcover edition). The correspondents include Professor Friedland’s research assistants, archivists in the University of Toronto Archives, officials and editors at the University of Toronto Press, other editors, writers and independent researchers with an interest in the University’s history, and members of the public that Professor Friedland met in the course of his research and his giving of talks about the history of the University. The majority of the correspondents are academics and administrative personnel at the University of Toronto and elsewhere who were asked for information or offered their expertise. Some of the correspondence is post-publication reaction to the book.

The research assistants (in addition to those listed in Series I), are Sara Burke, David Bronskill, Colin Grey, Graham Rawlinson and Katrina Wyman. Of the staff in the University of Toronto Archives, Harold Averill was seconded part-time to the project to direct the researchers to the appropriate sources in the University Archives, to offer his knowledge of the history of the University and to read the manuscript. Other correspondents from the Archives are Garron Wells (University Archivist), Marnee Gamble (special media archivist) and Loryl MacDonald (administrative records archivist). The University of Toronto Press, the publisher of the book, is represented by Val Cooke, Ani Deyirmenjian, Malgosia Halliop, Bill Harnum, Anne Laughlin,
Melissa Pitts, and Ron Schoeffel. Presidents (past and current) of the University represented are: Robert Birgeneau, Claude Bissell, George Connell, Robert Prichard, and David Strangway. Some of the academics and university administrators forwarded drafts of articles or excerpts from books they were writing, while others commented on the manuscript or portions thereof. Papers or lengthy memoranda and reports are present on a cross-section of activities, disciplines themes and individuals relating to the University including (with the names of the correspondents in brackets). They include the admission of women (Sara Burke), botanical gardens (John Court), chemistry (Susanne McClelland), Connaught Laboratories (George Connell), engineering (Richard White), fees policy (David Stager), gays and lesbians (David Rayside), Jacob Hirschfelder (Sheldon J. Godfrey), Margaret Eaton School (John Byl), history of medicine (Jacalyn Duffin), medicine (David Bronskill), No. 4 General Hospital at Salonika, Greece during World War I (Mary Louise Gaby), philosophy (John Slater), the proposed Wolfe’s University (D. V. Anderson), women (Katrina Wyman), and women in graduate studies (Natalie Zemon Davis).

In addition to letters, the files may contain articles, notes, memoranda, background documents and publications, and the occasional press clipping A few of the files contain historical items, dating back to 1887, that had belonged early graduates and were forwarded by their descendants, Professor Friedland’s correspondents. The detailed comments on the drafts of the book by the correspondents in this series may, for the most part, be found in Series 4.

Personal and family

This series consists of files documenting Professor Friedland’s personal and family activities. It begins with a number of files documenting Friedland’s activities as a student and professor of law at the University of Toronto, his post-retirement professional and other activities. There follow files relating to members of his family, arranged by name, which focus broadly on family affairs and more specifically on personal lives, including professional and social activities, achievements, births, weddings and deaths. These are followed by other files containing correspondence sent home from England, Europe and Israel, and relating to the Friedland residences on Hillsdale Avenue and Belsize Drive.

The files contain correspondence, appointment books, certificates, curriculum vitae, greeting cards, honours, notes, notices, legal documents such as passports and wills, medical reports, programmes, postcards, photographs, and press clippings (including obituaries).

Honours

The files in this series contain correspondence, addresses, certificates, programmes, and a photoprint relating to honours bestowed in Professor Friedland.

The honours described herein are: Queen’s Council (Canada), 1976; James Marshall Tory Dean’s Chair, Faculty of Law, University of Toronto, 1996; an LLD degree from Cambridge University (2000); and an honorary degree from the University of Toronto (2001).

Correspondence

The correspondence files in this series are arranged alphabetically by author. They document Professor Friedland’s activities as a friend, as a student advisor and thesis supervisor, as a colleague assisting in honours bestowed on his peers, as an author, and as an authority on legal matters. They also document the increased leisure that came with official retirement.

