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University of Toronto Archives and Records Management Services
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Friedland 1st 2002 accession

Records compiled by Professor Martin Friedland in the researching and writing of his University of Toronto: A history (University of Toronto Press, 2002). Included are correspondence files, files on the structure of the project, research notes and material, drafts of the manuscript, correspondence relating to publication matters, addresses, photographs, audiotapes, books, pamphlets and other publications.

The records document how the project was conceived and carried out, including the evolution of the manuscript and discussions over the shaping of the book. One consequence was putting the footnotes on line, a first for the University of Toronto Press, and also issuing them in a separate hardcopy volume. The records document the major issues at the University and, by extension, in higher education in Ontario over more than 175 years. The research reports, correspondence from academics, university administrators and graduates from across North America, original material forwarded by individuals, and the commentaries by some sixty people who read the whole manuscript, together provide extra breadth and depth to this historical record of the University.

Correspondence

The correspondents in this series number just under four hundred individuals, of whom sixty-two read and commented on the entire manuscript (these names are listed on page 723 of the 2002 hardcover edition). The correspondents include Professor Friedland’s research assistants, archivists in the University of Toronto Archives, officials and editors at the University of Toronto Press, other editors, writers and independent researchers with an interest in the University’s history, and members of the public that Professor Friedland met in the course of his research and his giving of talks about the history of the University. The majority of the correspondents are academics and administrative personnel at the University of Toronto and elsewhere who were asked for information or offered their expertise. Some of the correspondence is post-publication reaction to the book.

The research assistants (in addition to those listed in Series I), are Sara Burke, David Bronskill, Colin Grey, Graham Rawlinson and Katrina Wyman. Of the staff in the University of Toronto Archives, Harold Averill was seconded part-time to the project to direct the researchers to the appropriate sources in the University Archives, to offer his knowledge of the history of the University and to read the manuscript. Other correspondents from the Archives are Garron Wells (University Archivist), Marnee Gamble (special media archivist) and Loryl MacDonald (administrative records archivist). The University of Toronto Press, the publisher of the book, is represented by Val Cooke, Ani Deyirmenjian, Malgosia Halliop, Bill Harnum, Anne Laughlin,
Melissa Pitts, and Ron Schoeffel. Presidents (past and current) of the University represented are: Robert Birgeneau, Claude Bissell, George Connell, Robert Prichard, and David Strangway. Some of the academics and university administrators forwarded drafts of articles or excerpts from books they were writing, while others commented on the manuscript or portions thereof. Papers or lengthy memoranda and reports are present on a cross-section of activities, disciplines themes and individuals relating to the University including (with the names of the correspondents in brackets). They include the admission of women (Sara Burke), botanical gardens (John Court), chemistry (Susanne McClelland), Connaught Laboratories (George Connell), engineering (Richard White), fees policy (David Stager), gays and lesbians (David Rayside), Jacob Hirschfelder (Sheldon J. Godfrey), Margaret Eaton School (John Byl), history of medicine (Jacalyn Duffin), medicine (David Bronskill), No. 4 General Hospital at Salonika, Greece during World War I (Mary Louise Gaby), philosophy (John Slater), the proposed Wolfe’s University (D. V. Anderson), women (Katrina Wyman), and women in graduate studies (Natalie Zemon Davis).

In addition to letters, the files may contain articles, notes, memoranda, background documents and publications, and the occasional press clipping A few of the files contain historical items, dating back to 1887, that had belonged early graduates and were forwarded by their descendants, Professor Friedland’s correspondents. The detailed comments on the drafts of the book by the correspondents in this series may, for the most part, be found in Series 4.

Personal and family

This series consists of files documenting Professor Friedland’s personal and family activities. It begins with a number of files documenting Friedland’s activities as a student and professor of law at the University of Toronto, his post-retirement professional and other activities. There follow files relating to members of his family, arranged by name, which focus broadly on family affairs and more specifically on personal lives, including professional and social activities, achievements, births, weddings and deaths. These are followed by other files containing correspondence sent home from England, Europe and Israel, and relating to the Friedland residences on Hillsdale Avenue and Belsize Drive.

The files contain correspondence, appointment books, certificates, curriculum vitae, greeting cards, honours, notes, notices, legal documents such as passports and wills, medical reports, programmes, postcards, photographs, and press clippings (including obituaries).

Correspondence

This series consists of correspondence from individuals and organizations throughout most of his academic career. The correspondence covers a wide variety of subjects and issues, and should be consulted along with other series described in this finding aid.
This series is arranged in 2 groups: correspondence arranged alphabetically by name of writer and correspondence by subject. Writers include colleagues such as David Catchpole, J.D.G. Dunn, Charlie Moule, Ben Meyer, Wayne McCready and Prof. Richardson’s brother, Douglas Richardson, professor of fine art at the University of Toronto. Subject files include correspondence with academic associations, journals and publishers, on individuals such as Victor Graham, John Franklin, George Brooke, Douglas Le Pan, among others. Also included is a file “Honors and Honorarium” which supplements personal information in Series 1.

Robert Meredith Janes fonds

  • UTA 1426
  • Fonds
  • 1929-1961

Offprints of articles published by Professor Janes. Arranged in chronological order

Janes, Robert Meredith

Book reviews (G.M. Craig)

Gerald M. Craig donated a number of books to the University of Toronto Library which contained a variety of inserts. These have been removed and listed below, along with the name of the book in which they were found.

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