The correspondence touches on many aspects of Dr. Friedland’s life, both personal and professional. It reveals his enormous network of contacts in legal and academic circles ranging from Lord Denning down to lowly law students. The letters cover a wide range of topics and issues, including some very topical ones such as international terrorism. Dr. Friedland received numerous requests for references from students and colleagues and, because he sat on the manuscript review committee of the University of Toronto Press, he was also asked to evaluate many manuscripts.

Some of the files contain commentary on legal issues on which Dr. Friedland was working. They may also hold drafts of articles forwarded by colleagues for commentary or presented a complementary copies [published copies have been removed, though the appropriate references have been retained], letters of congratulation and of reference. There is also correspondence regarding and programmes of conferences, and correspondence re and programmes for installation ceremonies. There are numerous invitations to dinners and other events and tributes on the deaths of friends and colleagues and notes on any of the above. Also present are greeting cards and several photographs.

Research and publications

This series contains material relating to a number of Professor Friedland’s publications. For four of his books – Double jeopardy, The trials of Israel Lipski, The case of Valentine Shortis, and The death of Old Man Rice – the files contain only a small amount of correspondence, press clippings, and promotional material. The manuscripts for these books, along with the supporting correspondence and related material, are located in Friedland’s earlier accession, B1998-0006.

The series concentrates on three of Friedland’s publications, each of which generated a number of spin-off articles and much commentary. The files for these titles complement the more complete record of activities contained in B1998-0006. Controlling misconduct in the military, his 1997 study for the federal Commission of enquiry into the deployment of Canadian Forces in Somalia, attracted much attention. So did ‘Borderline justice’, his 1992-1996 study with Kent Roach comparing jury selection in the two Niagaras, one Canadian and the other American. Friedland delivered papers on their findings at conferences and articles appeared in several journals and in a festschrift. The third publication, A place apart: Judicial independence and accountability in Canada (1995), continued the spirited public debate over the issue, one that is still going on and which is documented here in conferences, seminars, reports, and even a video, along with supporting correspondence and notes. A file on the Chinese translation of this volume is located in ‘Series VII: Other activities’. There are also drafts of papers on topics such as legal aid and the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, along with drafts of the manuscript for the eighth edition (1997) of his book (co-authored by Kent Roach), Cases and materials on criminal law and procedures.

Other activities

The records in this series document some of Dr. Friedland’s professional activities, mostly outside the Faculty of Law (he retired in 1998 but still teaches). The first three boxes focus on his relationship with the University of Toronto Press where he served on its Board of Directors and has sat on its Manuscripts Review Committee for over twenty years, including being chair since 1995. Nearly all of the files relate to the Committee, and contain extensive correspondence with other committee members and the executive of the Press, including commentary on policy decisions, including manuscripts being considered for publication.

Dr. Friedland has also sat on the board of directors of the Osgoode Society, which promotes the writing of legal history. The five files relating to this society consist principally of memoranda, minutes and supporting documentation and there are few annotations and notes. The original material consists primarily of Dr. Friedland’s 1999 oral history interview conducted as a part of the Society’s Chief Justice Bora Laskin Project and his file on the Society’s twentieth anniversary symposium in June 1999, “History goes to Court”, where he chaired the panel on ‘Other leading cases’.

Dr. Friedland was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada in 1983 (the files relating to his activities prior to 1997 are located in accession B1998-0006). In 1997 and 1999 he chaired the Innis-Gérin Medal selection committee. In 1997 he became a member of the nominating committee of Academy II (Humanities and Social Sciences) of the Royal Society of Canada and in 1998 was elected to the Council of Academy II for a three-year term. These activities, and his involvement in the 1999 RSC symposium in Edmonton, are documented here.

In October 2000 Dr. Friedland went to Beijing for ten days to discuss with Chinese judges issues relating to judicial independence. This project consisted of a series of seminars in Canada-China’s Senior Judges Training program sponsored by the Canadian International Development Agency and held at the National Judges College of China. Three different seminars were held – one on ‘judicial ethics’ in October (in which Dr. Friedland participated) and two in November on ‘judicial review’ and ‘case management’. The correspondence, notes, and reports relating to the project are contained in these files, along with drafts, in Chinese, of the published version of Dr. Friedland’s study on judicial independence, A place apart.

The remaining files in the series document a number Dr. Friedland’s other activities between 1995 and 2002. Included are a few addresses, some of his travels, and his membership in or association with a number of professional organizations such as the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research and the Law Commission of Canada. Dr. Friedland was appointed an officer of the Order of Canada in 1990 and awarded the Canada Council’s Molson Prize for ‘outstanding achievements and exceptional contribution to the enrichment of the cultural life of Canada’ in 1995. The files on the Molson Seminar and the Order of Canada reflect his ongoing responsibilities as a recipient of these awards. The last of the files document his continuing involvement in activities and issues at the University of Toronto, ranging from the Centre for International Studies’ program on conflict management to the Sports Hall of Fame selection committee.

Addresses

Dr. Pimlott's expertise in wildlife preservation and the ecology resulted in requests to speak at conferences, government bodies and meetings of various local groups interested in the environment. These files consist of rough notes prepared for talks in Halifax, Sault Ste Marie, Regina and other unidentified locations on such topics as Arctic ecology and off-shore drilling, history of Algonquin Wildlands League, and wolves and men, among others. Also included is a tape recording of a talk by Stephen Lewis to public meeting of the Algonquin Wildlands League.

Correspondence

This series consists of correspondence from individuals and organizations throughout most of his academic career. The correspondence covers a wide variety of subjects and issues, and should be consulted along with other series described in this finding aid.
This series is arranged in 2 groups: correspondence arranged alphabetically by name of writer and correspondence by subject. Writers include colleagues such as David Catchpole, J.D.G. Dunn, Charlie Moule, Ben Meyer, Wayne McCready and Prof. Richardson’s brother, Douglas Richardson, professor of fine art at the University of Toronto. Subject files include correspondence with academic associations, journals and publishers, on individuals such as Victor Graham, John Franklin, George Brooke, Douglas Le Pan, among others. Also included is a file “Honors and Honorarium” which supplements personal information in Series 1.

Other presentations and informal lectures

This series contains files documenting Prof. Richardson’s presentations generally outside the community of scholars associated with pure academic religious studies. As a recognized expert and scholar in his field, Prof. Richardson was frequently invited to speak to groups both inside and outside the University, in informal settings. Files in this series may contain manuscripts, notes, correspondence, programmes and other documents prepared for presentations to church groups like Temple Emanu-El and the Yorkminster Park Baptist Church, members of the general public, students, faculty, associations and others interested in historical or current topics relating to religion. Unlike Series 9 and 10, this series contains works not usually submitted for publication or other scholarly distribution. In addition, one will find some of his earliest presentations, mainly in the form of sermons, delivered while a student in divinity and campus minister at Knox College in the University of Toronto (see /034(01)-(06)).

Scholarly papers

In addition to published works, Prof. Richardson made numerous presentations at conferences, symposia, invited lectures, memorials, convocations, and other occasions. The papers contained in this series were, for the most part, prepared for academic and other scholarly activities such as meetings of associations like the Society for Biblical Literature, Canadian Society of Biblical Studies, Canadian Society for the Study of Religion and the SNTS and represent a significant portion of Prof. Richardson’s body of work. Other presentations were made at many Canadian universities as invited lecturer and to various groups at the University of Toronto. A few files contain papers submitted, but never published. Indeed, many of these presentations are on topics that formed the basis of future publications. Researchers are therefore referred to Series 10 for topics of written works not represented in this series.

Files may contain correspondence, manuscripts, and notes.

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